FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



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Continuum: Enhance What You Get Out of College and What You Do When You Get Out of College

Darren

Darren Poley, Interim Library Director

The Library is a natural place to conduct intellectual exploration. It has a labyrinth of book stacks; computer enabled areas and hotspots; audio, video, and even microform materials. It has noisy gathering spaces: some organized for co-curricular activity, such as ACS approved event programming, and others where students collaborate and discuss in an anarchic way. Falvey is not a shushing library, but it does offer spaces for quiet study. Falvey has places to nourish the mind, the body and, it is hoped, even the spirit.

Lent is a time for renewal and Easter a time for regeneration. And when the University community returns from the holiday weekend—which I hope is filled with both times for reflection as well as times for fellowship and fun—I hope folks know they are welcome to come to the Library to prepare for the end of the academic year.

Photo by Frank Klassner

Photo by Frank Klassner

For some it will be a time to prepare for being graduated and going into the world as alums holistically prepared by the Villanova educational experience. It has been said in various ways, and I think it holds true: Education is about more than learning to make a living. Rather, education should be about learning to make a life worth living. It is hoped that Falvey and library explorations have enriched the Villanova experience for students and the campus community by its support of the enterprise of a liberal education. That is, one distinguished by the freedom to be imaginative and curious as much as analytical and fact-driven. Such an education produces, in addition to a fulfilling vocation and career, great thinkers and presenters of ideas who pursue truth, goodness, and beauty.

For those returning after the long Easter weekend—whether you are graduating or will have yet more exploring to do next year—please keep in mind Falvey extends both electronic and human guides that are here to help you along your educational journey. Online, we have subject guides and more. These virtual guides enable you to more easily navigate databases and full-text collections. You may also want a human guide, either to help you use our online tools or to orient you to Falvey’s physical collections. For support, contact a librarian. If you need a specialist for subject-specific library research, make an appointment with a liaison librarian by reaching out to the subject-specific liaison team that matches your research needs.

Everyone at Falvey is dedicated to aiding our students’ intellectual explorations, and I hope you find the Library complements your Villanova educational experience.

DARREN SIG2

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And the Best Literary Character Is…

BRACKETOLOGY-LOGOThe time has finally come: today we crown Falvey Memorial Library’s top literary character. After three weeks of fierce voting and competition, the tournament draws to a close with two titans in the Championship matchup: Atticus Finch, lawyer extraordinaire, and Gandalf, White or Gray depending on your preference. But before we name a victor let’s take a look at a few of the match-ups these two characters had to get here.

2014-04-16 19.45.14Gandalf v. Ebenezer Scrooge:

Gandalf’s opening match-up was an intense showing of geriatric prowess. You’d think that Gandalf would take this one in a landslide, as Scrooge is famously crotchety and smells like Metamucil and IcyHot, but the final count was closer than anyone expected. In the end Gandalf proved too much for old man Ebenezer, and we all learned a valuable lesson about generosity and the ancient Istari order. So that was nice.

Gandalf v. Winnie the Pooh

No one, and I mean no one, could have predicted the tournament that Winnie the Pooh ended up having. You’d think a character whose single motivation is a desire for condensed milk and “hunny” wouldn’t stand a chance against the psychological complexity of Elizabeth Bennett. But then again this is March, and anything can happen I guess. Luckily, Gandalf escaped the bear with minimal lumps, probably because he’s an all-powerful white wizard and not a hopelessly naïve, snack-grubbing cartoon bear JEEZ. I’m sorry guys. I just—I flew off the handle.  Let me be the first to apologize to the Disney Corporation and all the Pooh lovers out there, wherever you are. This one’s for you.

Atticus Finch v. Tom Sawyer

Well, we were expecting a very cordial match-up between these two Southern gentlemen. We were expecting a sporting competition between two good-ol-boys, one in a white suit and the other in overalls, just sippin’ ice tea at the general store. What we got was an absolute beatdown, and it wasn’t pretty. Atticus Finch trounced Tom Sawyer in the Elite Eight, with Tom Sawyer receiving just two measly votes on the big board. Two. I feel kinda bad for the guy. He can barely look Becky Thatcher in the eye after that.

2014-04-16 19.26.12But our final match was the most contentious yet, garnering over 80 votes! When the dust settled, we were looking at a 52-30 victory by none other than…Gandalf! Congratulations my man, we knew you could do it.

Thanks to everyone who voted this year. Stay tuned to find out who won the drawing and will receive a free copy of a book featuring one of these fine characters. And as always, happy reading.

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Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online

Brill's New Pauly OnlineFalvey Memorial Library is pleased to announce that it now offers Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online, which serves as a complement to Brill’s New Pauly Online: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World. The supplements consist of six distinct reference titles that provide in-depth information on ancient authors and texts, historical atlases, the history of classical scholarship, the reception of myth and classical literature, and more. This resource is highly recommended for humanists and scientists alike.

With Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online, you now have access to the following titles:

1)      Chronologies of the Ancient World - This is an exhaustive list of names, dates and facts about the rulers and dynasties that have played significant roles in the course of history.

2)      Dictionary of Greek and Latin Authors and Texts - Provides an overview and history of ancient authors and their works up to the present and contains lists of manuscripts; scholia; early, modern and bilingual editions; translations; and commentaries.

3)      Historical Atlas of the Ancient World - Covering the ancient Near East, the Mediterranean world, the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic world and the Holy Roman Empire from 3000 B.C. to the 15th century A.D., this new atlas illuminates the political, economic, social and cultural developments of key areas in history.

4)      The Reception of Myth and Mythology - Explores how and where the myths of Greece and Rome have spread into literature, music and art over the centuries.

5)      The Reception of Classical Literature - This supplement provides an overview of the reception and influence of ancient literary works on the literary, visual and musical arts from Antiquity to the present.

6)      History of Classical Scholarship – A Biographical Dictionary - Offers an overview of the history of classical studies and contains biographies of over 700 scholars from the 14th century to the present in social, political and cultural contexts.

After completing a quick and simple registration online, you will find a series of “personal user tools” that can catapult your research experience into another world. Some of these added features include the ability to label and “star” entries, to email entries to yourself or classmates, and to share links on social media (Facebook and Twitter). You can save your searches and easily return to those lists of results, manage them from “My Account,” and even subscribe to Brill’s RSS Feed to learn when new or revised content is added.

As an additional bonus, try out the “Cite this Page” feature found at the end of each entry. If you are using this resource for an assignment, copy and paste citations to create your reference list in just seconds. You can also use the “export citation” feature to send the bibliographic information to EndNote or RefWorks, or you can even save it as a document in either MLA or Chicago Style.

Be sure to browse the bibliography at the end of each entry so you can easily find other sources that explore your topic of interest.

Alex Williams theology liaisonIf you have any questions pertaining to this resource, please contact Alexander Williams via email or telephone (ext. 8845).

 

 

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Sarah Garland: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Sarah Garland poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

“Taken”
by
Sarah Garland

Shutters splintered
Basement flooded
Black mold creeps like ringworm
In the recesses of the crawlspace
Spores soar, invading our breathing space.

When Jake was young I lost him in the crowd.
He had been holding my hand, and I turned around,
Just for a second.
It’s like that, the quickened pulse, tight chest,
Over-firing neurons – panic.

If FEMA can’t help,
Where will he go?
Sandy will rip us apart,
More inconvenient debris
scattered across the city.

Sarah Garland, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “‘Taken’ was written as part of a project for my literary festival class, for which we were asked to write a series of poems from different narrative points of view.  The speaker in ‘Taken’ was inspired by the stories and people I met on my break trip to areas destroyed and slow to recover from the devastation of Hurricane Sandy.”

Sarah Garland is a senior English major from Severna Park, MD.  She is has been on two break trips and is involved with sorority and Villanova Ambassadors.

Like this poem? Come to the Open Mic Poetry ReadingWed., April 23, 12 – 1 p.m. and you may get to hear this author read her poems. You’re also welcome to share your own. 

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Easter Holiday Library Hours

ChurchIn compliance with the University holiday schedule, Falvey Memorial Library will be closed Friday, April 18, through Monday, April 21. Regular library hours will resume on Tuesday, April 22. The Falvey Hall 24-hour lobby and reading room and Falvey Library’s 24-hour lounge will be available as study space throughout the holiday weekend.

 

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Add Comments to an Item

Did you know you can add a comment to an item’s catalog record? This video shows how to add comments to an item right from within the catalog.

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Kimberly Julien: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Kimberly Julien poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

Excerpt from “We Might Be Dead By Tomorrow”
by
Kimberly Julien

……“The way he suddenly sounds so serious makes me want to run back into the hotel. He knows the way we live. He knows the type of people we are.
……He knows why I visit the tree every year, and show up in his club right after, looking for every escape possible.
……Because we might be dead by tomorrow, and heaven forbid we die alone.
……A part of me wants to say all this, wants to ask him if it’s really okay. This isn’t my place. It’s a foreign land.”

Kimberley Julien, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says ”I do a lot of writing in the middle of class. I don’t set out to write in class. My mind just wanders a lot. My notes from all my classes are filled with story fragments, some pages long. Before computers got big, it used to be a real hassle. Now I can collate everything when I get home.”

Kimberly Julien is an English major from Lakewood, New Jersey. She enjoys foreign languages, film scores, lucid dreaming and writing. Her least favourite Shakespeare play is Romeo and Juliet.

 

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End-of-Term Prep Tips: Chicago Style Workshops

chicago manual of style

Are you working on a final project or paper that requires Chicago Style formatting? Attend one of these helpful sessions to brush up before your deadline.

Sessions will be held in Falvey 204 in the second-floor Learning Commons.

Monday, April 14:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 23:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Tuesday, April 29:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert.

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Nkiruka Umegbolu: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Nkiruka poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

“Retail Therapy”
by
Nkiruka Umegbolu

Jesus wept
As I walked
Through the revolving doors
Made a LEFT
Wait no
A RIGHT
Two more RIGHT(s)
Down the escalator
Around the corner
Then
A LEFT
This
Is the LEFT I was referring to earlier
The premature LEFT
Like when girls hit puberty
Before boys grow pubic hair
Ages 9-13
Aisle 14
Deliberation
& Renovation
My Barbie Dream House
& The Pink Glam Corvette
That I will always drive
To the job I will never have
Barbie I Can Be…
Anything , Trademarked & Copyrighted….
But only the
Mermaid
Beautiful Fairy
Ms. USA
Ballerina
Dolls are in stock
And
Before we entered
Mother explicitly stated
Either/Or
But I wanted to Have-It-All
So I Bought-Them-All
Fast forward…parking lot
Despair, Fatigue, Pain, Aggression
PMS?
Buyer’s Remorse?
Either/Or
c. All of the Above

Nkiruka Umegbolu, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “I know the poem is finished when I enjoy reading it aloud each and every time.”

Like this poem? Come to the Open Mic Poetry ReadingWed., April 23, 12 – 1 p.m. and you may get to hear this author read her poems. You’re also welcome to share your own. 

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Foto Friday: In a word …

Complete poem can be found hanging on the first floor of Falvey Library.

Complete poem is displayed on the first floor of Falvey Memorial Library. Don’t miss it!

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

 

 

 

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Last Modified: April 11, 2014