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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/13)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Academic Libraries in the Digital Age. Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar lecture featuring William Y. Arms, PhD. Today at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks, and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library. Refreshments will be served.

Philosophy Department Meeting. 2:00 p.m. in room 205. Questions? Contact: peggy.edler@villanova.edu

Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) Regular Group Meeting. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week on (most) Fridays to play video games in a safe and fun environment. 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge (Holy Grounds). Always accepting new members. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Join us, this Monday, Feb. 16 at 3:00 p.m. in room 204 for the launch of “Travels Through Greco-Roman Antiquity,” a digital humanities project created by two of Dr. Valentina DeNardis’s classical studies classes. The website uses Special Collections materials from the Library to explore some of the sites of ancient Greece and Rome. Dr. DeNardis will discuss the classes and give a tour of the website. Light refreshments will be served.

Please join us on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 for a Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Megan Quigley, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of English. Dr. Quigley will speak about her book, entitled Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form, and Language (forthcoming from Cambridge University Press), which explores the intertwined history of 20th-century British fiction and philosophy. Specifically, it argues that much modernist literary experimentation connects to the linguistic turn in philosophy. Dr. Quigley’s book will be for sale at the event.


SWEET STUFF ABOUNDS!

The winners of our red velvet oreos will be notified today via email and announced here (with the names of lots of beloved books) in The 8:30 on Monday morning! Good luck!

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And, how darn cute is this! Check out the great job done by Class of ’15 Outreach student worker Molly Quinn (whatever will we do when she graduates!) on our Pop Fiction Valentines display. Be sure, too, to not miss the great romantic fun reads in our collection recommended by staff member Laura Hutelmyer and the great list of books loved by other staff members compiled earlier this week by Sarah Wingo in the Library News blog.


SPEAKING OF CUTE, MEET NELLIE…

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You may remember Nova, the seeing eye puppy raised by Villanova’s Matthews family and featured in our blog last fall? Well Nova’s gone off to do her good work in the world and Laura (who works for the library’s events programming team,) has welcomed Nellie, a 7 week old Labrador Retriever who will also begin training to become a seeing eye assistant for a visually impaired human. Laura brought Nellie by the library yesterday morning.


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

Did you catch The History of “Loving” to Read posted by New Yorker magazine and re-posted by Falvey on Facebook?

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QUOTE OF THE DAY
“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” – Frederick Douglass


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Fictional Power Couples

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Close your eyes. Let Celine fill your ears. Embrace the 90’s synth and imagine that slow beat bouncing from the school’s gymnasium walls, and dance (but leave room for the Holy Spirit).

I just want you to know you are safe in my heart and my heart will go on and on.

It’s Love Week, guys, and we’re about to dig deep into our saccharine souls and wrap ourselves in the soft, warm blanket of fictional romance. Lonely? Not today. In love? Not as much as these kids. Swelling strings, musical numbers, tight camera angles, meandering confessorial monologues, slow mo, pink cheeks, unrequited tension—this is it. This is what you’ll never have in your life.

Heart eyes emoji.

Rose and Jack

Jack and Rose

Star-crossed lovers on a fateful voyage. Love at first sight. Sacrifice. Memories. Jack and Rose of Titanic are one of those staple relationships of my generation, because you never forget the first doomed love story that shatters your heart and throws you headlong into melancholic despair—and then gives you that Heaven Scene as consolation before Celine Dion serenades the end credits. Ugh, why am I doing this? I didn’t ask for these feelings. Here, just—just take this quote. Read it. I’ll be over in the corner crying.

Rose: I love you, Jack.
Jack: Don’t you do that, don’t say your goodbyes. Not yet, do you understand me?
Rose: I’m so cold.
Jack: Listen, Rose. You’re gonna get out of here, you’re gonna go on and you’re gonna make lots of babies, and you’re gonna watch them grow. You’re gonna die an old—an old lady warm in her bed, not here, not this night. Not like this, do you understand me?
Rose: I can’t feel my body.
Jack: Winning that ticket, Rose, was the best thing that ever happened to me. It brought me to you. And I’m thankful for that, Rose. I’m thankful. You must do me this honor. Promise me you’ll survive. That you won’t give up, no matter what happens, no matter how hopeless. Promise me now, Rose, and never let go of that promise.
Rose: I promise.
Jack: Never let go.
Rose: I’ll never let go, Jack. I’ll never let go.


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 (Ed. note – and let’s hope that this is a new cherished tradition akin to A Christmas Story and Elf marathons: Titanic‘s on all day and all night on Saturday (Valentine’s Day as if you didn’t know) on AMC channel, starting at 10am. Ever feel like you just won a ticket to first class!? Woohoo!)


Satine and Christian

satine christian
Another doomed love. Subterfuge, secrecy, poetry, music. The forbidden love of Christian and Satine from Moulin Rouge (yes, Falvey has it. Yes, you should watch it.) is particularly adorable because they have a secret song.

Christian: “The greatest thing you’ll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.”

 

Nala and Simbasimba nala

Standard Disney power couple from The Lion King. Why is this couple so awesome? Well, they’re lions. Also, they were totally in love as kids, got separated for a very long time, argued a little bit, and fell right back in love. Plus, they’re the couple of Can You Feel the Love Tonight. Can you get more lovey than that song?

Simba: I can’t marry her! She’s my friend!

 

Leia and Han
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Han and Leia of Star Wars. Classic. Could you have a fictional couples list without them? No. No, you can’t. Han, the impossibly adorable scoundrel, and sass-master Leia… they’re the couple everyone wants to be. Or maybe that’s just me.

Leia: I love you.
Han: I know.

Scully and Mulder
Mulder Scully

Mulder and Scully of The X-Files is perhaps a little retro, though no more retro than Han and Leia. The classic formula of opposites attract, Mulder and Scully generated all sorts of romantic tension for season upon season. And who needs to plan a Valentine’s Day date? Why leave the house? The entire series is on Netflix. What a time to be alive.

Mulder: The end of my world was unrecognizable and upside down. There was one thing that remained the same. You… were my friend, and you told me the truth. Even when the world was falling apart, you were my constant… my touchstone.
Scully: And you are mine.

Sigh. Well, now that I’m filled with warm fuzzies, I’ve got to know. What is your favorite fictional couple?


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/12)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu

Irish Studies Conversation Circle. 6:30-8:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact Jerry Sweeney: tighdon@gmail.com


SAVE THE DATE…

Tomorrow! Academic Libraries in the Digital Age. Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar lecture featuring William Y. Arms, PhD. Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks, and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library. Refreshments will be served.

Join us, next Thursday, Feb. 19 at 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner for a poetry reading and talk given by Bruce Smith, one of the Literary Festival’s featured speakers. Originally from Philadelphia, Bruce Smith is the author of several books of poems, including The Other Lover(2000), a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He will be reading selections from his collection entitled Devotions. Publisher’s Weekly called his poems “alternately sharp, slippery, and tender,” and in them he “finds a way to take in almost everything—’Shooter Protocol,’ Charlie Parker, high school shop class—moving seamlessly between critique and embrace.” A book sale and signing will follow the reading.


LAST DAY TO ENTER TO WIN RED VELVET OREOS

COOKIE

Be sure to stop by the front desk to submit the name of a book you love. We’ll be giving away five packages of red velvet Oreos – which you can regift to your Valentine – or just eat all of them yourself. We won’t ask. We won’t tell. ;-) Winners will be announced and notifed tomorrow!

 


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

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Did you hear the news? We’ve recently hit 10K tweets on our Twitter! You know what that means? Following us is a great idea! Just like our Facebook, our Twitter feed is a great way to keep up with this blog and other library news, and we will sprinkle your homepage with all sorts of educational and entertaining content. Follow us and give us a shout – we just might retweet you!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” – President Barack Obama


BE THE CHANGE YOU SEEK TODAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The Curious ‘Cat: “What Person, Living or Dead, Would Be an Ideal Librarian?”

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This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students,

What Person, Living or Dead, Would Be an Ideal Librarian?

 

mccarthy

Caroline McCarthy: “Maya Angelou … after she passed away this year, I … read a lot of her quotes, and they’re all awesome, and I read her book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. So I think she was a great author and inspirational figure and had a lot of wisdom and helped the students.”

 

 

grace

Tanner Grace: “I’m thinking back to the colonies in America, the American colonies, those really educated men who would read all day. I would say Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson. … I read a biography on him once, and he seemed very bookish.”

 

 

obinecheNkemka Obineche: “I think Dr. Seuss would be a good librarian. … He’s a fun guy … makes reading fun. That’s how I learned to read.”

 

 

 

mcgaurnErica McGaurnStephen Colbert—“It would just be very comical … he would be very interactive with the students.”

 

 

 

 

mccreavy

 

Isobel McCreavy: “Truman Capote because he would just tell you to read his books.”

 

 

 

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Nicholas Crowley: Genghis Khan—“I just watched this Netflix show; it’s called Marco Polo. … I guess that’s why he popped into my head.”


The Curious ‘Cat feature by Gerald Dierkes, senior copyeditor, Communication and Publications team; Access Services specialist, Access Services Team; liaison to the Department of Theater.

 

 


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Share the Love: Xs & Os for Romantic Pop Fiction

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Valentine’s Day is almost here, but not all minds wander to chocolate and roses. If you are the person who would rather celebrate this day with a good, heart-pumping read, visit the Pop Fiction shelves on the library’s first floor to take home one of these quasi-romantic novels:

Once Upon a Winter’s Heart
Melody Carlson

PS3553.A73257 .O53 2014

Once-upon-a-winter's-heart2Emma has given up on dating and declared romance dead. She is forced to give it a second thought when her grandfather dies leaving her grandmother heartbroken. In her grandfather’s honor, Emma agrees to keep the tradition of decorating the bookstore with hearts for Valentine’s Day and is helped by Lane who soon becomes more than just a friend. Unfortunately, he is also more than just a friend to Emma’s sister.

The Heart has its Reasons
Maria Duenas

PQ6704.U35 M5713

Heart3After losing her husband, Blanca, a college professor in Madrid travels to California in search of a new life. Accepting a research grant to follow a deceased, exiled Spanish writer, she works to sort out a long gone life of passion and intrigue while dealing with a colleague who has not disclosed secrets he knows about the writer.

 

The Woman from Paris
Santa Montefiore

PR6113.O544 W66 2013

woman-from-paris2Phaedra appears at the funeral of Lord Frampton, recently deceased due to a skiing accident. She is a surprise to the entire family and also the heiress to Lord Frampton’s sapphires. Three brothers contest the will, while the oldest wins Phaedra’s heart. The love affair is made difficult by another family member who is determined to uncover Phaedra as a fraud.

 

Silver Girl
Elin Hilderbrand

PS3558.I384355 S55 201

silver-girl2First a story of loss, then love, Meredith retreats to Nantucket with a friend to heal after her husband cheats his rich investors out of millions of dollars and loses the house. Life becomes interesting when Meredith’s high school sweetheart shows up and she is forced to sort through thoughts of what life might have been.

 

Under the Wide and Starry Sky
Nancy Horan

PS3608.O8725 U53 2014

wide-and-starry2The second novel by the author of Loving Frank, this time Horan focuses on the love between Robert Louis Stevenson and his feisty American bride, Fanny. I haven’t read this one, but Loving Frank was exceptional so I’ve put this on my list.

 

 

These books also go well with chocolate and roses. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Our Pop Fiction selection varies month to month, so check frequently for new titles.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management. 


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Dig Deeper: William Y. Arms, PhD

Arms

On Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, William Y. Arms, PhD, will be delivering a lecture entitled Academic Libraries in the Digital Age. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Department of Computing Sciences, is free and open to the public. j_luciaEvent organizers also expect Joseph P. Lucia, former director of Falvey Memorial Library and now dean of libraries at Temple University, to appear and offer his perspective on Arms’ work and the changing face of digital libraries.

For further information relevant to Dr. Arms and his publications, check out the resources listed below.


Dig Deeper

Digital LibrariesAuthor of Digital Libraries. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2000.

See what William Y. Arms has published by using Falvey’s Articles & More search function.

Use WorldCat.org to see what books Dr. Arms published.Professor Emeritus, Computing & Information Science

Professor Emeritus, Computing & Information Science, Cornell University

Career highlights

Publications


Resources selected by research support librarian Susan A. Ottignon.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/11)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


 SAVE THE DATE…


Join us, next Wednesday February 18 at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 for a Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Megan Quigley, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of English. Dr. Quigley will speak about her book, entitled  Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form, and Language (forthcoming from Cambridge University Press), which explores the intertwined history of 20th-century British fiction and philosophy. Specifically, it argues that much modernist literary experimentation connects to the linguistic turn in philosophy.


LAST TWO DAYS TO VOTE FOR A BOOK YOU LOVE

COOKIE

Be sure to stop by the front desk to submit the name of a book you love. We’ll be giving away five packages of red velvet Oreos – which you can regift to your valentine – or just eat all of them yourself. We won’t ask. We won’t tell. ;-)

 


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

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Have you given our page a Like on Facebook? If not, we recommend it! Our Facebook page is an easy way to keep track of new blog posts, event announcements, and fun content from our social network.


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.” -Letter to My Daughter by Maya Angelou


SHINE WITH ALL THE COLORS OF ROY G. BIV AND HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The Highlighter: How many DVDs can I borrow, for how long, and can I renew DVDs?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO Falvey has over 2,300 DVDs in its collection. How can you find the borrowing policies for library DVDs?  This video shows how to find Falvey’s guidelines for DVDs and other items.

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Share the Love: Seeking Romantic Art for Valentine’s Day?

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When asked to write a blog about romantic art, I could think of no images to accompany it; this is not a typical subject for this art historian. A search of Falvey’s catalog for “art, romantic” retrieved 297 titles, but these deal with romanticism in art and in literature. A Google search first gave me “Romanticism – The Metropolitan Museum of Art,” followed by “Romanticism – Wikipedia, the free encylopedia” and “images for romantic art.” None of these references yielded the type of images associated with love or Valentine’s Day. What they did have in common were references to a specific period in art history, the style known as Romanticism: a period which lasted from about 1750 to about 1850.

What is Romanticism in art? Broadly defined it is the beginning of modernism. Artists, according to Hugh Honour, had no programs nor common goals but were concerned with “integrity of feeling” (p. 25). Their subject matter is considered romantic because it stresses ideal beauty or strong emotions or combinations of ideal beauty, strong emotions and other materials. Gardner (Art Through the Ages, ninth edition, p. 872) says, “The Romantic artist, above all else, wanted to excite the emotions of the audience.” And these emotions can be either positive or negative.

"John Constable - Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop's Garden - Google Art Project" by John Constable - SQHNHPBhfP7FBg at Google Cultural Institute,  Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia

“John Constable – Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop’s Garden – Google Art Project” by John Constable  at Google Cultural Institute, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Is it just us, or is this the view looking east from Tolentine Hall?

This is one of the great ages of landscape painting – J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, Caspar David Friedrich and the American, Thomas Cole are major artists. Other artists with very different subjects are Antoine-Jean Gros, Théodore Géricault, Eugène Delacroix and Henry Fuseli.

The Barque of Dante, Delacroix 1822 (150 Kb); Oil on canvas, 189 x 242 cm (74 1/2 x 95 1/4"); Musee du Louvre, Paris

The Barque of Dante, Delacroix
1822 (150 Kb); Oil on canvas, 189 x 242 cm (74 1/2 x 95 1/4″); Musee du Louvre, Paris

The Metropolitan Museum of Art compiled a list of works of art dealing with love, but again, these will not meet your expectations of romantic, Valentine-type art.

For a more light-hearted approach to the subject, visit, “Love Is in the Air, and in the Art,” by Ken Johnson, “The New York Times, Art & Design,” published Feb. 7, 2013.

Dig Deeper

Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Romanticism.”
Romanticism by Hugh Honour. A classic work.
The Romantic Rebellion: Romantic Versus Classic Art by Kenneth Clark. Another classic.
The Romantic Rebellion by Eric Newton.
Romantic Art in Britain: Paintings and Drawings, 1760 – 1860 by Frederick J. Cummings.
German Romantic Painting by Hubert Schrade
Romantic Painting in America, Museum of Modern Art exhibition catalog.
Historical Dictionary of Romantic Art and Architecture by Allison Lee Palmer.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/10)

 

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

“A Great Thing for Our People”: The Institute for Colored Youth in the Civil War Era. 3:00 p.m. in room 204. Come celebrate Philadelphia’s (First) School of Civil Rights with the launch of a new website. Falvey Memorial Library hosts the site and welcomes you to view it: http://exhibits.library.villanova.edu/institute-colored-youth. Questions? Contact: judith.giesberg@villanova.edu


Muticultural Affairs’ Professional Development Series: Talking Tuesday. 5:00-7:00 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: nicole.davis@villanova.edu


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Join us, next Monday, February 16 at  3:00 p.m. in room 204 for the launch of “Travels Through Greco-Roman Antiquity,” a digital humanities project created by two of Dr. Valentina DeNardis’s classical studies classes. The website uses Special Collections materials from the Library to explore some of the sites of ancient Greece and Rome. Dr. DeNardis will discuss the classes and give a tour of the website. Light refreshments will be served.


RED VELVET OREOS WILL BE UP FOR GRABS

COOKIE

Be sure to stop by the front desk to submit the name of a book you love. We’ll be giving away five packages of red velvet Oreos! How much fun would it be to bundle up and eat ‘em while sitting at The Oreo? You know you want a selfie of that!


SHARETHELOVE2

IT’S VALENTINE WEEK AT FALVEY

The Oreo cookie giveaway is just part of the fun (albeit the most delicious part)! Check our Library News blog each day for great resources on the Romantic period of art, staff picks, pop fiction recommendations and more!


SPEAKING OF SHARING…
The Psychology Behind Why We Share on Social Media

Borrowed from stockphoto company Shutterstock’s blog, the reasons why we’re so compelled to share – and sometimes overshare – on social media.


Important Note for Faculty: Falvey Scholars Award Nominations Due by 3/31

Please consider nominating an eligible student for a Falvey Scholar award! The Falvey Scholar awards are given each spring semester to individual or group projects of seniors who have completed exemplary (and publicly presentable) scholarship or research during their undergraduate careers at Villanova. The awards traditionally have an emphasis on work that has required substantial use of scholarly literature of the sort provided and supported by the Library. The link to the nomination form is below (and is accessed through our Falvey Scholars page); it is available early this year to encourage more nominations. Faculty have from now until March 31 to nominate students. We ask that they please consider nominating a student who exemplifies the award’s criteria!

Additional information or contact Laura Matthews.


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QUOTE OF THE DAY

“The Sun himself is weak when he first rises, and gathers strength and courage as the day gets on.” -The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens


NOW GO FORTH THIS DAWN AND GATHER YOUR STRENGTH AND COURAGE WITH THE SUN!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Last Modified: February 10, 2015