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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Save Your Search

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you save a whole search-results list? This video shows how to save a whole search-results list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

 

 

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Window Shopping: Careers in International Development Day

internatl dev exhibitThis colorful blue and green window display with its large centrally located sign and eye-catching world map made of four layers of stacked cubes promotes Careers in International Development Day on Wednesday, March 26, 1:30 – 5:00 p.m. in the Connelly Center.

Flanking the dominant central elements are two side panels: “World Options” and “Find Out How to Get There.” “World Options,” to the left, lists career choices, such as humanitarian engineering, advocacy, the United Nations and more. “Find Out How to Get There,” the right panel, provides information needed for attending the Careers in International Development Day event.

internatl dev exh pptPowerPoint presentations, prepared by Trudy Pacella, staff member of the Office for Mission and Ministry and administrative assistant of the Catholic Relief Services (CRS) advisory board, show photographs from trips taken by nursing students and also from participants in the Careers in International Development Day programs.

A panel to the right of the map lists numerous sponsors, among them Catholic Relief Services Partnership with Villanova University and Falvey Memorial Library.

Publications related to international development and written by Villanova faculty, selected by Linda Hauck, business librarian, complete the bottom of the display.

Joanne Quinn, design specialist, created and mounted the exhibit. Suzanne Toton, EdD, associate professor, Dept. of Theology and Religious Studies, and coordinator of the CRS Partnership, and Trudy Pacella, senior administrative assistant, provided information and inspiration for the exhibit.

This Careers in International Development Day window will be on display until early April.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

Photos by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication and Service Promotion team and Access Services team leader.

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Symposium: Careers in International Development Day

international development logoA recently installed library display highlights the March 26 Careers in International Development Day. This is not your usual job fair but a symposium designed for career exploration. Catholic Relief Services organized and hosted the event in partnership with Villanova University, the College of Nursing Center for Global and Public Health, the Villanova School of Business, the VSB Center for Global Leadership, the Career Center, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, the Office of Mission and Ministry and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Consortium for Higher Education.

The blue and green display consists of wayposts to the plenary talk by Lindsay Coates, executive director of InterAction, titled, “The Scope and Changes in the Field of Humanitarian Relief” and the breakout roundtables on advocacy impacting policy, global health, government foreign service, humanitarian engineering, non-governmental organizations, social entrepreneurship, social impact investing, think tanks and the United Nations. Recent additions to the library collection touching on international development topics are also included as are works authored by Villanovans.


Dig Deeper

The library’s collection includes many books, article databases and statistical sources about international development. For the policy wonk, Columbia International Affairs Online includes full-text  case studies, policy briefs, scholarly articles and books. Public Affairs International  Service (PAIS) is an article database covering similar territory. Because international development is truly interdisciplinary, academic research on international development can be found in many specialized databases, such as  PubMed for health, EconLit for economics, and  Compendex or Inspec for engineering.

Since 1990 the United Nations has published the Human Development Report, which identifies trends in development, and the Index, which is a tool used to assess country level development in terms of life expectancy, education and income. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development publishes numerous books and statistical series on development in many dimensions all available in the OECDiLibrary. AidData.org takes a data driven approach to improving outcomes by publishing datasets, visualizations and reports.

Villanovans across the disciplines are engaged in research on various aspects of development aid. Suzanne Toton, EdD, writes about Catholic relief, world hunger and social justice. The writing of Kishor Thanawala, PhD, explores economic development and justice. Latin American Development is the area of expertise of Satya Pattnayak, PhD. Jonathan Doh, PhD, is a prolific researcher on nongovernmental organizations and global corporate responsibility. Christopher Kilby, PhD, is a thought leader on the economics of foreign aid. Ruth McDermott-Levy, PhD, is a practicing nurse, educator and researcher on international community health.

Careers in International Development Day speakers represent a variety of organizations, all with interesting web sites well worth exploring with links below:

Acumen http://acumen.org/

Bread for the World:  Have Faith, End Hunger http://www.bread.org/

Catholic Relief Services http://crs.org/

Center for Global and Public Health https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/nursing/centers/globalhealth.html

Global Policy Solutions http://globalpolicysolutions.com

InterAction:  A United Voice for Global Change  http://www.interaction.org/

United Nations Refugee Agency  http://www.unhcr.org

U.S. Agency for International Development  http://www.usaid.gov/


imagesArticle by Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, (pictured) business librarian and team coordinator for the Business Research team.

 

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops!

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Smart Search Tips to Save You Time: Search, Capture … Done!

refworkssm

zotero

 

 

girl-writingAre you still typing bibliographies the old-fashioned way? Or are you typing references into online templates (such as Son of Citation Machine) to generate more-or-less correct citations? Here’s your chance to learn about two powerful software products, RefWorks and Zotero. With just  a couple of clicks, you can capture references from databases and search engines and then generate a bibliography in the style of your choice. Bring your laptop or Mac to try them out!  Attend any of the following sessions. Take note of the locations.

4-4:45pm, Falvey 207 – Tuesday, 3/18;  Wednesday , 3/19; Wednesday, 4/2
4-4:45pm, Driscoll 244 – Thursday, 4/10

For more information, contact barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu.

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What’s Happening with David and Goliath (“The Triumph of David” attributed to Pietro da Cortona)?

Kristin deGhetaldi, conservator, University of Delaware, and her interns, Maggie Bearden and Ellen Nigro, have been diligently cleaning “The Triumph of David” located in the Falvey Hall Reading Room.

Cleaning is performed inch by inch: moistening a small cotton swab in solvent, using the swab to clean a small area and then discarding that swab for a fresh one. “What size area do you clean?” I ask Bearden, one of the interns. She explains that it varies according to how much varnish or overpaint is present. She shows me a pure cotton swab she had been using; it is filled with a brownish-black substance – discolored varnish. Once the swab is filled with varnish or overpaint, it is replaced by a fresh one. The lower half of the huge painting has been cleaned, and deGhetaldi and Bearden and Nigro are now cleaning the top half, working from a scaffold.

Painting---marksWhat is newly visible? When I examine the painting today, I first notice a number of brilliant white areas—our eyes are drawn to white. I see some places where the bare canvas is visible, some bright colors that had been obscured by the dark varnish and, for me an art historian, an exciting discovery: some visible paint strokes. The brilliant white areas, I learn, are fill added by the conservators in places where the original paint is missing. Later in the conservation process they will inpaint those areas, using materials that are archively safe and easily removed if needed.

BlueLarge expanses of bright pink and lapis lazuli blue, previously hidden under the discolored varnish, are now visible. The presence of the large amount of lapis lazuli – on a blue dress on the right side of the painting – tells us something about the patron (the person who originally commissioned the painting). Lapis lazuli is a gemstone that is finely ground to make artists’ pigments.

When “The Triumph of David” was painted, the only source for lapis lazuli was a mine in Afghanistan. Because this stone was so expensive, the patron could specify how much money the artist would be allowed to spend on this color in a painting.

Painting---brush-strokesAlso visible in two areas are brush strokes known as impasto. The Renaissance concept of a painting was that it was a window on the world; to create this illusion, the means of creation had to be concealed. Beginning in the Baroque (later 16th and 17th centuries) some artists used touches of impasto in their painting, and this practice expanded; in Impressionism entire paintings are filled with impasto. The two areas of impasto in the David and Goliath painting fascinate me because here are the visible brushstrokes of the master himself (or perhaps a trusted apprentice).

In discussing this painting I use the word attributed with the artist’s name, Pietro da Cortona. Why? No documentary evidence exists to connect the painting to the artist – no contract, no signature on the painting, nothing. According to George T. Radan, PhD, (Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide, with the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA) the University accepted the donor’s attribution. What her evidence was is unknown to this writer.

Pietro da Cortona (1597-1669) (born Pietro Berretini in Cortona, Italy) is a major Baroque painter and architect who appears in numerous art history textbooks. Unfortunately, I have found no monographs in English and my Italian is limited, so information about him must be drawn from textbooks, art encyclopedias and art dictionaries. He is widely acknowledged as one of the three most important Italian Baroque architects, and he is also considered a major Baroque painter. Cortona (named for his home town) worked for many wealthy, influential patrons. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to discover who commissioned “The Triumph of David” and to document that it is indeed the work of Pietro da Cortona?

If you have time, please visit the project and talk to the conservators. DeGhetaldi, Bearden and Nigro will readily answer questions about their work. They usually work Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays If you cannot visit in person, this live feed shows them at work.


Article written by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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C. Nataraj, PhD, on the Intersection of Medicine and Robotics

natarajThis Monday, March 10 at 1:30 p.m., award winning lecturer C. Nataraj, PhD, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Moritz, Sr., Endowed Chair Professor in Engineered Systems at Villanova University, will deliver a Scholarship@Villanova lecture. Dr. Nataraj’s expertise ranges from machinery to medicine to robotics, and his lecture is entitled “Dynamic Systems: The Science of Machinery, Robots, Medical Diagnostics, and Autonomy.” The lecture will be held in room 204 of the Falvey Memorial Library Learning Commons, and in the tradition of past Scholarship@Villanova events, will be free and open to the public.

To help us learn more about this fascinating scholar and his areas of interest, we’ve invited Alfred Fry, Science/Engineering Liaison Librarian, to compile a list of Dig Deeper resources.


Dig Deeper

The topic of Dr. Nataraj’s lecture is very broad with applications in diverse areas such as engineering, science, economics, biology, and others. Dr. Nataraj will also discuss some interesting results from his research wanderings which will focus on the areas of machinery, robotics and medicine. In addition, the talk will highlight applications without getting into the mathematical intricacies in order to make it comprehensible to a broad audience.

Here is one example of a CENDAC (Center for Non-linear Dynamics and Control) project:

More videos and links:

Overview of The Center for Non-linear Dynamics and Control (CENDAC)

Villanova University CENDAC student profile

Villanova University CENDAC faculty profile

Additional Villanova University CENDAC projects

Villanova University Engineering CENDAC YouTube Channel

Falvey Memorial Library Engineering Subject Guide

 


Article by Corey A. Arnold, graduate assistant for Communication and Service Promotion.

UnknownLinks prepared by Alfred Fry, Science & Engineering Librarian

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Collection-and-Services Data Tell a Story

Out of the 570,000 print titles in our collection, about 60,000 circulated to Villanova patrons last year. This doesn’t include the journals, group study rooms or laptops. Many print materials are also used in-house without being checked out to patrons.

It’s perhaps not surprising that the main stacks titles with the heaviest circulation in the Falvey collection are a mix of fiction and non-fiction, including business, history and literature titles that can be associated with actively taught courses. Looking at the top five titles below, I’m going to have to say that Catching Fire is probably evidence that patrons still want to read for enjoyment and not just for assignments.

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins. (10 loans)

AchebePragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty by Colin Koopman. (10 loans)

Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success by Rodney Stark. (10 loans)

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. (9 loans)

Business of Sports: edited by Brad R. Humphreys and Dennis R. Howard.  (7 loans)

While the most popular books borrowed in 2013 weren’t necessarily predictable, they showed us what students and faculty were interested in last year. By comparing this internal data with the external data below, we also see where gaps may exist in our collections.

between menBehavioural ecology (7 requests), Programming the World Wide Web (5 requests) and Centering Prayer and Inner Awakening (4 requests) were the top three requested titles through Interlibrary Loan, spanning the humanities and sciences. The two books borrowed most through E-ZBorrow were Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (4 requests) and Introduction to Software Testing (4 requests), also representing the arts and sciences equally.

Moving on from monographs (print books), we have statistics showing the number of articles requested through Interlibrary Loan from other libraries’ journal holdings and through Document Delivery services from our own journal collection.

What is Document Delivery, you may ask? It’s a service rendered only to Villanova students, staff and faculty who need a scanned (digitized) copy of a print journal article from our collection.

It’s interesting to note the fifteen most requested journal titles through Interlibrary Loan are a mix of many disciplines, but most predominantly philosophy, theology, nursing and engineering, as evidenced by the top five titles from that list.

Critical care medicine (43)

Water Science and Technology (20)

Theology and Science (19)

The Leibniz review (17)

American family physician (17)

As you can see, journal data from the Document Delivery system shows that faculty and patrons are making good use of this service, although theology, nursing and engineering emerge as the frontrunners.

Journal of Ecumenical Studies (74 requests)

Tetrahedron Letters (35 requests)

JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association (22 requests)

National Catholic Register (20 requests)

Journal of Heat Transfer (19 requests)

Falvey librarians use all available data to make purchasing decisions in consultation with individual academic departments. We also strive to improve patron access to our immediate collection and to offer services that extend the collection beyond our walls.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, editorial blog coordinator, Communication & Service Promotion team; team leader, Access Services.

 

Critical care medicine

Water Science and Technology

Theology and Science

The Leibniz review

American family physician

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate ProQuest-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through ProQuest, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate ProQuest-provided databases. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Last Modified: February 12, 2014