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Philadelphia Researching Tips

Even though Philadelphia is only 13 miles away, navigating the city may seem like another world in some sense. With world class institutions, museums, and parks, coupled with a rich history running throughout the city, it is no wonder people can feel overwhelmed when visiting Philadelphia. Luckily Falvey has access to many resources to help navigate and research any topic on Philadelphia. Whether the resource is in print or online, the Library can help resolve any confusion when it comes to researching the City of Brotherly Love.

Books

Falvey has a vast collection of books on Philadelphia; where that collection is located in the Library depends on your subject of research. Start with “Philadelphia” in the subject line to narrow your results.

 

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Use the facets on the right to filter the results down to your area of interest:

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In this example, the results are filtered down into books about Philadelphia politics. The picture below displays that books on this subject can be found in the F 158 call number section of the library.

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Online Resources

Jutta Seibert, History Librarian and Academic Integration Team Leader, suggests the following free resources readily available online:

Historical Images of Philadelphia – 20,000 historical images of the city dating back to 1841 courtesy of the Free Library.

Library Company of Philadelphia – The Library Company was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin and remains to this day an independent cultural institution. Its rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art are worth a visit to its Locust Street location. The Library Company currently hosts “Fashioning Philadelphia – the Style of the City, 1720-1940.” Selected exhibits such as the “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic” are available online.

Digital Maps of Philadelphia – Digital access to city maps ranging from 1834 to 1962 courtesy of the Free Library.

 

This is a short, starting point for researching tips on Philadelphia. Remember to always contact your subject librarian for a more in depth search.


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‘Caturday: Heel’d – A Villanova Documentary About People & Pets

Heel'd For some, Spring Break is an opportunity to serve others. Next week Villanova ‘Cats will be traveling all over the world on service trips that benefit people and their communities.

Social justice, as noted on Villanova’s Center for Service and Social Justice website, is “action that seeks to bring about peace and justice in the world” and can be achieved “through service, advocacy, and justice education.”

Two years ago, as part of a social justice course, a short documentary was written, filmed and produced by a group of Villanova students. It tells the story of “a local Philadelphia nonprofit, Hand2Paw, and its mission to bring together homeless youth and homeless animals.” (Main Line Media News)

Here’s the official trailer.

 


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‘Caturday: Black Wildcat

Shown below is the cover of Black Wildcat, an image borrowed from Black Villanova: An Oral History. Take a scroll through this amazing resource, especially this month as we celebrate Black History Month.

“On April 23, 1969, the Black Student League (BSL) published the first edition of the Black Wildcat. The unmistakable clenched fist on the front cover sent a clear signal to the Villanova community that the BSL was clearly influenced by the larger Black Power movement. With its controversial articles and opinion pieces, the Black Wildcat served to educate the Villanova community about the experiences of black students on a predominately white campus.”

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‘Caturday feature written by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion Team and team leader, Access Services.


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Now through March 27, Peruse the Bloomsbury Collection

evUntil March 27 the library has a trial subscription to Bloomsbury Collections. This is a collection of e-books from Bloomsbury Publishing, which incorporates the previous Continuum, Methuen, and Berg imprints, among others. The collection is strong across a wide range of humanities and social science disciplines, including classical studies, history, literary studies, philosophy, political science and religious studies.

Click here to access the collections.

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Some highlights: The Philosophy collection contains titles of particular interest in critical theory, postmodernism, political philosophy and aesthetics, as well as a number of excellent series, including Bloomsbury Studies in Continental Philosophy, Key Thinkers, and Ancient Commentators on Aristotle. The Literature collection contains the Arden Shakespeare, and the History collection has a large number of titles on ancient, medieval and early modern topics.

The collection is easily searchable and can be browsed by subject, so it’s simple to find book chapters on your topic of research. It also features a particularly clear interface. Most titles include a book summary/abstract, and individual chapters can be read as HTML, or downloaded and printed as PDF files.

Please contact Nikolaus Fogle (nikolaus.fogle@villanova.edu) with any questions or comments.


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Today’s database: a powerful tool for research on MLK and African American and African History and Culture

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Falvey Memorial Library is fortunate to be able to provide access to hundreds of instructional databases for the Villanova Community. While the choices may be vast, each searchable collection presents a unique treasure trove of information. Today, in commemoration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we’d like to direct your attention to a uniquely browsable resource, the Oxford African American Studies Center. Touted as “the online authority on the African American Experience,” the Oxford AASC provides a wide array of primary source documents, educational resources and articles, and multimedia.

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The database provides students, scholars and librarians with online access to the finest reference resources in African American studies. At its core, AASC features the new Encyclopedia of African American History: 1619-1895, Black Women in America, the highly acclaimed Africana, a five-volume history of the African and African American experience, and the African American National Biography project (estimated at 8 volumes). In addition to these major reference works, AASC offers other key resources from Oxford’s reference program, including the Concise Oxford Companion to African American Literature and selected articles from other reference works.

Feel free to contact a librarian if you’d like further help exploring and utilizing any of Falvey Memorial Library’s databases.



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What We Were Reading in 2014

Though we’re not a public library, sometimes we get asked about what types of items were charged out the most. Of course, those may not always be the most popular items. So, taking a look back at the rapidly fading year 2014, finds the New York Times bestseller, Me Before You by JoJo Moyes, charged out as many times as any of our works. This is followed by perennial favorites, such as the The Holy Bible: New International Version-Containing the Old Testament and the New Testament, Oxford Spanish Dictionary, Mckay’s Modern Italian-English and English-Italian Dictionary, The Grammar Book: an ESL/EFL Teacher’s Course, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution (now also online), Phaedo, Catch-22, Ulysses, Lolita, Beloved: a novel and Catcher in the Rye.

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Popular this year too was the New York Times bestseller Flash Boys, followed by titles such as Gone Girl: a novel, the Gabriel García Márquez novel, El Coronel No Tiene Quien le Escriba, All Names Have Been Changed, Organic Chemistry as a Second Language: First Semester Topics (second semester topics not as popular), Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches (2014), The Fault in Our Stars, and The Laramie Project.

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Popular leisure reading material this year can be summed up in one sentence (more or less): Good News, for the Best of Me, in America’s Great Game, don’t Blink but Would It Kill You to Stop Doing That since 1345, or do you want a Casual Vacancy because you’ll have No Easy Day if you’re an Alchemist, English German Girl or a Racketeer.

Some of the most selected movies this year include perennial favorites like Citizen Kane; Groundhog Day; 2001, A Space Odyssey; and The Tree of Life. Other movies, The Corporation, Taxi to the Dark Side, Adaptation, Nun’s Story and La Jetée Sans Soleil were also charged out several times.

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Very requested subjects and books borrowed through our interlibrary loan and E-ZBorrow services were The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, The Goldfinch: a Novel, and books about counseling, statistics, public speaking and science fiction.

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Happy holidays from all of us to all of you – and we hope Santa puts some of your favorite reading material in your stocking. But if not, you know the first place to visit once you get back on campus! Click here for Christmas and New Year break hours.


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The Library Invites Intellectual Property Lawyer, Statistics Education Director and You to Discuss “Open Access” Issues

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Join us this week for Open Access Week events,
and we welcome your response to our survey below!

Open Access Week is a global event for inspiring the academic community to advance the open-access movement. Open access embraces two key complimentary ideas: scholarship should be freely available on the web, AND it should be free of permission barriers for legitimate uses. The Budapest Open Access Initiative (2002) is probably the most often quoted definition of “open access”:

By “open access” to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.

Since that definition was penned, much progress has been made by individual scholars, universities, scholarly societies, publishers and national and international bodies for making open access to scholarship a reality. So many journals have gone or been established as open access that we need a Directory of Open Access Journals. Furthermore, traditional subscription journal publishers such as Taylor & Frances, Wiley, Springer and Elsevier offer authors fee-based options to make their articles open access, what some might consider an effort to co-opt the open-access movement. Institutional repositories for archiving all forms of scholarship from articles to data and born digital artifacts, many open, have proliferated on campuses big and small around the globe.

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Additionally, open access mandates by funders requiring that the results of research be made publically available for free are becoming the norm (for a database of funder mandates see SHERPA/JUIET).  Faculties at top universities such as Harvard University,  Duke University and the University of California System have adopted institutional  open access policies which typically address depositing scholarship in an institutional repository and granting rights to scholarship (See Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions.)

Open Access Week is a good time to examine your thoughts on how open access impacts your own scholarly practice and what initiatives you would like to see Villanova University take regarding to open access. The best way to do that is by joining a conversation or by taking our open access survey!

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Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs will participate in Open Access Week with two events, both lunch hour brown bag participatory lectures. On Tuesday, Oct. 21, 1-2 p.m., in Falvey room 204, Michael Posner, PhD, director, Center for Statistics Education and Linda Hauck, business liaison librarian, will discuss “Open Data Trends: Policies, Privacy and Preserving Data Integrity.”

Posner, Hauck, Leytes, Fogle

Posner, Hauck, Leytes, Fogle

On Friday, Oct. 24, 1-2 p.m., in room 205, Dina Leytes, practice group chair, Intellectual Property and New Media, at Griesing Law, LLC, and Nikolaus Fogle, subject librarian for philosophy, will discuss “Author Rights: When and How Can You Archive, Share and Own Your Published Work?”

Open Access Week is an international event being held for the eighth time. It provides “an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research.”

To learn more about open access from local viewpoints, attend one or both of the events to be held in Falvey on Oct. 21 and 24.


Article by Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, (pictured) business librarian and team coordinator for the Business Research team.


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‘Cat in the CAVE

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 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


CAVEToday at 2:00, Villanova’s CAVE is officially open. In honor of opening day, this week’s blog post will be all about immersive virtual reality—for those of us who might not even know where to begin thinking about the creative and academic applications of virtual environments.

Disclaimer: I’m not an expert. I’m a virtual reality noob. I’m writing this with no in-depth technical expertise—just a whole lot of geeky excitement. But I do play (and, by way of literary theory, study) video games, and my personal interest in virtual reality’s possible applications is heavily biased towards, well, play. And by “play” I don’t mean to imply the installment is only for entertainment (nor do I think its entertainment and audio/visual/tactile immersion possibilities should be minimized, especially for the arts and humanities). I mean “play” as in stepping inside a world and getting your hands virtually dirty, like a kid in a sandbox.

But before we talk Earth science and data visualization, whet your VR palette with the incredibly cool Tilt Brush (aka “Microsoft Paint for the Year 2020”).

Oculus_vs_Morpheus-740x580-580x450Depending on your hobbies, you might have already heard about the VR movement in video games a la Oculus Rift  and Project Morpheus. These are headset-based immersive mechanisms, while the CAVE is quite literally a virtually immersive walk-in cave. Still, if you want to explore discussion of virtually reality without scholarly pressure, the gaming community is a good place to start.

If you feel like you’re ready to brave the technical background and scholarly applications of virtual reality, The Verge posted a feature video on The Virtual Reality CAVE, featuring UC Davis’s setup, KeckCAVES. A little digging into UC Davis’s ongoing projects, which include applications in Earth science, data visualization, and responsive media, is a fun way to get your feet wet!

Based on a little internet reading, the possibilities of virtual reality in scholarly, scientific and creative application are innumerable—but are not all fully realized, or even drafted. And that’s the cool part: if this is the forefront of a new wave, this is your chance to brainstorm, too.

How could you imagine immersive virtual reality used in your field of study?

 


Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and ServicArticle by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Falvey Scholar program recognizes student accomplishments in research, innovation and creativity

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Interim Library Director Darren G. Poley presents Jerisa Upton with her award.

The annual Falvey Scholars Award—established by Falvey Memorial Library in conjunction with the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships and the Honors Program—recognizes and celebrates the academic excellence of some of Villanova’s finest undergraduate scholars. This year’s event, held on Friday April 25, honored six Falvey Scholars under each of the following categories: business, engineering, liberal arts, science, nursing and our new category, social science, which was added given the overwhelming response and volume of excellent candidates in the liberal arts.

Each of the Falvey Scholars presented a 30-minute summary of their winning project and were each presented with the Falvey Scholars Award by our Interim Library Director, Darren Poley.

Falvey is delighted to announce the following undergraduates as the 2014 Falvey Scholars:

Aurora Vandewark (nursing); mentor: Michelle M. Kelly, PhD, CRNP; Project: “Evidence-Based Practices to Reduce Psychosocial Distress Among Parents of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Patients.”

Jerisa Upton (social science); mentor: Maghan Keita, PhD; Project: “Understanding Bureaucratic Politics and the Origins of the Great Leap Forward.”

Mark Bookman (liberal arts); mentors: Maghan Keita, PhD, and Edwin Goff, PhD; Project: “Re-imagining Discourse: Shingon Buddhism and Western Epistemologies.”

Clockwise, from top left: Vandewark, Upton, Bookman, McGrane, Ferguson and Shaik

Clockwise, from top left: Vandewark, Upton, Bookman, McGrane, Ferguson and Shaik

Noor F. Shaik (science); mentor: Dennis D. Wykoff, PhD; Project: “Using Fluorescent Markers in Cells and Flow Cytometry to Measure the Selective Pressures in Yeast.”

Olivia Ferguson (business); mentor: Peter Zaleski, PhD; Project: “Metropolitan Manufacturing Decline, 1980-2005, and Subsequent Effects on Residents.”

Robert McGrane (engineering); mentor: Noelle Comolli, PhD; Title: “Chitosan Thin-Films for Post-Surgical Drug Delivery.”

Falvey Scholars is just one of the many events that comprise the Undergraduate Research Exposition, or EXPO 14: a week-long series of programs that recognize the research undergraduates accomplish throughout the year. Villanova is proud to highlight the contributions of its undergraduate student community!


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator for the Scholarly Outreach team. Photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.


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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Tag Items in the Library’s Catalog

Do you ever think an item should have a search term or category associated with it, but it doesn’t? This video shows how to make items easy to find by adding a tag. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.


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Last Modified: May 1, 2014