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The Curious ‘Cat: What Podcasts do you listen to?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students and staff,
Do you listen to podcasts? What podcasts do you listen to?

RS9513_DSC_3693-scrHaley Miller—“I’ve listened to [only] one podcast ever and it was [from] Serial; it was a murder mystery. And I really did enjoy it; it was 12 episodes long and about 45 minutes an episode. They re-opened a man’s case who was being accused of murdering his ex-girlfriend. It had my attention the whole time. I did it on a car ride … to somewhere and [then back] home. … That’s been my only experience [with podcasts]. It’s a true story. The case is currently being appealed in the Maryland circuit court system, so it’s still ongoing.”

RS9517_DSC_3697-scrDarrell Robinson—“I do listen to podcasts, but I don’t have a favorite one. I pretty much listen to anything that will catch my interest, but usually it’s language, stuff about languages, modern languages … There’s one I have on my computer to help me learn Chinese, for instance. … It’s on iTunes; it’s completely free … It’s great ‘cause you can listen and just go about your business, go about your day.”

 

 

RS9540_DSC_3701-scrDaniel Ehinger—“I only listen to one podcast. I listen to something called the Rooster Teeth Podcast. It’s an Internet company; they make Internet shows and they sell paraphernalia … it’s all video-game-based. I’m really into video games and Internet stuff, so that’s why I listen to them.”

 


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Foto Friday: In the Lobby, 4th and Walnut, Philadelphia

Mailbox ed

The art of art, the glory of expression and the sunshine of the light of letters, is simplicity. 

~Walt Whitman

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management


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Philadelphia Researching Tips

Even though Philadelphia is only 13 miles away, navigating the city may seem like another world in some sense. With world class institutions, museums, and parks, coupled with a rich history running throughout the city, it is no wonder people can feel overwhelmed when visiting Philadelphia. Luckily Falvey has access to many resources to help navigate and research any topic on Philadelphia. Whether the resource is in print or online, the Library can help resolve any confusion when it comes to researching the City of Brotherly Love.

Books

Falvey has a vast collection of books on Philadelphia; where that collection is located in the Library depends on your subject of research. Start with “Philadelphia” in the subject line to narrow your results.

 

subject

Use the facets on the right to filter the results down to your area of interest:

refine

 

In this example, the results are filtered down into books about Philadelphia politics. The picture below displays that books on this subject can be found in the F 158 call number section of the library.

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Online Resources

Jutta Seibert, History Librarian and Academic Integration Team Leader, suggests the following free resources readily available online:

Historical Images of Philadelphia – 20,000 historical images of the city dating back to 1841 courtesy of the Free Library.

Library Company of Philadelphia – The Library Company was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin and remains to this day an independent cultural institution. Its rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art are worth a visit to its Locust Street location. The Library Company currently hosts “Fashioning Philadelphia – the Style of the City, 1720-1940.” Selected exhibits such as the “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic” are available online.

Digital Maps of Philadelphia – Digital access to city maps ranging from 1834 to 1962 courtesy of the Free Library.

 

This is a short, starting point for researching tips on Philadelphia. Remember to always contact your subject librarian for a more in depth search.


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The Highlighter: How do I find schedules for support services in the Library and also the Library itself?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Did you know that in addition to the Research Support Center, the Library also houses the Learning Support Center, the Mathematical Learning Resource Center and the Writing Center? All of their schedules can be found by clicking just one link on Falvey’s homepage. This video shows how to find that link and the schedules for support services as well as the Library itself. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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‘Caturday: Following Thomas

VillanuevaDeLosInfantes_CampoDeMontiel00

This beautiful Spanish plaza can be found in Villanueva de los Infantes, which is near the village in which St. Thomas of Villanova was raised.

According to the Villanova University website, the “University is named for a Spanish Augustinian, Thomas García (1486-1555), the son of a miller who was born in Fuenllana, a village near Villanova de los Infantes, Castile, Spain. Thomas studied at the University of Alcalá where he received his master’s degree in 1509, and the insignia marking him as a doctor shortly thereafter. In 1512, he became a professor of philosophy at the University of Alcalá where his lectures were received enthusiastically for their clarity and conviction. In addition, Thomas was praised by his students and colleagues for always being friendly and helpful.”

I like to think Falvey’s subject librarians emulate St. Thomas as they assist faculty, staff, students and visitors with their research needs.

On a lighter and only slightly related note, you might want to check out this cool summer book for kids featuring Thomas the Cat (or Tomas el Gato). It’s written in both English and Spanish!

thomas the cat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of the Access Services team.

Photo of Plaza Major used with permission from Carlos Barraquete and the Asociacion de Amigos del Campo de Montiel, whose website is a Tribute to Campo de Montiel.


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Pluto—the Second of Two Dwarf Planets Seen at Close Range in 2015

Before New Horizons captured the first-ever detailed images of Pluto this month, it had traveled for nine-and-a-half years to reach the edge of our Solar System. When that spacecraft launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. on January 19, 2006, Pluto was still classified as a planet.

Pluto

Pluto discovered—Clyde Tombaugh, working at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona, discovered Pluto February 18, 1930. But the first such object, albiet smaller than Pluto, had been discovered more than a century earlier.

Ceres discovered—A Catholic priest, Giuseppe Piazzi, who held a PhD in mathematics, was also an astronomer. His catalog of almost 7,000 stars earned him the L’Institut de France prize for “best astronomical work published in 1803″ (Barr). On January 1, 1801, while working on his catalog, he discovered an object whose changes in position were more like those of a planet than a star. “Piazzi had found the first [and the largest] of many thousands of ‘asteroids’ or ‘minor planets’ whose orbits lie mainly in a belt between Mars and Jupiter” (Barr).

Eris discovered—The next such discovery, after that of Pluto, came more than two centuries later, on October 21, 2003.

Eris

This sphere, at the Solar System’s limit and orbiting the Sun, was larger than Pluto and had its own moon (Pluto has five known moons). This find begged the question: If Pluto is a planet, how could this larger globe, Eris, not also be considered a planet?

Haumea discovered—Its discovery was officially announced in 2005.

Makemake discovered—The International Astronomical Union officially recognized Makemake as a dwarf planet in 2008.

More dwarf planets?—Scientists have estimated that “dozens or even more than 100 dwarf planets” may be awaiting discovery. The likelihood of additional yet-to-be-discovered globes has left astronomers asking, “Just what constitutes a planet?”

 “Planet” (re)defined— At the International Astronomical Union (IAU) General Assembly in Prague, 2006, astronomers “debated vigorously” over the definition of “planet.” They established a definition that would classify Ceres, Pluto, Eris, Makemake and Haumea as “dwarf planets,” leaving our Solar System with eight planets.

planets

Why, then, is Pluto the second dwarf planet to be seen at close range in 2015?

Dawn makes history—Earlier this year, another space probe reached another dwarf planet, capturing detailed images and, this time, discovering a mystery. NASA’s Dawn space-probe entered into orbit around Ceres March 6, 2015, becoming “the first mission to achieve orbit around a dwarf planet.” Dawn’s photos revealed “a cluster of mysterious bright spots” on Ceres’ surface, which have intrigued scientists.

Ceres' spots

Father Giuseppe Piazzi would undoubtedly be pleased that his discovery has generated such interest more than two centuries after he identified it.

Works Cited

Barr, Stephen, and Dermott Mullan. “Planets, Priests and a
……..Persistent Myth.” Wall Street Journal, Eastern edition ed.
……..May 22 2015. ProQuest. Web. 15 July 2015. Gerald Dierkes


Check out these Villanova resources for additional information:

The Library’s Astronomy and Astrophysics subject page

Falvey resources on dwarf planets

The Villanova Astronomical Society

The Villanova Public Observatory


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Philosophy

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”RS9332_2014-01-29 14.34.20-5-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Philosophy Librarian Nikolaus Fogle

What’s new this year?

NF—Well, the Philosophy program is about to welcome six new graduate students, who I’ll get to meet in August. And of course the philosophy collection is constantly growing. We’ve recently acquired the online version of the Loeb Classical Library, which is great for people doing ancient philosophy. We’re getting more resources online generally, including Oxford Handbooks and a Bloomsbury e-book collection in political thought.

What are the challenges for philosophy students who want to use the Library? 

NF—People often just don’t know where to start. Depending on the project, they might need to use any number of different research tools. And once they figure out where to go, students don’t always know the right sorts of questions to ask themselves in order to use them effectively. A related problem, too, is waiting too long to ask for help.

What resources does the Library offer to help philosophy students overcome those challenges? 

NF—We try to make navigation as easy as possible. The subject and topic guides on the website are pretty helpful, but librarians are also here in person to provide guidance whenever it’s needed. In addition to individual research consultations, we also do in-class orientations and workshops on research skills, tools and techniques throughout the year.

What do you wish philosophy students knew about you, about the Library? 

NF—I guess I just want them to know that the Library is here to provide them with help, and with resources. There’s practically nothing you might need that we won’t be able to get a hold of for you. And it’s not just materials—we’re here to provide you with the knowledge and know-how to enable you to move through the research process as effectively as possible.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

NF—I love getting to help people, and finding out what they’re working on. I really enjoy collaborating with my colleagues in the Library and elsewhere on campus. And I love that I get to be a philosophy nerd in a really big way.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

NF—Villanova students have such a wide range of interests, and so much enthusiasm. The humanities curriculum here is really great. I like that I never know what the next question is going to be. I also like seeing people’s interests coalesce as they decide on a paper topic, or a major, or a dissertation.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “After your final exam or project, what’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

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Chantelle Casillas—“… go on vacation. I’m going to Barcelona.”

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Robert Carey—“Beach—go right to the beach, Rehoboth Beach, that’s where I’ll go.”

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Atena Hashemoghli—“I’m moving to New York. So the first thing is visiting Times Square or somewhere else to have fun, and enjoy the rest of the summer there.”

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Jeffrey Hupf—“going to visit my friends and family back home in New Jersey … Hammonton, New Jersey.”

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Ciara Sprance—“For fun? probably read a book that wasn’t assigned, read a book that I’m going to enjoy and not cry about or sweat about … I’m going to read a book by John Banville; he’s a good Irish writer. … I’m going to read The Sea, after I read this.”

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Daniel Shea—“That is a hard question. Usually I go home for break … I usually go immediately, so I don’t really do anything [for fun. My home is in] San Francisco.”

 


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Science

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

RS9333_2014-01-29 11.43.48-7-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Science Librarian Alfred Fry

What’s new this year?

AF—We don’t have any new science resources this year, but the Library just hired a new director. I expect there will be a lot of changes.

What are the challenges for science students who want to use the Library? 

AF—Our databases, particularly in chemistry, are very powerful. Although it is very easy to do simple searches, it can be challenging to discover all the advanced features without instruction. Also, many students are familiar with just one database and are unaware of others that would be more appropriate in some situations.

What resources does the Library offer to help science students overcome those challenges? 

AF—Me. I’m happy to teach classes or provide individual or small group instruction.

What do you wish science students knew about you, about the Library? 

AF—I majored in chemistry. Many students know about the subject guides, but I wish more did.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

AF—Helping students and faculty in all areas, but particularly in science and engineering.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

AF—Villanova students tend to be more patient than students at other places I’ve worked. So, I can take the time to demonstrate the most effective techniques for getting the best results. There are also a few people from the wider Villanova community who have asked very interesting questions.


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The Highlighter: Who is the Ultimate Fact-Checker?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Need to check your facts before turning in that big paper? This video shows how to contact a University librarian: the ultimate fact-checker. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Last Modified: July 21, 2015