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Foto Friday: Making a statement

Bottle-Brushes

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Swan Songs (+ a Kallie and Michelle Playlist)

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Harry Potter 2

Congratulations to the class of 2015. You did it! And for the non-graduates, you did it too: welcome to summer. Whether this summer is the first summer of your independent adult life, or it’s another in-between summer, summers can be a time of personal reinvention or, at least, a time to check in with yourself—your wants, needs, goals, your sense of equanimity. And reestablishing your relationship with sunshine, of course!

Sometimes summer can feel like an aimless abyss if you’re between semesters. All of a sudden, you’re at home again and away from the social network you just worked so hard on establishing. You’re not on constant go-mode after the intensity of finals. The sudden change is a little startling! But you’ll settle in. You’ve deserved it. Quiet your brain when you can—September you will thank you!

And if this summer is your launch into a job or the real world, take time to appreciate your college experience; you’ve learned so much in classrooms, from books, from friends, from teachers—and it’s all going to help you. Bask in the nostalgia. And have an emotionally cathartic experience to this bittersweet swan song playlist.


SpotifyClick me!

Kallie and Michelle’s Past Playlists:
Warm Weather playlist
Music to Research By
Volume 1
Thanksgiving
Christmas
Valentine’s Day/Singles Awareness

Best of luck, Nova Nation. Happy summer, happy graduation! The 2014-15 academic year is complete!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Now on Display: Sinking of the Lusitania Special Collections Exhibit

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The RMS Lusitania, designed to be the fastest ocean liner in service, was launched in Sept. 1907. Owned by the Cunard Line, Ltd., her maiden voyage was from Liverpool, England, to New York. Her 68,000 horse-power engines allowed the Lusitania to travel at an average speed of over 25 knots per hour (28.8 miles per hour). That same year the top speed for a Model T Ford was about 45 miles per hour; a Stutz Bearcat had a top speed of 85 miles per hour. For comparison, by 1969 the Queen Elizabeth, another large Cunard luxury liner, had a maximum sustained speed of 28.5 knots (32.8 miles per hour).

In 1913, with war clouds looming, the Lusitania was sent to dry dock to be fitted for government service: ammunition magazines and hidden gun mounts were installed on her decks.
On May 1, 1915, the Lusitania, captained by William Turner, left New York bound for Liverpool on what became her last voyage. Although the German embassy had placed advertisements in New York newspapers warning that any ship sailing into the “European War Zone” might be attacked by German submarines, the Lusitania nevertheless sailed, carrying 1,264 passengers, including 124 children and infants, and 693 crew members.

At 2:10 p.m. on May 7 a German submarine, U-20 captained by Walter Schwieger, torpedoed the Lusitania as she cruised eight miles off the coast of Ireland. After the torpedo hit, a second, larger explosion quickly followed, and within eighteen minutes the Lusitania sank. Schweiger said in his log, “… great confusion on board … they must have lost their heads.” (“The Lusitania.” HistoryLearningSite.co.uk. 2014. Web) One thousand one hundred ninety five of the 1,959 people aboard the Luisitania died, 123 Americans among them. Captain Turner survived although he had been washed overboard and spent over three hours in the sea.

Installing the Lusitania exhibit are  (l-r): Laura Bang, Alison Dolbier and Marjory Haines.

Installing the Lusitania exhibit are (l-r): Laura Bang, Alison Dolbier and Marjory Haines.

This event sets the stage for the current Special Collections exhibit, “‘Too Fast for Any Submarine’: The Last Voyage of the Lusitania,” curated by Allison Dolbier, a Digital Library intern. Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant; Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator; and Marjory Haines, intern, helped Dobier install the exhibit, which fills seven display cases. Joanne Quinn, graphic designer and Communication and Service Promotion team leader, created the graphics. The exhibit is multi-faceted, incorporating a wide variety of materials: newspapers, children’s books, two medals, photographs and more.

2015-05-05 17.11.22A large poster, “Dastardly Deed!” captures the eye and leads one to the beginning of the exhibit in the upright case; the dastardly deed is, of course, the German U-boat’s attack. On the top shelf is the curator’s introduction, “A Fateful Voyage.” And on the same shelf is a color postcard of the Lusitania, mailed in 1909. On the next shelf are a 1913 two-page advertisement for the Cunard Steamship Co. in The Fra: A Journal of Affirmation, “Are You a Citizen of the World? An Advertisement by Elbert Hubbard.” There is a newspaper from Panama City, May 9, 1915, with a prominent headline, “Death’s Toll of the Lusitania, 1346.” There are also a menu and tickets in a frame as well as a copy of an advertisement for the Lusitania with a “Notice” below warning travelers. The “Notice” is signed by the Imperial German Embassy.

On the bottom of this case is a bright red flag with a golden yellow lion, a Cunard Steamship Company flag on loan from Eugene L. DiOrio, a small bottle containing rust from the Lusitania and its certificate of authenticity, and Exploring the “Lusitania”: Probing the Mysteries of the Sinking That Changed History, 1995, by Robert D. Ballard and Spencer Dunmore. This book is open to show the Lusitania as it appears underwater today.

IMG_2146Flanking this cabinet is a large framed print, “The Cunard Line Steamships: Lusitania and Mauretania.”
There are six more cases, each labeled “Too fast for any submarine,” the claim made for the Lusitania. These cases contain a variety of materials such as books, a newspaper scrapbook open to a clipping with the headline. “U. S. Ship Torpedoed; American Lives Lost,” pamphlets from 1915 and ’17, two medals, and much more.

One case is dedicated to “The Irish advocate for Germany … and Independence,” and another case focuses on “German-Americans and the case for American neutrality.” These two cases remind viewers that the United States is and was a nation of immigrants and there were often conflicting opinions about the Great War, World War I.

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Highly informative and often visually appealing, this is an exhibit worth multiple visits to fully absorb its offerings. The exhibit will continue until mid-September.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “After your final final, what’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

GALLOTaylor Gallo—“The first thing I want to do for fun is lay out by the pool [at] home.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHUNDIPrathyusha Chundi—“First, I want to meet my friends, get together and have some party.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

PETERPeter Rokowski—“I need to get through a few books that I’ve been putting off for a couple years … I’m working on my thesis … so I haven’t had time to read leisurely for about six years now.”

 

 

 

 

 

larkinPatrick Larkin—“I’m gonna go out to dinner with my dad; my dad’s gonna come in. So there’s that, and then I’m out the next day. That’s probably what I’ll end up doing; just sit down and relax for a little bit is probably what I’ll do, and just let my mind clear out … ‘Cause I’m going to start working again when I get back home, probably five days afterwards, … so I’m going to do as little as possible. Then in the next couple of days watch the Blackhawks play.”

 

wurtsterPatrick Wurster—“go outside and play Kubb (aka Ye Olde Viking Game)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROCCACristina Rocca—“I’m a senior, so I’m graduating. The first thing I’m gonna do for fun—probably pop a bottle of Champagne, sit on my porch and drink it … And then the seniors have a party, like Party on Deck—something like that, so I’ll be going to that.”


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Nomnomnomatology winners!

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As you may have read, finance-and-accounting major and sophomore Mihir Shah is the lucky winner of the library’s Nomnomnomatology contest for a private study suite for late night hours finals week and a sumptuous feast of Villanova’s final four favorite foods to nosh on while studying!

And – who’s the best friend ever? He’s sharing it with a bunch of his study buddies also from the Class of 2017, including (photo above, L-R), Brendan Shea (finance and accounting), Samantha Faust (communication) and Patrick Wallace (psychology.) Mihir is on the far right.

Mihir and his friends enjoyed Little Bites brownies, hot fries from Campus Corner, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, and now have private access to a suite in the Library this week, just in time for finals.



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A Misconception about “Cinco de Mayo”

Happy Cinco de Mayo! In case you missed it the first time around, we are reposting a popular blog post from 2013 written by Sue Ottignon, Research Support Librarian for Languages & Literatures that answers the question, once and for all, what Cinco de Mayo commemorates. Always ask a librarian! 

Battle of Puebla, 5 May 1862

Battle of Puebla, 5 May 1862

Wait!!  Before you make the mad dash to enjoy all those delicious salsa combos you made to kick off your annual “Cinco de Mayo” celebration, I have some little-known facts to share with you about this day.

If you thought Cinco de Mayo was Mexico’s Independence Day, you would be mistaken! Mexico’s Independence Day is September 16th. Yup, you heard me. It was on that September day, in 1810, Mexicans declared their independence from Spain, which had controlled the territory referred to as “New Spain,” since 1521 when Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztec Empire. If you plan to add Independence Day, aka “Grito de Dolores,” to your celebration list, be sure to check out the article in the Encyclopaedia Britannica[1]on Mexico’s struggles!

So what’s so great about the 5th of May? Although it is not an official holiday in Mexico, it does commemorate the Mexicans’ victory over the French on May 5, 1862, in the town of Puebla; thus, the holiday is called “El Día de la Batalla de Puebla,” and there are celebrations. The Mexican-American community, from the western states, began the observance shortly after the event. Ultimately, the day’s events evolved within the US as recognition of the Mexican culture and heritage.  Moreover, the U.S. Congress recently issued  resolutions[2] recognizing the historical significance of Cinco de Mayo. The Congressional Record, for the House of Representatives, recorded on June 7, 2005, a concurrent, non-binding resolution recognizing the historical significance of the day,[3]

Selected resources about “Cinco de Mayo”:

Arellano, Gustavo.  Interview by Michel Martin. Arts & Life.  Natl. Public Radio, 5 May 2011. NPR.org. Web. 29 Apr. 2013.

“Cinco de Mayo.” Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online Academic Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2013. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

Ganster, Paul. “Cinco de Mayo.” Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture.

Ed. Jay Kinsbruner and Erick D. Langer. 2nd ed. Vol. 2. Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2008. 413. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

Hamnett, Brian. “Puebla, Battle and Siege of.” Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture. Ed. Jay Kinsbruner and Erick D. Langer. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2008. 401-402. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

“Monthly Record of Current Events: Mexico.” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. 25.146 (1862): 261. Making of America, 1815-1901. Web. 29 April 2013.

“News from San Francisco.” New York Times (1857-1922): 1. Jun 01 1862. ProQuest. Web. 27 Apr. 2013.

Pérez, Daniel Enrique. “Cinco de Mayo.” Confluencia: Revista Hispánica de Cultura y Literatura 27.1 (2011): 210+. Academic OneFile. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

Recognizing Historical Significance Of The Mexican Holiday Of  Cinco De Mayo of2007.  H.R. Con. Res. 44. 7 June 2005. Web.


Sue Ottignon is the subject librarian for romance languages and literatures. RS4540_FML164_SusanOttignon_018_EDIT---ed


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The Highlighter: Need a Quiet Place to Study?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

This video provides a lighthearted look at a resource the Library takes seriously: quiet study spaces.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

 


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May the Fourth Be With You! A Star Wars Dig Deeper

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To say Star Wars is the best movie franchise of all time might be overselling it (especially considering the execrable episodes I-III), but it was the first movie I ever saw on the big screen, and yes, it was brand new when I saw it in 1977. I was five, and even though I didn’t understand the subtext, it helped define my lifelong love of science fiction and high fantasy and the same can be said of millions of fans worldwide. The question is “why”? Why is it so important to so many people? Why has it been translated into dozens of languages, spawned more movies, cartoons, dozens of novels, and a fanatical global following? Why are my friends handing down their original 1970’s Kenner action figures to their children, like some ancient sword passed down from their father’s, father’s, father? Why is it being reborn, yet again, by Disney and directed by the highly respected J.J Abrams?

Two simple words: It’s awesome.

Prior to Star Wars (now known as Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, an inelegant name for an inelegant time) a “Space Opera” was a pejorative term for the cheap, pulp comics of the 1940’s, 50’s, and 60’s. The Oxford English Dictionary defines it as “a science fiction story or drama set in space; space fiction esp. of an unsophisticated or clichéd type.” These stories are known for their melodramatic and overly romantic portrayals of enemies fighting each other in outer space using advanced, futuristic weaponry and technology.

By 1977, Space Opera was a well-established – if fringe – genre in comic books like Flash Gordon (1934), television shows like Star Trek (1966), and films like Barbarella ( 1968). But Star Wars brought something new to the equation; a complex coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of a totalitarianism and rebellion.

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Themes of mysticism, oppression, community, colonialism, trade politics and self-discovery gave the first trilogy a depth that did not jibe with the “unsophisticated” definition of Space Opera. The genre had suddenly become something for grown ups: The number of times you saw “Jedi” became a badge of pride for geeks and non-geeks alike. Its state-of-the-art special effects blurred the line between reality and fiction to the point that robots and fighting teddy bears became lovable – and essential – characters. Discussions about hyperdrive, Jedi mind tricks, and the feasibility of real world light sabers became water cooler conversation. It marked a sea change that first legitimized Space Opera and, by extension, science fiction as a mainstream genre.

Viewership for shows like Star Trek and Battlestar Gallactica swelled as fans hungered for more and the success of these shows and ancillary movies spawned hundreds of sci-fi knock-offs and permutations. Whether you love Star Wars or not, it can be argued that all modern science fiction, from blockbuster movies like Interstellar and Transformers to TV shows like Futurama and Doctor Who, owe their continued success, and even their genesis, to a low budget 1970’s film trilogy about a farm boy, a scoundrel, a sassy princess, and a few droids who toppled an oppressive empire and saved their galaxy a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…

To learn more about the Star Wars universe and its influence, check out these Falvey Memorial Library resources:

Non-Fiction Books:
Star Wars and Philosophy : More Powerful than you Can Possibly Imagine
by Kevin S. Decker
PN1995.9.S695 S76 2005 – Falvey Main 4th Floor

Empire Building : The Remarkable, Real-life Story of Star Wars
by Garry Jenkins
PN1995.9.S695 J46 1999 – Falvey Main 4th Floor

Culture, Identities, and Technology in the Star Wars Films : Essays on the Two Trilogies
by Carl Silvio
PN1995.9.S695 S55 2007 – Falvey Main 4th Floor

From Star Wars to Indiana Jones : The Best of the Lucasfilm Archives
by Mark Vaz
PN1995.9.S695 V3913 – Falvey Main 4th Floor

Fiction Books:
Star Wars: Darth Plagueis
by James Luceno
PS3562.U254417 D37 – Falvey popular reading collection, Main floor

Star Wars: Heir to the Empire  by Timothy Zahn  PS3576.A33 H45 1991 – Falvey Main 4th Floor

e-Books:
How Star Wars Conquered the Universe : The Past, Present, and Future of a Multibillion Dollar Franchise
by Chris Taylor

Articles:
Search for articles using the search terms “Star Wars” (in quotes) and Film. Other useful search terms: politics, mysticism, influence, impact, technology, etc.

For help with research on the movies and their influence, contact Rob LeBlanc, first-year experience & humanities librarian at robert.leblanc@villanova.edu.


Rob LeBlanc is first-year experience & humanities librarian.Rob-ed


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Mood Board: Falvey Scholar Joseph Schaadt

This week, we are featuring the 2015 Falvey Scholars and giving you the chance to get to know these bright young adults up close and personal. Not only are they very smart – they’re very interesting! Just last week, Falvey Memorial Library, the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships, and the Honors Program announced the 2015 Falvey Scholars Award winners: Katie Kline, Elizabeth Long, Jessica Swoboda, Nicholas Ader, Joseph Schaadt and John Szot. These six remarkable senior students have been selected from a pool of candidates from various disciplines for their outstanding undergraduate student research projects at Villanova University. Click here for a listing of their projects as presented at the 2015 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony.
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Featuring Joseph Schaadt
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“I’m a mechanical engineering major from the Bay Area in California and I work in Dr. Aaron Wemhoff’s Multiscale System Analysis Laboratory (MSAL) here at Villanova as part of the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) for Energy Smart Electronic Systems (ES2). When I’m not conducting research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of data centers, I can be spotted playing on the Villanova men’s water polo team or using my free time to play recreational basketball with my friends. While at Villanova, I have enjoyed taking advantage of the numerous opportunities to do service in the community, being involved with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers as the Vice President of our student chapter, and being a cohost on The Zone, a sports talk program on WXVU 89.1 Villanova Radio.”

Project Title: “Load Capacity and Thermal Efficiency Optimization of a Research Data Center Using Computational Modeling”


I am inspired by my father Russell. His diligence, hard work, confidence, and pursuit of excellence are something I try to copy daily.

If I could be any person for a day, I’d be Brandon Stanton, the creator of Humans of New York. He has a great passion for his job and is able to reach and inspire millions of people through his art.

My favorite Villanova memory is being at the Syracuse basketball game my sophomore year when we upset them in overtime at the Wells Fargo Center. I was with some of my best friends Ricky, George, Adam, Brandon, and Chris that day and had a great opportunity to go to a car show, see Reading Terminal market, and explore the city of Philadelphia after. Juice the Cuse!
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While working on my research project, I was challenged by having to explore a topic so foreign to anything I had ever known. It forced me to step outside of my comfort zone, learn quickly, and seek out experts in my field of research who could offer advice when I needed help.

Today I’m feeling the color Yellow. I can’t wait for summer!

I’m listening to the Grateful Dead. Their music is relaxing and has a special peace about it and always reminds me of my Dad and my home.

One Summer Adventure I’m daydreaming about is adventuring around my birthplace and home of San Francisco with my Dad. I can’t wait to get back to the city by the bay.

Happiness is the feeling of what it’s like to have a wonderful family, close friends, and good health.

Everyone should know that everything you want in life is just outside your comfort zone or else you would already have it.

I am amazed by the inherent beauty and complexity of life on Earth. It’s easy to forget just how many great things there are to see in this world and how little time we have to do it!

Thanks, Joseph!


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‘Caturday: The Nights Belong to Us Wildcats

Every dog has his day, but the nights belong to us Wildcats!

You can take your pick of 24-hour study in the Falvey Hall reading room, lobby, or basement soft seating or, stick with the tried and true main library seating on all four floors, most nights until 3 a.m., and the 24-hour lounge.

Whichever you choose, good luck on your final exams and papers, Wildcats!

falvey at night old falvey moon


 

 

 

‘Caturday feature by Luisa Cywinski, writer for Commmunication & Service Promotion team and team leader, Access Services team.


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Last Modified: May 2, 2015