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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Falvey Celebrates Black History Month 2014

BLACKORAL-TO

Please join us in Falvey Memorial Library this week as we observe Black History Month. On Tuesday, Feb. 18, at 2:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner, Thomas Mogan, PhD, director, Office of Student Development and adjunct professor in the Department of History will present a talk titled “The Black Oral History Project: Confronting Our Past to Inform Our Future.”

Dr. Mogan will discuss the research efforts that led to the creation of Black Villanova: An Oral History, one of Falvey Memorial Library’s online exhibits, which examines the history of the African American student experience at Villanova University throughout the years spanning from approximately 1950-1985.

Alice Bampton, senior writer and visuals specialist, Communication and Service Promotion team, recently interviewed Dr. Mogan about the project:

AB: How did you get interested in the Black Villanova Oral History Project?

TM: I have always had a keen interest in the history of the civil rights movement, and this led me to pursue graduate work in history. I was conducting research for a seminar paper on the integration of African American athletes at Villanova, and I met with Dr. Ed Collymore, former executive director of Multicultural Affairs at Villanova and a former student-athlete. He shared with me some fascinating stories about what it was like to be an African American student-athlete at Villanova during the 1950s, and that set me on my journey to learn more. I knew that he was part of a much larger story that needed to be told.

Tom Mogan, PhD

Tom Mogan, PhD

AB: Who decided to involve the Falvey Digital Library?

TM: As part of my training to be a historian, I knew that it was good practice to make your research accessible to the public. So, as I began to conduct the interviews, I knew immediately that I wanted to share these interviews with the Villanova community. I approached Joe Lucia, former director of Falvey Memorial Library, with the idea, and he was very eager to support me in this endeavor. David Uspal [senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications] has also provided invaluable assistance in developing the oral history project’s website.

AB: What are your plans for the future of this project?

TM: I hope to continue to add to the collection by conducting more interviews. I have added a news feature to the site so I hope to keep it updated and fresh so that people have a reason to return to the site.

AB: Are there plans to publish your research (beyond the dissertation)?

TM: I have spoken with several journals about publishing an article based on this research, and I will be working on submitting those by the early summer. I hope to one day publish this work as a book.

AB: How did you select the subjects for the interviews?

TM: As a starting point, I sent an invitation letter to several African American alumni whom I knew were leaders within the Black Student League in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Two alums in particular, Ted Freeman and Napoleon Andrews, responded quickly and enthusiastically agreed to help me find African American alumni who might be willing to share their stories. This project would not have happened without the support of these two gentlemen. I have only interviewed one woman to date so I would like to include more about the African American woman’s experience at Villanova.

AB: Any additional information/comments that you would like to share?

TM: This project has been one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had in my life. In support of this project, I worked with the Alumni Association to sponsor a reunion for African American alumni during Homecoming 2012. We were able to welcome back over 40 African American alumni, some of whom had not been back to campus in over 40 years. This project has helped to begin the healing process for many black alums, and for that I am very pleased. I also hope that this project will allow Villanova to learn from our past as we continue to address issues of diversity and inclusion on our campus today.

David Uspal, Falvey’s senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications, was the library’s main point person for the project as he helped with the very difficult technical aspects of mounting the exhibit. On behalf of Uspal, his colleague Laura Bang, digital and special collections curatorial assistant and digital humanities coordinator at Falvey, says, “The Black Villanova project is a great addition to the library’s digital projects. Dr. Mogan’s interviews bring to life important perspectives on the Villanova experience for African Americans.” Work on this project will continue as it is an evolving historical record. Dr. Mogan, the project coordinator, invites additional participants in this project as he wants to include their stories in the rich heritage of African American history at Villanova University.


Farah Jasmine Griffin, PhD

Farah Jasmine Griffin, PhD

In addition to Dr. Mogan’s Black Oral History talk on Feb. 18, Falvey will also co-sponsor the Annual Black History Month talk along with the Africana Studies Program. On Thursday, Feb. 20, at 4:00 p.m. in room 204, join us as Farah Jasmine Griffin, PhD, William B. Ransford professor of English and comparative literature and African-American studies, Columbia University presents the Annual Black History Month talk as part of Africana Studies’ Spring Lecture series. Make sure to check out these great events!


Regina-edIntroduction written by Regina Duffy, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator.

imagesInterview by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Black Oral History Project graphics by Joanne Quinn.

 

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Dig Deeper: Sochi 2014, unfiltered

The 2014 Winter Olympic Games began last week in Sochi, Russia, amidst swirling accusations of corruption, human rights violations and inadequate facilities, to name just a few. To help us get to the bottom of these issues and more, research librarian and liaison to the Department of Political Science, Merrill Stein, has compiled links and information on all things Sochi.


Merill's Sochi Map

Dig Deeper

Overview:

Sochi is a popular resort city with a warm climate, mineral springs and mountain scenery located (lat: 43 35 00 N, long: 039 46 00 E) on the Black Sea coast near the foot of Caucasus range. Occupying the site of the former fort of Navaginskoye, according to the Getty Thesaurus, the city combines “ … officials say, the natural attractions of both France’s Cannes and Davos in Switzerland (Financial Times, Grost, 2012, Nov. 2). “Not since Stalin favored Sochi as the sunny retreat of the Soviet elite has so much been done to remake the city’s landscape” (Putin’s Olympic Fever Dream – NYT Magazine).

Once described as the  [Leonid] Brezhnev “Camp David,” Sochi has been the site for many important Russian and international political meetings and summits.

Construction:

Stacy St Clair tweet from Sochi 2014 2

Anatoly Pakhomov, mayor of Sochi, lists the preparations: “‘We built 438 transformer substations, 17 power-distribution hubs, [and] two thermoelectric power stations! … We generate 540 megawatts!’ The Olympics, he went on, have done nothing less than transform Sochi, a subtropical resort that stretches about 90 miles along a narrow coastline at the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains. Three new water-purification plants; more than 200 miles of new roads; 22 tunnels and 55 bridges to ease the city’s chronically snarled traffic; 13 new and renovated railroad stations; five new schools; six medical centers ‘with top-of-the-line medical equipment’; 49 new hotels with 24,000 rooms” (Putin’s Olympic Fever Dream – NYT Magazine).

“Russia has built two venues for the Sochi Winter Games from scratch. An area of swamp on the city’s western seaboard that was once a haven for wild duck now encloses a 256 hectare Olympic park that will host the ice sports competitions, including speed skating, ice hockey and curling. Snow events such as ski jump, bobsledding and luge will take place at the sprawling Krasnaya Polyana mountain resort above the city where the tallest peaks reach 2,050m above sea level. Tourists will be whisked between the two areas by a new 40km mountain road or by a railway being built on stilts to avoid polluting the Mzytma river valley.” (Financial Times, Grost, 2012, Nov. 2).

Corruption:

The Christian Science Monitor follows the $50 billion that’s been spent on Sochi

Business Insider asks: Why is Sochi so expensive?

Security and History:

In all respects, Soviet tourism was communal as opposed to being individual or family oriented. When a Soviet citizen visited a resort in Sochi on the Black Sea, he or she was often in the company of fellow workers from his or her factory or collective farm. And while tourism was primarily domestic (due to the strict security concerns of the Soviet government), international tourism grew throughout the post-WWII period, reaching its apex in the 1980s (Hall, 1991). Most of these were inter-bloc visitors coming from East Europe. Outbound international tourism remained minimal during the entire Soviet period, specifically because private travel abroad was almost never granted and most citizens did not have the financial means to travel to the majority of foreign destinations. (University of Texas, Perry-Castañeda Map Collection)

In advance of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, the recent bombings cast doubt on Russia’s ability to provide the level of security required for the games. In February a Chechen terrorist group reportedly claimed responsibility for the attack, as several more suicide bombings occurred that month.

Robert Bruce Ware has a new book on the Caucasus and Russia: The Fire Below, available in the library collection now.

Additional Info and Databases:

ABSEES – American Bibliography of Slavic & East European Studies (EBSCO)

Historical Abstracts (EBSCO)

ProQuest Central

Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports, 1974- 1996 (Readex)

Lexis Nexis Academic

Russian Studies subject guide

Political Science subject guide

History subject guide

Falvey catalog – related works


2014-01-29 14.53.13Introduction by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Arnold is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

SteinArticle, sources and links by Merrill Stein, librarian and liaison to the Department of Political Science.

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Foto Friday: Valentine’s Day Facts

Valentine

Valentine’s Day 2014: Feb. 14

Expressing one’s love to another is a celebrated custom on Valentine’s Day. Sweethearts and family members present gifts to one another, such as cards, candy, flowers and other symbols of affection. Opinions differ as to who was the original Valentine, but the most popular theory is that he was a clergyman who was executed for secretly marrying couples in ancient Rome. In A.D. 496, Pope Gelasius I declared Feb. 14 as Valentine Day. Esther Howland, a native of Massachusetts, is given credit for selling the first mass-produced valentine cards in the 1840s. The spirit continues today with even young children exchanging valentine’s cards with their fellow classmates.

Candy

1,148

Number of U.S. manufacturing establishments that produced chocolate and cocoa products in 2011, employing 35,538 people. California led the nation with 122 of these establishments, followed by Pennsylvania, with 109. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2011, NAICS code (31132) and (31133). More information can be found here.

440

Number of U.S. establishments that manufactured nonchocolate confectionary products in 2011. These establishments employed 19,198 people. California led the nation in this category with 56 establishments. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2011, NAICS code (31134)

$13.5 billion

The estimated value of shipments in 2011 for firms producing chocolate and cocoa products. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 Annual Survey of Manufactures, Products and Service Codes (311320 and 311330)

Nonchocolate confectionery product manufacturing, meanwhile, was an estimated $8.4 billion industry. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 Annual Survey of Manufactures, Products and Service Code (311340)

3,320

Number of confectionery and nut stores in the United States in 2011. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (445292) 

Flowers

15,307

The total number of florists’ establishments nationwide in 2011. These businesses employed 66,165 people. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (4531)

$280,357,058

The value of imports for cut flowers and buds for bouquets in 2013 through Oct. The total value of fresh cut roses as of Oct. 2013 was $354,703,231. Source: U.S. Census Bureau: Foreign Trade Division USA Trade Online U.S. Import and Export Merchandise trade (Commodity code-060319)

Jewelry

23,394

The estimated number of jewelry stores in the United States in 2011. Jewelry stores offer engagement, wedding and other rings to couples of all ages. In Feb. 2013, these stores sold an estimated $2.8 billion in merchandise. Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (448310)  and Monthly Retail Trade and Food Services.

The merchandise at these locations could well have been produced at one of the nation’s

1,385 jewelry-manufacturing establishments.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (339911) 


Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management. And thanks to Merrill Stein, librarian and liaison to the Department of Political Science, for supplying the Valentine facts and figures.

 

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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How Easy is E-ZBorrow?

ezborrow logoWhen current Villanova University students, faculty or staff can’t find the book they need in our collection, they turn to E-ZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad).

The recently upgraded E-ZBorrow service, which delivers books to Villanova library patrons within 4-5 days of their requests, is popular because it’s easy to search for and request books from 50 participating Mid-Atlantic libraries. The newest library to join E-ZBorrow is New York University with close to 4 million volumes in its collection. Once a requested item arrives, it can be borrowed for up to 12 weeks (6-week loan with optional 6-week renewal).

Very often, when a Falvey title is unavailable, the library’s catalog provides the user a “Search E-ZBorrow” link.

ezb vufind charged

 

ezb facetedThe E-ZBorrow link can also be found on our homepage. The E-ZBorrow web interface was recently improved with better advanced searching and faceted results that offer the patron related headings, like author and subject. Its advanced search is more robust, allowing users to combine search words in several fields, including author, title, keywords and ISBN.

Also new on the E-ZBorrow service site are icons that indicate the format of the material at lending libraries. Although regular print books can always be requested, only some libraries will have copies available. As shown below, libraries with requestable copies are listed, but E-ZBorrow also shows that Villanova (PVU) has a copy available and provides a link to the Falvey catalog.

ezb link to pvu

 

If the E-ZBorrow system deems that no copies are available, it will prompt the user to click on a link to Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad), another excellent service that provides users with materials from libraries all over the world.

ezb link to ill

 

ILLiad policies are a bit more limited (2-3 week loans), but some users prefer ILLiad because they can find and borrow unusual or rare materials not held by the E-ZBorrow libraries. ILLiad is also used by patrons to request articles from print and electronic collections. We can very often deliver requested articles within 24-48 hours.

If you need additional assistance, don’t hesitate to call the Information Desk at 610-519-4270. You can also contact a subject librarian for more specialized help.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, team leader of Access Services and editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team.

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Over Six Million Images for You to Use: ARTstor and AP Images

imagesAre you giving a presentation or writing a paper that would benefit from including images? Rather than Googling, why not investigate Falvey’s two image databases, ARTstor and AP Images (Associated Press Images). In both of these collections you will find high quality, properly identified images.

ARTstor is a digital library containing over 1.6 million images that go beyond the traditional arts – painting, sculpture, graphics and architecture. ARTstor also contains images in the humanities and sciences: music, photography, literature, world history, American studies, Asian studies, classical studies, Medieval studies, Renaissance studies, literature and more.

ARTstor can be found in Falvey’s Databases A-Z or you can go directly to ARTstor. Although anyone can log on to ARTstor from Falvey, registered users with valid Villanova University e-mail addresses are allowed additional privileges: they can save image groups, create shared folders, add notes to images and download the offline viewer. Once you have an account, you can access ARTstor from outside the Library or from a mobile device.artstor-mobile3

You can search for images using a keyword or by an advanced search of such terms as creator, culture, subject, title, geography, a date range or other features. Once you’ve located an image, you can pan or zoom in on the image to look at details. And, of particular interest to art history students, you can even make flashcards for studying. The other image database to which Falvey subscribes is AP Images (listed in Databases A-Z as Associated Press Images).

AP Images contains over 4.6 million photographs dating back to the 1800s, more than 4,500 hours of audio files from the 1920s forward and news stories from 1997 forward. AP Images can be searched by keywords, dates, people’s names, events, locations, photographers and more. Materials found in AP Images are considered primary sources and according to AP Images, the Associated Press “is the most credible source for non-biased reporting.” The database also contains a comprehensive, easily understood “AP Images Quick Reference Guide,” which not only provides thorough information about searching for images and viewing them but also has an appendix that lists topics and their contents.

Screen Shot 2013-12-10 at 12.03.21 PM

While both of these databases are easy to use, if you need help using them or finding specific images, please contact Jutta Seibert, Academic Integration team leader and liaison to the Dept. of History, 610-519-7876, room 228, or any of Falvey’s research support librarians.


Photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

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Faculty Forum #3: Airing views on an Institutional Repository for Villanova Scholarship and Data

The final Faculty Forum in a series of three was held on Nov. 11 in the Connelly Center cinema. The Faculty Forums were co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs (ORPG). Villanova faculty, researchers and students came to hear panelists discuss “the challenges that researchers now often face in relation to the dissemination and eventual disposition of the products of their scholarship …”

Alfonso (Al) Ortega, PhD, College of Engineering, and associate vice president for research and graduate programs, and the James R. Birle professor of energy technology in the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, welcomed the attendees. Members of the Faculty Forum #3 panel included David Lacy, team leader for Library Technology Development, Falvey Memorial Library; Edward (Ed) Sion, PhD, Dept. of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, professor; A. Maria Toyoda, PhD, Dept. of Political Science and associate dean for Interdisciplinary Studies and Global Initiatives; Aaron Wemhoff, PhD, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, assistant professor; Ryan P. Jorn, PhD, Dept. of Chemistry, associate professor; Paul Hanouna, PhD, Dept. of Finance, Villanova School of Business (VSB); and Daniel McGee, director, strategic planning and consulting, University Information Technologies (UNIT).

David Lacy

David Lacy

The first panelist, David Lacy, presented the library’s perspective on the creation of an institutional repository “to provide a historical record of Villanova University’s scholarly output.” Lacy reported that Falvey has already begun to create a repository with its Community Bibliography, which is designed to house the entire publications of the University community. He discussed the configuration and workflow of an institutional repository and said, “[Its] ultimate success comes from an institutional mandate.”

Dr. Edward Sion discussed the research database containing the “Catalog of White Dwarf Stars” (a white dwarf is a star that has exhausted its nuclear fuel) and libraries of theoretical models constructed to compare data from Hubble Space Telescope and other orbiting observatories. Dr. Sion created the Catalog with a colleague, George P. McCook, PhD, Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Hamada

A. Maria Toyoda

Dr. A. Maria Toyoda discussed a database, the Quinn-Toyoda CAPITAL, which she and Dennis P. Quinn, PhD, Georgetown University, created. The Quinn-Toyoda CAPITAL is a dataset used in her research on financial openness and political economic issues in East Asia.

The next presenter, Dr. Aaron Wemhoff, showed data from his research in molecular dynamics simulations and the data storage strategies he used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Dr. Ryan P. Jorn, who joined Villanova’s Dept. of Chemistry in August 2013, discussed his research computational methods and the data generated in his quantitative chemistry studies.

The final researcher to address the need for an institutional repository, Dr. Paul Hanouna, discussed the data he has generated in his financial research and the resources already housed in the VSB Dept. of Finance.

Daniel McGee discussed UNIT’s views on creating an institutional repository for Villanova scholarship and data.

The speakers joined Dr. Ortega and Darren Poley, interim library director, for a lively question and answer session and open discussion with the audience.


Photos and article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

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Remembering JFK: 50th Anniversary of the President’s Assassination

JFK


November 22 marks the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s (JFK’s) assassination in Dallas, Texas in 1963. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was travelling by motorcade with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy that fateful day, campaigning for the next presidential election, when he was shot and killed. Many Americans believe this tragic event changed America forever.

During his brief time in office, JFK was a monumental force in promoting the change of the social and political landscape of America. He helped to raise minimum wage, create the Peace Corps, aid the Civil Rights Movement, improve Social Security benefits and even build support for the space program’s mission of landing on the moon—a dream that would eventually come to fruition in 1969. Most notably, perhaps, JFK played a vital role in peacefully ending the Cuban Missile Crisis, avoiding what could have been a devastating nuclear war with the Soviet Union. His famous call to all Americans during his inaugural address, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country,” was the main motivating force of his presidency. He lived for public service and encouraged all Americans to do the same in order to contribute to the greater good. He gave us hope that things could change for the better.

Millions of Americans and people from all over the world mourned the loss of JFK in 1963, and many are still fascinated with him to this day. Why are we still captivated by a man who has long since gone? Kennedy served as president for just under three years, but in that short amount of time he made quite an impact. In addition to his political work, JFK was also greatly admired for his roles as husband and father to his two small children, Caroline and John Jr. The First Family was often in the public eye, especially as televised news increased in popularity, which helped many connect with JFK on a deeper level. The American public found him easy to relate to when they saw him playing these common, everyday roles. Images of his children playing in the White House Oval Office and similar warm family moments have become icons and an illuminative window into a simpler time in America. Through his youth and charisma, it seems as though JFK was able to give the White House a newfound warmth and vibrancy that it had never quite had before. Perhaps that is part of what keeps us interested in him—his death represents a loss of innocence during what was thought to be a time of hope and transformation.

Although JFK’s popularity has endured throughout the years, current college students may be curious about what he truly symbolized to American public at the time and why he is sometimes still analyzed in the media to this day. Not to fear! Falvey Memorial Library’s political science research expert, Merrill Stein, has assembled library resources to satisfy your curiosity and help you to Dig Deeper.

 


Dig Deeper

Resources available at Falvey Memorial Library (suggested by our very own Political Science research expert, Merrill Stein):

Articles:

This Close to a Killer

 The Truth About JFK and Vietnam: Why the Speculation is Wrong-Headed

Books:

Blind Over Cuba

Passion for Truth : From Finding JFK’s Single Bullet to Questioning Anita Hill to Impeaching Clinton

The CIA & Congress : The Untold Story from Truman to Kennedy

The Other Missiles of October : Eisenhower, Kennedy, and the Jupiters

The Missile Crisis of October 1962 : A Review of Issues and References

The Road to Dallas: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Report of the Warren Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy

 

CDs:

Jacqueline Kennedy : Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy, Interviews with Arthur M. Schlesinger.

Films/Documentaries:

The Missiles of October

Databases/Journals:

American National Biography Online (Oxford)

Congress and the Nation

CQ Almanac

CQ Electronic Library (SAGE)

CQ Press Voting and Elections Collection

JSTOR

National Journal

Washington Post Historical

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts

External Websites:

JFK Facts

JFK Library

JFK 50 Year Anniversary Website

The  American Presidency Project

Today in 1963 Twitter Feed

Wilson Center-Cold War International History Project

U.S. Government Bookstore (collection of the official Federal publications by and about President John F. Kennedy) 

Local Exhibit:

Philadelphia University’s Paul J. Gutman Library:

“Single Bullet: Arlen Specter & the Warren Commission Investigation of the JFK Assassination.”

Information on of some of the many TV specials, movies and books that will be available around the anniversary of JFK’s death this month:

Daily Bulletin

San Jose Mercury News

TV Guide

USA Today


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication & Service Promotion team and Library Events and Program coordinator.

SteinResearch links provided by Merrill Stein, team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science.

Our new Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Cristina Soriano, PhD, Presents Research on Social Networks in Colonial Venezuela

Cristina Soriano, PhD

Cristina Soriano, PhD

This Wednesday, Nov. 20, Cristina Soriano, PhD, holder of the Albert R. LePage Endowed Professorship and assistant professor in the Department of History, will deliver a lecture as part of our ongoing Scholarship@Villanova series. The lecture is entitled “The Revolutionary Contagion: Pamphlets, Rumors, and Conspiracies in Venezuela during the Age of Revolutions,” and explores the many fascinating connections between plebeian literary practices, webs of circulation of information, and the emergence of social networks for political mobilization in colonial Venezuela.

This week’s Dig Deeper material was prepared by Jutta Seibert, librarian and Team Leader for Academic Integration.


Martín Tovar y Tovar [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Martín Tovar y Tovar [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Dig Deeper: Revolutionary Movements in Latin America & Revolutionary Print Culture

Falvey Memorial Library has numerous resources related to Dr. Soriano’s research for those who would like to learn more about the revolutionary movements in Latin America and revolutionary print culture.

In El Libro En Circulación: En El Mundo Moderno En España Y Latinoamérica, Dr. Soriano writes about the circulation of books in colonial Venezuela.

Among the more recent books about Latin American revolutionary movements available in the library are—

 

Falvey also has various related primary sources in translation:

For those who would like to read more about the relationships between print and politics in early modern history, we recommend—

Need to brush up on your knowledge of Venezuela’s history? The Encyclopedia of Latin America History and Culture is a great starting point.


Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

imgres

Links prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

Our new Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Last Modified: November 19, 2013