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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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How Easy is E-ZBorrow?

ezborrow logoWhen current Villanova University students, faculty or staff can’t find the book they need in our collection, they turn to E-ZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad).

The recently upgraded E-ZBorrow service, which delivers books to Villanova library patrons within 4-5 days of their requests, is popular because it’s easy to search for and request books from 50 participating Mid-Atlantic libraries. The newest library to join E-ZBorrow is New York University with close to 4 million volumes in its collection. Once a requested item arrives, it can be borrowed for up to 12 weeks (6-week loan with optional 6-week renewal).

Very often, when a Falvey title is unavailable, the library’s catalog provides the user a “Search E-ZBorrow” link.

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ezb facetedThe E-ZBorrow link can also be found on our homepage. The E-ZBorrow web interface was recently improved with better advanced searching and faceted results that offer the patron related headings, like author and subject. Its advanced search is more robust, allowing users to combine search words in several fields, including author, title, keywords and ISBN.

Also new on the E-ZBorrow service site are icons that indicate the format of the material at lending libraries. Although regular print books can always be requested, only some libraries will have copies available. As shown below, libraries with requestable copies are listed, but E-ZBorrow also shows that Villanova (PVU) has a copy available and provides a link to the Falvey catalog.

ezb link to pvu

 

If the E-ZBorrow system deems that no copies are available, it will prompt the user to click on a link to Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad), another excellent service that provides users with materials from libraries all over the world.

ezb link to ill

 

ILLiad policies are a bit more limited (2-3 week loans), but some users prefer ILLiad because they can find and borrow unusual or rare materials not held by the E-ZBorrow libraries. ILLiad is also used by patrons to request articles from print and electronic collections. We can very often deliver requested articles within 24-48 hours.

If you need additional assistance, don’t hesitate to call the Information Desk at 610-519-4270. You can also contact a subject librarian for more specialized help.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, team leader of Access Services and editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team.

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Over Six Million Images for You to Use: ARTstor and AP Images

imagesAre you giving a presentation or writing a paper that would benefit from including images? Rather than Googling, why not investigate Falvey’s two image databases, ARTstor and AP Images (Associated Press Images). In both of these collections you will find high quality, properly identified images.

ARTstor is a digital library containing over 1.6 million images that go beyond the traditional arts – painting, sculpture, graphics and architecture. ARTstor also contains images in the humanities and sciences: music, photography, literature, world history, American studies, Asian studies, classical studies, Medieval studies, Renaissance studies, literature and more.

ARTstor can be found in Falvey’s Databases A-Z or you can go directly to ARTstor. Although anyone can log on to ARTstor from Falvey, registered users with valid Villanova University e-mail addresses are allowed additional privileges: they can save image groups, create shared folders, add notes to images and download the offline viewer. Once you have an account, you can access ARTstor from outside the Library or from a mobile device.artstor-mobile3

You can search for images using a keyword or by an advanced search of such terms as creator, culture, subject, title, geography, a date range or other features. Once you’ve located an image, you can pan or zoom in on the image to look at details. And, of particular interest to art history students, you can even make flashcards for studying. The other image database to which Falvey subscribes is AP Images (listed in Databases A-Z as Associated Press Images).

AP Images contains over 4.6 million photographs dating back to the 1800s, more than 4,500 hours of audio files from the 1920s forward and news stories from 1997 forward. AP Images can be searched by keywords, dates, people’s names, events, locations, photographers and more. Materials found in AP Images are considered primary sources and according to AP Images, the Associated Press “is the most credible source for non-biased reporting.” The database also contains a comprehensive, easily understood “AP Images Quick Reference Guide,” which not only provides thorough information about searching for images and viewing them but also has an appendix that lists topics and their contents.

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While both of these databases are easy to use, if you need help using them or finding specific images, please contact Jutta Seibert, Academic Integration team leader and liaison to the Dept. of History, 610-519-7876, room 228, or any of Falvey’s research support librarians.


Photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

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Faculty Forum #3: Airing views on an Institutional Repository for Villanova Scholarship and Data

The final Faculty Forum in a series of three was held on Nov. 11 in the Connelly Center cinema. The Faculty Forums were co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs (ORPG). Villanova faculty, researchers and students came to hear panelists discuss “the challenges that researchers now often face in relation to the dissemination and eventual disposition of the products of their scholarship …”

Alfonso (Al) Ortega, PhD, College of Engineering, and associate vice president for research and graduate programs, and the James R. Birle professor of energy technology in the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, welcomed the attendees. Members of the Faculty Forum #3 panel included David Lacy, team leader for Library Technology Development, Falvey Memorial Library; Edward (Ed) Sion, PhD, Dept. of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, professor; A. Maria Toyoda, PhD, Dept. of Political Science and associate dean for Interdisciplinary Studies and Global Initiatives; Aaron Wemhoff, PhD, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, assistant professor; Ryan P. Jorn, PhD, Dept. of Chemistry, associate professor; Paul Hanouna, PhD, Dept. of Finance, Villanova School of Business (VSB); and Daniel McGee, director, strategic planning and consulting, University Information Technologies (UNIT).

David Lacy

David Lacy

The first panelist, David Lacy, presented the library’s perspective on the creation of an institutional repository “to provide a historical record of Villanova University’s scholarly output.” Lacy reported that Falvey has already begun to create a repository with its Community Bibliography, which is designed to house the entire publications of the University community. He discussed the configuration and workflow of an institutional repository and said, “[Its] ultimate success comes from an institutional mandate.”

Dr. Edward Sion discussed the research database containing the “Catalog of White Dwarf Stars” (a white dwarf is a star that has exhausted its nuclear fuel) and libraries of theoretical models constructed to compare data from Hubble Space Telescope and other orbiting observatories. Dr. Sion created the Catalog with a colleague, George P. McCook, PhD, Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

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A. Maria Toyoda

Dr. A. Maria Toyoda discussed a database, the Quinn-Toyoda CAPITAL, which she and Dennis P. Quinn, PhD, Georgetown University, created. The Quinn-Toyoda CAPITAL is a dataset used in her research on financial openness and political economic issues in East Asia.

The next presenter, Dr. Aaron Wemhoff, showed data from his research in molecular dynamics simulations and the data storage strategies he used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Dr. Ryan P. Jorn, who joined Villanova’s Dept. of Chemistry in August 2013, discussed his research computational methods and the data generated in his quantitative chemistry studies.

The final researcher to address the need for an institutional repository, Dr. Paul Hanouna, discussed the data he has generated in his financial research and the resources already housed in the VSB Dept. of Finance.

Daniel McGee discussed UNIT’s views on creating an institutional repository for Villanova scholarship and data.

The speakers joined Dr. Ortega and Darren Poley, interim library director, for a lively question and answer session and open discussion with the audience.


Photos and article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

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Remembering JFK: 50th Anniversary of the President’s Assassination

JFK


November 22 marks the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s (JFK’s) assassination in Dallas, Texas in 1963. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was travelling by motorcade with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy that fateful day, campaigning for the next presidential election, when he was shot and killed. Many Americans believe this tragic event changed America forever.

During his brief time in office, JFK was a monumental force in promoting the change of the social and political landscape of America. He helped to raise minimum wage, create the Peace Corps, aid the Civil Rights Movement, improve Social Security benefits and even build support for the space program’s mission of landing on the moon—a dream that would eventually come to fruition in 1969. Most notably, perhaps, JFK played a vital role in peacefully ending the Cuban Missile Crisis, avoiding what could have been a devastating nuclear war with the Soviet Union. His famous call to all Americans during his inaugural address, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country,” was the main motivating force of his presidency. He lived for public service and encouraged all Americans to do the same in order to contribute to the greater good. He gave us hope that things could change for the better.

Millions of Americans and people from all over the world mourned the loss of JFK in 1963, and many are still fascinated with him to this day. Why are we still captivated by a man who has long since gone? Kennedy served as president for just under three years, but in that short amount of time he made quite an impact. In addition to his political work, JFK was also greatly admired for his roles as husband and father to his two small children, Caroline and John Jr. The First Family was often in the public eye, especially as televised news increased in popularity, which helped many connect with JFK on a deeper level. The American public found him easy to relate to when they saw him playing these common, everyday roles. Images of his children playing in the White House Oval Office and similar warm family moments have become icons and an illuminative window into a simpler time in America. Through his youth and charisma, it seems as though JFK was able to give the White House a newfound warmth and vibrancy that it had never quite had before. Perhaps that is part of what keeps us interested in him—his death represents a loss of innocence during what was thought to be a time of hope and transformation.

Although JFK’s popularity has endured throughout the years, current college students may be curious about what he truly symbolized to American public at the time and why he is sometimes still analyzed in the media to this day. Not to fear! Falvey Memorial Library’s political science research expert, Merrill Stein, has assembled library resources to satisfy your curiosity and help you to Dig Deeper.

 


Dig Deeper

Resources available at Falvey Memorial Library (suggested by our very own Political Science research expert, Merrill Stein):

Articles:

This Close to a Killer

 The Truth About JFK and Vietnam: Why the Speculation is Wrong-Headed

Books:

Blind Over Cuba

Passion for Truth : From Finding JFK’s Single Bullet to Questioning Anita Hill to Impeaching Clinton

The CIA & Congress : The Untold Story from Truman to Kennedy

The Other Missiles of October : Eisenhower, Kennedy, and the Jupiters

The Missile Crisis of October 1962 : A Review of Issues and References

The Road to Dallas: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Report of the Warren Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy

 

CDs:

Jacqueline Kennedy : Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy, Interviews with Arthur M. Schlesinger.

Films/Documentaries:

The Missiles of October

Databases/Journals:

American National Biography Online (Oxford)

Congress and the Nation

CQ Almanac

CQ Electronic Library (SAGE)

CQ Press Voting and Elections Collection

JSTOR

National Journal

Washington Post Historical

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts

External Websites:

JFK Facts

JFK Library

JFK 50 Year Anniversary Website

The  American Presidency Project

Today in 1963 Twitter Feed

Wilson Center-Cold War International History Project

U.S. Government Bookstore (collection of the official Federal publications by and about President John F. Kennedy) 

Local Exhibit:

Philadelphia University’s Paul J. Gutman Library:

“Single Bullet: Arlen Specter & the Warren Commission Investigation of the JFK Assassination.”

Information on of some of the many TV specials, movies and books that will be available around the anniversary of JFK’s death this month:

Daily Bulletin

San Jose Mercury News

TV Guide

USA Today


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication & Service Promotion team and Library Events and Program coordinator.

SteinResearch links provided by Merrill Stein, team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science.

Our new Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Cristina Soriano, PhD, Presents Research on Social Networks in Colonial Venezuela

Cristina Soriano, PhD

Cristina Soriano, PhD

This Wednesday, Nov. 20, Cristina Soriano, PhD, holder of the Albert R. LePage Endowed Professorship and assistant professor in the Department of History, will deliver a lecture as part of our ongoing Scholarship@Villanova series. The lecture is entitled “The Revolutionary Contagion: Pamphlets, Rumors, and Conspiracies in Venezuela during the Age of Revolutions,” and explores the many fascinating connections between plebeian literary practices, webs of circulation of information, and the emergence of social networks for political mobilization in colonial Venezuela.

This week’s Dig Deeper material was prepared by Jutta Seibert, librarian and Team Leader for Academic Integration.


Martín Tovar y Tovar [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Martín Tovar y Tovar [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Dig Deeper: Revolutionary Movements in Latin America & Revolutionary Print Culture

Falvey Memorial Library has numerous resources related to Dr. Soriano’s research for those who would like to learn more about the revolutionary movements in Latin America and revolutionary print culture.

In El Libro En Circulación: En El Mundo Moderno En España Y Latinoamérica, Dr. Soriano writes about the circulation of books in colonial Venezuela.

Among the more recent books about Latin American revolutionary movements available in the library are—

 

Falvey also has various related primary sources in translation:

For those who would like to read more about the relationships between print and politics in early modern history, we recommend—

Need to brush up on your knowledge of Venezuela’s history? The Encyclopedia of Latin America History and Culture is a great starting point.


Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

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Links prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

Our new Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Dig Deeper: Dr. Mark Lawrence Schrad discusses Vodka Politics

Mark Lawrence Schrad, PhD

Mark Lawrence Schrad, PhD

This Wednesday, Nov. 13, Mark Lawrence Schrad, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science, will deliver a lecture as part of our ongoing Scholarship@Villanova event series.

Dr. Schrad’s talk is entitled “Understanding Putin’s Russia through the Bottom of the Bottle,” and will analyze alcohol politics as a means for uncovering deep tensions within Russia’s culture and economy. The New York Times published several of Dr. Schrad’s op-eds on this subject, which he investigates in greater detail in his forthcoming book Vodka Politics: Alcohol, Autocracy and the Secret History of the Russian State.

This week’s Dig Deeper material, found below, was compiled by research librarian and liaison to the Department of Political Science, Merrill Stein.


PUTIN-BLOGDig Deeper: Vodka Politics

Editorials:
Article databases/indexes:
Selected, related data, books, encyclopedias:
Selected journals:
Guides:

Select relevant articles:

Schrad,Mark Lawrence. 2007. “Constitutional Blemishes: American Alcohol Prohibition and Repeal as Policy Punctuation.” Policy Studies Journal 35 (3) (Aug 2007):437-63.

Schrad, Mark L. 2004. “Rag Doll Nations and the Politics of Differentiation on Arbitrary Borders: Karelia and Moldova.” Nationalities Papers 32(2):457-496

The suppression of vodka. (1915). The British Medical Journal, 1(2821), 171-172.

Review of book by Dr. Schrad:  A Review of A contemporary history of alcohol in Russia.


Article by Corey Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

SteinResearch links provided by Merrill Stein, team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science.

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CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment Comes to Villanova

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Imagine stepping into a room-sized enclosure, donning a pair of 3D glasses, and having the experience of touring the basilicas in Rome or exploring Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary or standing in the Sistine Chapel—all without leaving the Library. Well, technically Falvey Hall, which was the Villanova College Library before Falvey Memorial Library was built, will house this new facility, called CAVE.

What does CAVE mean?

CAVE stands for Cave Automatic Virtual Environment. I know some of you are asking, “Then, what does that “Cave” stand for?” MerriamWebster.com has your answer. The University’s version of this technology is called the Villanova Immersive Studies System (VISS).

The VISS allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even circle around the 3D image of an object, such as vase on a pedestal, as though they were in the actual setting. The VISS, in addition to the visual dimension, includes sound. For historical sites that have begun to deteriorate, such as the Eastern State Penitentiary, it preserves them for posterity. For sites of limited space, such as the Santa Rosa Necropolis under Vatican City that cannot accommodate large groups, the VISS allows 10-15 people at a time to examine that location.

How does it work?

The VISS enclosure—18’ wide, 10’ deep, 7.5’ high—features three walls and a ceiling. An opening, where the fourth wall would be, allows access. Rear-projected HD screens form its walls and ceiling, and it has a front-projected floor. To minimize shadows from viewers, strategically placed projectors create the floor imagery.

In addition to the CAVE’s capability to display images, the VISS has a camera component for capturing images and video. The custom-made camera cart actually holds several cameras mounted in a spherical array (software combines the cameras’ input into a single image or video). This camera system includes lights and microphones, all mounted atop a telescopic pedestal that extends to raise the cameras from their five-feet-high retracted position up to a height of twelve feet. Not only can the camera record images and video, it can also stream live images from remote locations.

How will this system benefit Villanova?

University professors will have the ability to record artifacts, settings, and events to be studied—unencumbered by distance, climate, or time of day—by their students on campus. Faculty may also include such recordings when developing their course curriculums.

Non-Villanova researchers, aka “off-campus collaborators,” will have the opportunity to access to the VISS for their own research projects. This collaboration with non-Villanova researchers illustrates a trend in which academic libraries provide environments called “collaboratories.”

Klassner, Poley, Dougherty

Klassner, Poley, Dougherty

The project is under the direction of Frank Klassner, PhD, professor of computing sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with Edmond Dougherty, assistant professor in the College of Engineering, and Darren Poley, interim director of Falvey Memorial Library.

According to the University’s Oct. 23 press release, the first component of the VISS, the CAVE structure itself, “is expected to be completed late in the spring of 2014.”

Gerald Dierkes is an information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copyeditor for the Communication and Service Promotion team, and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Forums Explore Ways to Make Villanova University Scholarship More Accessible

nsf1The National Science Foundation has extended its “where discoveries begin” initiative to include not just  principal investigators but anyone interested in perusing publically funded data through the promulgation of rules requiring funding recipients to have data management plans in place. Instead of researchers seeing this request as another chore in an unending to-do list, data management plans (DMP) can be considered a beneficial and valuable impetus to organize and archive resources with potential for enhancing a researcher’s profile. As Alfonso Ortega, PhD, associate vice president for research and graduate programs and the James R. Birle professor of energy technology in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, says “DMP’s are not just about fulfilling regulations but also about making your good work available.”

Intermim Director Darren Poley

Interim Director Darren Poley

The imperative to make Villanova University scholarship more accessible drove Falvey Memorial Library Interim Library Director Darren Poley to organize a series of forums with Dr. Ortega on three emerging developments in scholarly communication: data management plans (Sept. 16), open access journals (Oct. 21st) and institutional repositories (Nov. 11). All forums will take place in Connelly Center cinema from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Both Dr. Ortega and Mr. Poley recognize that a “build it and they will come” philosophy can lead to costly missteps and that faculty input is critical to success. With this guiding principle in mind, the forums are designed to facilitate conversations about these trends and generate ideas about how they ought to be tackled at Villanova.

At the first forum on data management plans, Dr. Ortega introduced the topic by commenting on the challenges researchers face in the day to day management and storage of data of all stripes (big, proprietary, and sensitive), the dilemmas researchers face about pressure to archive and share data, and the importance of clearly articulating how solutions to data management will advance the University Strategic Plan and are essential for them to be resourced sustainably. Poley spoke about how libraries are natural partners in the scholarly enterprise with deep expertise in organizing and archiving resources that ought to be extended to research data.  Linda Hauck, business librarian, surveyed how data management services are progressing at other higher-education institutions.

Ortega and Hauck

Ortega and Hauck

The highlight of the program was talks by Assistant Professor Melissa O’Connor, PhD, MBA, RN, COS-C (College of Nursing) and Professor Amy S. Fleischer, PhD, (College of Engineering) and the discussion they generated. Dr. Fleischer described the National Science Foundation’s data-management-plan requirement from the inside out. Dr. O’Connor illuminated the technical and physical security safeguards that need to be in place when using Medicare data and National Institutes of Health funding as well as the costs associated with data extraction. Comments and questions were volleyed about how to balance intellectual property rights with public access and scholarly reputations, whether Villanova has a research data policy, who should curate and provide stewardship of data a Villanova, and what secure methods for data back-up are available at Villanova.


Clockwise from top left, Spiro, Fogle, Hoskins and Bauer.

Clockwise from top left, Spiro, Fogle, Hoskins and Bauer.

At the second forum, held Oct. 21st on open access journals, Nikolaus Fogle, PhD, subject librarian for philosophy, provided an overview of the open access journal publishing movement including quality issues, tenure and promotion dilemmas, faculty initiated open access policies, and sustainability challenges.  He detailed how the traditional journal-publishing-business model employed by for-profit, non-profit and association publishers alike are straining library budgets. Next up was Professor Aaron M. Bauer, Gerald M. Lemole endowed chair in integrative biology, presenting the researcher point of view, noted that publication fees for high quality open access journals range from $1350 to $3000 per paper and that those fees cannot reasonably be recouped for externally funded research given the volume of papers some projects spawn (one such project alone lead by Dr. Bauer generated 68 papers!). He observed that publication fee discounts are among the benefits of institutional membership in open access publishing organizations, such as PLoS (Public Library of Science) and Biomed Central, and many of our peer institutions have made the commitment. Finally, he commented that the transition to open access will not be simple or quick as pressure to publish in high impact and h-index journals is a fact of life for academics establishing careers and striving to advance professionally. Dr. Bauer implored Villanova academic departments, Colleges and the Library to commit to finding sustainable solutions to the National Science Foundation’s impending mandates for open access publishing. Interim Library Director Darren Poley discussed library supported journals. Gregory D. Hoskins, PhD, Lawrence C. Gallen fellow in the humanities, took attendees for a deep dive into how Concept has become a professional-looking online journal powered by graduate student editors and reviewers. Finally Professor John-Paul Spiro shared the joys and difficulties that came with starting up the online journal, Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, including managing subscriptions and submissions to cultivate readership.

Faculty Forum #2 panel

Faculty Forum #2 panel

Contribute to the ongoing conversation by attending the final forums on institutional repositories (Monday, Nov. 11, 3:30-5 p.m., Connelly Center Cinema).


Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, is a business librarian. Photographs by Alice Bampton. 

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Brill´s New Pauly Online: A New Way to Discover the Ancient World

Have you ever heard of Lupercalia? Wanted to know more about the reign of Constantinus, “the Great” emperor of Rome? Do you need to write a paper about trade routes in post-Antiquity? Brill’s New Pauly Online might just be the place for you to start your research. Its interdisciplinary approach, easy-to-use interface, straightforward language and scholarly authority make this online resource an outstanding reference on the ancient world.

Brill’s New Pauly Online has two different sections you can search through at the same time, one on Antiquity and another on the Classical Tradition. As Brill explains:

“The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly is devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship.”

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Brill’s New Pauly Online allows for basic and advanced searches, features cross-references with hyperlinks, a browsable alphabetical index, maps and illustrations, and easy access to names, places, dates and objects from Greek and Roman culture. Plus, you can press Ctrl + F to quickly find relevant key words and phrases in the entries. Once you find what you’re looking for, try scanning the list of bibliographic references at the end of the entry or scroll through an automatically generated “Related Articles” for further topic coverage.

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After completing a quick and simple registration online, there are a series of “personal user tools” that can catapult your research experience into another world. Some of these added features include: the ability to label and “star” entries, email entries to yourself or classmates, and share links on social media (Facebook & Twitter). You can also save your searches and easily return to those lists of results, manage them from “My Account,” and even subscribe to Brill’s RSS Feed to hear when new or revised content is added.

As an additional bonus, try out the “Cite this Page” feature that is found at the end of each entry. If you are using this resource for an assignment, copy and paste this citation to create your reference list in just seconds. You can also use the “export citation” feature to send the bibliographic information to EndNote or RefWorks, or you can even save it as a document in either MLA or Chicago Style.

This resource is highly recommended for literature, history, philosophy, theology/religious studies, classical studies, and art/art history students. Find it by searching for Brill’s New Pauly in the library catalog, then click the “Search online version” link, or you can access it from the philosophy subject guide and the late antiquity: reference works course guide.

Questions or comments? Please email me at alexander.williams@villanova.edu or post a comment below.


RS6126_Alex-Williams-work-stationAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams. He is currently pursuing an MS in Library and Information Science at Drexel University’s iSchool.

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Last Modified: November 5, 2013