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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (3/11)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Next Thursday, March 19 at 5:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner for a lecture celebrating St. Patrick’s Day. Eoin Mc Evoy, visiting Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant from the University College, Dublin, will be giving a lecture: “Gaelic Yesterday and Today: Tracing the Irish Language through History.”


SPEAKING OF THE CAVE…
CAVE

Check out this article about what Disney’s Bei Yang has to say about virtual reality and what, besides the recent push in head-mounted displays, constitutes virtual reality. Word of the day: proprioception.


NOM NOM NOM!
The first round of #NomNomNomatology has begun! Be sure to vote for the winningest foods in some intensely delicious match-ups right here, or vote in person at the front desk in Falvey!
NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY


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QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Old habit of mind is one of the toughest things to get away from in the world. It transmits itself like physical form and feature.” -A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The Highlighter: How many times can I renew a Falvey book?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Want to renew books online? … or learn how many renewals remain? This video shows how to access your library account and accomplish those tasks. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (3/10)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

The Office for Undergraduate Students (OUS) Event: Financing a Legal Education featuring Jeffrey Hanson, Ph.D. 9:30-11:30 a.m. in room 205. Questions? Contact: michael.j.pennington@villanova.edu

VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Please join us next Monday, March 16 at 4:00 p.m. in room 204 for a screening of the film War of the Buttons. This event is part of a weeklong series of events celebrating St. Patrick’s Day, presented by the Irish Studies Program in conjunction with Falvey Memorial Library.


APPLE EVENT

Didn’t have a chance to stream yesterday’s Apple event? Interested in catching up on the news on Apple’s latest gadgets? Check out the coverage on CNET.

apple


NOM NOM NOM!
The first round of #NomNomNomatology has begun! Be sure to vote for the winningest foods in some intensely delicious match-ups right here, or vote in person at the front desk in Falvey!
NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

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What are you reading? If you use Goodreads (by the way, they have an app!), join our Falvey Memorial Library group!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“‘Tis misfortune that awakens ingenuity, or fortitude, or endurance, in hearts where these qualities had never come to life but for the circumstance which gave them a being.” – The History of Henry Esmond by William Makepeace Thackeray


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Nomnomnomatology: A Mouth-Watering March Madness Begins!

NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY
What was that sound? Was that a lion? A tiger? A WILDCAT?!

Oh, sorry. It was your stomach grumbling–how rude of me. It’s completely understandable, because all that studying can make a person hungry—hungry for some March Madness BRACKETOLOGY!

But wait, you say, that doesn’t make any sense – I can’t eat a basketball! Well, not with that attitude you can’t.

You might remember from years past that Falvey’s tournament has seen a fierce battle among authors and fictional characters—because well, yes, we are indeed a library and books are our jam. But while our stacks are here to serve, we are also your cultural commons and your haven on campus. We’ve got cozy nooks and crannies, couches and tables, clever librarians and oh, so many events. Now, in honor of March Madness, we are revealing this year’s bracketology lineup. Commence voting. This year, it might just work in your flavor—er, favor!

At the front entrance of the Library, you’ll see a giant bracket with a smorgasbord of dorm-friendly comfort food teams—historically strong contenders like Mac n’ Cheese, the clear underdog Lukewarm Spam, and ol’ faithful Ramen—and it’s up to you to choose our chompians. The competitions will be intense: 90s kids won’t know what to do with GoGurt versus Dunkaroos—and kale versus mashed potatoes? Who came up with these?

But wait, there’s more!

Every round, you have the opportunity to enter a drawing for your own personal study room for you and your friends from May 3 through 7, 6 p.m.-3 a.m. On Monday May 4, we will serve you the top four foods from our bracket! To enter in person, use the box by the printed bracket at the front desk. Or vote online here. Online voting counts as a entry to the drawing. The winner must be a current Villanova student and must present a valid Wildcard to receive room access.

Let the voting begin!

 


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (3/9)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

SAVE THE DATE…

Please join us next Friday, March 20 at 2:00 p.m. for a lecture featuring Amy Hillier, PhD, Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Hillier’s talk is titled “The Ward: Race and Class in Du Bois’ 7th Ward.” The Ward is a 10-year-old teaching, public history, and outreach project based on Du Bois’ 1899 book, The Philadelphia Negro.


Did you know there was a Twitter feed for “Things not a word” https://twitter.com/nixicon. In case your OED isn’t handy. It’s totally intrical! (Which totally should be a word, btw.)


HELLO, DAVE. YOU’RE LOOKING WELL TODAY.
Watch Google’s Smart AI learn to absolutely obliterate a game of Breakout in just a few hundred games. I, for one, welcome our new AI overlords. (Just kidding! Run for your lives.)

Breakout

via Polygon.com


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Follow Falvey Library on Instagram for a fun assortment of people photos, quotes and whiteboard art!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“In this world you’ve just got to hope for the best and prepare for the worst and take whatever God sends.” Anne Of Avonlea by Lucy Maud Montgomery


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Foto Friday: Making peas with the weather

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Austrian scientist and Augustinian monk Gregor Mendel used peas which he called “Pisum saccharatum” in his famous experiments demonstrating the heritable nature of specific traits, though this may not refer to the same varieties identified with modern snow pea. But no matter – we’re optimistic. Spring Break is over and soon the snow will melt, allowing us to soon break ground and plant any variety of anything that we wish.


Photo is of the sculpture of Gregor Mendel on Villanova’s campus and is the work of James Peniston of Philadelphia, PA. Commissioned in 1998, it was inspired by the original Mendel monument in Brno, (in the present day Czech Republic). The statue was officially unveiled on October 2, 1910 in the square before St. Thomas Monastery, which was renamed Mendel Square. 

From Mendel’s Villanova Legacy, accessible here. Photograph by Joanne Quinn. 


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For “Who” the Bell Tolls?

Today, March 4, is National Grammar Day.

linguo Don’t worry. I’m not one of *those* people: you know, the self-appointed grammar police. I would no sooner correct someone’s spoken grammar than I would loudly “Shush!” someone in a library.

But I do wonder whether “whom” will be used five years from now.

And for how much longer should we write, “For each prospective student: give him or her his or her application before he or she leaves”? Is it acceptable just to say “… give them their application before they leave”? I don’t expect “… give them they’re application …” to become acceptable, though.

Until each of us can borrow Linguo, the grammar robot from The Simpsons, we can search Falvey’s catalog for resources. Also, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide to Better English in Plain English by Patricia T. O’Conner (available through E-ZBorrow) provides reader-friendly answers to challenging or confusing grammar questions.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.


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Art of Spring Break: Ruspoli and Droutzkoy Art Collections Will Be Reunited and Displayed

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KRISTEN W PAINTING

Villanova owns a number of paintings donated by Princess Eugenia Ruspoli; her adopted daughter, Princess Maria Theresa Droutzkoy; and her daughter’s husband, Prince Alexis Droutzkoy. Who are these donors and what did they collect? The massive painting, “Triumph of David,” by Pietro da Cortona, which is currently undergoing conservation in Falvey Hall’s Reading Room, is only one of a number of paintings donated by the two families although it is certainly the largest.

Princess Eugenia Ruspoli, donor of “The Triumph of David,” was born Jennie Enfield Berry in Alabama in either 1861 or 1869 (date varies according to the source consulted), the oldest daughter of a Confederate army colonel and plantation owner, Thomas Berry, and his wife, Frances Margaret Rhea. Before her first marriage, young Jennie Berry had traveled and studied in Europe. On May 7, 1889, Berry married a wealthy, older man, Henry Bruton, head of the American Snuff Company. Bruton died in 1892, making Jennie Berry Bruton a wealthy, childless widow who soon resumed her European travels.

eugenia_ruspoli-108x150In March 1901 Jennie Berry Bruton married the 23-year-old Prince Enrico Ruspoli whom she had met in her travels. Prince Ruspoli, with a title but little fortune, had followed Jennie to Georgia where he proposed. They were married in Washington, D.C., by the Papal Nuncio and the couple took up residence in a palazzo in Rome. After her marriage, Jennie Ruspoli changed her first name to Eugenia, derived from the Greek “eugenes,” meaning “well-born.”

Castello Ruspoli, Vignanello, Italy

Castello Ruspoli

With funds provided by Eugenia, she and Enrico Ruspoli purchased the Castle Nemi, parts of which date to the 10th century. The castle, still standing, is 20 miles south of Rome and near the papal summer palace, Castel Gandolfo. She provided the cash; he provided a title to support their aristocratic Italian lifestyle. Prince Enrico Ruspoli died in 1909 only eight years after their marriage. Despite a verbal agreement with his wife, Prince Enrico Ruspoli wrote a will in which he left the castle and most of his property to his own Ruspoli family.

Princess Eugenia Ruspoli challenged the will and, after years of litigation, she received the title to the castle and whatever personal property it contained. Presumably, this personal property included the grand “Triumph of David” donated by Princess Ruspoli to Villanova University in 1950. Were the other paintings she eventually donated to Villanova part of the contents of Nemi Castle when she and her husband purchased it, or did they, with her funds, collect additional works of art? And did she continue to collect after the prince died?

After becoming a widow for the second time, Princess Eugenia Ruspoli frequently traveled between Italy and the United States and eventually made her home in New York City. After the outbreak of World War II she shipped some of her art and furniture from the castle to the United States, a wise choice because the castle was later damaged by a bomb, leaving “The Triumph of David” exposed to the weather. After the war, Nemi Castle was inhabited by families of Italian squatters who had little respect for the historic property. This and the war-time damages led to additional litigation which continued even after Princess Eugenia Ruspoli’s death.

In 1929 Princess Ruspoli adopted her six-year-old niece, Maria Theresa, who later married Prince Alexis Droutzkoy, a white Russian from St. Petersburg. Droutzkoy came to the United States in 1926 as a journalist, attended Columbia University, became a naturalized citizen and editor of Bachelor magazine and later editor of American Helicopter magazine. He and his wife were active socially. Prince Alexis Droutzkoy died in 1976.

His wife, Maria Theresa Ruspoli was born in Norwich, England, in 1923. She became an American citizen in 1945; by this time she was married and well-traveled. Additional information about Princess Maria Theresa Droutzkoy is sparse except in reports of various society events in New York and elsewhere. We do know that the Droutzkoys were Princess Eugenia Ruspoli’s heirs.

Radan and Cannuli

Radan and Cannuli

Now for their art collections: from information provided by the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, and in the Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide (1986) by George T. Radan and Father Cannuli, we can get a sense of their tastes as collectors. With only two exceptions, the paintings in both collections are Old Masters. These paintings are either Italian or Flemish works created from the 1500s through the 1700s.

The two exceptions are an undated work by an English artist, Samuel Prout (1783-1852), “Interior of a Cathedral Scene,” an oil painting on canvas, and an undated “Church Choir Boys,” oil on canvas, by C. De Antonio. The only C. De Antonio I discovered is Cristobal de Antonio, a Spanish artist (c.1862-after 1905). The subject of each of these paintings is the interior of a Gothic style cathedral or church, much like the paintings by the Dutch Baroque master, Saenredam. These paintings are listed in the Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide as gifts from the Droutzkoys, but are not in the recent inventory mentioned below.

According to the current inventory created by the University Art Gallery director, Princess Ruspoli donated seven paintings (including Cortona’s “Triumph of David”) and the Droutzkoys donated an additional seventeen paintings. The older list in the Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide says Princess Ruspoli donated six paintings (the Cortona included) and the Droutzkoys gave eight.

All paintings in the current inventory have been conserved with one exception. The works were brought from off-campus storage and locations on campus and briefly housed in the Reading Room last fall so that the conservators working on “The Triumph of David” could study them. I was able to visit this collection several times – a truly fascinating experience. Not all of the works are by famous masters, but they are all wonderful representations of their art historical periods. All feature religious subjects, including a “St. Thomas of Villanova Giving Alms” by Jacob Jordaens (Flemish, 1593-1678, attributed to or workshop of).

Paintings fr Ruspoli and Droutzkoy

Radan and Cannuli (Villanova University Art Collection, p. xv) say, “ …[T]he authorship supplied by the donors has been accepted by the curators of the collection.” And that leads to an interesting question: is there another painting by Pietro da Cortona in the University’s collection? Listed as a 1952 donation by Princess Alexis Droutzkoy is an oil painting, “Adoration of the Magi” by Pietro Berretini. Pietro Berretini is the birth name of Pietro da Cortona, the artist of the large painting undergoing conservation in the Reading Room.

Princess Ruspoli made her gifts in 1949 and 1950. The Droutzkoys gave the bulk of their gifts from 1952 through 1957 plus a “Resurrection” painted by an anonymous 16th century Italian which was donated by Princess Droutzkoy in 1973. Two large paintings, “Madonna of the Rosary” by Cosimo Daddi, donated by Eugenia Ruspoli, and a 1614 Nativity triptych (a three-paneled work) by an anonymous Flemish master donated by the Droutzkoys are especially impressive.

When the conservation of Cortona’s “Triumph of David” is completed, the works donated by Princess Eugenia Ruspoli and the Prince and Princess Droutzkoy will be united once more. “The Triumph of David” will be hung on the wall and the other paintings will be placed behind glass in the niches that once held books in the Reading Room. The huge windows which provide the room with wonderful daylight will be treated to filter the harmful sunlight so that all these beautiful, conserved paintings will not deteriorate as did “The Triumph of David.”

fatherfalveyAnd true to the wishes of the Rev. Daniel P. Falvey (1906-1962), the former library director for whom Falvey Memorial Library is named, the Library will once more display an art collection. “… [H]e wanted the objects of his collection to be permanently housed in the Library of Villanova College. The aesthetic pleasure of viewing the paintings would enhance any student’s visits to do research. … Not only did he himself place the objects strategically at various locations in the Old Library, but he also secured donations (such as those of the Droutzkoys) to improve the scope of his garden.” (Villanova University Art Collection, p. xiv).

How inspiring to be able to study in such a vast, high ceilinged space surrounded by Old Master paintings.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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Art of Spring Break: The Highlighter: Let Villanova’s Art Inspire and Enrich You

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Art at Falvey Memorial Library can be as ephemeral as an image on a whiteboard, enduring as a masterpiece on canvas or interactive as virtual reality in a Cave. In deference to “Art of Spring” week on our blog, this week’s Highlighter will feature artwork on Villanova University’s campus.

An exciting exhibit opens this week at the Villanova University Art Gallery (Connelly Center). Other, permanent artworks, such as abstract sculptures and other secular statues, can also be found on campus. Most permanent art on campus, though, has a religious theme. St. Mary’s Hall, for instance, offers mosaics in its foyer, statues in its courtyard and stained glass windows and shrines in its chapel. St. Rita’s Chapel holds artwork, too, as do the Corr Hall Chapel and St. Thomas of Villanova Church.

As these webpages show, several of these artworks have been created by members of Villanova’s community. Take a moment to take in the art Villanova has to offer.


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Art of Spring Break: Mood Board with Dr. Amanda Norbutus

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Keeping in theme with the Art of Spring week, this week’s mood board features Amanda Norbutus, PhD, Mendel Science Post-Doctoral Fellow and a faculty member here at Villanova. Dr. Norbutus is involved with the conservation treatment of Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David,”a large-scale oil on canvas that currently resides in “Old Falvey,” Falvey Memorial Library’s original wing.


AJN - MaastrichtAmanda Norbutus’ background has focused mainly on the surface analysis of art. She analyzed the materials and methods used in a Dutch genre painting as part of her master’s thesis research in analytical chemistry (M.S., Villanova University, 2008).  At the University of Delaware, Norbutus investigated the best practices of outdoor public mural production, protection, and preservation as part of her doctoral research; specifically, the assessment of commercially-available paints and protective coatings.  Her current research as a Mendel Science Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry involves protective coatings for modern art.  She is a lecturer in the science of art materials, art conservation, as well as criminalistics and forensics at Villanova University and an instructor for the NSF Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops & Communities of Scholars “Advanced Chemistry and Art” workshops.

(via Conserving a Giant: Resurrecting Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David”)


Condi_Rice

via Wikimedia Commons

I am inspired by the natural beauty of the world and trying to understand how it all works.

If I could be any person for a day, I’d be Condoleezza Rice. She is a powerful woman, and I would love to help shape the world like she has been able to with her career. Plus, the travel!

If springtime were an art piece, it would be an Impressionist painting, perhaps a Renoir.

The most useful tool I used today is my cell phone. Although I really should give credit to the old fashioned ink pen for writing down data.

Today I’m feeling the color green. I’m anticipating spring.

I’m listening to I heart Radio, the Florida Georgia Line station.

One Summer Adventure I’m daydreaming about is boating on the Cheasapeake or the James River.

flordia georgia lineHappiness is good friends, loving family, an intriguing book, and having adventures.

Everyone should know how to sew and cook. I took a Buzzfeed quiz on how long I’d survive the zombie apocalypse. Let’s just say, I think those two reasons are why I “lasted” at least 6 months.

I am amazed by my students. They tackle challenges outside of their comfort zones, either with science material or mastering a new artistic technique, and they impress me every time.

Thank you, Dr. Norbutus!


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Last Modified: March 2, 2015