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An InExact Science Podcast – Lisa Cantrell

Hi all,

I am creating a podcast called An InExact Science that features psychological and cognitive research! I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for the project.  I need support and help in spreading the word! Please pitch in and share the info with others!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1864204081/we-are-all-creating-an-inexact-science

Lisa Cantrell
Graduate Student
Cognitive Development Lab
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
Indiana University
812-855-8256
http://mypage.iu.edu/~cantrell

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Hypatia Author Interviews and Virtual Bibliographies

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: July 30, 2014
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

In addition to preparing for the upcoming pinkcoveronline symposium, Hypatia has recently announced two new resources for the feminist philosopher. The new virtual bibliographies are a composition of Hypatia articles discussing important topics in politics and culture. The first bibliography covers Immigration and Citizenship, providing a distinctly feminist philosophical outlook on highly discussed issue. Hypatia also offers author interviews, which provide authors’ commentary on their own works, as well as their thoughts to current and future feminists. These two new features can both be valuable resources for teaching or research, and can be found on the journal’s website at the links below.

http://www.hypatiaphilosophy.org/Editorial/feminist-philosophy-connections.html

http://www.hypatiaphilosophy.org/Editorial/bibliography.html

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Hypatia Special Issue and Symposium on Climate Change

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: July 9, 2014
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

pinkcoverIn Hypatia 29.3, a special issue on Climate Change, feminist philosophers Chris Cuomo (author of Feminism and Ecological Communities: An Ethic of Flourishing) and Nancy Tuana (author of Feminism and Science) focus critical attention on one of the most pressing social and environmental issues of our day. Policy makers have recently begun to acknowledge the disproportionate impacts of climate change on women and disadvantaged communities, but feminist analyses of the complex epistemic and political dimensions of climate change, as well as its causes and effects, are urgently needed. This special issue initiates a necessary conversation that will deepen our understanding and help identify promising opportunities for positive change. Co-editors Cuomo and Tuana have invited scholars and activists working at the forefront of feminist climate justice to share their perspectives. Watch the interviews online, and join the co-editors in an open forum on issues on August 19-23, 2014.

For more information, please visit the Hypatia website (http://hypatiaphilosophy.org), or the Philosopher’s Eye (http://thephilosopherseye.com/phileye/online-events/hypatia-symposium-2/).

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Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Ethics of Big Data

Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Ethics of Big Data, Oxford Internet Institute associated with a non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship at St Cross College University of Oxford Grade 7: £29,837 – £36,661 p.a.

We are a leading world centre for the multidisciplinary study of the Internet and society, looking for a full-time Researcher to work on a funded project, “The Ethics of Biomedical Big Data”, led by Professor Luciano Floridi.

The analysis of large datasets (Big Data) has become a major driver of innovation and success in biomedical research. However, the use of Biomedical Big Data raises serious ethical problems, which may threaten the huge opportunities it offers. This pilot project will formulate a blueprint of the ethical aspects, requirements and desiderata underpinning a European framework for the ethical use of Big Data in biomedical research.

Applicants should hold a PhD in a relevant discipline, have a strong interest in information/computer ethics and proven experience in ethical and policy analysis and writing papers based on qualitative and/or quantitative research. The successful candidate will work with Prof. Floridi and a multidisciplinary team of researchers, and will be able to take a lead in project management, conceptual analysis, and the dissemination of results.

Based at our OII North office at 34 St Giles, Oxford, this position is available from 1 October 2014 for 1 year, with a possibility of extension beyond that date, depending on funding.

The post is associated with a non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship at St Cross College for its duration. Details of the College and its facilities are available on the College website at: www.stx.ox.ac.uk.

Applications for this vacancy are to be made online.

To apply for this role and for further details, including a job description and selection criteria, please click on the link below:

https://www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=113435

The application deadline is 12.00 midday on Thursday 26 June 2014.

Interviews for those shortlisted are currently planned to take place in the week commencing 21 July 2014.

 

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Workshop: Marx’s Labour Theory of Value in the Digital Age

  • Posted by: Georg Theiner
  • Posted Date: May 26, 2014
  • Filed Under: Conferences, Events

Workshop: Marx’s Labour Theory of Value in the Digital Age

COST Action IS1202 “Dynamics of Virtual Work”, http://dynamicsofvirtualwork.com/ The Open University of Israel

June 15-17, 2014

Recent developments in digital technology, from “social media”/”web 2.0” such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Weibo, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Foursquare, etc to mobile devices, have spurred new forms of production.

A variety of terms has been used to describe new production practices and new products enabled by the Internet: participatory culture, co-creation, mass collaboration, social production, commons-based peer production, mass customization, prosumption, produsage, crowdsourcing, open source, social production, user-generated content, user participation, folksonomics, wikinomics, collaborative innovation, open innovation, user innovation.

These terms and debates are often over-optimistic, celebratory and lack a critical understanding of “social media” – they do not engage with the social problem-dimension of the “social”. The multiplicity of neologisms is also a symptom of a “technologistic” outlook, which assumes that each technical innovation brings about a paradigmatic change in culture and in society and more democracy and a better society. While such multiplicity of terms attests to a phenomenology of technological innovation and diversity, it is also an analytical and theoretical liability. Concurrent with this dominant approach, there have been attempts for a systematic critical analysis of new forms of online production, digital labour and commodification on social media through the prism of the labour theory of value. Such theoretical approaches attempt to apply a unified conceptual framework in order to gain better understanding of the socio-economic foundations of digital media and the social relations, power relations and class relations that they facilitate. They also help to connect these new productive practices with a longstanding theoretical tradition emerging from Marxian political economy.

The role of Marx’s labour theory of value for understanding the political economy of digital and social media has been a topic of intense work and debates in recent years, particularly concerning the appropriateness of using Marxian concepts, such as: value, surplus-value, exploitation, class, abstract and concrete labour, alienation, commodities, the dialectic, work and labour, use- and exchange-value, General Intellect, labour time, labour power, the law of value, necessary and surplus labour time, absolute and relative surplus value production, primitive accumulation, rent, reproductive labour, formal and real subsumption of labour under capital, species-being, collective worker, etc.

The critical conceptualization of digital labour has been approached from a variety of critical approaches, such as Marx’s theory, Dallas Smythe’s theory of audience commodification, Critical Theory, Autonomous Marxism, feminist political economy, labour process theory, etc. In this workshop we explore current interventions to the digital labour theory of value. Such interventions propose theoretical and empirical work that contributes to our understanding of the Marx’s labour theory of value, how the nexus of labour and value are transformed under virtual conditions, or they employ the theory in order to shed light on specific practices.

The Israeli location will provide an opportunity to explore some issues pertinent to digital technology in the local context, including a lecture on the Palestinian Internet and a tour exploring techniques of separation and control along the separation wall in Jerusalem.

Keynote talks:

Noam Yoran: The Labour Theory of Television, or, Why is Television Still Around Christian Fuchs: The Digital Labour Theory of Value and Karl Marx in the Age of Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Weibo Anat Ben David: The Palestinian Internet

The programme features the following talks:

* Andrea Fumagalli: The concept of life subsumption in cognitive bio-capitalism: valorization and governance

* Bingqing Xia: Marx’s in Chinese online space: some thoughts on the labour problem in Chinese Internet industries

* Brice Nixon: The Exploitation of Audience Labour: A Missing Perspective on Communication and Capital in the Digital Era

* Bruce Robinson: Marx’s categories of labour, value production and digital work

* Eran Fisher: Audience labour: empirical inquiry into the missing link of subjectivity

* Frederick Harry Pitts: Form-giving fire: creative industries as Marx’s ‘work of combustion’”

* Jakob Rigi: The Crisis of the Law of Value? The Marxian Concept of Rent and a Critique of Antonio Negri`s and his Associates` Approach Towards the Marxian Law of Value

* Jernej Prodnik: Media products and (digital) labour in global capitalist accumulation: A preliminary study

* Kylie Jarrett: The Uses of Use-Value: A Marxist-Feminist contribution to understanding digital media

* Marisol Sandoval: The Dark Side of the Information Age – Arguments for an Extended Definition of Digital Labour

* Olivier Frayssé: Cyberspace ground rent, surplus value extraction, realization, and general surplus value apportionment

* Sebastian Sevignani: Productive prosumption, primitive accumulation, or rent? Problematising exploitation 2.0

* Thomas Allmer: Digital and Social Media Between Emancipation and Commodification: Dialectical and Critical Perspectives

* Yuqi Na: Capital accumulation of targeted advertising-based capitalist social media. What do people in the UK and China think about it and why? A Marxist perspective

If you wish to attend the workshop, please contact RSVP Eran Fisher: eranfisher@gmail.com

 

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French Translation Assistance Programs

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: May 6, 2014
  • Filed Under: Grant

TRANSLATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

The Book Department of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy works with FACE (French American Cultural Exchange), the Institut françaisand the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to promote French and Francophone literature and to encourage English translations of French fiction and non-fiction. To that effect, it provides a range of grants and awards. It oversees three bi-annual programs concerning translations from French into English of works that have not yet been published in the United States. All these grants are awarded to fiction and non fiction translations (including comic books, poetry and digital books).

The French Voices Award honors both translators and American publishers for English translations of works that have been published in France in the last 6 years. Award recipients are selected by a literary committee. Each book receives a $6,000 award.

The Hemingway Grant allows publishers to receive financial help for the translation and publication of a French work into English. Grant beneficiaries are selected by the Book Department of the French Embassy in the United States. Grants awarded for each work range from $500 to $6,000.

The Acquisition of Rights Program
The Institut français helps American publishers offset the cost of acquiring the rights to French works. Grant beneficiaries are selected by the Institut français in Paris. The amount awarded cannot exceed the amount of the advance paid to the French publisher for the acquisition of rights and varies from 500 to 7,000 Euros.

Application deadlines

The deadline for the second 2014 session is August 29, 2014.
(Expected date of printing: no sooner than March 2015 for the upcoming session.)

The deadline for the first 2015 session is February 17, 2015.

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Call for Papers: Philadelphia Summer School in Continental Philosophy – Topic: Continental Philosophy of Religion and the New Metaphysics

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: May 5, 2014
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

Call for Papers: Philadelphia Summer School in Continental Philosophy

Topic: “Continental Philosophy of Religion and the New Metaphysics” (featuring seminars on the work of Quentin Meillassoux, Ray Brassier, Bruno Latour, and Catherine Malabou)

Seminar Leader: John Caputo

When and where:

Saturday, August 9th, 2014; 9am-4:30pm

Campus of Immaculata University

Malvern, Pennsylvania

***

Topic: Continental Philosophy of Religion and the New Metaphysics

John Caputo will be leading two one hour seminars with catered lunch in between: one seminar on Quentin Meillassoux and Ray Brassier; one seminar on Bruno Latour and Catherine Malabou.  Select attendees will present their research during the morning and afternoon flanking the Caputo seminars.

Attendees are encouraged to purchase The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion (Indiana University Press, 2014) and The Insistence of God (Indiana University Press, 2014).   A reading list featuring works by Meillassoux, Brassier, Latour, and Malabou will be provided.

Location: Immaculata University, Malvern, Pennsylvania

Organizers: Leon Niemoczynski (Immaculata University) & Stephanie Theodorou (Immaculata University)

Cost: $70.00 faculty; $45.00 student or other (seating is limited, pre-registration required.  Cost includes catered lunch)

***

Immaculata University is pleased to announce the”Philadelphia Summer School in Continental Philosophy,” a one day seminar style “summer school” and workshop that, this year – its first – features John Caputo as its seminar leader.  The event will be organized with two new books as a backdrop: The Insistence of God and The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion (both Indiana University Press, 2014), although a formal reading list including works by Meillassoux, Brassier, Latour, and Malabou (for the seminars) will be provided.  John Caputo will lead two one hour seminars/classes flanked by morning and afternoon mini-research presentations where researchers present 2000 word abstracts/summaries of their work and engage other participants in query designed to further research goals and enhance the nature of research projects through mutual dialogue.

***

The theme of this year’s summer school will explore the relationship between the future of Continental philosophy of religion and new schools of thought emerging in contemporary Continental metaphysics, identifying possible routes of exploration as well as areas of influence, cross-over, or challenge.

Topics such as materialist approaches to theology and religion, speculative materialism and non-theology, environmental aesthetics and theology, political theology and ecology, the speculative theologies of German idealism, process-relational philosophy and theology, phenomenology and contemporary French theory and theology/religion, as well as questions of atheism’s relationship to contemporary Continental philosophy of religion will be of central importance for the school. The “new metaphysics” in its most contemporary forms will be a major point of discussion as it bleeds into its Continental philosophical antecedents, especially vis-a-vis thinking about religion, theology, and the Absolute.

Philosophical naturalism (Ray Brassier), the divine inexistence (Quentin Meillassoux), non-philosophy and theology (Francois Laruelle), the Absolute (Iain Hamilton Grant), plasticity (Malabou), or the factish gods (Bruno Latour) are some possible starting points, but one could also see discussion of historical figures as well: whether Bergson, Deleuze, Schelling, Hegel, Kant, Whitehead, Heidegger, or Derrida for example, as participants explore those figures’ importance for the future of Continental philosophy of religion and corresponding areas of realism, materialism, and metaphysics.  Those who have an interest in contemporary French philosophy (Badiou, Meillassoux, Kacem, Laruelle, Malabou) should certainly apply.

How to Apply: Those interested should send a summary of a current research project (no more than 2000 words, fit for a 15 minute presentation) to: lniemocz@mail.immaculata.edu by May 30th, 2014.

Those accepted into the summer school will be notified by June 10th, 2014.

Please attach research statements/summaries as .rtf or MS Word .doc files.

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Library Trial to Maney Publishing Journals

Until June 7, Falvey has a trial subscription to Maney Publishing’s Philosophy, Religion and Theology journal collection. We have access to current issues and backfiles of nineteen journals:

 

Black Theology

Comparative and Continental Philosophy

Critical Horizons

Journal of Adult Theological Education

Journal of Critical Realism

Journal for the Study of Spirituality

Medieval Mystical Theology

The New Bioethics

Political Theology

Practical Theology

Reformation

Reformation & Renaissance Review

Rural Theology

Theology & Sexuality

Journal of Chinese Religions

Levant

The Linacre Quarterly

Medieval Sermon Studies

Palestine Exploration Quarterly

 

I’d greatly appreciate any feedback you might have about these. Please send any comments to: nikolaus.fogle@villanova.edu. I’ll also send around a survey at the end of the trial.

 

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5th Summer School UQAM (Montréal) – Web Science and the Mind

  • Posted by: Georg Theiner
  • Posted Date: April 5, 2014
  • Filed Under: Conferences, Events

The Fifth Summer School in Cognitive Sciences : Web Science and the Mind.
Organized by the UQAM Cognitive Science Institute in Montréal (Canada), from July 7th to 18th.

Theme of the Summer Institute: Web Science and the Mind.
This summer school will present a comprehensive overview of the interactions between the web and cognitive sciences, with topics ranging from social network analysis to distributed cognition and semantic web.

The Summer School will feature a poster session.
Information about this poster session is available at:
http://www.summer14.isc.uqam.ca/page/affiche.php
Deadline: April 11th 2014

Registration for the Summer School is open (”Early Bird” Registration fees until May 9th).

Note that the lowest fee is for students that will attend the Summer School as a credited activity (worth 3 university credits). Details:
http://www.summer14.isc.uqam.ca/page/inscription.php

Scholarships
Scholarships for travel, accomodation and/or registration will be available for students registered in a Quebec University (CREPUQ).
http://www.summer14.isc.uqam.ca/page/bourses.php

Want to stay in touch? Follow us on Twitter! @iscUQAM

We hope to see you there in July.

 

 

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CFA: Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy

Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy

Duquesne University

Dept. of Philosophy

Pittsburgh, PA

Call for Applications

We are pleased to announce the 2014 Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy, held at Duquesne University. Details for the program are as follows:

 

Formalism and the Real: Ontology, Politics, and the Subject

 

August 4 – 8, 2014

(Optional Participants’ Conference, August 2-3)

“The real can only be inscribed on the basis of an impasse of formalization.”

— Jacques Lacan, Seminar XX

 

“We need a theory of the pass of the real, in the breach opened up by formalization. Here, the real is no longer only what can be lacking from its place, but what passes through by force.”

— Alain Badiou, Theory of the Subject

 

Seminar Leaders:

Prof. Bruno Bosteels (Cornell University)

Prof. Tom Eyers (Duquesne University)

Prof. Paul Livingston (University of New Mexico)

 

Course Description:

Philosophy in the twenty-first century has seen an extensive reconsideration of formalistic methodologies and theoretical structures. This is heavily influenced by the formalism developed by a number of mid-twentieth century French thinkers who rejected humanist philosophies of experience or consciousness typified by dominant forms of existentialism and phenomenology. Insights derived from Marxism, Freudianism, and philosophy of science were argued to undermine central tenets of the latter, including the priority of description and the emphasis on first-person experiences. Rather, stress was placed on the priority of construction, an emphasis on the concept, and a rethinking of the nature of knowledge and the object of science.

 

The recent history of formalist approaches is framed in important ways by Louis Althusser and Jacques Lacan. As is well known, Althusser rejected historicist and humanist readings of Marx in favor of a structuralist approach, which was amenable to the conception of science developed by thinkers like Jean Cavaillès, Gaston Bachelard, and Georges Canguilhem. Simultaneously, Lacan rejected ego-psychological readings of Freud, forming interpretive, theoretical, and clinical bases for psychoanalysis that drew on Ferdinand de Saussure’s structuralist linguistics and Claude Levi-Strauss’s structuralist anthropology. This led him to a methodological formalism, particularly when addressing the Real and the psycho-dynamics in which it is involved. The presence of Althusser and Lacan at the École Normale Supériere during this time formed the intellectual milieu in which students such as Alain Badiou, Jacques-Alain Miller, Étienne Balibar, and Jacques Rancière would begin to develop their own thought. An important forum for this was the journal the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (1966-69). The current project to translate it into English has prompted a surge in research related to these themes. In the Cahiers, efforts were made to reconcile Marxist politics with a Lacanian account of the subject. Lacan’s notion of the Real was essential to this and, along with the other elements of his thought, came to be developed by Badiou to address political and ontological domains.

 

More recently, formalism in philosophy has expanded to address issues beyond these origins. For instance, formalistic reconstructions of Heideggerian and Husserlian thought have proved intensely productive and have problematized the opposition of philosophies of the concept to phenomenological philosophies. Moreover, recent efforts to address questions in aesthetics and politics with formal approaches has further expanded the boundaries of formalism’s theoretical scope. Paul Livingston’s book, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein, and the Consequences of Formalism, examines the landscape of political criticism and change given the results and paradoxes of 20th century projects of formalization in mathematics and logic. Following this, his current project focuses on Heidegger’s philosophy, and will reexamine our inherited notions of sense and truth. After writing a book on Lacan’s concept of the Real, Tom Eyers has analyzed the intellectual foundations of structuralism in 1930s and 1940s French epistemology and philosophy of science. He is presently writing a book entitled Speculative Formalism: The Poetics of Form in Literature, Science, and Philosophy which will bring that work to bear on poetics and literary theory. In addition to translating Badiou’s Theory of the Subject and Wittgenstein’s Antiphilosophy, Bruno Bosteels has devoted numerous books to Badiou and issues in political thought. In his recent Marx and Freud in Latin America: Politics, Psychoanalysis, and Religion in Times of Terror, Bosteels investigates ways art and literature provide insight into processes of subjectification at the core of Marxist and psychoanalytic concerns.

 

This summer symposium will bring together interested graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty for a week of discussion, lecture, and close textual study. Together, we will pursue questions regarding formalism and its relation to the Real in contemporary ontology, politics, and theories of the subject and their consequences for understanding knowledge, history, state, language, art, and literature. Lacanian and Badiouian thought will form a key theoretical backdrop. Yet, we expect our studies will include work by a number of other figures, including Plato, Marx, Nietzsche, Frege, Freud, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Lautman, Bachelard, Canguilhem, Althusser, Deleuze, Derrida, Macherey, Miller, Butler, Jameson, Žižek, Hägglund, and Malabou.

 

All texts and discussion will be in English.

 

Application:

We invite current graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty in philosophy or related disciplines to submit an application composed of a C.V. and a short letter of intent (500 words maximum) to pghsummersymposium2014@gmail.com. The deadline for applications is Friday, April 25th, 2014. We expect to respond with notifications regarding acceptance to the symposium by Thursday, May 1st, 2014 to help facilitate summer plans. The seminar will be limited to 30-40 participants. For more information as it becomes available, we have created a website for the symposium: http://pghsummersymposium6.wix.com/pghsummersymp2014

 

Participants’ Conference (August 2-3):

In order to facilitate a further exchange of ideas and research, a participants’ conference will be held the weekend before the seminar begins. Applicants who receive notice of acceptance as participants will be asked – if interested – to submit an abstract of up to 500 words on any theme related to the topic of the seminar. The participants’ conference will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 2-3, 2014.

 

Financial Information:

There will be a $200 registration fee for each participant of the seminar. This money will be used for event expenses like a conference dinner, celebration, daily coffee, etc. Please note that participants will be responsible for arranging their own housing as well as financing most of their own meals for the duration of the symposium. However, with respect to lodging, we expect a limited number of arrangements with graduate students will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

 

Organizers:

 

James Bahoh

Dept. of Philosophy

Duquesne University

bahohj@duq.edu

Martin Krahn

Dept. of Philosophy

Duquesne University

krahnm@duq.edu

Jacob Greenstine

Dept. of Philosophy

Duquesne University

greenstinea@duq.edu

Dave Mesing

Dept. of Philosophy

Villanova University

dmesing@villanova.edu

 

 

 

 

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Last Modified: March 19, 2014