FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

‘Cat in the CAVE

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


CAVEToday at 2:00, Villanova’s CAVE is officially open. In honor of opening day, this week’s blog post will be all about immersive virtual reality—for those of us who might not even know where to begin thinking about the creative and academic applications of virtual environments.

Disclaimer: I’m not an expert. I’m a virtual reality noob. I’m writing this with no in-depth technical expertise—just a whole lot of geeky excitement. But I do play (and, by way of literary theory, study) video games, and my personal interest in virtual reality’s possible applications is heavily biased towards, well, play. And by “play” I don’t mean to imply the installment is only for entertainment (nor do I think its entertainment and audio/visual/tactile immersion possibilities should be minimized, especially for the arts and humanities). I mean “play” as in stepping inside a world and getting your hands virtually dirty, like a kid in a sandbox.

But before we talk Earth science and data visualization, whet your VR palette with the incredibly cool Tilt Brush (aka “Microsoft Paint for the Year 2020”).

Oculus_vs_Morpheus-740x580-580x450Depending on your hobbies, you might have already heard about the VR movement in video games a la Oculus Rift  and Project Morpheus. These are headset-based immersive mechanisms, while the CAVE is quite literally a virtually immersive walk-in cave. Still, if you want to explore discussion of virtually reality without scholarly pressure, the gaming community is a good place to start.

If you feel like you’re ready to brave the technical background and scholarly applications of virtual reality, The Verge posted a feature video on The Virtual Reality CAVE, featuring UC Davis’s setup, KeckCAVES. A little digging into UC Davis’s ongoing projects, which include applications in Earth science, data visualization, and responsive media, is a fun way to get your feet wet!

Based on a little internet reading, the possibilities of virtual reality in scholarly, scientific and creative application are innumerable—but are not all fully realized, or even drafted. And that’s the cool part: if this is the forefront of a new wave, this is your chance to brainstorm, too.

How could you imagine immersive virtual reality used in your field of study?

 


Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and ServicArticle by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like

Villanova’s Automatic Virtual Environment Opens Oct. 2

Imagine stepping into a room-sized enclosure, donning a pair of 3D glasses, and having the experience of touring the basilicas in Rome or exploring Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary or standing in the Sistine Chapel—all without leaving the Library. Well, technically Falvey Hall, which was the Villanova College Library before Falvey Memorial Library was built, will house this new facility, called the Villanova CAVE.

What does CAVE mean?

CAVE stands for Cave Automatic Virtual Environment. You may be asking, “Then, what does that “Cave” stand for?” MerriamWebster.com has your answer. The University’s version of this technology is called “the Villanova CAVE.

The Villanova CAVE allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even walk to either side of the 3D image of an object, such as a statue or sign, as though they were in the actual setting. For historical sites that have begun to deteriorate, such as the Eastern State Penitentiary, it preserves them for posterity. For sites of limited space, such as the Santa Rosa Necropolis under Vatican City that cannot accommodate large groups, the Villanova CAVE allows 10-15 people at a time to examine that location.

How does it work?

The Villanova CAVE enclosure—18’ wide, 10’ deep, 7.5’ high—has scrims that form three of its walls and a ceiling. These scrims, rear-projected HD screens, display a unified 3D image.

The Villanova CAVE can also be configured to display a 3D image on three walls and its floor, instead of its ceiling. To minimize shadows from viewers, strategically placed projectors create the floor imagery. An opening, where the fourth wall would be, gives users access to the CAVE. Users wear 3D glasses to achieve an immersive experience. The Villanova CAVE also includes sound.

In addition to the CAVE’s capability to display images and video, this immersive studies system will, in the future, also include a multi-camera component for capturing images and video. Assistant Professor and Director Engineering Entrepreneurship Edmond Dougherty is constructing a robotic camera unit that will not only record images and video but also stream live, immersive video into the Villanova CAVE. This unit will hold several cameras mounted in a spherical array (software combines the cameras’ input into a single 3D image or video). This camera unit includes lights and microphones.

How will this system benefit Villanova?

University professors will have the ability to record artifacts, settings, and events to be studied—unencumbered by distance, climate, or time of day—by their students on campus. Faculty may also include such recordings when developing their course curriculums.

Non-Villanova researchers, aka “off-campus collaborators,” will have the opportunity to access to this immersive studies system for their own research projects. This collaboration with non-Villanova researchers illustrates a trend in which academic libraries provide environments called “collaboratories.”

Speaking of collaboration, Frank Klassner, PhD, associate professor of computing sciences and director of the University’s Center of Excellence in Enterprise Technology (CEET) teamed up with Professor Dougherty and then-Library-Director Joe Lucia to write the proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF). Together they garnered a $1.67 million NSF grant: “the largest NSF research grant ever awarded to the University.”


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

Like

Advice on Getting Published from Campus Journal Editors

1312.i017.007.S.m001.c10.education iconDo you want to improve the chances of getting your articles published? Are you looking for insight into the mysterious process of submission and review? This Thursday the editors of several journals produced on campus will speak about the publishing process and answer all of the questions you’ve been dying to ask. Sally Scholz, PhD, (Department of Philosophy, editor of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy); Seth Whidden, PhD, (Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, editor of Nineteenth-Century French Studies); and Professor John Paul Spiro, (Augustine and Culture Seminar, managing editor of Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities), will offer editors’ points of view on a wide range of topics including what to submit where, what to expect during the review process, when and how to interact with a journal’s editorial staff, and much more.

 

THREE BOOKS

The event will take place this Thursday at 11:30 a.m. in the Hypatia editorial suite, located on the first floor of Falvey Memorial Library, near the entrance to the Falvey West stacks. Please direct any questions to Dr. Sally Scholz at sally.scholz@villanova.edu.

Like

The War to End All Wars: Great War Resources at Falvey

By Canadian Official photographer, Castle, W I (Lieutenant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Canadian Official photographer, Castle, W I (Lieutenant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When a nation enters war, it often justifies its actions with promises of a better and more just world. The Great War, which consumed much of Europe and its colonial outposts from 1914 to 1918, was no exception. H.G. Wells called it the “war that will end war,” which later morphed into “the war to end all wars.” Wells coined this phrase in a Times editorial. His 1914 editorials are easily accessible in a book: The War That Will End War.

2014 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the war: A war that started with Austria’s declaration of war against Serbia on July 28, 1914, following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife a month earlier. Much has been written about the war since then, and 2014 promises a bumper crop of new scholarship. The Library will showcase new publications in a small exhibit in the Learning Commons throughout the fall semester.

WWI CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT WILL CONTINUE THROUGH THE FALL SEMESTER

WWI CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT WILL CONTINUE THROUGHOUT THE FALL SEMESTER

Here are some titles you can expect to see in the exhibit. Aside from run-of-the-mill general surveys, a number of these books explore previously neglected aspects of the war.

The historiography of the Great War has gone through many changes, and the amount of scholarship can be overwhelming. The three volumes of the Cambridge History of the First World War, particularly the excellent bibliographic essays included in each volume, are a good starting point for interested readers.

Among the excellent primary sources available at Falvey are the complete archives of the New York Times and the London Times. Your Villanova id. will allow you either to open the New York Times from Sunday, August 9, 1914 and browse through pages after pages of war coverage or to read the detailed coverage of the war declaration in the Times of London on July 29, 1914.

Online exhibitions commemorating the Great War abound: The National World War I Museum has a series of exhibitions ranging from War Art to War Fare. Europeana 1914-1918 features untold stories and official histories of the war from archives and museums across Europe. Last but not least, Falvey hosted Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4 p.m. for a talk about the origins of the war: “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.”


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

Like

The Villanova CAVE—What’s in it for You?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

What’s in it for you? Find out! Come to the Falvey Hall lobby and Reading Room this Thursday, Oct. 2 for the grand opening of the Villanova CAVE.

Like
1 People Like This Post

Window Shopping: Augustine the Reader: Library Resources and Support for the Augustine & Culture Seminar Program

RS8222_ACS window 1 (1)

“Augustine the Reader: Falvey Memorial Library Resources and Support for the Augustine & Culture Seminar Program” is the theme of the exhibit filling a display window between Falvey’s first floor and the Holy Grounds Café. Vertical rows of hexagonal mirrors flank the body of the exhibit. The mirrors refer to the theme, “Who am I?; this is the fundamental question of the Augustine & Culture Seminar (ACS), a two-semester seminar that all first-year students are required to take.

The first semester students read works from the greatest thinkers of the ancient, medieval and Renaissance worlds. Second semester students read works by writers from the Enlightenment to the present. Works by some of these writers are on display, including a volume of Augustine’s Confessions and one by Shakespeare, each held by an owl, traditionally a symbol of wisdom.

Librarian Rob LeBlanc, right, works with first year students Conor Quinn and Steve

Librarian Rob LeBlanc, right, works with first year students Conor Quinn and Steve Halek

Four text panels explain what ACS teaches students, present two passages from the Confessions and introduce Rob LeBlanc, the first-year experience librarian who works with the ACS students.

Chosen readings were selected by Gregory D. Hoskins, PhD, ACS program faculty mentor. Dr. Hoskins mentors students in studies of texts that cross disciplinary boundaries. The exhibit and its graphics were designed by Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

Like

Don’t miss the Grand Opening of The CAVE this Thursday!

CAVE-POSTER-SMALL

On Thursday, Oct. 2 at 2 p.m., join us for the grand opening of Villanova’s CAVE Facility in Falvey Memorial Library. The CAVE, an immersive virtual reality environment, is an interdisciplinary venture among investigators from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering and Falvey Memorial Library. The facility will provide Villanova’s faculty and students with many research and educational possibilities.

Next best thing to being in The Cave! Click on below link to view logo in action.

Next best thing to being in The Cave! Click on below link to view logo in action.

Click here to observe a sample effect of the CAVE in action. It is supported by a $1.67 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Light refreshments will be served and tours will run throughout the afternoon.

Like
1 People Like This Post

Laura Matthews – New Scholarly Outreach Specialist

Laura MatthewsLaura Matthews recently joined the Scholarly Outreach team as a “library events and outreach specialist.” She reports to Regina (Gina) Duffy, Rebecca (Becky) Whidden while Duffy is on leave and Darren Poley, team leader. She is responsible for assisting in the scheduling and setting up for events held in the Library.

Matthews, a native of Wayne, graduated from Shippensburg University, where she received a BSBA degree in marketing and international studies. She also has a post-baccalaureate certificate in pre-speech language pathology from LaSalle University. Before coming to Falvey, Matthews worked at Elwyn SEEDS (Special Education for Early Development).

Her special interest is raising dogs for The Seeing Eye. Her current puppy is named Nova, “a complete coincidence,” she says. “I found out about The Seeing Eye at the Special Olympics here at Villanova about four years ago. After talking to other members of the club and meeting the pups, I attended my first club meeting and I was hooked! I raised my first pup a year later.”

“I am excited to be working at Villanova,” Matthews adds.

Like

Foto Friday: Author Wes Moore Book Signing

DSC_0043 copy A (1)

Falvey Memorial Library was pleased to host a book signing for Wes Moore on Thursday, September 25 as part of the OneBook Villanova’s tenth year anniversary. Close to one hundred students and members of the community turned out for the occasion. Moore signed books for over an hour, with the line for those waiting to meet and greet the genial author snaking out past the elevator bank.

Posters of book covers for each of the OneBook Villanova selections since the program began in 2004 were hung in the windows surrounding the Speakers’ Corner. Moore signed the oversized cover of The Other Wes Moore, and took home his ‘Big Head‘ decoration reportedly to show it to his mother!


Photo by Alice Bampton.

Like

Dig Deeper: The Village That Cried

HedtkeAs part of the Alumni Author series, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will be giving a talk titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk is based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944. The talk will focus on the crash of an American B-24 bomber into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944. The crash and ensuing firestorm killed 61 people, including 38 children in the village elementary school. This tragic event destroyed an entire generation of children in the village of 900 people. In addition, Hedtke’s talk will also touch upon the communal funeral and the village’s almost 70-year attempt to recover from this horrendous incident.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public, and will be held on Monday, Sept. 29 at 2:30 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

To learn more about the Freckleton, English Air Disaster, explore the resources provided below, chosen and organized by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

 


Dig Deeper

Freckleton: The Village That Cried

Freckelton

Freckleton, known as “the village that cried,” is located on Britain’s beautiful Fylde Coast, situated in the historic Ribble Valley. It is approximately 230 miles northwest of London in Lancashire county.

BBC- Remembering the Freckleton air disaster of 1944  - with recording of eyewitness testimony

The Times Digital Archive 1785-1985 (Gale)Aircraft Crash on School

Historical New York Times: 1851-2009 (ProQuest)MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED: Soldiers Built Playground Where U.S. Plane Crashed in Britain

Washington Post Historical: 1877-1996 (ProQuest)Bomber Crash Kills All But 6 Of British Town’s 41 Children

Cabrini College news

Lancashire Aircraft Investigation Team (LAIT)

Ribble Valley

 

Books:

Freckleton HedtkeBlackpoolAtWar

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for Geography and Political Science.

Like
1 People Like This Post

« Previous PageNext Page »

 


Last Modified: September 26, 2014