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The Curious ‘Cat: “What Person, Living or Dead, Would Be an Ideal Librarian?”

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This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students,

What Person, Living or Dead, Would Be an Ideal Librarian?

 

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Caroline McCarthy: “Maya Angelou … after she passed away this year, I … read a lot of her quotes, and they’re all awesome, and I read her book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. So I think she was a great author and inspirational figure and had a lot of wisdom and helped the students.”

 

 

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Tanner Grace: “I’m thinking back to the colonies in America, the American colonies, those really educated men who would read all day. I would say Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson. … I read a biography on him once, and he seemed very bookish.”

 

 

obinecheNkemka Obineche: “I think Dr. Seuss would be a good librarian. … He’s a fun guy … makes reading fun. That’s how I learned to read.”

 

 

 

mcgaurnErica McGaurnStephen Colbert—“It would just be very comical … he would be very interactive with the students.”

 

 

 

 

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Isobel McCreavy: “Truman Capote because he would just tell you to read his books.”

 

 

 

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Nicholas Crowley: Genghis Khan—“I just watched this Netflix show; it’s called Marco Polo. … I guess that’s why he popped into my head.”


The Curious ‘Cat feature by Gerald Dierkes, senior copyeditor, Communication and Publications team; Access Services specialist, Access Services Team; liaison to the Department of Theater.

 

 


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/11)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


 SAVE THE DATE…


Join us, next Wednesday February 18 at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 for a Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Megan Quigley, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of English. Dr. Quigley will speak about her book, entitled  Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form, and Language (forthcoming from Cambridge University Press), which explores the intertwined history of 20th-century British fiction and philosophy. Specifically, it argues that much modernist literary experimentation connects to the linguistic turn in philosophy.


LAST TWO DAYS TO VOTE FOR A BOOK YOU LOVE

COOKIE

Be sure to stop by the front desk to submit the name of a book you love. We’ll be giving away five packages of red velvet Oreos – which you can regift to your valentine – or just eat all of them yourself. We won’t ask. We won’t tell. ;-)

 


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QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.” -Letter to My Daughter by Maya Angelou


SHINE WITH ALL THE COLORS OF ROY G. BIV AND HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The Highlighter: How many DVDs can I borrow, for how long, and can I renew DVDs?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO Falvey has over 2,300 DVDs in its collection. How can you find the borrowing policies for library DVDs?  This video shows how to find Falvey’s guidelines for DVDs and other items.

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Share the Love: Seeking Romantic Art for Valentine’s Day?

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When asked to write a blog about romantic art, I could think of no images to accompany it; this is not a typical subject for this art historian. A search of Falvey’s catalog for “art, romantic” retrieved 297 titles, but these deal with romanticism in art and in literature. A Google search first gave me “Romanticism – The Metropolitan Museum of Art,” followed by “Romanticism – Wikipedia, the free encylopedia” and “images for romantic art.” None of these references yielded the type of images associated with love or Valentine’s Day. What they did have in common were references to a specific period in art history, the style known as Romanticism: a period which lasted from about 1750 to about 1850.

What is Romanticism in art? Broadly defined it is the beginning of modernism. Artists, according to Hugh Honour, had no programs nor common goals but were concerned with “integrity of feeling” (p. 25). Their subject matter is considered romantic because it stresses ideal beauty or strong emotions or combinations of ideal beauty, strong emotions and other materials. Gardner (Art Through the Ages, ninth edition, p. 872) says, “The Romantic artist, above all else, wanted to excite the emotions of the audience.” And these emotions can be either positive or negative.

"John Constable - Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop's Garden - Google Art Project" by John Constable - SQHNHPBhfP7FBg at Google Cultural Institute,  Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia

“John Constable – Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop’s Garden – Google Art Project” by John Constable  at Google Cultural Institute, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Is it just us, or is this the view looking east from Tolentine Hall?

This is one of the great ages of landscape painting – J. M. W. Turner, John Constable, Caspar David Friedrich and the American, Thomas Cole are major artists. Other artists with very different subjects are Antoine-Jean Gros, Théodore Géricault, Eugène Delacroix and Henry Fuseli.

The Barque of Dante, Delacroix 1822 (150 Kb); Oil on canvas, 189 x 242 cm (74 1/2 x 95 1/4"); Musee du Louvre, Paris

The Barque of Dante, Delacroix
1822 (150 Kb); Oil on canvas, 189 x 242 cm (74 1/2 x 95 1/4″); Musee du Louvre, Paris

The Metropolitan Museum of Art compiled a list of works of art dealing with love, but again, these will not meet your expectations of romantic, Valentine-type art.

For a more light-hearted approach to the subject, visit, “Love Is in the Air, and in the Art,” by Ken Johnson, “The New York Times, Art & Design,” published Feb. 7, 2013.

Dig Deeper

Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Romanticism.”
Romanticism by Hugh Honour. A classic work.
The Romantic Rebellion: Romantic Versus Classic Art by Kenneth Clark. Another classic.
The Romantic Rebellion by Eric Newton.
Romantic Art in Britain: Paintings and Drawings, 1760 – 1860 by Frederick J. Cummings.
German Romantic Painting by Hubert Schrade
Romantic Painting in America, Museum of Modern Art exhibition catalog.
Historical Dictionary of Romantic Art and Architecture by Allison Lee Palmer.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/10)

 

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

“A Great Thing for Our People”: The Institute for Colored Youth in the Civil War Era. 3:00 p.m. in room 204. Come celebrate Philadelphia’s (First) School of Civil Rights with the launch of a new website. Falvey Memorial Library hosts the site and welcomes you to view it: http://exhibits.library.villanova.edu/institute-colored-youth. Questions? Contact: judith.giesberg@villanova.edu


Muticultural Affairs’ Professional Development Series: Talking Tuesday. 5:00-7:00 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: nicole.davis@villanova.edu


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Join us, next Monday, February 16 at  3:00 p.m. in room 204 for the launch of “Travels Through Greco-Roman Antiquity,” a digital humanities project created by two of Dr. Valentina DeNardis’s classical studies classes. The website uses Special Collections materials from the Library to explore some of the sites of ancient Greece and Rome. Dr. DeNardis will discuss the classes and give a tour of the website. Light refreshments will be served.


RED VELVET OREOS WILL BE UP FOR GRABS

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Be sure to stop by the front desk to submit the name of a book you love. We’ll be giving away five packages of red velvet Oreos! How much fun would it be to bundle up and eat ‘em while sitting at The Oreo? You know you want a selfie of that!


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IT’S VALENTINE WEEK AT FALVEY

The Oreo cookie giveaway is just part of the fun (albeit the most delicious part)! Check our Library News blog each day for great resources on the Romantic period of art, staff picks, pop fiction recommendations and more!


SPEAKING OF SHARING…
The Psychology Behind Why We Share on Social Media

Borrowed from stockphoto company Shutterstock’s blog, the reasons why we’re so compelled to share – and sometimes overshare – on social media.


Important Note for Faculty: Falvey Scholars Award Nominations Due by 3/31

Please consider nominating an eligible student for a Falvey Scholar award! The Falvey Scholar awards are given each spring semester to individual or group projects of seniors who have completed exemplary (and publicly presentable) scholarship or research during their undergraduate careers at Villanova. The awards traditionally have an emphasis on work that has required substantial use of scholarly literature of the sort provided and supported by the Library. The link to the nomination form is below (and is accessed through our Falvey Scholars page); it is available early this year to encourage more nominations. Faculty have from now until March 31 to nominate students. We ask that they please consider nominating a student who exemplifies the award’s criteria!

Additional information or contact Laura Matthews.


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QUOTE OF THE DAY

“The Sun himself is weak when he first rises, and gathers strength and courage as the day gets on.” -The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens


NOW GO FORTH THIS DAWN AND GATHER YOUR STRENGTH AND COURAGE WITH THE SUN!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Share the Love: Fall For a Book

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Maybe you’ve got plans with a special someone or maybe February 14th is just another day for you. Whatever your feelings about Valentine’s Day, there’s never a bad time to fall in love with a new book. Below Falvey librarians and staff share a book they have read and loved, or a book that they’re looking forward to getting to know in 2015.

 

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Staff Picks: Books We Love

Book Title: Cat’s Cradle
Author: Kurt Vonnegut

Rob LeBlanc loves this book because: It’s a hilarious story about love, religion, people rubbing their feet together, executions on a giant fish hook, and the end of the world! What’s NOT to love!

Book Title: Company of Liars
Author: Karen Maitland

Chris Hallberg loves this book because: Company of Liars was pitched to me as a retelling of The Canterbury Tales and the resemblance is uncanny. This brilliant work of historical fiction is packed with dark secrets, amazing twists, and incredibly accurate details that paint a picture of era of the Black Plague like no other. Follow an unlikely group of travelers through these pages or listen to the audiobook, the narrator delivers an absolutely spellbinding performance.

Book Title: The Book of Strange New Things
Author: Michel Faber

Bill Greene loves this book because: This novel is a successful combination of science fiction and romance. Faber ignores the science to some extent so he can make the romance part work. If you have little knowledge of physics this would not be noticeable to you. I highly recommend this novel.

Book Title: The House at Tyneford (UK Title: The Novel in the Viola)
Author: Natasha Solomons

Sue Ottignon loves this book because: it is an historical fiction, situated in Britain prior to World War II, about the emigration of 2 Jewish sisters escaping Austria in 1938 focusing on the life of one of the sisters as a servant. Fabulous, poignant, suspenseful and in my top 10 best fiction I’ve read.

Book Title: Jane Eyre (1847)
Author: Charlotte Brontë

Dennis Lambert loves this book because: My daughter was assigned Jane Eyre in 11th grade English late last year and she challenged me to read it at the same time. We kept reading at about the same pace, neither of us getting too far ahead of the other. What was really fun was discussing the book with her, comparing our reactions to the characters and the story. Despite a couple of improbable plot twists, it is a very well written and engaging story.

Book Title: Florence Gordon
Author: Brian Morton

Luisa Cywinski loves this book because: There is a strong female lead character, Florence Gordon, who defies social convention and, because of that, reminds me of my mother. I also liked Morton’s development of Florence’s intellectual relationship with her granddaughter. I also loved it because it features libraries and research!

 

Book Title: La Symphonie Pastorale (The Pastoral Symphony)
Author: André Gide

Barbara Quintiliano loves this book because: La Symphonie Pastorale will always have a special place in my heart as the first novel I ever read in French. Nobel Prize winner (1947) André Gide is a master storyteller, lyrical writer, and an implacable inquisitor of the human heart. In this novelette named after Beethoven’s symphony, of course, a Protestant pastor takes blind, orphaned Gertrude into his home and raises her as one of the family. She eventually regains her sight while he becomes increasingly blind to the nature of his true feelings for her and the heartbreak he is sowing all around him. Available at Falvey in English translation in Two Symphonies (PQ2613.I2I813) and in the collection Eleven Modern Short Novels (PN PN6014.H25), but read it in the original French if you can (PQ2613.I2S9 1970).  

Book Title: Someday, Someday, Maybe
Author: Lauren Graham

Kallie Stahl loves this book because: The witty, uplifting narrative encourages readers to remain positive during that period in life when everything is uncertain.

Book Title: Dataclysm: Who we are (when we think no one’s looking)
Author: Christian Rudder

Linda Hauck loves this book because: What’s not to love about using massive user generated data from online dating sites to uncover social, cultural and political patterns?

 

Book Title: Trinity
Author: Leon Uris

Joanne Quinn loves this book because: I first read Trinity as a Villanova undergraduate back in the eighties. I remember being swept up in the larger than life story of hero, patriot, and martyr Conor Larkin as he lives from the Irish famine to the Easter Uprising. Brooding, blue-eyed and poetic, I probably pictured Aidan Quinn or Bobby Ewing from Dallas in the role. Still reeling in love in ’96, I was able to convince my husband that we name our son Conor.

Book Title: Nine Days to Istanbul
Author: Jeanne Frankel de Corrales

Becky Whidden loves this book because: Nine Days to Istanbul is the true story of the journey of Jeanne Frankel de Corrales and her mother across Europe by train on a pilgrimage to Haifa. She endures snow storms that strand the train, diminishing food and water sources, packs of hungry wolves and the tribulations that present themselves to a woman traveling unaccompanied to this region of the world in the 1950s.
I love this book because I found it quite by accident. It is the first book in the survival/real-life adventure genre that I read. It made me want to read others like Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage/Alfred Lansing, The Indifferent Stars Above: The Harrowing Saga of a Donner Party Bride/Daniel James Brown, Sunk Without a Sound: The Tragic Colorado River Honeymoon of Glen and Bessie Hyde/Brad Dimock, and more modern tales like The Perfect Storm and Into Thin Air/ Jon Krakauer, North to the Night/Alvah Simon.

Staff Picks: Books We’re Looking forward to reading

Book Title: The Mirror and the Light
Author: Hilary Mantel

mantelSarah Wingo is looking forward to reading this book because: The Mirror and the Light will be the final book in Mantel’s Thomas Cromwell trilogy, and is slated to be published in 2015. The first two books in the series are are Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. Both won the Man Booker Prize, in 2009 and 2012 respectively, making Mantel the first woman to win twice. Set in Tudor England and with Mantel’s command of prose and unflinching attention to historical detail, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies easily rank among my top ten books of all time.


Sarah WingoSarah Wingo is the team leader for the Humanities II team and the subject librarian for English and theater.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/9)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

 

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Please join us today at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library for the annual Black History Month lecture featuring Saladin Ambar, PhD, associate professor of political science, Lehigh University. Dr. Ambar will be presenting a talk titled “Malcolm X’s Legacy at 50: Lessons for Today.”

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Africana Studies Program, is free and open to the public.


SAVE THE DATE…

Join us, on Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ corner. Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar lecture titled “Academic Libraries in the Digital Age” featuring William Y. Arms, PhD.  William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks, and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library. Refreshments will be served.


FATHER GALLAGHER POSES WITH HIS WHITEBOARD TRIBUTE

GALLAGHER WHITEBOARD


FINAL FOUR DAYS (LOVE THE SOUND OF THAT) TO ENTER TO WIN COOKIES!

COOKIE

Be sure to stop by the front desk to submit the name of a book you love. We’ll be giving away five packages of red velvet Oreos – which you can regift to your valentine – or just eat all of them yourself. We won’t ask. We won’t tell. ;-)

 


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG :-)

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Do you follow the library on YouTube? We have a great array of Falvey-produced videos old and new that are instructional and entertaining. Newcomers to the channel are archival copies of Gerald Dierkes’ Highlighter videos, which debuted last semester, featuring helpful insider tips on getting the most out of the library’s resources. View and rewind to your heart’s content!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“When the good is a furlong off, and we with our beetle eyes can only see three inches, it takes some confidence in general principles to pull us through.” – The Stark Munro Letters, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Foto Friday: What do you see?

Looking-Glass

Not sure? Take a closer look at the tall display case on Falvey Library’s first floor. It will satisfy your curiosity.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/6)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) Regular Group Meeting. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week on (most) Fridays to play video games in a safe and fun environment. 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge (Holy Grounds). Always accepting new members. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE!

Don’t miss the Annual Black History Month lecture co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Africana Studies Program. This Monday, February 9, at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Saladin Ambar, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Political Science at Lehigh University, where he teaches courses on the American presidency and governorship, race and American political development, and political parties and elections. He is a graduate of Rutgers University’s PhD program in political science and a former fellow of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. Professor Ambar is the author of How Governors Built the Modern American Presidency and Malcolm X at Oxford Union. 


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pinterest-icon-vectorAre you a pinner? We are, too! Check out our Pinterest.

 

 

 


RANSOMWARE: WHAT IT IS AND HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF.

Padlock Icon Computer Key Showing Safety Security And ProtectionThanks to Sarah Wingo for this heads-up! “The best way to keep ransomware off your computer, experts say, is to follow best practices by keeping software updated, using antivirus and other security software, and being careful about where you click and what you install. Backing up data on a separate hard drive or using a cloud service could save you from being held for ransom if an infection does occur.” More info here.


PRESIDENT OBAMA’S BUDGET INCREASES LIBRARY FUNDING

FROM THE ALA: President Barack Obama today (2/5/15) transmitted to Congress the Obama Administration’s nearly $4 trillion budget request to fund the federal government for fiscal year 2016, which starts October 1, 2015. The President’s budget reflected many of the ideas and proposals outlined in his January 20th State of the Union speech.

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Highlights for the library community include $186.5 million in assistance to libraries through the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA). This important program provides funding to states through the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

“The biggest news for the library community is the announcement of $8.8 million funding for a national digital platform for library and museum services, which will give more Americans free and electronic access to the resources of libraries, archives, and museums by promoting the use of technology to expand access to the holdings of museums, libraries, and archives. Funding for this new program will be funded through the IMLS National Leadership Grant programs for Libraries ($5.3 million) and Museums ($3.5 million),” said American Library Association (ALA) President Courtney Young


QUOTE OF THE DAY

“I’m not afraid of storms, for I’m learning how to sail my ship.” – Little Women by Louisa May Alcott 


SAIL STRONG, FRIENDS!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/5)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


Irish Studies Conversation Circle. 6:30-8:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact Jerry Sweeney: tighdon@gmail.com


SAVE THE DATE…


Annual Black History Month lecture. Monday, February 9, at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Saladin Ambar, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Political Science at Lehigh University, where he teaches courses on the American presidency and governorship, race and American political development, and political parties and elections. He is a graduate of Rutgers University’s PhD program in political science and a former fellow of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. Professor Ambar is the author of How Governors Built the Modern American Presidency and Malcolm X at Oxford Union.

Academic Libraries in the Digital Age by William Y. Arms, PhD.  Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks, and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library.


YOUR SOURCE FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH RESOURCES
Are you a teacher? Know a teacher? Love free access to quality education materials? Check out Smithsonian’s Heritage Teaching Resources for a thorough collection of Black History teaching materials.


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RebelMouseDo you want easy access to a lot of our social media and blog content in one spot? Check out our Rebel Mouse site.

 

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY

“Ride on! Rough-shod if need be, smooth-shod if that will do, but ride on! Ride on over all obstacles, and win the race!” – David Copperfield by Charles Dickens


NOW GO RIDE ON! WIN THE RACE!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Last Modified: February 5, 2015