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2 Permanent Positions at Essex (May 6 2012)

  • Posted by: Annika Thiem
  • Posted Date: April 5, 2012
  • Filed Under: Job Ad
LECTURER/ SENIOR LECTURER/ READER IN PHILOSOPHY, School of Philosophy and Art History [2 Positions]
Ref.: ACR613
Salary:                     In the range £37,012-£52,706 per annum
Closing date:              06/05/12

The School of Philosophy and Art History at the University of Essex seeks to appoint two full-time members of staff, either with permanency or with eligibility for permanency after a probationary period, to start on 1 September, 2012, or as soon as possible thereafter. One post will be at the rank of Lecturer; the second will be at the rank of Lecturer, Senior Lecturer or Reader, depending on the experience and qualifications of the applicant. We seek to make one appointment that will strengthen our teaching and research profile in moral and/or political philosophy, and a second that will either contribute to or suitably supplement our existing strengths in Continental European Philosophy.

The post-holders will be expected to make significant contributions to the research and teaching activities of the School, and to participate in the usual range of administrative duties. Essential qualifications include: a PhD in Philosophy or a related discipline; evidence of research excellence; experience of teaching in a higher education environment or the demonstrable potential to achieve this. Candidates for appointment to ranks beyond that of Lecturer will be expected to have a proven record of experience and accomplishment as detailed in the recruitment pack for these posts (see the link below). Ability to contribute teaching and/or research in the area of medical ethics may be an advantage.

Essex Philosophy is part of the School of Philosophy and Art History in the Faculty of Humanities and Comparative Studies at the University of Essex. We are internationally recognized for our unique combination of Anglo-American and Continental European Philosophy. We also have a long-standing research orientation in moral and political philosophy, and research strengths in the Philosophy of Psychiatry. We are committed to fostering a variety of philosophical approaches, and to developing links between philosophy and other disciplines. We offer a wide range of courses for undergraduates, taught postgraduates, and doctoral research students. We were rated among the top-ten research departments in Philosophy in the UK in the last Research Assessment Exercise; and are ranked in the top ten in the Guardian league table for philosophy (4th in 2010; 7th in 2011). We are currently ranked 4thnationally in philosophy for employability of our graduates. Applications for places have been steadily rising in recent years. The School offers a congenial environment for research and teaching, both of which are carried out with considerable emphasis on collegiality and collaboration. The School hosts the Essex Autonomy Project (http://autonomy.essex.ac.uk/). The work of the EAP is funded by two major grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Council of Great Britain, for investigation of the ideal of autonomy in human affairs.
Please use the link below for the jobpack containing a full job description, person specification and further information relating to this post: http://gs12.globalsuccessor.com/fe/tpl_essex01.asp?newms=jj&id=63784
If you have informal enquiries about this position, please contact Prof. Wayne Martin (Head of School) onwmartin@essex.ac.uk.
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Write, Damnit

by Katy Meyers (via Inside Higher Ed)

During my first PhD anthropology theory course, it was suggested to us that we should start writing every single day. Our professor told us that we needed to sit down for an hour every single day, or most days of the week, and just write. We shouldn’t focus on a specific topic, or try to answer a question, but rather we should just write whatever is on our mind. Honestly, I’ve been a fairly good writer since high school, and I wrote a lot in undergrad, so I wasn’t concerned with it. I had to do half a dozen 25 page papers during my masters, and I had just finished writing my thesis. Practicing writing was the least of my worries.

However, writing was a slow process for me. I wrote out detailed outlines, took weeks to fill them in with perfect sentences and dozens of citations. For a final paper I had to begin the process of writing at least a month or two in advance so that I could carefully make my way through it. My thesis only took two months to write, but I spent nearly 8 months planning out every single detail.

Then I started writing my blog. It was literally a way for me to keep up to date with journal articles. I figured that twice a week I would read a journal article that had nothing to do with my own personal interests, but something broadly from archaeology. I would then writeup a summary of the article, add some of my own critiques and publish them online. Honestly, I didn’t even think that people would read it.

My first post was August 2010, and I’ve written almost two posts per week since then, coming to a grand total of 180 posts to date. The posts are about 600 to 800 words long depending on the length of the journal article or my opinion. It used to take me about two hours two write that many words. Now it’s about an hour, and the posts always range on the longer end of the spectrum. I honestly didn’t realize until recently the writing benefits that I had been getting from an activity I consider to be a hobby. I now have the power to sit down at my computer and pound out 800 words with little difficulty.

Since writing is a major part of graduate school, its important that we start developing this skill. That way when we get to the dissertation we’re not paralyzed by the writing. Here are some tips:

1. Write almost every day: My suggestion is not that everyone start writing a blog, but try writing more often. Try sitting down every other day and just writing for an hour or even a half hour. Emails and facebook messages don’t count. Writing isn’t a big deal if you’re doing it all the time.

2. Break it down: Writing a ten page paper isn’t daunting, but writing a 200 page dissertation is. Don’t think about the ultimate goal, think about the proximate ones. Instead of listing ‘finish thesis’ on your to do list, write down each chapter, or even sections within the chapter. If you’re practice writing a thousand words a week, getting out a section won’t seem so scary.

3. Strive for progress, not perfection: The writing doesn’t have to be perfect. We’ve got computers so we can write really rough drafts and edit them later. Don’t worry about getting it right the first time, just get it out! I think of it as doing a ‘mind vomit’. Just get the ideas down on the screen and make them pretty later.

4. Take a break: After you’ve finished your brain dump at the computer, and the words are roughly strewn across your screen, walk away. Take a breather, go for a run, maybe even close the document down for a few days. When you come back to it you’ll be refreshed and ready to make those rough ideas into a document you’ll be happy with.

So just do it. Sit down. And Write, Damnit! I promise it’ll hurt less the more you do it.

 

 

 

 

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DALHOUSIE Visiting Asst. Prof (5/1/12)

  • Posted by: Annika Thiem
  • Posted Date: April 3, 2012
  • Filed Under: Job Ad

The Department of Philosophy at Dalhousie University invites
applications for a Two-Year Limited Term Appointment at the Assistant
Professor/Lecturer level, effective July 1, 2012.  This position is
subject to budgetary approval.  Area of specialization: Moral
Psychology and/or Philosophy of Law and/or Feminism. Areas of
competence: Philosophy of Sex and Love, Environmental Ethics.
Expertise in some aspect of the History of Philosophy is an asset.

The successful applicant will teach courses at introductory,
intermediate and advanced undergraduate/graduate levels, with some
limited graduate student supervision and committee work. Excellence in
teaching and research is required. Applicants must hold (or be about
to receive) a Ph.D. in Philosophy. Salary will depend upon
qualifications and experience. Course load will be the equivalent of 3
and 3.

Applications should include: a complete curriculum vitae, transcripts
(undergraduate and graduate), writing sample, teaching dossier
(including evidence of teaching effectiveness),  a statement of
research and teaching interests and philosophies, and three
confidential letters of recommendation (in hard copy, forwarded
separately by the referees). A record of publication will be an asset.

Applications should be sent to Duncan MacIntosh, Chair, Department of
Philosophy, Dalhousie University, 6135 University Avenue, PO Box
15000, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2. (Please use dalphil@dal.ca for
correspondence).  The closing date for applications is May 1, 2012.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians
and permanent residents will be given priority. Dalhousie University
is an Employment Equity/Affirmative Action employer. The University
encourages applications from qualified Aboriginal people, persons with
a disability, racially visible persons and women.

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Last Modified: April 3, 2012