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The Great, Good Place

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American author Henry James wrote a short story in 1900 in which protagonist George Dane, a successful author (and as most surmise, James’ alter ego), dreams of a ‘great good place’ far from the busy day to day trappings of reading, writing and responsibilities. AKA, what today’s generation would label #firstworldproblems! 

Sociologist Roy Oldenburg borrowed the term for the title of his influential book The Great Good Place: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Bookstores, Bars, Hair Salons, and Other Hangouts at the Heart of a Community, a treatise on the human need for third places for congregation and happiness. Oldenburg found communal bliss in places like pubs, cafes and libraries.

We hope that the Class of 2015 and all members of the Villanova community who come to Falvey Memorial Library have utilized and enjoyed our third place creature comforts (i.e. the comfy chairs, whiteboard art, Peet’s coffee and the close company of others in the same boat) as much as the academic trappings of reading, writing and responsibilities. As Pete Hamill wrote, (and Oldenburg included in his introduction),  “But aside from friends, there must also be a Place. I suppose that this is the Great Good Place that every man carries in his heart…”

Villanova University Class of 2015, we hope you remember Falvey as a great, good place. 


Photo by Joanne Quinn. Follow the library on Instagram @falveylibrary.


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The Best of The Highlighter: Library Policies for DVDs

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Click here for the video about library policies for DVDs.


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Senior Week Special: Congrats and Farewell to Falvey’s Friendly Front Line

A whole new set of smiles will soon greet patrons visiting Falvey Memorial Library as our intrepid, friendly – and soon-to-be degreed seniors in Access Services go off to conquer the world. The University’s Commencement ceremonies begin this Friday, May 15. For full schedule and to sign up for Commencement text updates, click here.

Best wishes, smooth sailing – and know that you’ll always be remembered fondly here at the Library. #OnceaWildcatAlwaysaWildcat!

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Some of our smiling seniors (clockwise from top left): Marissa, Kristi, Jonathan, Vanessa, Kaitlyn and Liz.

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Some of our smiling seniors (clockwise from top left): Lily, Jane, Prathyusha, Jeff, Tri and Annemarie.


Photos by Luisa Cywinski, team leader for Access Services


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Happier Mary, the Mother of our Lord

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Mary, Our Mother of Good Counsel (Photo courtesy of Our Mother of Good Counsel Parish, Bryn Mawr. omgcparish.org

A sermon attributed to Saint Augustine says, “Happy Eve as the mother of people; happier Mary, the Mother of our Lord” (John E. Rotelle, OSA Mary’s Yes From Age to Age. London: Collins, 1989. 54).

Perhaps a homily attributed to Saint John Chrysostom can provide deeper insight: “Mary is a servant as the creature of him who was born of her; she is the Mother of God inasmuch as of her God was born in human flesh. She is a virgin because she did not conceive from the seed of man; she is a mother because she gave birth and became the mother of him who before all eternity was begotten of [God] the Father” (Ibid., 52).

A lesser known fifth-century saint, Basil of Seleucia exclaims, “O holy womb in which God was received, in which the record of our sins effaced, in which God became man while remaining God!” (Homily 39, Ibid., 60).


DarrenPoleyArticle by Darren G. Poley, outreach librarian, theology specialist, and curator of the Augustinian Historical Institute. The Augustinian Historical Institute of Villanova University serves as a resource center for the study of the history of the Augustinian Order. Besides maintaining an extensive collection of materials on the history of the Order, we publish scholarly books and articles on these topics along with some studies of St. Augustine. Mr. Poley was named curator of the AHI this spring.


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‘Caturday Cat Meme Collection

It’s the last ‘Caturday before graduation and, well, you might notice a theme today. We’re not open this weekend, but our book drop is!

caturday overdue books

 

caturday return books right meow

 

caturday turn in books


‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, writer for Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader, Access Services team.


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Foto Friday: Making a statement

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Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Swan Songs (+ a Kallie and Michelle Playlist)

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 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


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Congratulations to the class of 2015. You did it! And for the non-graduates, you did it too: welcome to summer. Whether this summer is the first summer of your independent adult life, or it’s another in-between summer, summers can be a time of personal reinvention or, at least, a time to check in with yourself—your wants, needs, goals, your sense of equanimity. And reestablishing your relationship with sunshine, of course!

Sometimes summer can feel like an aimless abyss if you’re between semesters. All of a sudden, you’re at home again and away from the social network you just worked so hard on establishing. You’re not on constant go-mode after the intensity of finals. The sudden change is a little startling! But you’ll settle in. You’ve deserved it. Quiet your brain when you can—September you will thank you!

And if this summer is your launch into a job or the real world, take time to appreciate your college experience; you’ve learned so much in classrooms, from books, from friends, from teachers—and it’s all going to help you. Bask in the nostalgia. And have an emotionally cathartic experience to this bittersweet swan song playlist.


SpotifyClick me!

Kallie and Michelle’s Past Playlists:
Warm Weather playlist
Music to Research By
Volume 1
Thanksgiving
Christmas
Valentine’s Day/Singles Awareness

Best of luck, Nova Nation. Happy summer, happy graduation! The 2014-15 academic year is complete!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Now on Display: Sinking of the Lusitania Special Collections Exhibit

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The RMS Lusitania, designed to be the fastest ocean liner in service, was launched in Sept. 1907. Owned by the Cunard Line, Ltd., her maiden voyage was from Liverpool, England, to New York. Her 68,000 horse-power engines allowed the Lusitania to travel at an average speed of over 25 knots per hour (28.8 miles per hour). That same year the top speed for a Model T Ford was about 45 miles per hour; a Stutz Bearcat had a top speed of 85 miles per hour. For comparison, by 1969 the Queen Elizabeth, another large Cunard luxury liner, had a maximum sustained speed of 28.5 knots (32.8 miles per hour).

In 1913, with war clouds looming, the Lusitania was sent to dry dock to be fitted for government service: ammunition magazines and hidden gun mounts were installed on her decks.
On May 1, 1915, the Lusitania, captained by William Turner, left New York bound for Liverpool on what became her last voyage. Although the German embassy had placed advertisements in New York newspapers warning that any ship sailing into the “European War Zone” might be attacked by German submarines, the Lusitania nevertheless sailed, carrying 1,264 passengers, including 124 children and infants, and 693 crew members.

At 2:10 p.m. on May 7 a German submarine, U-20 captained by Walter Schwieger, torpedoed the Lusitania as she cruised eight miles off the coast of Ireland. After the torpedo hit, a second, larger explosion quickly followed, and within eighteen minutes the Lusitania sank. Schweiger said in his log, “… great confusion on board … they must have lost their heads.” (“The Lusitania.” HistoryLearningSite.co.uk. 2014. Web) One thousand one hundred ninety five of the 1,959 people aboard the Luisitania died, 123 Americans among them. Captain Turner survived although he had been washed overboard and spent over three hours in the sea.

Installing the Lusitania exhibit are  (l-r): Laura Bang, Alison Dolbier and Marjory Haines.

Installing the Lusitania exhibit are (l-r): Laura Bang, Alison Dolbier and Marjory Haines.

This event sets the stage for the current Special Collections exhibit, “‘Too Fast for Any Submarine’: The Last Voyage of the Lusitania,” curated by Allison Dolbier, a Digital Library intern. Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant; Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator; and Marjory Haines, intern, helped Dobier install the exhibit, which fills seven display cases. Joanne Quinn, graphic designer and Communication and Service Promotion team leader, created the graphics. The exhibit is multi-faceted, incorporating a wide variety of materials: newspapers, children’s books, two medals, photographs and more.

2015-05-05 17.11.22A large poster, “Dastardly Deed!” captures the eye and leads one to the beginning of the exhibit in the upright case; the dastardly deed is, of course, the German U-boat’s attack. On the top shelf is the curator’s introduction, “A Fateful Voyage.” And on the same shelf is a color postcard of the Lusitania, mailed in 1909. On the next shelf are a 1913 two-page advertisement for the Cunard Steamship Co. in The Fra: A Journal of Affirmation, “Are You a Citizen of the World? An Advertisement by Elbert Hubbard.” There is a newspaper from Panama City, May 9, 1915, with a prominent headline, “Death’s Toll of the Lusitania, 1346.” There are also a menu and tickets in a frame as well as a copy of an advertisement for the Lusitania with a “Notice” below warning travelers. The “Notice” is signed by the Imperial German Embassy.

On the bottom of this case is a bright red flag with a golden yellow lion, a Cunard Steamship Company flag on loan from Eugene L. DiOrio, a small bottle containing rust from the Lusitania and its certificate of authenticity, and Exploring the “Lusitania”: Probing the Mysteries of the Sinking That Changed History, 1995, by Robert D. Ballard and Spencer Dunmore. This book is open to show the Lusitania as it appears underwater today.

IMG_2146Flanking this cabinet is a large framed print, “The Cunard Line Steamships: Lusitania and Mauretania.”
There are six more cases, each labeled “Too fast for any submarine,” the claim made for the Lusitania. These cases contain a variety of materials such as books, a newspaper scrapbook open to a clipping with the headline. “U. S. Ship Torpedoed; American Lives Lost,” pamphlets from 1915 and ’17, two medals, and much more.

One case is dedicated to “The Irish advocate for Germany … and Independence,” and another case focuses on “German-Americans and the case for American neutrality.” These two cases remind viewers that the United States is and was a nation of immigrants and there were often conflicting opinions about the Great War, World War I.

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Highly informative and often visually appealing, this is an exhibit worth multiple visits to fully absorb its offerings. The exhibit will continue until mid-September.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “After your final final, what’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

GALLOTaylor Gallo—“The first thing I want to do for fun is lay out by the pool [at] home.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHUNDIPrathyusha Chundi—“First, I want to meet my friends, get together and have some party.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

PETERPeter Rokowski—“I need to get through a few books that I’ve been putting off for a couple years … I’m working on my thesis … so I haven’t had time to read leisurely for about six years now.”

 

 

 

 

 

larkinPatrick Larkin—“I’m gonna go out to dinner with my dad; my dad’s gonna come in. So there’s that, and then I’m out the next day. That’s probably what I’ll end up doing; just sit down and relax for a little bit is probably what I’ll do, and just let my mind clear out … ‘Cause I’m going to start working again when I get back home, probably five days afterwards, … so I’m going to do as little as possible. Then in the next couple of days watch the Blackhawks play.”

 

wurtsterPatrick Wurster—“go outside and play Kubb (aka Ye Olde Viking Game)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROCCACristina Rocca—“I’m a senior, so I’m graduating. The first thing I’m gonna do for fun—probably pop a bottle of Champagne, sit on my porch and drink it … And then the seniors have a party, like Party on Deck—something like that, so I’ll be going to that.”


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Nomnomnomatology winners!

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As you may have read, finance-and-accounting major and sophomore Mihir Shah is the lucky winner of the library’s Nomnomnomatology contest for a private study suite for late night hours finals week and a sumptuous feast of Villanova’s final four favorite foods to nosh on while studying!

And – who’s the best friend ever? He’s sharing it with a bunch of his study buddies also from the Class of 2017, including (photo above, L-R), Brendan Shea (finance and accounting), Samantha Faust (communication) and Patrick Wallace (psychology.) Mihir is on the far right.

Mihir and his friends enjoyed Little Bites brownies, hot fries from Campus Corner, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, and now have private access to a suite in the Library this week, just in time for finals.



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Last Modified: May 6, 2015