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Foto Friday: HAPPY Halloween!

Pumpkin

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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The Great War: WWI through a literary lens

WWI-era American Library Association ad; retrieved from http://boingboing.net/2010/02/14/wwi-pro-reading-ad.html

WWI-era American Library Association ad; retrieved from http://boingboing.net/2010/02/14/wwi-pro-reading-ad.html

Due to the shifting social and economic factors at the turn of the 20th century and the rise of the middle class, more people than ever before, from all levels of society, were literate. The rise in literacy contributed to not only the prolific creation of literature during and after WWI but also to the demand for and consumption of this literature.

Though both professional and amateur authors wrote throughout the period, much of the literature that we think of as World War I literature was written after the war during the 1920s and 30s and often dealt with issues such as shell shock, the difficulty that soldiers had returning to their old lives after the war, and the effect losses from war had on families.

The study of war literature was for a very long time, and still is to an extent, focused largely on male authors. It wasn’t until the late 20th century that the writing of women during and about the War began to receive attention. Catherine Reilly’s 1981 anthology, Scars Upon my Heart: Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War, is the first work strictly dedicated to examining women’s poetry and prose from World War I.

World War I also ushered in a new era of literature and heavily influenced literature in the decades following it. The world was faced with a sense of disillusionment that it had never faced in such a way before, and genres such as the hard-boiled detective novels sprung up with war veteran protagonists embittered and changed by their pasts, while authors such as H. P. Lovecraft explored themes of chaos, apathy and despair through a new kind of horror story.

Below I have selected a number of titles and web resources to literature written both during and following WWI that deals directly with the war and its impact.

Because not all literature written during the War directly deals with the War, I have also created a timeline depicting a selection of major literary publications alongside a selection of historical events between the years of 1914 and 1922.

Link to Timeline:

http://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline/latest/embed/index.html?source=0Avs0oI7XtkWUdEhzel9pNFRMdFlNOXVmNHdGbTY1M0E&font=Bevan-PotanoSans&maptype=toner&lang=en&height=650

Parade’s End by Ford Madox Ford (book and beautiful HBO mini series)

Ford, Parade's End old cover

Parade’s End is a tetralogy by the English novelist and poet Ford Madox Ford published between 1924 and 1928. It is set mainly in England and on the Western Front in World War I, where Ford served as an officer in the Welsh Regiment.

Originally published as four individual novels Some Do Not (1924), No More Parades (1925), A Man Could Stand Up (1926), and Last Post (1928) they are now typically combined into one volume as Parade’s End. In 2012 Parade’s End was adapted as a five part miniseries for the BBC/HBO, with script by Tom Stoppard, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Rebecca Hall.

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

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All Quiet on the Western Front, first published in 1929, is a novel by Erich Maria Remarque, a German veteran of World War I. “The book describes the German soldiers’ extreme physical and mental stress during the war, and the detachment from civilian life felt by many of these soldiers upon returning home from the front.”

Made into a film in 1930 only a year after its publication, All Quiet on the Western Front was the first all-talking non-musical film to win the Best Picture Oscar. In 2009 it was announced that there would be a remake, but thus far nothing has come of it.

Scars Upon My Heart: Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War by Catherine Reilly 1981

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Scars Upon My Heart is a poetry anthology collected by Catherine Reilly,” and is the first work strictly dedicated to examining women’s poetry and prose from World War I.

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks

harlem_hellfighters_cover_art_a_p

This is a contemporary graphic novel by Max Brooks, author of World War Z. It focuses on the 369th infantry, an African American unit that spent more time in combat than any other American unit and returned home to face extreme discrimination from the US government.


The Waste Land
By T.S. Eliot.

Though not directly about the war The Waste Land published in 1922 is clearly a modernist product of a post war world of disillusionment, a theme carried forward in Eliot’s other writings such as his 1925 poem “The Hollow Men.” When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Eliot tried to join the U.S. Navy but was rejected for physical reasons.

First World War Poetry Digital Archive

Link to Eliot’s registration for WWI

Link to war related resource from our new online Eliot resource

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The Highlighter: Explore Falvey’s Many Blogs

 

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

In addition to the Library News blog, Falvey publishes several subject-specific blogs on its site. This video shows how to access the library’s subject-specific blogs.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Foto Friday: Say it with flowers

VU-Flowers2

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

 

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Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month in Falvey: Agnes Moncy, PhD

Portrait of a Man 1595-1600 Oil on canvas, 53 x 47 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Portrait of a Man
1595-1600
Oil on canvas, 53 x 47 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

To celebrate Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month, Agnes Moncy, PhD, professor of Spanish in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Temple University, will discuss El Greco. This event, held at 3:00 p.m. Oct. 23, in room 204, commemorates the 400th anniversary of El Greco’s death.

The eventco-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Sigma Delta Pi and the Hispanic Honor Societyis free and open to the public.

El Greco, born Doménikos Theotokopoulos (c. 1547 – 1614) in Crete (a Greek island), moved to Italy as a young man. There he visited Venice, where he was influenced by the paintings of Titian and Tintoretto; El Greco also traveled to Rome where he saw Roman and Florentine Mannerist works. By 1577, he had moved to Toledo,Spain, where he remained for the rest of his life.

El Greco (“the Greek”) is considered a major Spanish Renaissance artist although his personal style reflects strong elements of Late Byzantine and Late Italian Mannerist art. He painted portraits and intensely emotional religious paintings such as “The Burial of Count Orgaz,” 1586, in Santo Tomé, Toledo, Spain.

Dig Deeper: El Greco Resources

Videos—
El Greco: Christ Driving the Traders from the Temple (Great Britain: National Gallery, 1995).

Rubens, van Dyck and the 17th Century Flemish Painters; Rembrandt and the 17th Century Dutch Masters; Velazquez, El Greco, Goya and the Spanish Masters (Russia: Gosudarstvennyi Ermitazh,1992).

Books—
Alvarez Lopera, José. El Greco (Barcelona: Galaxia Gutenberg, 2003). Text in Spanish.

Alvarez Lopera, José. El retablo del Colegio de Doña Maria de Aragón de El Greco [The Retablo (Altarpiece) of the Colegio of Doña Maria of Aragon by El Greco] (Madrid: Tf. Editores, c.2000). Text in Spanish.

Calvo Serraller, F. Entierro del conde de Orgaz [Burial of the Count Orgaz] (Milano: Electra, c.1994). Text in Italian.

Figures of Thought: El Greco as Interpreter of History, Tradition and Ideas (Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 1982).

Guinard, Paul J. El Greco: Biographical and Critical Study (Lausanne: Skira, 1956).

Kelemen, Pál. El Greco Revisited: Candia, Venice, Toledo (New York: Macmillan, 1961).

Marías, Fernando. El Greco in Toledo (London: Scala, 2001).

Marías, Fernando. El Greco, Life and Work: A New History (London: Thames and Hudson, 2013).

Museo Thyssen Bornemisza. El Greco: Identity and Transformation: Crete, Italy, Spain (Milano: Skira, 1999).

Panagiötakës, Nikolaos. El Greco: The Cretan Years (Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2009).

Sérullaz, Maurice. Christ on the Cross (London: M. Parrish, 1947).

Sureda, Joan. La Gloria de los Siglos de Oro: Mecenas, Artistas y Maravillas en la España Imperial [The Glory of the Golden Age: Patrons, Artists and Wonders of Imperial Spain] (Barcelona: Lunwerg Editores, 2006). Text in Spanish.

Toledo Museum of Art. El Greco of Toledo (Boston: Little, Brown, 1982).

Wethey, Harold E. El Greco and his School (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1962).

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Foto Friday: Halcyon Days

Church

“I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying in the house.”

― Nathaniel Hawthorne, The American Notebooks [Notebook, Oct.10, 1842]

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

 

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A Golden Anniversary for Wonka’s Golden Tickets, and a Previously Unpublished Chapter to Read

A first edition of signed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently available from the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America for $25,000.

A first edition of signed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently available from the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America for $25,000.

As Charlie and the Chocolate Factory celebrates its golden anniversary this fall, news of an unpublished chapter from an early draft of Roald Dahl’s masterpiece emerges: “Roald Dahl draft spills Charlie and the Chocolate Factory secrets.”

It’s fun to imagine what could have been, but I doubt that the book would have been better even with the “vanilla fudge mountain” or additional golden tickets and ticket winners. What do you think?

Read the previously unpublished chapter in its entirety here.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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All about VUFind Infographic

VUFIND TIMELINE4


Infographic designed by Joanne Quinn with copy and invaluable assistance provided by Demian Katz and Darren Poley.

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VuFind Summit 2014 Welcomes Software Developers to Library, Oct. 13 & 14

VUFIND  LOGO

VuFind, an open source library search engine, is more powerful and user-friendly than the traditional online public access catalog (OPAC). Using VuFind, for example, Falvey’s catalog now enables users to perform just a single search to see not only books, media and articles but also Falvey-website items and books from other libraries—all on one page.

DAVELACY

David Lacy presents at VuFind ’13

The first VuFind 2.0 Summit occurred in Sept. 2010. It expanded to a VuStuff Conference in Oct. 2011. By Oct. 2012, VuFind had gained international recognition; this annual conference attracted librarians and technologists from Nepal, Portugal, Germany and Norway. The following year, this annual gathering of software developers featured several components, in addition to VuFind, and lasted a week. VuFind Summit 2014, the fifth annual VuFind conference, will take place for two days and focus exclusively on VuFind.

Presenters for this year’s conference come from the Murray Library at Messiah College, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, OCLC Developer Network and Falvey Memorial Library, to name a few. Falvey will host this event, and registration is required. Click here for registration information.

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Foto Friday: End of Summer

Grill

End of Summer

An agitation of the air,

A perturbation of the light

Admonished me the unloved year

Would turn on its hinge that night.

______

I stood in the disenchanted field

Amid the stubble and the stones,

Amazed, while a small worm lisped to me

The song of my marrow-bones.

_______

Blue poured into summer blue,

A hawk broke from his cloudless tower,

The roof of the silo blazed, and I knew

That part of my life was over.

________

Already the iron door of the north

Clangs open: birds, leaves, snows

Order their populations forth,

And a cruel wind blows.

 Stanley Kunitz

Stanley Kunitz, “End of Summer” from The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz. Copyright © 1953 by Stanley Kunitz.  Reprinted by permission of W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Last Modified: October 10, 2014