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Catalog Week: How to Save Your Search

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Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you save a whole search-results list? This video shows how to save a whole search-results list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

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Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: Quickly Find the Article(s) You Need

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Find articles quickly with the following library-catalog features (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: Interactive Map Shows Locations of Books and More

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Falvey’s interactive map shows you where a book is shelved:

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: Easily Find the Book(s) You Need

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Find books easily with the following library-catalog features (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Foto Friday: Celebrating Labor Day with Rosie

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Click here to read about how this image became an icon for female workers in the United States.

This poster can also be found on the library’s 3rd floor. Take a look!

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

 

 

 

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Print & post this all-in-one infographic guide to Library essential services

Hey, Wildcats! We’ve prepared an at-a-glance, all in one infographic that’s packed with all you need to know about library services. You’ll find the name of your subject librarian, great places to study, hours, borrowing policies and a whole lot more! Print it out and hang it on your corkboard for easy access. Or if you’re reading it online, click to enlarge.

REV-INFO-UG-FINAL-TO

 

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The World According to the Class of 2018

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Today is Move-In Day for the Class of 2018! Our incoming first-year students have never lived in a world without wearable cellular telephones, AMBER Alerts, computers that can defeat the world chess champion, or cloned sheep.

Television shows, from their point of view, have always displayed a score from the TV ratings system.

These millennials may have played with a Furby or with Teenie Beanies—miniature Beanie Babies included in fast-food children’s meals. At Christmastime, many of them received a “Tickle Me Elmo” doll.

They may not realize that the “save” icon for Microsoft and other products is an image of a floppy disk. Even if they do, they probably have never used a floppy disk.

Adobe Flash, MP3 (audio format), wikis and JAVA have always existed in their lifetimes, as has Amazon.com.

And the dictionary has always included the terms “alcopop,” “always-on,” “censorware,” “fist bump,” “microbrowser,” and “phishing,” as far as they’re concerned.

Certainly you could add examples not included on this list. Please share your own ideas/observations about the class of 2018 in our Comment section.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. Graphic by Joanne Quinn.

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What’s New with Pietro da Cortona’s “The Triumph of David”?

Intriguing developments about “The Triumph of David” have occurred since our previous blog post about this Cortona painting. The painting has been completely cleaned and, over the Memorial Day weekend, varnished. And, most impressive, Anthony Lagalante, PhD, associate professor, Dept. of Chemistry, received a grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for technical analysis of the artwork. Dr. Lagalante received the notification and a check for $24,000 at the end of May.

Although varnishing is normally the final step in the creation of an oil painting, the conservator, Kristin de Ghetaldi, explains, “We always put a thin ‘isolation’ coat of varnish on the surface of paintings after we have removed as much of the unoriginal restoration as we are able. This helps to bring back some of the saturation but also serves as a barrier layer between the original surface and any materials that we then add (fills, inpainting, etc.).”

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Areas with gouache viewable on painting’s bottom right.

Currently the interns, volunteers and de Ghetaldi are filling areas of paint loss and toning the fills with red gouache (gouache is opaque watercolor paint) to simulate the original ground of “The Triumph of David.” To observe the conservators in action, visit the Reading Room in Falvey Hall (aka Old Falvey) or watch the live feed. The conservators are happy to answer questions about their work.

For more information about the conservation project – “About the Restoration;” the Kress award; biographies of the conservation team; the chemistry of the painting; a biography of the donor, Princess Eugenia Ruspoli (1861-1951, born Jennie Berry in Alabama); and more – go to projects.library.villanova.edu/paintingrestoration/ or from Falvey’s homepage, click “Projects” and scroll to “Conserving a Giant …”

For more information about the artist, Pietro da Cortona, see “Dig Deeper: About the artist Pietro da Cortona.”


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

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UPDATE: Villanova’s Automatic Virtual Environment

Last fall this blog post informed you of a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment, aka “CAVE,” coming to the Library. This summer construction accelerated, and the Villanova CAVE will open soon.

“It sounds similar to watching an IMAX film in 3D,” a colleague informed me. I explained that it’s much more than observing. It’s more like the holodeck from Star Trek, the television series. The Villanova CAVE allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even circle around the 3D image an object, such as a statue or tree, as though they were in the actual setting. The Villanova CAVE also includes sound.

Funding for the Villanova CAVE comes from a $1.67 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant: “the largest NSF research grant ever awarded to the University.”

 

UntitledThe CAVE—aka the Villanova CAVE—arrives … some assembly required.

 

 

RS7959_1725Formerly Viewing Room 4 in Falvey Hall, this space has been prepared to house the Villanova CAVE.

 

 

RS7973_DSC_2181 copyInstallation begins!

 

RS7981_DSC_0370An installer prepares one of the Villanova CAVE’s many projectors.

 

RS7980_DSC_0369The enclosure begins to take shape.

 

RS8005_DSC_2216Testing the Villanova CAVE

 


Photos by Luisa Cywinski and Alice Bampton.

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Last Modified: August 18, 2014