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Dr. Elizabeth Dowdell to Speak at Falvey on Child Internet Safety

  • Posted by: Barbara Quintiliano
  • Posted Date: November 2, 2012
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

Please join us on Thursday, Nov. 8, at 1:00 p.m. in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner (1st floor), as Elizabeth Burgess Dowdell, PhD, RN, FAAN, presents “A Multi-prong Approach to Child Internet Safety.”

Dr. Dowdell will share key findings of of her grant-supported research involving middle school, high school and college students, as well as over 400 adult offenders defined primarily by having an Internet sexual offense or a hands-on sexual offense and/or prior Internet experience. She will offer ideas for policy recommendations, such as designing technologies and/or educational programs to identify suspicious online behaviors, strengthening Internet filters for student online protection, and school outreach for students who are harassed, threatened or assault from meeting someone online. Part of the Scholarship@Villanova series.

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Need research assistance?  Contact Barbara Quintiliano, liaison librarian to College of Nursing

 


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Info to Go

Need research assistance stat? Look for the crash cart staffed by Robin or Barbara on Tuesdays and Thursdays at varying locations in Driscoll Hall.

Ask us anything. Seriously. We can get you stats, pertinent journal articles for a paper, or just help you find the odd fact from a reputable source.

Research life support is our specialty!


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Lexi-Comp Drug Interactions Database/Full-Text Mysteries Solved

Did you know that UpToDate, the evidence-based, peer-reviewed information resource for health practitioners, makes it easy to check for drug interactions?  Just start at the library homepage (http://library.villanova.edu) and click Databases A-Z.  Then choose UpToDate.

At the UpToDate search page, click drug interactions.

 

 

 

This will take you to the Lexi-Comp comprehensive drug-to-drug, drug-to-herb, and herb-to-herb analysis software.

 

Type in the name of two or more medications and/or herbal remedies for which you’d like to check possible interactions.  The database will respond with a list of generic and brand names.  Check off your choices and click Analyze.

 

 

 

The database responds with one of the following risk ratings:

A:  No known interaction.
B:  No action needed.
C.  Monitor therapy.
D.  Consider therapy modification.

Give Lexi-Comp on UpToDate a try!

 

KNOW HOW TO FIND FULL TEXT? DROP IN FOR A DEMO

You’re reading an interesting journal article and see this intriguing study in the list of references at the end:

K. Harrison, A.L. Marske. Nutritional content of foods advertised during the television programs children watch most.
Am J Public Health, 95 (2005): 1568–1574.

Do you know how to determine if this article is available full text through a Falvey subscription? (HINT: It’s easier than you think!). And how would you find articles by other authors doing similar research? Drop in anytime between 12:00 and 1:00 and see how it’s done. Dates and locations for these drop-in sessions are as follows:
Tues., Oct. 23, Driscoll 305
Thurs., Oct. 25, Driscoll 376

Questions welcome!  Contact barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu
Or call X 95207


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Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database – Try it out until Sept. 14!

  • Posted by: Barbara Quintiliano
  • Posted Date: August 29, 2012
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

A warm welcome back to everyone at the College of Nursing!

We’re starting off the semester with trial access to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, and we’d love to have your feedback. This Database is the most comprehensive resource available for evidence-based, reliable information on natural ingredients, commercial products, and alternative therapies. Please take a few moments to review the Database by going directly to the website (http://www.naturaldatabase.com) from any Villanova University computer. You will be automatically logged in. From off-campus use

http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://www.naturaldatabase.com

Major features of Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database:

  • Up-to-date information on over 85,000 natural medicines (safety, effectiveness, adverse reactions, etc)
  • Access to feature articles on over 1,200 ingredients
  • Printable patient handouts (available in English, Spanish, & French)
  • Natural Medicines Brand Evidence-based Ratings (NMBERTM). Each brand name product on their website has been assigned an evidence-based overall product rating (on a scale of 1 to 10). This rating is based on a rigorous, systematic process that synthesizes data on safety, effectiveness, and product quality.
    • The “Natural Product / Drug Interaction Checker” tool to test for dangerous interactions
    • “Natural Medicines Effectiveness Checker” tool to find out what is recommended for certain conditions
    • “Nutrient Depletion Checker” to identify potential nutrient depletion issues caused by medications (includes a rating of the clinical significance)

The Database editors use the same evidence-based standards to evaluate alternative therapies that they use to evaluate conventional drug therapies.
Put the Database through its paces until Sept. 14.  Comments to barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu


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Designer data sets at bargain prices

OK, soon there will be no more excuses.  Classes and exams will be over, grades handed in.  Summer break is a great time to explore the wonderful world of health data sets available to you for FREE (beat that price if you can!) from ICPSR, the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research.  Here are just a few of the data collections available in the area of the health sciences.

How could you use some of these data sets for your research?  For projects for your classes?

Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA) – preserves and disseminates data collected by research projects funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans.

Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) – offers data and tools for examining issues related to families and fertility in the United States spanning five decades. IFSS encompasses the Growth of American Families (GAF), National Fertility Surveys (NFS), and National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG), as well as a single dataset of harmonized variables across all ten surveys. Analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.

National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program – NAHDAP acquires, preserves and disseminates data relevant to drug addiction and HIV research. By preserving and making available an easily accessible library of electronic data on drug addiction and HIV infection in the United States, NAHDAP offers scholars the opportunity to conduct secondary analysis on major issues of social and behavioral sciences and public policy.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) –  provides public data access and online analysis for important substance abuse and mental health data collections. The project offers variable-level searching, an archive of survey instruments, related literature for data collections, a listserv, disclosure analysis, and traditional data products. SAMHDA was established at ICPSR in 1995 by the Office of Applied Studies (OAS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

To access ICPSR, start at the library homepage

  • Click Databases A-Z
  • Choose ICPSR
  • Log in with your LDAP ID and password

Questions? Need help? Contact Barbara

 


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BioDigital Human

  • Posted by: Robin Bowles
  • Posted Date: March 12, 2012
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

BioDigital Human is the latest in interactive, detailed maps of the human body available on the Internet. This free web tool centers around a static model of a human figure beginning with just a skeleton visible which can be rotated and scaled to view from any angle. You can control the visibility of not just the many top level systems (skeletal, digestive, nervous, cardiovascular, and many others) but also the individual components of those systems down to the individual muscles, organs, and nerves on the right and left sides.

BioDigital Human Screenshot

With the dissection tool you can remove just the muscles that are in your way while leaving the rest visible.

Each piece can be highlighted, has a label of its full name with an audio pronunciation and an information window with links to related conditions from Medline Plus and further anatomical information from Wikipedia. A search box allows you to search for a structure by name so if you don’t remember where the pronator quadratus muscle is it quickly gives you the choice of left or right before making the muscle visible and zooming to its location.

The viewer also provides tools like “dissection mode” which allows you to remove structures one at a time, delving into the body from the outside in, an “x-ray” view that shows all structures transparently allowing you to see through them to what lies beneath, and isolation view that temporarily singles out a structure you have highlighted without losing your other visible structures.

Using these tools you can easily create your own personalized views with the exact choice of structures visible and angle of view. You can even “bookmark” these views for later and view bookmarks others have made public as well as take snapshots of interesting views that can be saved to your computer for later.

Today the BioDigital Human tool is in a free Beta testing mode and free for anyone to use. You can find it at http://www.biodigitalhuman.com using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser.

MORE NEWS: Falvey Membership to Hindawi Benefits Villanova Scholarly Community


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Falvey Membership to Hindawi Benefits Villanova Scholarly Community

Open Access Logo

Falvey Memorial Library is pleased to have an institutional membership to Hindawi Publishing Corporation. Launched in 1997, Hindawi publishes a growing number of open access journals in engineering, medicine and the sciences, and now includes Nursing Research and Practice, as well as social sciences titles such as Journal of Anthropology and Urban Studies Research. A complete list of current Hindawi titles is available at the company’s website.

So what is open access (OA)? In the words of SPARC researcher Peter Suber, “Open Access is a publishing model that provides immediate, worldwide, barrier-free access to the full text of research articles without requiring a subscription to the journal in which these articles are published.” (Read more about open access here.) Publication costs are usually covered by the authors, the author’s institution or research funds. The OA business model facilitates the rapid sharing of scholarly research. It also offers an alternative to traditional subscription-based journal publishing, whose ever -soaring costs threaten to consume academic library budgets.

Because of Falvey’s institutional membership, the processing fee will be waived for all Villanova University authors whose articles are accepted for publication in Hindawi journals. (Please note that this fee waiver applies to articles submitted on or after February 15, 2012, the starting date of the library’s institutional membership).

Articles submitted to Hindawi journals undergo the same rigorous peer-review process as those submitted to subscription-access journals. In addition, many Hindawi titles are part of the International Scholarly Research Network (ISRN), a series of peer-reviewed, open-access journals with a 28-day review cycle.

For a list of Villanova University scholars participating in Hindawi journals as authors, editors, and reviewers, visit http://www.hindawi.com/institutions/villanova.edu/


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Social Capital Forum, Dec. 1 at PHMC

The Community Health Data Base (CHDB) staff cordially invites members of the Villanova University community, one of its supporting institutions, to a forum and discussion of social capital in the Philadelphia region. This forum will take place on Thursday, December 1st from 10:00 am to 11:30 am on the 18th floor at Philadelphia Health Management Corporation, located at 260 South Broad Street, Suite 1800, Philadelphia, PA 19102.

As part of this forum, CHDB staff will present key findings on social capital from the latest Household Health Survey; additionally, CHDB staff will release a Social Capital Brief about these findings. The forum will also include a panel of speakers, including Andrew Swinney from the Philadelphia Foundation, Dr. Allen Glicksman from Philadelphia Corporation for Aging, and Dr. Lorraine Dean from the Philadelphia Department of Public Health.  Dr. Glicksman and Dr. Dean will present case studies of how they have used CHDB’s social capital data in their respective work.

Light refreshments will be served. All members and affiliates are welcome to attend. To RSVP for this event, please contact Johanna Trowbridge at: 215-985-2548 or johannat@phmc.org.


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Do I need that DOI?

Yes, you do!

So, what is a DOI anyway? In the words of Chelsea Lee, a contributor to the APA Style Blog, “A DOI, or digital object identifier, is like a social security number for a document online. It’s a unique and permanent identifier that will take you straight to a document no matter where it’s located on the Internet.” Read more at her blog post, “A DOI Primer”.

In other words, even if a journal moves to a new Internet home, the DOI numbers will provide a permanent link to its articles. No more broken links. Just copy and paste the DOI number into Google and you will be taken to the web page where the article is located.

Of course, viewing the full text of an article will usually require a subscription to the journal in which it has been published. Villanova University community users may use our Citation Locator to search for and access the full text of an article via the library’s subscription source. A rather circuitous route, to be sure. But such is the current world of electronic publishing and DRI or digital rights management…but that’s a topic for another day!

If you are creating a bibliography of resources according to APA 6th Style, the DOI is required as the last element of the citation:

And if there is no DOI number? You can try looking it up using the Simple Text Query Form at http://www.crossref.org/SimpleTextQuery/ If unable to find a DOI number, then APA 6th Style recommends noting Retrieved from followed by the URL of the journal’s homepage.

More information on DOI numbers as required by APA 6th Style can be found on pp. 188–192 of the Publication Manual.

Questions? Feel free to contact Barbara.


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Need a Measurement Instrument? C’mon, Get HaPI!

Want to gather data in some area of health or psychosocial sciences? Wondering if a questionnaire, interview schedule, checklist, rating scale or some other measurement instrument already exists? Now you can stop wondering and get HaPI. Health and Psychosocial Instruments (HaPI) is a database that provides references to journal articles and monographs containing information on approximately 15,000 measurement instruments.

While the full-text of the instruments is not included in the database, HaPI can help you discover the titles of instruments that exist and determine their reliability and validity. The library has access to many of the journals and books cited in the database or can obtain them for you through ILLiad. In addition, the full text of instruments are often included in the appendix of dissertations and can be found by searching the instrument titles in Dissertations and Theses Full Text.

To access HaPI:

  • Start at the Falvey home page: http://library.villanova.edu
  • Click Databases A-Z.
  • Choose HaPI.
  • NOTE: HaPI is not to be confused with the database bearing the same acronym, Hispanic-American Periodical Index.

 

 

 

 

 


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Last Modified: September 20, 2011