FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



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‘Twas the Week Before Finals: Chicago-Style

chicago manual of style

Are you working on a final project or paper that requires Chicago Style formatting? Attend this helpful session to brush up before your deadline.

The workshop will be held in Falvey 204 in the second-floor Learning Commons on Tuesday, April 29:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert.

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What’s that New Desk for in The Learning Commons?

Second floor service deskThe new Learning Commons Service Desk has opened on Falvey’s second floor. The Library has recognized the need for a service point in the Learning Commons to help library patrons locate resources, people and places. Falvey’s Information and Research Assistance team, whose mission is “to serve the Villanova community by connecting members and visitors with the resources necessary to achieve their learning and research goals while developing their information-seeking skills,” has assigned two of its team members to staff this new desk.

Information Services Specialists Donna Chadderton and Gerald Dierkes will be happy to—

  • Connect you with a research librarian,
  • Direct you to the print and online resources you seek
  • And get you answers for your questions.

Donna and Gerald staff the desk Monday through Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stop by and say “Hi.”

Photo taken by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Continuum: Falvey is the Place to Be

DarrenWith hints of spring in the air, I hope the Villanova community has been faring well during the recent severe winter weather. I need to inform you about a schedule change and a noteworthy event.

In response to the University’s plan to schedule make-up classes on Sundays as compensation for snow days, Falvey is offering expanded hours. The Library will be open two hours earlier (including collection access and desk services) on the following Sundays: March 16, March 23, March 30, April 6, April 13, April 27 and May 4—in other words, from 10 a.m. to midnight on the Sundays for rescheduled classes and for the last week of exams. The library’s first-floor lounge and Falvey Hall (aka Old Falvey), as places to study, are still Wildcard accessible 24/7.

Despite the weather’s disruption to classes, event programming in Falvey has not been hindered. We have been the venue for 62 events and meetings in the spring semester so far. It looks as though the Library will have hosted or sponsored close to 200 again this academic year.

scholars_bw.jpgOne library event that is on track for at the end of the semester is the annual Falvey Scholar Awards.

Falvey Memorial Library is now gathering Falvey-Scholars-Award nominations from faculty members who work with undergraduates on a senior thesis or capstone project. The individuals or teams of Villanova seniors who are accomplishing the most outstanding undergraduate research should be nominated.

The faculty-nomination deadline is April 4. We also welcome nominations before the April 4 deadline.

For the link to the nomination page and more information about the Falvey Scholars Award, go to the Library’s Falvey Scholars Webpage.

Nominated students or teams will be invited to apply for the award. Winners will be chosen from the pool of nominated undergraduate seniors who apply. Winners will be invited to present their research at the Falvey Scholars Award event, part of a weeklong celebration of outstanding Villanova research.

Falvey Scholars Event:

Date: Friday, April 25

Time: 9 a.m.-12 noon

Location: Falvey Memorial Library

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Collection-and-Services Data Tell a Story

Out of the 570,000 print titles in our collection, about 60,000 circulated to Villanova patrons last year. This doesn’t include the journals, group study rooms or laptops. Many print materials are also used in-house without being checked out to patrons.

It’s perhaps not surprising that the main stacks titles with the heaviest circulation in the Falvey collection are a mix of fiction and non-fiction, including business, history and literature titles that can be associated with actively taught courses. Looking at the top five titles below, I’m going to have to say that Catching Fire is probably evidence that patrons still want to read for enjoyment and not just for assignments.

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins. (10 loans)

AchebePragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty by Colin Koopman. (10 loans)

Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success by Rodney Stark. (10 loans)

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. (9 loans)

Business of Sports: edited by Brad R. Humphreys and Dennis R. Howard.  (7 loans)

While the most popular books borrowed in 2013 weren’t necessarily predictable, they showed us what students and faculty were interested in last year. By comparing this internal data with the external data below, we also see where gaps may exist in our collections.

between menBehavioural ecology (7 requests), Programming the World Wide Web (5 requests) and Centering Prayer and Inner Awakening (4 requests) were the top three requested titles through Interlibrary Loan, spanning the humanities and sciences. The two books borrowed most through E-ZBorrow were Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (4 requests) and Introduction to Software Testing (4 requests), also representing the arts and sciences equally.

Moving on from monographs (print books), we have statistics showing the number of articles requested through Interlibrary Loan from other libraries’ journal holdings and through Document Delivery services from our own journal collection.

What is Document Delivery, you may ask? It’s a service rendered only to Villanova students, staff and faculty who need a scanned (digitized) copy of a print journal article from our collection.

It’s interesting to note the fifteen most requested journal titles through Interlibrary Loan are a mix of many disciplines, but most predominantly philosophy, theology, nursing and engineering, as evidenced by the top five titles from that list.

Critical care medicine (43)

Water Science and Technology (20)

Theology and Science (19)

The Leibniz review (17)

American family physician (17)

As you can see, journal data from the Document Delivery system shows that faculty and patrons are making good use of this service, although theology, nursing and engineering emerge as the frontrunners.

Journal of Ecumenical Studies (74 requests)

Tetrahedron Letters (35 requests)

JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association (22 requests)

National Catholic Register (20 requests)

Journal of Heat Transfer (19 requests)

Falvey librarians use all available data to make purchasing decisions in consultation with individual academic departments. We also strive to improve patron access to our immediate collection and to offer services that extend the collection beyond our walls.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, editorial blog coordinator, Communication & Service Promotion team; team leader, Access Services.

 

Critical care medicine

Water Science and Technology

Theology and Science

The Leibniz review

American family physician

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Longer (Sun)days and Midterm Hours

2014-02-04 11.50.54The weather may have shortened the lead time for midterms, but we’ve lengthened the library hours. Not only will the Library stay open until 3 a.m. on February 24 – 26, we will also open the Library earlier on Sundays, at 10 a.m. So when you hear those early birds chirping outside your windows as harbingers of spring, you can jump out of bed and head to Falvey. And don’t forget, you can also use the 24-hour study lounges in the Library and Falvey Hall!

 

Photo by Joanne Quinn

 

 

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Sunday Hours Extended to Accommodate Make-up Classes

Painted in WaterlogueAs we all know, the past month has been rife with severe weather and power outages that forced the University to close for a total of seven class days so far.

In response to these events, the Rev. Kail C. Ellis, PhD, OSA, vice president of Academic Affairs, has offered faculty the option to “schedule make-up classes on Sundays in order to offer classroom/lab teaching possibilities which will minimize faculty and student conflicts … and spread the make-up sessions throughout the second half of the semester.”

Interim Library Director Darren Poley quickly responded to this decision by extending Sunday library hours. Starting Feb. 23, the Library will open at 10 a.m., two hours earlier than usual.

The Sundays before and after Spring Break, and Easter Sunday, will not be affected by this temporary adjustment to library hours.

Feb. 23: 10 a.m. – Midnight

March 2 (Beginning of Spring Break): Closed

March 9 (End of Spring Break): 2 p.m. – 12 a.m.

March 16: 10 a.m. – Midnight

March 23: 10 a.m. – Midnight

March 30: 10 a.m. – Midnight

April 6: 10 a.m. – Midnight

April 13: 10 a.m. – Midnight

April 20 (Easter Sunday): Closed

April 27: 10 a.m. – Midnight

May 4: 10 a.m. – Midnight

As always, late night study hours will be available during midterms.

“We encourage everyone to work together to manage this problem in a spirit of cooperation and patience.” –Father Ellis

Photograph by Joanne Quinn, graphic design specialist and team leader, Communication and Service Promotion.

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How Easy is E-ZBorrow?

ezborrow logoWhen current Villanova University students, faculty or staff can’t find the book they need in our collection, they turn to E-ZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad).

The recently upgraded E-ZBorrow service, which delivers books to Villanova library patrons within 4-5 days of their requests, is popular because it’s easy to search for and request books from 50 participating Mid-Atlantic libraries. The newest library to join E-ZBorrow is New York University with close to 4 million volumes in its collection. Once a requested item arrives, it can be borrowed for up to 12 weeks (6-week loan with optional 6-week renewal).

Very often, when a Falvey title is unavailable, the library’s catalog provides the user a “Search E-ZBorrow” link.

ezb vufind charged

 

ezb facetedThe E-ZBorrow link can also be found on our homepage. The E-ZBorrow web interface was recently improved with better advanced searching and faceted results that offer the patron related headings, like author and subject. Its advanced search is more robust, allowing users to combine search words in several fields, including author, title, keywords and ISBN.

Also new on the E-ZBorrow service site are icons that indicate the format of the material at lending libraries. Although regular print books can always be requested, only some libraries will have copies available. As shown below, libraries with requestable copies are listed, but E-ZBorrow also shows that Villanova (PVU) has a copy available and provides a link to the Falvey catalog.

ezb link to pvu

 

If the E-ZBorrow system deems that no copies are available, it will prompt the user to click on a link to Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad), another excellent service that provides users with materials from libraries all over the world.

ezb link to ill

 

ILLiad policies are a bit more limited (2-3 week loans), but some users prefer ILLiad because they can find and borrow unusual or rare materials not held by the E-ZBorrow libraries. ILLiad is also used by patrons to request articles from print and electronic collections. We can very often deliver requested articles within 24-48 hours.

If you need additional assistance, don’t hesitate to call the Information Desk at 610-519-4270. You can also contact a subject librarian for more specialized help.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, team leader of Access Services and editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team.

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Smart Search Tips to Save You Time: Get the Most out of Google Scholar

Why do you still need a librarian when “everything” is online? It’s because librarians are experts in showing you how to retrieve the reliable and scholarly information you need from the endless possibilities the Internet offers. Watch this space for regular time-saving data searching suggestions and secrets that only librarians know! Please Ask Us if there’s a particular searching dilemma you’d like us to cover.

Get the Most out of Google Scholar

Did you know you can turn Google Scholar into a super search engine that will allow you to access the full text of the library’s journal articles, even from off campus? Just set the following options:

· Go to Google Scholar: http://scholar.google.com

· Click Settings.
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Click “Library Links” and type “Villanova” into the search box. Then click the search icon. When options are displayed, be sure to check off “Villanova University – Click here for full text.” (Sometimes other options are also displayed, but “Click here for full text” is the most useful.) Then click “Save.”
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Now when you do a search, look for the “Click here for full text” link. Click it, and at the next screen, click the Article link. You will be able to access the full text of the article, even from off-campus!

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Bonus tip: Want to retrieve the most recent articles? Try the publication-date options on the left-hand side of your results page.

 


Quintiliano

Quintiliano

Barbara Quintiliano is a nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian. Contact her at 610-519-5207 or by email.

 

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Falvey Student Satisfaction Survey: results are in!

MICK-Recently Falvey presented the results of its faculty survey in our blog space. In this post, we are pleased to report the results of the student satisfaction survey.

Since spring 2002, a survey has been administered every 2 to 3 years to a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students to assess their satisfaction with the Falvey Memorial Library services and resources. In February and March, 2013, we again administered the questionnaire to a sample comprised of 2,042 undergraduate students and 1,289 graduate students. The overall response rate for undergraduate students was 22%, ranging from 17% for VSB students to 29% for students majoring in the sciences. Fifteen percent (15%) of the graduate students responded to the survey with rates ranging from 9% for VSB students to 23% for nursing students.

Villanova’s Office of Planning and Institutional Research electronically administered the faculty and student surveys. An invitation email was sent through the survey software and reminders were sent to non-respondents to increase response rates. Chi-square goodness of fit tests were run to determine representativeness of the respondents.

The library display case in front of Falvey Holy Grounds currently holds some of the results of both the faculty and student surveys. Check it out next time you’re in the Library. It will be up for a limited time only, prior to our forthcoming One Book Villanova display.

SATISFACTION


Academic success
Daily or weekly visits to Falvey were made by 68% of undergraduates, with about 30% visiting monthly or during the semester. Forty-five percent (45%) of undergraduates visited Falvey weekly. Graduate students responded that 35% visit Falvey daily or weekly with about 17% visiting Falvey monthly. Slightly more than three-quarters (76%) of undergraduate respondents feel that Falvey Memorial Library is important to their success. Eighty-four percent (84%) of graduate students agree or strongly agree that Falvey is important to their success. Overall, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students comprised the majority of nearly 80% of respondents who felt Falvey was important to their success.

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Learning Commons
Students are increasingly finding Falvey an attractive place to work alone or in groups, use public computing, and avail themselves of Learning Commons services, as this 2013/2011 survey comparison shows.

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For what purposes did students visit the library?
Students, especially the graduate population, still visit Falvey to check out or borrow books and study or work alone. In 2013, 72% of undergraduates and 37% of graduate students sometimes visit to work in groups. Also in 2013, 35% of undergraduate respondents used the Writing Center, 15% of undergraduates respondents used the Math Learning Resource Center, and 7% or undergraduates used Learning Support Services. About 17% of respondents also attend lecture/events (see chart below).

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Rating resources used – undergraduates
In 2013, 35% of undergraduates used subject databases daily, weekly and monthly. Twenty-four percent of undergraduate students used electronic journals/electronic periodicals and the online catalog at least daily, weekly and monthly. E-books were used daily, weekly or monthly 28% of the time, and print books were used by the same measure 18% of the time. Undergraduate responses also indicated 31% of students used research librarian services daily, weekly and monthly, and 23% responded as using the Information/Circulation Desk services daily, weekly and monthly. Undergraduates continue to rate many of those resources favorably, as well (see charts below).
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Rating resources used – graduate students
In 2013, approximately 60% of graduate students used electronic journals/electronic periodicals and the online catalog at least daily, weekly and monthly, and 65% used subject databases just as frequently. E-books were used daily, weekly or monthly 22% of the time, and print books were used at the same rate 42% of the time. Nearly 40% of graduate students used the Information/Circulation Desk services daily, weekly and monthly. Thirty-seven percent (37%) of graduate students also made use of research librarian services daily, weekly and monthly. Graduate students also continue to rate many of the resources as adequate, approaching very adequate (see charts following).

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Assessment of staff and services
Students even more strongly agree, as compared with our 2011 survey, that many of the library staff and services are very good. Librarians remain approachable, courteous, helpful and accessible. In many cases, graduate students agree more so. However, there is always room for some improvement. While satisfaction with tools such as scanners increased, students expressed only moderate satisfaction with the amount of space available for quiet, individual study (see charts following).

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Receiving information
Falvey patrons responded that email remains the single best tool for conveying information about the Library although Facebook followers are on the rise.

2013

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2011
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E-book preferences
Most students still prefer print books for both course-related and leisure reading.
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Comments noted
We also appreciate all those students who took time to write responses. Graphs are nice but there’s gold in those comments. Students enjoy the new Learning Commons areas, wishing only that “… it all looked like the 2nd floor (Learning Services floor).” Many graduate students asked, “Graduate Student Quiet Study Area!” and “When is the graduate student lounge coming?!?!” We can now answer this request with a new study lounge for graduate students in the liberal arts and sciences, in Falvey Hall.

However, our work is still not done. Several pages of requests and comments accompanied our survey.

Hours of operation generated a numerous comments: “While the library has many benefits, the area where it needs the most improvement and the aspect that I feel strongly about is the hours of operation.” “24 HOUR LIBRARY, I think this is necessary, at least just keeping the whole first floor (including printers and computers and tables open for students to use 24 hours, rather than just the 24 hour lounge)…”

Many comments involved having more efficient study space. Some freshman and sophomores expressed this sentiment in such comments as, “Sometimes the library is so full of people even if the area is quiet, … the lack of power outlets sometimes prevents me from using my computer when I would like to … There need to be more tables. Better lighting on the 3rd and 4th floors … a little updating would be great! Otherwise, the people are helpful and it is always quiet! … Honestly, during any sort of “crunch” time (finals, midterms, etc.) the library is completely swamped …”

Several comments referred to printing challenges: “We should be able to print to the printers wirelessly from our laptops. … have the print center re-installed in the library instead of having one print center at Bartley … I used Falvey’s iPrint center all of the time and now that it is gone, I use Falvey half as much as I did before.”

Temperature still remains a challenge, commented on by both graduate students and undergraduates. It’s not just the engineering students who noticed that “… it is FREEZING on the upper floors … All the time, both during winter and during summer, library is cold and they set the interior temperature to colder than normal room temperature …”

THANK2


So, as we enter the heart of a new decade, we thank all of you for caring and sharing. We hope that future efforts will enable Falvey to continue our quest to meet and compete with the best of libraries. Have a great semester and new year!


SteinMerrill Stein is team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science. Other members of the Assessment team include Dennis Lambert, Kathleen O’Connor, Susan Ottignon and Barbara Quintiliano. 

Window display design and photograph by Joanne Quinn, team leader for Communication & Service Promotion.

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Don’t Let This Be You! Part Five: Citation help

DLTBY-BREAR

 

Flummoxed by citations? Grammar? Style? Our citation guide has got you covered. Check there for links to all kinds of writing resources, from APA to Chicago and everything in between.


Script by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Publications team, and specialist on the Access Services Team.

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Last Modified: December 20, 2013