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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Nursing

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

………………resource locators,

…………idea developers,

……database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

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Today’s subject librarian—Nursing/Life Sciences & Instructional Services Librarian Barbara Quintiliano 

What’s new this year?

BQ—By now, many students and faculty are familiar with our mobile research assistance cart, staffed either by my colleague Robin Bowles (pictured below) or me.

…..—We set up our cart on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the café area on the 2nd floor of Driscoll Hall. Our hours nursing librarians
for staffing the cart vary due to our other duties. This year, however, we are going to try to have regular hours and publicize them, so students will know when we will be there.

What are the challenges for nursing students who want to use the Library?

BQ—First of all, students must be aware that Google is not a gateway to all resources that they will need for nursing research. Nursing students need access to quite a few specialized resources—such as CINAHL (nursing database), PubMed, Cochrane Reviews, and the Community Health Data Base—and these can be found on the library’s website. Links for accessing these resources can be found on the nursing subject page (http://library.villanova.edu/research/subject-guides/nursing/).

…..—Second, these resources do not have Google-like search screens. They require just a little bit of technique to get the best results. However, if you are seeking specialized nursing or health data, these are the resources you need to use.

…..—Everything said in the previous paragraph goes double for students enrolled in distance courses, such as the University Alliance RN to BSN program. The library website is another interface that they need to discover because without those resources they will not be able to complete research assignments successfully.

What resources does the Library offer to help nursing students overcome those challenges?

BQ—All students in NUR1102 come to the Library during a regular class period for an introduction to the most important specialized nursing resources and for a primer in APA documentation style.

…..—Short instructional videos, linked on the nursing subject guide pages, illustrate how to search the specialized resources.

…..—My colleague Robin Bowles and I are available to assist students with any topic. I can be contacted by email at barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu and by phone at 610-519-5207. Robin can be contacted at robin.bowles@villanova.edu or 610-519-8129. We are also happy to make telephone appointments to work with distance learners.

What do you wish nursing students knew about you, about the Library?

BQ—Robin and I are as close as your email/phone. You can contact us anytime. We do our best to respond within 24 hours, if not sooner.

…..—No inquiry is too big or too small. We can assist you in doing literature searches, finding full text of articles when you have references, creating APA-Style bibliographies.

…..—I am available on Thursdays at Driscoll Hall 343 (when not staffing the research cart) and the other days of the week in Falvey Memorial Library, 2nd floor, Rm 225. Robin is available on Tuesdays at Driscoll Hall 343 and the other days of the week in Falvey, 2nd floor, Rm 230.

What do you like best about being a librarian?

BQ—I enjoy pursuing so many different topics and assisting with research of various levels of simplicity or complexity.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students?

BQ—I enjoy meeting and chatting with them (in person or by phone), as well as helping them with their assignments. They are remarkably cheerful under academic, clinical and work pressures. They brighten my day.


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On Sale tomorrow: One Day Passes for Regional Rail Travel for Papal Visit

  • Posted by: Joanne Quinn
  • Posted Date: July 19, 2015
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized
Photo by Diane Brocchi

Photo by Diane Brocchi

Septa Announces Availability of One Day Passes for Regional Rail Travel for September 26 and 27

The regional rail authority, SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority), announced this week that one-day passes for Regional Rail travel during the papal visit will go on sale Monday, July 20, at 9 a.m. There are a limited number of tickets available for each station. These passes are necessary in order to ride the Regional Rail on Saturday September 26 through Sunday September 27.

Please note that tickets sold as part of the World Meeting of Families-Philadelphia 2015 Congress are valid and ticket holders are encouraged to visit SEPTA’s booth at the Convention Center to indicate their stations and time slots for Saturday and Sunday.

To learn more, including a list of the limited stations which will be open during the weekend of September 25-26, please reference the links below and visit SEPTA.org.

Please direct your calls or inquiries regarding SEPTA’s plans to the SEPTA website.

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‘Caturday: Impatient Pets

We’ve crossed over the midsummer mark, and most school-aged children have been off from school for a few weeks. What are your little Wildcats doing this summer? YMCA camp? Traveling with the family? Having fun with friends at the community pool? Do they have chores to do?

I hope they aren’t tempted to follow this young lady’s example.

Girl feeding cat and dog salami

“Don’t be impatient, children!”

Trade card featuring a girl feeding salami to a dog and cat, given with Frank Leslie’s “Chimney Corner”, from the Villanova Digital Library Dime Novel and Popular Literature collection.


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Foto Friday: In Corso

Sneak peek CORTONA

We’re taking a sneak peek as conservation work continues on the Falvey Hall Reading Room’s hidden treasure, the baroque masterpiece by Pietro da Cortona. Follow along on the Conserving a Giant: Resurrecting Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David” blog.


Photo by Alice Bampton.


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The Curious ‘Cat: Which of the following statements is true?

Curious CatThis week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “Which of the following statements is true?” *

1. The Library houses a rare painting, the massive 12-by-19-feet “The Triumph of David” by Pietro da Cortona, a major artist of the Baroque period.

2. The Library houses a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment that allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about as though they were in the actual setting.

3. The Library is soon to house a Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship that will nurture students as creative and innovative thinkers.

4. The Library houses a Research Support Center, which provides eleven research librarians—each an expert both in scholarly research and in one or more academic disciplines—who look forward to helping you with your assignments.

RS9291_DSC_3610-scrKyle Johnson—“I think multiple parts of these are true. I know for sure that there is a CAVE, and I’m pretty sure that there are eleven research librarians. I’m not sure about the new Center, and I haven’t seen the painting myself. But I know those two are true.”

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Jaclyn Lanciano—“I think it’s number three. … I just heard them talking about how they’re going to renovate.”

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Martha Wolnicki—“Number one, I would say, is false. Number two, I would say, is false. Three and four are true.”

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Francesca Cocchi—“I’ve seen the painting; I don’t know if all the stats are correct, but I assume. And I wrote an article about the CAVE facility, so I know that’s here … when we first got the grant for it … for the school newspaper (The Villanovan) … Yeah, I want to be a journalist. The Center for Innovation sounds familiar. I actually would think we already have one. I guess that’s true. … And I would say the last one is—eleven sounds like a lot, but—I think I’ll just say “true” for all of them.”

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John Suggs—“They all kind of sound true. … Is that a bad thing? They’re all true statements. I like the one about nurturing students as creative and innovative thinkers.”

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Brooke Erdman—“More than one sound true to me. … I kind of like the CAVE. … I’m going to go with the second one.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* All four of the statements are true.


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Harper Lee’s Second Book and its Publication Bring Controversy

Go Set a Watchman - cover

Imagine having a book you’ve written published for the first time. How surprised would you be if your book became a bestseller, won a Pulitzer Prize, and was even made into a motion picture starring a major actor? Would you publish another book and risk disappointing your audience? Or would you choose to leave your readers wanting more?

That book, of course, is Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. When it was released 55 years ago, one critic compared Lee’s skill to that of Mark Twain, and described her as “an artist of rare talent and control. This first novel is an achievement of unusual magnitude” (Canfield).

The recent announcement that Harper Lee’s second book to be published, Go Set a Watchman, would be released today captured the imaginations of Mockingbird’s fans and of the literary world. Watchman, however, is not a new book. In fact, Lee wrote it decades ago, before writing Mockingbird. That Lee waited so many years before publishing Watchman has raised questions about her decision, including controversy about whether she herself made this decision.

The first controversy

Harper Lee, now 88, suffered a stroke in 2007 and lives in an assisted-living facility (Trachtenberg). Her sister, Alice Lee (now deceased), in a 2011 interview, described Harper as “mostly blind and deaf” following her stroke (Berman). Alice Lee, an attorney, who had “long represented her sister and whom friends describe as Ms. Lee’s ‘protector,’ died Nov. 17 [2014].” Less than three months after Alice Lee’s death comes the announcement from HarperCollins Publishers that Go Set a Watchman would be published on July 14, 2015.

Lee has not spoken to anyone except her agent and her attorney about Watchman, its discovery or its publication. Harper publisher Jonathan Burnham insists that Lee is “very much engaged in the process,” although he bases his assessment on reports from Lee’s agent. Lee, Burnham adds, will not give interviews or other publicity when Watchman is released (Berman).

That Lee’s agent and her attorney, who appear to have everything to gain financially from this situation, have been the only ones communicating with the author Harper Leehas prompted an investigation. The Alabama Securities Commission investigated and “concluded that Ms. Lee appeared to understand what was occurring while approving the publication of ‘Go Set a Watchman’” (Stevens).

Despite the Commission’s findings, Lee’s fans have remained skeptical over the circumstances of Watchman’s discovery. These lingering doubts may have motivated Lee’s attorney, Tonja Carter, to publish an explanation in Monday’s Wall Street Journal (Carter).

The second controversy

Although Watchmen includes characters from Mockingbird, such as Scout and Atticus, the novel is set twenty years into the future, into the civil-rights movement. Fans of Mockingbird may be shocked to discover changes in Atticus. He served as Mockingbird’s “moral conscience: kind, wise, honorable, an avatar of integrity” (Kakutani).

In Watchmen, Scout, 26 and known as Jean Louise, has been living in New York City. She visits her hometown, Maycomb, Ala., to discover that Atticus now holds “abhorrent views on race and segregation” (Kakutani). Readers may wonder why Lee wrote this book as “a distressing narrative filled with characters spouting hate speech.” Ultimately, as Mockingbird “suggested that we should have compassion for outsiders like Boo and Tom Robinson,” Watchman “asks us to have understanding for a bigot named Atticus” (Kakutani).

Works Cited

Berman, Russell. “How Harper Lee’s Long-Lost Sequel Was
……..Found.” theatlantic.com. Feb 4, 2015.

Canfield, Francis X., “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Critic, 1960

Carter, Tonja B. “How I found the Harper Lee Manuscript.” Wall
……..Street Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Jul 13 2015. ProQuest.
……..Web. 13 July 2015.

Kakutani, Michiko. “Review: Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’
……..Gives Atticus Finch a Dark Side.” http://nyti.ms/1ULlBZv

Stevens, Laura, and Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. “Business News: No
……..Fraud found Is Discovered in Harper Lee Case.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed.Mar 13 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.

Trachtenberg, Jeffrey A., and Laura Stevens. “Harper Lee
……..Bombshell: How News of Book Unfolded.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Feb 07 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.


To Dig Deeper, explore the following links, prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader: Humanities II and also subject librarian for English, literature and theatre:

One of the big issues that has sprung up around GSAW beyond the controversy over its publication is the difference in the character of Atticus Finch and concerns that it may “tarnish” his legacy.

Here is another point from yesterday

You can read the first chapter or listen to Reese Witherspoon read it

NPR piece from yesterday

NPR piece from Feb

NPR piece from 2014 indicating that if Lee is being taken advantage of with this publication it may not be the first time


SarahDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. 


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Foto Friday: A Summer Beauty

Lily Pad

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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The Curious ‘Cat: When you need a break from studying, what is a good way to refresh your mind?

Curious Cat

 

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “When you need a break from studying, what is a good way to refresh your mind or to relieve stress?”

RS9263_DSC_3570-scrYeji Seak—“I usually catch up on all the delayed text messages that I need to send back to people. Or I try to stretch a little bit and get some food to refresh my memory and just take a 10-to-15 minute break each time—use the bathroom if I need to … When I’m taking a break I don’t really think about what I just learned; I try to calm myself down and relax a little bit and then go back to studying and focus.”

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Wilson Capellan, OSA—“I go to the coffee shop. Just being alone makes my mind refreshed. And then surf the Internet and visit social media—while sipping a cup of coffee.”

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Aliyia N Patterson—“I cook—and run, either or—cooking or running. Sometimes when I’m running and we have a paper due next week I’ll be running and thinking about what I’m doing in the paper. Unless a car jumps out in front of me, then my mind is back on running. It’s happened a couple of times. So I like to cook and run.”

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Anna Fickenscher—“Sometimes I just take a break and watch stupid reality TV … or mindless Internet entertainment … reading different blogs or reading different articles—just kind of get my mind off of school work with something that requires less thought process.”

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Divya Bonagiri—“I’ll watch some comedy movie or comedy film, and I’ll have some refreshment for some time. And then I’ll go back to studies. Or I enjoy doing my hobby. … I get refreshed doing my hobby for some time and then get back to my studies.”

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Mervin Woodlin—“I have a family, so I spend time with them. I usually do most of my studying at home; the only reason I’m here is because I just started a summer program. Most of the time when I’m studying and I want to take a break, I spend time with them.”

 


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Foto Friday: A little Star Spangled History

The 26 star flag was the official flag of the United States of America for eight yearsbeginning with the Statehood of Michigan in 1837 and up until 1845 with the admission of Florida into the union as our 27th state.

The 26 star flag was the official flag of the United States of America for eight years beginning with the Statehood of Michigan in 1837 and up until 1845 with the admission of Florida into the union as our 27th state. The flag hangs on a wall in Connelly Center. The full story appears on an adjacent plaque.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management


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The Highlighter: Falvey’s Tips & Guides connect you with the research-paper help you need

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Just one page on Falvey’s site helps you learn whether a library resource is scholarly or popular, primary or secondary. That one page also shows you where to find help citing sources, help with your research, or help with your writing.

Discover that one page: Falvey’s Tips & Guides

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Last Modified: June 30, 2015