FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

President Lincoln Assassinated 150 Years Ago

John_Wilkes_Booth_wanted_poster_colour
On April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, the first American president to suffer this fate. Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, had met with General Ulysses S. Grant and the Cabinet that morning and planned to attend with his wife and others a comedy, “Our American Cousin,” at Ford’s Theater that evening. In the afternoon he and his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, took a carriage ride followed by dinner. Mrs. Lincoln complained that she had a headache and wished to stay home; President Lincoln said he was tired, but needed entertainment and planned to go to the theater with or without his wife. After a brief visit to the War Department, the president returned to the White House for Mrs. Lincoln. Accompanied by Major Henry R. Rathbone and Clara Harris, Rathbone’s fiancée, the group arrived at the theater after the play had started.

150401162524-john-wilkes-booth-exlarge-169

150401161637-lincoln-ford-theatre-presidents-box-exlarge-169
President and Mrs. Lincoln and their guests were seated in a decorated box at Ford’s Theater and John Parker, a guard, was stationed outside the box. Unfortunately Parker left his post and, during the third act of the play shortly after 10 pm, John Wilkes Booth, a famous American actor, entered the box and shot the president in the back of his head. The gunshot rang out; Booth climbed over the balustrade of the president’s box and jumped onto the stage where he brandished a dagger and shouted, “Sic semper tyrannis! (Thus always to tyrants!)” Although he had caught a spur in the draperies decorating the box and landed so awkwardly that he broke a leg, Booth was able to escape from the theater, setting off a massive manhunt that lasted until April 26. On that date John Wilkes Booth and an accomplice, David Herold, were captured in a tobacco barn near Bowling Green, Virginia. Herold surrendered; Booth was killed.

A young doctor in the theater audience, Dr. Charles Leale, examined the president shortly after Booth shot him, and it was decided that Lincoln be carried across the street to William H. Petersen’s boarding house rather than be transported the greater distance to the White House. Over six feet tall, Lincoln was laid diagonally across the bed in the small first floor bedroom of a government employee. Lincoln’s personal physician, Dr. Robert King Stone, was summoned although three doctors had accompanied Lincoln to the Petersen House. In the hours before Abraham Lincoln died over 90 people visited the Petersen House. Lincoln’s son, Robert, was brought to the house and remained there until his father died. Mrs. Lincoln was there, periodically visiting her husband, then retreating to a nearby room.

Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln

At 7:22 a.m. on April 15, President Lincoln died, having never regained consciousness. When informed of his death, Mrs. Lincoln said, “Oh, my God, and have I given my husband to die?” Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton said, “Now he belongs to the ages.” Lincoln’s body was placed in a temporary casket and transferred to the White House. Andrew Johnson was sworn in as president. On April 18 Lincoln’s body lay in state in the East Room of the White House. After a funeral the following day, he was laid in state in the Capitol Rotunda. On April 21 his body was taken to the railroad station in Washington to begin the long journey – 1,654 miles – to Springfield, Ill. At various locations along the route to Springfield, the train’s scheduled stops were published in the local newspapers. At those stops, the coffin was placed on a hearse and taken to an appropriate public building for viewing by the public. Finally, on May 4 he was buried in Springfield.

The final military engagement of the Civil War occurred on May 12, a skirmish at Palmito Ranch, Texas, although Robert E. Lee had surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865, effectively ending the war.

On June 30, 1865, eight assassination conspirators were convicted and on July 7 they were executed. John Wilkes Booth, who had actually fired the bullet which killed Lincoln, had been dead since April 26.


Dig Deeper:

“A Doctor’s View of the Lincoln Assassination.” Interview with Blaine Houmes, M.D.

Timeline by Clark Evans, Library of Congress historian.

Eyewitness from the National Archives

Lincoln’s Assassination (2014). Edward Steers, Jr.

The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory (2010). Harold Holzer, Craig L. Symonds and Frank J. Williams.

The Lincoln Assassination: The Evidence (2009). William C. Edwards and Edward Steers.

When the Bells Tolled for Lincoln: Southern Reaction to the Assassination (1997). Carolyn L. Jarrell.

The Assassination and Death of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, at Washington, on the 14th of April, 1865 (1865). Abott A. Abott.

The Conspirators:
American Brutus: John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies (2004). Michael W. Kauffman.

The Assassin’s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln (2008). Kate Clifford Larson.

The Riddle of Dr. Mudd (1974). Samuel Carter.



imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


Like

The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/15)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

 

THE FUTURE IS ROBOCHEF
Hate making dinner? Ready to embrace your Jetson-approved future? Check out this robot chef. The inventors hope to bring a build to consumers in 2017, and it’ll set you back $15,000. Cheaper than most cars, eh? The prospect is tempting.
Jetsons


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺
Goodreads small
What are you reading? If you use Goodreads (by the way, they have an app!), join our Falvey Memorial Library group!


against authenticityTHAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

Everyone is always telling you to be yourself. This book says otherwise. Simon Feldman, the author of Against Authenticity: why you shouldn’t be yourself, argues that you “should be yourself only if you are a good and reasonable person–otherwise, you should be someone else.”


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“All a man can betray is his conscience.” – Under Western Eyes by Joseph Conrad


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

The Highlighter: Falvey’s Tips & Guides connect you with the research-paper help you need

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Just one page on Falvey’s site helps you learn whether a library resource is scholarly or popular, primary or secondary. That one page also shows you where to find help citing sources, help with your research, or help with your writing.

Discover that one page: Falvey’s Tips & Guides

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Like

The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/14)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Philosophy Graduate Workshop. 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: john.immerwahr@villanova.edu

Food for Thought Discussion-VITAL. 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. in room 205. The discussions provide a forum for networking and exchanging ideas with colleagues from across the campus. Faculty are invited to bring their lunch. VITAL will provide dessert and beverages. Questions? Contact: gabriele.bauer@villanova.edu

From EndNote to Zotero Workshop. 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in room 204. Are you ready to move your work from EndNote to a more modern and responsive citation manager? Sick of downloading CIW and ENW files and struggling to find the right import filter? This workshop will show you how to move your citation library from EndNote to Zotero painlessly and how to find all your old favorite features including merging duplicate records, creating a citation from just a PDF, and inserting citations into a Word document or other work. Bring your own laptop to work along or take home instructions for later. Open to Faculty, staff, and students of any level. Questions? Contact: robin.bowles@villanova.edu

Chicago-Style Footnotes and Bibliographies Workshop. 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. in room 207. Are you confused by the different formats required by Chicago-Style for footnotes and bibliographies? Are you unsure about how and when to use “ibid.”? Answers to your questions are just around the corner. Come to Falvey Memorial Library for a quick introduction to Chicago-Style rules for footnotes and bibliographies. Questions? Contact: jutta.seibert@villanova.edu

Scholarship@Villanova. 4:30 p.m. in room 205. Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell, PhD,associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Dr. Sewell will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu

VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture featuring Giorgi Japaridze, PhD. Tuesday, April 21 at 2:00 p.m. in the Reading Room. Dr. Japaridze will discuss the extensive research that led him to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award in 2015. Tailored for a general audience, Dr. Japaridze’s talk “Computability, Logic, and Computability Logic” will give an overview of the new line of research introduced by the speaker several years ago, named “Computability Logic.” In the same sense that traditional logic is about providing a systematic answer to the question “What is (always) true?” Computability Logic is about providing a systematic answer to the more general question “What can (always) be computed and how?” This is a long-term program for rebuilding logic into a comprehensive formal theory of computability. Light refreshments will be served.


LINCOLN’S LAWS OF WAR

We continue to commemorate Lincoln’s assassination 150 years ago. Another Lincoln legacy from slightly over 150 years ago is also worth noting. A code Lincoln first promulgated is still embodied in current laws of war. According to the Law of Armed conflict Deskbook, “Prior to the American Civil War, although treatises existed, there was no written ‘Law of War.’ Only customary law existed regarding the need to distinguish between combatants and civilians.”

On April 24, 1863, Lincoln promulgated General Orders No. 100, Instructions for the Government of the Armies of the United States in the Field, containing 157 articles and ten sections. It was originally drafted as the Lieber code by Dr. Franz Lieber and four General Officers in November, 1862. (Deskbook, p.98). This is said to have laid the foundation for subsequent Geneva Conventions, respecting and protecting victims of warfare. In 1864, diplomatic representatives signed a treaty regarding the care of sick and wounded military personnel and neutrality of medical personnel, that generally became known as the first “Geneva Convention” leading to the “Geneva Tradition.”
LincolnCode

If you are interested in more information about the laws of armed conflict or the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, see these handy resources or visit the Library News blog tomorrow:

Lincoln’s code: the laws of war in American history

Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War, the author speaks

Rule of War in a Nutshell

General Orders No. 100 : The Lieber Code

Law of Armed Conflict Deskbook

International Law Institute

Lincoln’s Assassination: 150 years later

Lincoln Speaks: Words that Transformed a Nation


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺ 

Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 11.02.55 AM
Follow Falvey Library on Instagram for a fun assortment of people photos, quotes and whiteboard art!


russian orthodoxTHAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

The author of The Russian Orthodox Church, 1917-1948, from decline to resurrection, Daniela Kalkandjieva, is from the University of Sofia in Bulgaria. Find out more about the author and her works on the University of Sofia’s website.

 

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“People glorify all sorts of bravery except the bravery they might show on behalf of their nearest neighbors.” – Middlemarch by George Eliot


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

Upcoming Workshops for Chicago-Style Footnotes and Bibliographies

9780226103891_p0_v2_s260x420Are you confused by the different formats required by Chicago-style for footnotes and bibliographies? Are you unsure about how and when to use “ibid.”? — Answers to your questions are just around the corner.
Come to Falvey Memorial Library for a quick introduction to Chicago-style rules for footnotes and bibliography. Sessions will be held in Falvey 207 in the second-floor Learning Commons. For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu).

Tuesday, April 14: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 22: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Information provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for history.


Like

Dig Deeper: Dr. Lisa Sewell and Impossible Object

SewellOn Tuesday, April 14 at 4:30 p.m., a Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell, PhD, associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will be held in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Sewell will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English, is free and open to the public.

To learn more about Dr. Sewell’s poetry, dig deeper into the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Sewell’s work in Falvey’s Catalog: https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Author/Home?author=Sewell%2C+Lisa%2C+1960-

Audio via Poets.org:  http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/lisa-sewell

Liberal Arts and Sciences’ Faculty Spotlight highlights Dr. Sewell for winning the 2014 Tenth Gate prize for her poetry manuscript, Impossible Object:  http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/gws.html


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


Like

The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/13)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Philosophy Graduate Workshop. 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: john.immerwahr@villanova.edu

Food for Thought Discussion-VITAL. 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. in room 205. The discussions provide a forum for networking and exchanging ideas with colleagues from across the campus. Faculty are invited to bring their lunch. VITAL will provide dessert and beverages. Questions? Contact: gabriele.bauer@villanova.edu

Search, Capture, Done! Bibliographies Made Easy with Refworks! 4:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. in room 207. Are you still hand-copying references and typing bibliographies the old-fashioned way?   Here’s your chance to learn how to use the powerful citation management tool RefWorks. With just a couple of clicks, capture references from databases and search engines and then generate a bibliography in the style of your choice. Get subject search help too! Bring your laptop or Mac. Open to students, faculty, and staff. Questions? Contact: barbara.quintiliano@villanova.eduAdam-Bradley

Africana Studies: Ida B. Wells Lecture. 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. The lecture is titled “Ralph Ellison Listens to Kendrick Lamar and Other Counterfactuals” given by Dr. Adam F. Bradley, associate professor of English at the University of Colorado, Boulder. A distinguished scholar of African American Literature, specializing in the work of Ralph Ellison, Professor Bradley is also a nationally recognized scholar of Hip Hop and Cultural Studies. Most recently, he collaborated with rapper and actor, Common, on his memoir, One Day It’ll All Make Sense. Questions? Contact: joyce.harden@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Tomorrow! Scholarship@Villanova. 4:30 p.m. in room 205. Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell, PhD,associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Dr. Sewell will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.


WE’RE EVIDENTLY NOT THE ONLY LIBRARY WITH A ‘DRONE SERVICE’ 

Screen Shot 2015-04-10 at 1.04.45 PM

Proving that laughter is the international language, we heard from another library from almost halfway around the world that tried to pull the same April Fool’s Day trick on their patrons that we did! The Stadtbibliothek Koln – the City Library in Cologne, Germany, shared their announcement of their new, exciting drone delivery system via this YouTube video. And in the amazing way that only a world with an internet can do, the kind librarians there shared it with us in our comments section as well.  

Gerald Dierkes, senior copy editor on Falvey’s Communication & Service Promotion team and the author of our clever drone piece, was quick to reply to the Germans after viewing their video, stating, “Thank you for your comment and for providing the link for your wonderful video. Your six-propeller drone is impressive, a more capable aircraft than our quad-copters. And you’ve developed a clever name: Library Air Transportation Express (aka LAT-EX). The best part, though, is seeing LAT-EX in action. Also, the item delivered—Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines with the inimitable Terry-Thomas and the unique Red Skelton—was ideal for your video. Congratulations on your achievement!


I DON’T KNOW IF YOU KNEW THIS, BUT WE TWEET!

Twitter-iconFollow us on Twitter to easily keep track of library announcements, blog updates, interesting retweets, and totally charming banter.


travel writingTHAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

According to the author, Paul Smethurst, in his book Travel writing and the natural world, 1768-1840, “academic discourse on the subject [of the natural world] has been dominated by romantic ideas of wilderness, new primitivisms, and philosophical approaches to the concept of nature.”  Smethurst examines the height of travel writing about the natural world from 1768-1840 and how its practice turned “nature into a detached and abstract space.”


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“It’s in vain, Trot, to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present.” – David Copperfield by Charles Dickens


FORGET YESTERDAY AND HAVE A GREAT TODAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

‘Caturday: Poets, Then and Now

Five years ago Christine Simmons, ’10, then editor-in-chief of Arthology, presented the newest issue of Villanova’s student literary-art magazine at Falvey’s Open Mic Poetry Reading. This link will take you to the full blog article that mentions other poets and artists, including the Senior Class Poet of 2010, Emily Southerton, whose work was published in Arthology.

I wonder who will be featured this year at the Open Mic event on April 22.

Christine Simmons

Christine Simmons, ’10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnail‘Caturday feature by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services.


Like

Foto Friday: Librarian Retrievers!

2015-04-02 16.43.03

Nellie, The Seeing Eye puppy currently being fostered by Library Events & Outreach Specialist Laura Matthews, has been a frequent visitor to the Villanova campus. As you can see, Nellie has taken a special liking to Life and Health Sciences Librarian, Robin Bowles. We think it’s because she has mad respect for how well Robin can retrieve the latest research data and info for patrons.


Photo by Joanne Quinn.


Like
1 People Like This Post

The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/10)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Theology Department Meeting. 12:30 – 2:30 p.m in room 205. Questions? Contact: karen.cunningham@villanova.edu

Competitive Effectiveness Citation Review Session. 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: Linda.hauck@villanova.edu

Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) Regular Group Meeting. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week on (most) Fridays to play video games in a safe and fun environment. 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge (Holy Grounds). Always accepting new members. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell, PhD,associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Tuesday, April 14 at 4:30 p.m. in room 205. Dr. Sewell will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.


NOM NOM NOM!
The first of two lightning rounds of #NomNomNomatology has begun! The final four are duking it out. Be sure to vote for the winningest foods in some intensely delicious match-ups right here, or vote in person at the front desk in Falvey!
NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY

 


FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK
facebook logo
If you give our page a like on Facebook, you’ll be so in the know. Not only do we share links to all the goings-on of our blog, but we also post announcements and share very cool content from all around the internet!


THAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

unlikely entrepreneursThe excerpt below best represents the “major issues in the history of medicine, women’s history, and immigration history” addressed in Unlikely Entrepreneurs by Barbra Mann Wall.

“In 1877, Sister Lidwina Butler sat in the dimly lit steerage compartment of a trans-Atlantic sailing vessel, her thoughts no doubt shifting between the Ireland she left behind and the New World she would soon embrace. Few in this last great wave of Irish immigrants could have foreseen that this youthful nun would one day become the administrator of a major Catholic hospital.”


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“It is an old maxim of mine that when you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” – The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

« Previous PageNext Page »

 


Last Modified: April 10, 2015