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‘Cat in the CAVE

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


CAVEToday at 2:00, Villanova’s CAVE is officially open. In honor of opening day, this week’s blog post will be all about immersive virtual reality—for those of us who might not even know where to begin thinking about the creative and academic applications of virtual environments.

Disclaimer: I’m not an expert. I’m a virtual reality noob. I’m writing this with no in-depth technical expertise—just a whole lot of geeky excitement. But I do play (and, by way of literary theory, study) video games, and my personal interest in virtual reality’s possible applications is heavily biased towards, well, play. And by “play” I don’t mean to imply the installment is only for entertainment (nor do I think its entertainment and audio/visual/tactile immersion possibilities should be minimized, especially for the arts and humanities). I mean “play” as in stepping inside a world and getting your hands virtually dirty, like a kid in a sandbox.

But before we talk Earth science and data visualization, whet your VR palette with the incredibly cool Tilt Brush (aka “Microsoft Paint for the Year 2020”).

Oculus_vs_Morpheus-740x580-580x450Depending on your hobbies, you might have already heard about the VR movement in video games a la Oculus Rift  and Project Morpheus. These are headset-based immersive mechanisms, while the CAVE is quite literally a virtually immersive walk-in cave. Still, if you want to explore discussion of virtually reality without scholarly pressure, the gaming community is a good place to start.

If you feel like you’re ready to brave the technical background and scholarly applications of virtual reality, The Verge posted a feature video on The Virtual Reality CAVE, featuring UC Davis’s setup, KeckCAVES. A little digging into UC Davis’s ongoing projects, which include applications in Earth science, data visualization, and responsive media, is a fun way to get your feet wet!

Based on a little internet reading, the possibilities of virtual reality in scholarly, scientific and creative application are innumerable—but are not all fully realized, or even drafted. And that’s the cool part: if this is the forefront of a new wave, this is your chance to brainstorm, too.

How could you imagine immersive virtual reality used in your field of study?

 


Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and ServicArticle by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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The War to End All Wars: Great War Resources at Falvey

By Canadian Official photographer, Castle, W I (Lieutenant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Canadian Official photographer, Castle, W I (Lieutenant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When a nation enters war, it often justifies its actions with promises of a better and more just world. The Great War, which consumed much of Europe and its colonial outposts from 1914 to 1918, was no exception. H.G. Wells called it the “war that will end war,” which later morphed into “the war to end all wars.” Wells coined this phrase in a Times editorial. His 1914 editorials are easily accessible in a book: The War That Will End War.

2014 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the war: A war that started with Austria’s declaration of war against Serbia on July 28, 1914, following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife a month earlier. Much has been written about the war since then, and 2014 promises a bumper crop of new scholarship. The Library will showcase new publications in a small exhibit in the Learning Commons throughout the fall semester.

WWI CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT WILL CONTINUE THROUGH THE FALL SEMESTER

WWI CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT WILL CONTINUE THROUGHOUT THE FALL SEMESTER

Here are some titles you can expect to see in the exhibit. Aside from run-of-the-mill general surveys, a number of these books explore previously neglected aspects of the war.

The historiography of the Great War has gone through many changes, and the amount of scholarship can be overwhelming. The three volumes of the Cambridge History of the First World War, particularly the excellent bibliographic essays included in each volume, are a good starting point for interested readers.

Among the excellent primary sources available at Falvey are the complete archives of the New York Times and the London Times. Your Villanova id. will allow you either to open the New York Times from Sunday, August 9, 1914 and browse through pages after pages of war coverage or to read the detailed coverage of the war declaration in the Times of London on July 29, 1914.

Online exhibitions commemorating the Great War abound: The National World War I Museum has a series of exhibitions ranging from War Art to War Fare. Europeana 1914-1918 features untold stories and official histories of the war from archives and museums across Europe. Last but not least, Falvey hosted Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4 p.m. for a talk about the origins of the war: “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.”


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Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

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Dig Deeper: The Village That Cried

HedtkeAs part of the Alumni Author series, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will be giving a talk titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk is based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944. The talk will focus on the crash of an American B-24 bomber into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944. The crash and ensuing firestorm killed 61 people, including 38 children in the village elementary school. This tragic event destroyed an entire generation of children in the village of 900 people. In addition, Hedtke’s talk will also touch upon the communal funeral and the village’s almost 70-year attempt to recover from this horrendous incident.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public, and will be held on Monday, Sept. 29 at 2:30 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

To learn more about the Freckleton, English Air Disaster, explore the resources provided below, chosen and organized by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

 


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Freckleton: The Village That Cried

Freckelton

Freckleton, known as “the village that cried,” is located on Britain’s beautiful Fylde Coast, situated in the historic Ribble Valley. It is approximately 230 miles northwest of London in Lancashire county.

BBC- Remembering the Freckleton air disaster of 1944  – with recording of eyewitness testimony

The Times Digital Archive 1785-1985 (Gale)Aircraft Crash on School

Historical New York Times: 1851-2009 (ProQuest)MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED: Soldiers Built Playground Where U.S. Plane Crashed in Britain

Washington Post Historical: 1877-1996 (ProQuest)Bomber Crash Kills All But 6 Of British Town’s 41 Children

Cabrini College news

Lancashire Aircraft Investigation Team (LAIT)

Ribble Valley

 

Books:

Freckleton HedtkeBlackpoolAtWar

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for Geography and Political Science.

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‘Cat in the Stacks: Yodaisms

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


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A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Yoda was a student in a university and had to write a paper. Wise guy that he was, he had some axioms on the topic (as he often does), and luckily with the aid of the fine resources at Falvey Memorial Library (for real though, scout those Star Wars holdings), I’ve been able to scour the archives for his best nuggets of research wisdom.

After all, your best research tool is your brain—but without some meditation on your processes, it can be an agent of the dark side.

Yoda on Research

“Train yourself to let go of everything you fear to lose.”

When you come up with a research direction, don’t marry it. Follow it as far as it deigns to take you, but don’t be surprised if you end up in totally different territory than you’d initially planned. Writing workshops for years and years have called this “killing your darlings.” You aren’t wasting your time compiling sources on topics that, by the nature of research, might become irrelevant later on—you are using them as footholds to climb the mountain. Train yourself to stay objective and open-minded with your research, even if it means having to ditch the very thesis you set out to prove.

 

ahsoka-lightsaber

“Many of the truths that we cling to depend greatly on our point of view.”

Okay, this was technically Obi-Wan, not Yoda, but it’s important. Some of the strongest arguments are ones that continually engage opposing points of view. If you’re aware of a counterargument to your point, so is your reader. Address these counterarguments and duel them. With a lightsaber.

 

“Pass on what you have learned.” 

Papers and theses and scholarship aren’t just personal projects or measures of intellectual success. They are your voice in the scholarly conversations happening all around you. Remembering this will not only help you take control of your own work, but will also keep your writing penetrable. Yoda knew, like you and me, that reading dense articles is a total slog. So, his inverted syntax notwithstanding, he always made sure his papers clearly passed on what he learned in his research. After all, “If you can’t  explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” – Yoda Einstein (Fun fact: Yoda’s design is partly based on ol’ Albert.)

Yoda 2

“Do or do not. There is no try.”

Get out there and research! It’s all well and good for big thoughts to be in your brain, but get them out there, put them into words and do work.

 

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Dig Deeper: Noel Coward and Villanova Theatre’s New Comedy “Fallen Angels”

Fallen AngelsNoël Coward was a teenager 100 years ago when he began writing plays. Among the more than 50 plays he published, several continue to be performed and to draw audiences, including Hay Fever, Private Lives, Design for Living, Present Laughter and Blithe Spirit. When a skilled and capable director prepares a Noël Coward play, audience members enjoy an entertaining and memorable experience.

The Villanova University Department of Theatre’s production Noël Coward’ Fallen Angels promises to give audience members such a hilarious and memorable experience. The Rev. David Cregan, OSA, PhD ably directs a cast of talented, charismatic performers in this lively comedy.

Order your tickets soon before performances become sold out.

Noël Coward, in addition to creating enduring plays, wrote numerous songs, musical theatre works, poetry and short stories. Sarah Wingo—liaison librarian for English, literature and theatre—has assembled the following resources about this prolific playwright:


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Noel Coward

Official website: http://www.noelcoward.com/

Noël Coward Society: http://www.noelcoward.net/

Resources at Falvey: https://library.villanova.edu/Find/MyResearch/MyList/2588

IMDb page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0002021/

Artists Rifle
In light of the 100th anniversary of World War I, it is interesting to note that in 1918, Coward was conscripted into the Artists Rifles but was assessed as unfit for active service because of a tubercular tendency, and he was discharged on health grounds after nine months.

 


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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The Highlighter: You Are Going to Love Falvey’s Website Upgrade

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

 

Just a single search in Falvey’s catalog now yields not only books, media and articles but also Falvey-website items and books from other libraries—all on one page (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Dig Deeper: Jeffrey Johnson, PhD on “The Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe”

Jeffrey_JohnsonIn honor of the 100th anniversary of World War I, Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, professor of history, will be giving a lecture titled “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.” The talk will take place Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4:00 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

During the lecture, Dr. Johnson will discuss the background to the European diplomatic crisis of July 1914 that followed the assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and the various factors that led to war rather than a peaceful resolution of the crisis. He will then outline the initial phase of the fighting, as shaped by the Schlieffen-Moltke Plan that called for an all-out German attack on France through neutral Belgium while maintaining a defensive stance in the East. This plan and its subsequent failure transformed what might have been another localized Balkan war (like two previous ones in 1912 and 1913) into a long global war costing millions of lives and billions in property and resources. Finally, Dr. Johnson will briefly reflect on the broader historical significance of the First World War as the self-destruction of the ancient ideal of European empire, ultimately to be replaced by the modern ideal of international democracy.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public.

Below, Falvey’s team leader for academic integration, Jutta Seibert, has compiled a collection of resources should you wish to further study the topic of Dr. Johnson’s lecture.


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Books by Dr. Jeffrey Johnson

Johnson, Jeffrey A. The Kaiser’s Chemists: Science and Modernization in Imperial Germany (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990).

Johnson, Jeffrey A. and Roy M. MacLeod, eds., Frontline and Factory: Comparative Perspectives On the Chemical Industry At War, 1914-1924 (Dordrecht: Springer, 2006).

New Books About World War I Available at Falvey

Selected Surveys of World War I History:
John Horne, A Companion to World War I (Chichester, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).

J.M. Winter, The Cambridge History of the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Selected Online Encyclopedias:
Tom Pendergast, Sara Pendergast and Christine Slovey, eds. World War I Reference Library (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002)

John M. Merriman, J. M. Winter, Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction (Detroit, Mich.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006).

Alexander DeConde, Richard D. Burns and Fredrik Logevall. Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy. 2nd ed. (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002).

Robert D. Johnston, ed., Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History. Vol. 4: From the Gilded Age through the Age of Reform, 1878 to 1920 (Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010).


JuttaSeibertDig Deeper links selected by Jutta Seibert, team leader for academic integration.

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Dig Deeper: Outstanding Faculty Research Award Recipient: Sally Scholz, PhD

Sally ScholzA Scholarship@Villanova/Outstanding Faculty Research Award lecture featuring Sally J. Scholz, PhD, professor of philosophy, will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 24 at 2:30 p.m., in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Scholz will be talking about the extensive research that led her to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award in 2014.

Dr. Scholz’s talk, titled “Seeking Solidarity,” will articulate her thoughts not only on how invocations of solidarity conventionally call forth community’s spirit, inclusiveness and cooperation, but also on how nothing, unfortunately, keeps solidarities from sometimes being dangerous or harmful. Dr. Scholz’s presentation will explore these pernicious types of solidarities, revealing the moral failings of solidaristic relations.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office for Research and Graduate Programs, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dr. Scholz’s research, dig into the resources provided by Nikolaus Fogle, subject librarian for Philosophy.


Dig Deeper

Books and Scholarship by Sally Scholz, PhD


Feminism GuideScholz, Sally J. Feminism: A Beginner’s Guide. Oxford ; New York: Oneworld, 2010.
Dr. Scholz’s most recent book, Feminism: A Beginnger’s Guide, is her authoritative introduction to feminism.

 

 

Political SolidarityScholz, Sally J. Political Solidarity. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008.

Political Solidarity is a major contribution to social and political philosophy, in which she advances her framework for understanding political solidarity.

 

 

Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance.” Journal of Social Philosophy 38, no. 1 (March 1, 2007): 38–52. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9833.2007.00365.x.
“Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance” is one of her most-cited articles, in which she develops her conception of political solidarity as a variety of solidarity which “unites individuals based on their shared commitment to a political cause,” but which “is incompatible with physically violent forms of activism and resistance.”

Scholz, Sally J. “Transnational Feminist Solidarity and Lessons from the 2011 Protests in Tahrir Square.” Global Discourse 4, no. 2–3 (May 9, 2014): 205–19. doi:10.1080/23269995.2014.914369.
In this very recent article, Dr. Scholz develops a conception of transnational feminist solidarity.

Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and the More-Than-Human World.” Ethics & the Environment18, no. 2 (2013): 81–99.
“Political Solidarity and the More-Than-Human World” is one of her more recent contributions, which brings her theory of political solidarity into dialogue with environmental philosophy.

 

Hypatia

 

Dr. Scholz is the editor of what is certainly the premier feminist philosophy journal, Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy.

 

Watch Dr. Scholz’s acceptance speech for the Outstanding Faculty Research Award, given at the Faculty Scholars Dinner.

 


Nik FogleDig Deeper links selected by Nikolaus Fogle, Subject Librarian for Philosophy.

 

 

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Dig Deeper: Kevin Spacey at Villanova

Kevin-Spacey-as-Clarence-Da-528x7061

Parents Weekend offers an opportunity for the parents of students, new and seasoned, to visit Villanova’s campus. Parents Weekend 2014 will be held from Sept. 19-21. This year’s guest speaker for the Saturday evening program is the inimitable Kevin Spacey. Spacey, an Academy Award-winning actor, currently executively produces and stars in the hit Netflix original series House of Cards. He is perhaps most known for his breakout role in The Usual Suspects and his memorable characters in American Beauty and L.A. Confidential.

But Spacey’s involvement in the arts does not end at producing and acting—he also funds emerging artists through the Kevin Spacey Foundation; has his own production company, Trigger Street Productions; and since 2004, he has worked with The Old Vic Theatre Company in London as Artistic Director.

If you’d like to learn more about Spacey, or delve into his filmography here at Falvey Memorial Library, check out the resources compiled by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English literature and theatre.

 


Dig Deeper:

Fun fact: Spacey’s Wiki page notes that his “first professional stage appearance was as a spear carrier in a New York Shakespeare Festival performance of Henry VI, part 1 in 1981.”

Falvey Memorial Library has two articles and two documentaries.

Here is the full list of films on VHS & DVD at Falvey.

And see how even Kevin Spacey pixelated can steal the show in an upcoming video game.

 


Sarah

Dig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

 

 

 

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Dig Deeper: Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month fetes “Platero y Yo”

Domesticated donkey, ass, asinus vulgaris or Equus africanus asi

Mercedes_Julia

On Thursday, September 18 at 3:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, Mercedes Juliá, PhD, professor of modern and contemporary literature and cultural studies in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures will be presenting a lecture in honor of Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month. Her talk is titled “The Inner Exile of Juan Ramón Jiménez.” Following Dr. Juliá’s talk, a bilingual presentation of Juan Ramón Jiménez’s Platero y Yo will be given. This event is part of the celebration of the Año Platero, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the publication of Platero y Yo.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Sigma Delta Pi and the Hispanic Honor Society, is free and open to the public.

Juan Ramón Jiménez

Juan Ramón Jiménez

In preparation for the presentation of Juan Ramón Jiménez’s Platero y Yo and to help commemorate its 100th publication anniversary, check out the following resources provided by Susan Ottignon, the liaison librarian for Romance Languages and Literatures.

 


Dig Deeper:

Falvey Memorial Library offers resources to assist you in researching and appreciating Juan Ramón Jiménez’s Platero y Yo.

Looking for criticism? Try searching one of these databases to find critical analysis in journal articles about the work. You can search “platero y yo” to pull up results

MLA International Bibliography (ProQuest)
This database consists of bibliographic records pertaining to literature, language, linguistics and folklore. It includes citations to articles from over 4,400 journals and series published internationally, as well as monographs, collections and various types of reference works.

Literature Criticism Online (Gale)
LCO is an extensive compilation of literary commentary reaching back 30 years and covering centuries of critiques on authors and their works that span all time periods, types of literature and regions. The cross-searchable collection brings together the most acclaimed literary series Drama Criticism, Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, Poetry Criticism and Short Story Criticism providing criticism on the major authors, dramatists and poets.

JSTOR
A searchable and browsable archive of full-text core journals in the humanities, social sciences and mathematics.

Sometimes, a summary or overview may provide insight into the author’s writing. By searching one of these resources, you can pull up a concise article.

MagillOnLiterature Plus (EBSCO)
Provides access to editorially reviewed critical analyses, brief plot summaries, and extended character profiles covering works by more than 8,500 long and short fiction writers, poets, dramatists, essayists and philosophers. Coverage includes sources Cyclopedia of Literary Places, Masterplots and European Fiction Series.

Literature Resource Center (Gale)
Full-text articles from scholarly journals and literary magazines are combined with critical essays, work and topic overviews, full-text works, biographies and more to provide a wealth of information on authors, their works and literary movements.

“Hear straight from the horse’s mouth!”

The Library has a documentary on Juan Ramón Jiménez in which he talks about his book “Platero y Yo”? Just ask for the VHS, “Platero y yo Radio Televisión Española”—PQ6619.I4 P62 2000 (VHS)—at the circulation desk.

Don’t know Spanish? No problem!

Falvey has an English translation, Platero and I, available in the main collection on the 4th Floor with call number PQ6619.I4 P633.

 


RS4540_FML164_SusanOttignon_018_EDIT---ed

Dig Deeper links selected by Susan Ottignon, Research Support Librarian for Languages and Literatures. Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

 

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Last Modified: September 17, 2014