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Jane Golden and the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program

Jane GoldenJane Golden, founder and executive director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, will present a talk on Monday, April 7, at 3:00 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner. She will discuss the Mural Arts Program and present a slideshow of some of the latest, most impressive Philadelphia murals.

Golden began Mural Arts thirty years ago as an anti-graffiti program. Mural Arts is now internationally recognized for its leadership in community-based public art, a program which has involved over 30,000 young men and women. The participants have created 3,600 public murals. Mural Arts’ goal is “to create art that transforms public spaces and individual lives and asserts our fundamental belief that art can ignite change.”

Mayor W.Wilson Goode (mayor 1984-1992) originally hired Golden to help combat Philadelphia’s graffiti problem. She reached out to the graffiti writers and, recognizing their artistic talents, began to provide opportunities for them to utilize their skills as mural painters in appropriate settings.

Golden was appointed director of the Mural Arts Program in 1996 when it was placed under Philadelphia’s Department of Recreation. She has supervised numerous complex public art projects which have helped transform Philadelphia neighborhoods and allowed thousands to experience art in every day settings.

She has undergraduate degrees in fine arts and political science from Stanford University and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Rutgers University. Golden received the Adela Dwyer – St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award from Villanova in 2008. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree at commencement in 2008. She also holds honorary PhDs from Swarthmore College, University of the Arts, Widener University and Haverford College.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of English and its concentration in writing and rhetoric, the Cultural Studies Program and Falvey Memorial Library. It is free and open to the public.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Foto Friday: What are you waiting for?

Bring your work outside!

Bring your work outside!

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

 

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Literary Character March Madness Enters the Round of 16: Analyst Predictions

What a week it’s been for the library’s Literary Character March Madness! With votes rolling in both online and on our physical bracket by the circulation desk, we’ve finally entered the round of sweet 16. While each of these 8 battles will prove interesting in their own right, this week we’d like to offer four predictions in the signature match-ups of the round.

Curious George vs. Winnie the Pooh

imageI’m not sure anyone could have predicted that these two pants-less anthropomorphic goofballs would take down such heavy hitters as Anna Karenina and Alice in the round of 64, but here we are. In any case, despite the recent doping allegations and that very public falling out with the man in the Yellow Hat, the smart money is on Mr. George in this one. I mean, just look at his wittle face!

Hamlet v. Harry Potter

imageIn last year’s tournament Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling made it all the way to the championship match-up, taking down major contenders such as Herman Melville along the way. For that reason it seems like The Boy Who Lived … has the odds in this one. Sorry, Hamlet my man, but it looks like this one’s “not to be.”

James Bond vs. Tom Sawyer

imageIt’s high-tech gadgetry versus home-spun foolery in this Midwest match-up, but Mr. Bond-James-Bond won’t seem so suave after Tommy-Boy tricks him into whitewashing a fence, now will he? Then again I heard Bond’s been moving in on Becky Thatcher, so he may already be in Sawyer’s head. Seems like a coin-toss, but I’m going to take Sawyer in this one.

Gandalf vs. Dante

imageWow. These storylines just write themselves: the 5-3 battle in the East is between two Catholic wizards. Wait, I’m being told Gandalf isn’t Catholic. And Dante wasn’t a wizard?! What’s with the hat and spell book, then? Somebody else should really be writing this.

 

That’s all for now, book fans! Be sure to vote for your favorite characters here, and stick to the Library News blog for more analysis next week. Remember, you can follow Falvey Memorial Library (FalveyLibrary) on twitter (#novabookbracket) and Facebook for more action.

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Dig Deeper: John Paul II’s Theology of the Body

On Thursday, April 3 at 2:30 p.m. D.C. Schindler, PhD, associate professor of Metaphysics and Anthropology at The John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at The Catholic University of America and former Villanova professor will present a talk titled “The Labor of Love: John Paul II and the Sanctity of Work” as part of the Library’s annual Pope John Paul II Legacy Lecture series. This lecture will explore the meaning of human work as a form of self-gift by reflecting on John Paul II’s insights about work in the light of the theological anthropology of his Theology of the Body.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and the Department of Humanities, will take place in Room 204 in the Learning Commons and is free and open to the public.As this Legacy Lecture will explore the meaning of human work in the light of the theological anthropology of Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body, you may be curious to learn more about this seminal text. It is actually a compilation of over 120 lectures John Paul delivered to audiences in St. Peter’s Square and Paul VI Audience Hall between 1979 and 1984, shortly after he succeeded Pope John Paul I.

In these lectures, the Pope addresses a wide range of topics such as the Christian ideal of marriage, adultery, the resurrection of the body, celibacy and virginity, the sacrament of marriage, contraception and more. Generally, the lectures urge us not to perceive the body as an object, but as a gift worthy of dignity and reverence. The compiled text shows much depth and quality of thought because the Pope had studied philosophy and theology before his papacy, but there are several aids available to the adventurous reader (see below).


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Dig Deeper

For more information on Pope John Paul II and his Theology of the Body, please explore the following resources that Falvey Memorial Library currently offers.

Print Books

The Theology of the Body

Theology of the Body Explained: A Commentary on John Paul II’s “Gospel of the Body”
An excellent commentary that is written in an accessible style and is divided into “cycles” that treat the main themes of the Theology of the Body.

Men and Women are from Eden: A Study Guide to John Paul II’s Theology of the Body
A highly-readable study guide that provides nine accessible “lessons” that introduces the reader to the Pope’s message. Also recommended for study groups and marriage preparation courses.

John Paul > II, > Pope, > 1920-2005. > Theology of the body.
A listing of all items treating the Pope’ Theology of the Body. Be sure to check out researcher Christopher West’s series of DVDs on this subject.

John Paul > II, > Pope, > 1920-2005.
A listing of all items treating all aspects of the life and work of the Pope.

Websites

Theology of the Body Institute
A non-profit, educational organization promoting the Theology of the Body to both Christians and non-Christians alike. Offers a certification program, various courses, articles, videos, and much more.

Theology of the Body.net 
An online resource for John Paul II’s Theology of the Body that offers articles, documents, links and other resources to assist in promoting and disseminating the Pope’s message.


RS6126_Alex-Williams-work-stationAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams. He is currently pursuing an MS in Library and Information Science at Drexel University’s iSchool.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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April Fish or Poisson d’Avril

Poisson_d'avrilThere are many theories about the origins of April Fool’s Day celebrations. One such theory is that it originated in France in the 16th century when King Charles IX adopted the Gregorian calendar, moving the start of the year from the end of March to January 1. Get the facts about this unusual “holiday” on the Blue Electrode.

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Library Embraces New Social-Media Compliant AFD Citation Style

afd wordleIn an effort to further bolster its support to the pioneering field of the Digital Humanities, Falvey Memorial Library recently embraced AFD Style, a model for citation and composition that incorporates technologies in the expanding world of social media. The AFD Style offers interdisciplinary formatting guidelines that utilize social media technologies across the board, including those provided by Twitter, Facebook, Reddit and Snapchat.

The AFD Style Book leverages the power of social media as a means of verifying discursive notation, providing a feature-rich user experience for the reader. For example, where former styles such as the MLA identify the source of a quotation by referring to a work’s cited page at the end of a paper, the AFD requires direct hyperlinks to the quoted scholar’s LinkedIn profile or Facebook page. Where the Chicago style uses footnotes as a means of clarifying or expanding a point, the AFD offers guidelines for directly embedding YouTube or Vimeo clips of a writer defending his/herself against potential counterarguments.

The AFD format is the brainchild of Chaz Q. Queue, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur and intellectual who developed the style guide in consultation with several focus groups and think-tanks on the west coast. Mr. Queue first entered the academic spotlight in 2010 when he created an iPhone and Android app called Study Face, a hugely popular program that allowed students to live-stream their contemplative expressions during lectures and then broadcast them to other Study Face users. “The 21st Century will be all about social scholarship,” Mr. Queue said in a recent Skype interview from the ChazCorp offices in San Jose. “The AFD empowers the kind of nonlinear thinking and digital interfacing sorely lacking in the academic world. By requiring that all papers be posted to the Reddit subforum r/college, for example, and insisting that they meet a minimum quota of Reddit Gold before publication, we’re truly shattering the ivory tower mentality that plagues most universities.”

Librarian Robert LeBlanc demonstrating the finer details of an AFD Selfie Citation

Librarian Robert LeBlanc demonstrating the finer details of an AFD Selfie Citation

Falvey Memorial Library will offer a series of AFD Style Workshops beginning next week. First Year Experience Librarian and Liaison to the Humanities Department Robert LeBlanc will lead the workshops. LeBlanc’s classes will help students develop crucial AFD skills such as how to make a Selfie Citation and how to develop a strong argument with compelling evidence in 140 characters or fewer.


Article by Corey Waite For It Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

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Dig Deeper: Vera Figner, Icon of the Revolution in Soviet Russia

Lynne Ann Hartnett, PhD

Lynne Ann Hartnett, PhD

Falvey Memorial Library is pleased to host its latest Scholarship@Villanova lecture on Tuesday, April 1, at 2:30 p.m., featuring Lynne Hartnett, PhD, assistant professor, Department of History, director of Russian Area Studies, director of the Center for the Study of Violence and Conflict. Dr. Hartnett’s talk is entitled “On the Edge of Revolution: Activism, Terrorism, and Political Resurrection in the Life of One Russian Revolutionary Legend.”

This talk will use the life of Vera Figner, a Russian noblewoman who became a revolutionary terrorist, as a historical lens through which to explore political activism and radicalism in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Russia. As a leading member of a radical group widely considered to be the world’s first modern terrorist organization, Vera Figner’s biography provides great insight into the circumstances and choices that impel otherwise peaceful individuals to embrace violence as a method of protest. The lecture will follow Figner through the revolutionary underground, prison, exile and the Russian Revolutions of 1917 in order to analyze and assess the role that gender, class, personality and historical timing played in Figner’s decision to become a radical activist, her experiences within the revolutionary movement and her subsequent status as an icon of the revolution in Soviet Russia.

We invite you to enhance your enjoyment and understanding of Dr. Hartnett’s scholarship by exploring library resources listed below, selected and annotated by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.


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Dig Deeper

While many of you are eagerly anticipating the publication of Dr. Hartnett’s monograph The Defiant Life of Vera Figner: Surviving the Russian Revolution, which will be available in early June, here are some related sources which are currently available in print or online:

Figner, Vera. Memoirs of a Revolutionist. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1991.This is Figner’s autobiography written during her twenty-two years of incarceration and published soon after her release.

Hartnett, Lynne A. “Perpetual Exile: The Dynamics of Gender, Protest, and Violence in the Revolutionary Life of Vera Figner (1852-1917).” PhD diss., Boston College, 2000. ProQuest (AAT9961602). Dr. Hartnett’s dissertation is available online for Villanova students, faculty and staff.

We recommend the following encyclopedias and survey histories as background reading:

Burwood, Linnea G. “Figner, Vera (1852–1942).” In Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia edited by Anne Commire. Vol. 5. Detroit: Yorkin Publications, 2002.

Marik, Soma. “Women in the Russian Revolution.” In The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest edited by Immanuel Ness. Blackwell Publishing, 2009.

Millar, James R. Ed. The Encyclopedia of Russian History. New York: Macmillan, 2004.

Perrie, Maureen, D. C. B Lieven, and Ronald Grigor Suny. The Cambridge History of Russia. Vol. 3. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Monographs about women in the Russian Revolution in the Falvey collection:

McDermid, Jane., and Anna Hillyar. Midwives of the Revolution: Female Bolsheviks and Women Workers in 1917. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1999.

Hillyar, Anna, and Jane McDermid. Revolutionary Women in Russia, 1870-1917: A Study in Collective Biography. Manchester : New York: Manchester University Press, 2000.
[https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/542390]

Engel, Barbara A. and Clifford N. Rosenthal. Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar: The Memoirs of Five Young Anarchist Women of the 1870′s. Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1987.

Maxwell, Margaret. Narodniki Women: Russian Women Who Sacrificed Themselves for the Dream of Freedom. New York: Pergamon Press, 1990.

For an up-close look at Vera Figner and the Russian revolution in contemporary newspapers and magazines we recommend:

American Periodicals Series

Read George Kennan’s reply to a letter about Russian revolutionaries in Outlook:

Kennan, George. “Who are Russia’s Real Revolutionists? A Reply to a Letter from a Friend of the Bolsheviki.” Outlook,  December 19, 1917, 638-39.

Historical New York Times

Read the 1927 book review of Figner’s autobiography in the New York Times.

Memoirs of a Revolutionist.” New York Times, June 19, 1927, BR2.

British Periodicals

Read Ralston’s review and learn how baffled he was by the revolutionary commitment of Russian women. Here is a short excerpt:

“The most interesting by far of the conspirators are the women. The type of character which they represent is one which is very unfamiliar to us. We find it difficult to believe that young girls, belonging to what we should call the upper middle classes, well educated, and by no means destitute of culture, can leave their homes and go away, of their own free will, to lead a hard life among strange people of a lower class – and all for an idea. We can understand such a sacrifice being made in the cause, let us say, of religion or loyalty, but for the sake of irreligion and disloyalty it appears unaccountable.” [p. 400]

Ralston, W. R. S. “Russian Revolutionary Literature.” The Nineteenth Century: A Monthly Review 1, no. 3 (1877), 397-416.


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Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

Introductory article by Regina Duffy, Scholarly Outreach event coordinator.

 

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Save Your Search

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you save a whole search-results list? This video shows how to save a whole search-results list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

 

 

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Foto Friday: Coming soon to a location near you

Flowers

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Meet Kelly Forst, Scholarly-Outreach Graduate Assistant

ForstKelly Forst ’13 LAS, from Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J., is the Scholarly Outreach team’s graduate assistant for this academic year. Forst earned her bachelor’s degree in communication with a business minor from Villanova in 2013. She is enrolled in the graduate communication program and expects to graduate in May 2014 with a Master of Arts degree and a certificate in mediated communication.

Forst began working as a graduate assistant in August, reporting to Library Events and Program Coordinator Regina (Gina) Duffy, but has also worked as a tutor in the Writing Center during her junior and senior years, so she has worked in Falvey for three years.

“After graduation, I hope to gain experience in integrated marketing communication by working in a digital media agency. There’s so much about the communication field I enjoy, so working at an integrated agency will allow me to do a bit of everything, from public relations to social media, market research and strategic media planning. I’m also tossing around the idea of going back to school down the road to earn a PhD in new media studies and communication,” she says.

As the Scholarly Outreach team’s graduate assistant, Forst helps coordinate and manage events in the Library. She is responsible for organizing the undergraduate student workers, maintaining procedure manuals and documents, assisting in communication promotions as needed, writing and editing communication materials and reporting event statistics.

Her hobbies are music (playing the piano and the trumpet), volleyball, travelling, cooking, baking, reading dystopian novels and staying active.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Last Modified: March 27, 2014