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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate ProQuest-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through ProQuest, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate ProQuest-provided databases. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Dig Deeper: Frosty Russian Novels

Siberia

Siberia

With the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games in full swing, now is the perfect time to burrow into a frosty Russian novel. Whether writing in the frozen tundra of Siberia or amid the bustling streets of St. Petersburg, Russian novelists are always eager to plumb the inky depths of the soul and explore the limits of the human psyche. To help guide us on a tour through this unique branch of world literature, Team Leader- Humanities II, Subject Librarian for English Literature and Theatre Sarah Wingo has compiled a list of resources on classic Russian literature. You can find those links below.

Всего хорошего and as always, happy reading.


Dig Deeper:

anna karenina book coverNo list of Russian literature (especially snowy Russian literature) would be complete without Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. You can find the book, along with criticism, in the library collection, or you can download the entire public domain text for free to your device or e-reader.

For the uninitiated, this list provides the quick and chilly of all the “must reads” in Russian literature.

If you’re interested in contemporary Russian lit, here’s a great resource from the University of Virginia.

This blog chronicles an art project inspired by another novel by Tolstoy, his sprawling epic War and Peace.

The plays of Anton Chekhov are dark comedies, equal parts devastating and beautiful. Of his many great works, The Cherry Orchard and The Seagull manage to stand out. Because his works are also in the public domain, you can find a complete alphabetical list of full texts here.

Finally, some Cambridge Companions on the subject:

Cambridge Companion to Chekhov

The Cambridge Companion to Dostoevsky

The Cambridge Companion to twentieth-century Russian literature

The Cambridge Companion to the Classic Russian Novel

The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy

“Art is a human activity having for its purpose the transmission to others of the highest and best feelings to which men have risen.”

- Leo Tolstoy


2014-01-29 14.53.13Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

SarahLinks prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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New Trial Database: Index Religiosus

index religiosus

We are pleased to announce our trial of Index Religiosus, which will be available until March 10, 2014, so please try it out!

What is it?

The Index is an international reference bibliography for academic publications in theology, religious studies and Church history covering publications written in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch and more. Students and faculty in theology/religious studies, philosophy and humanities will benefit greatly from this epic online bibliographical tool.

Its coverage includes “the full range of disciplines in Theology and Canon Law: History of Theology, History of Religions, Old and New Testaments, Fundamental and Dogmatic Theology, Sacramentology and Liturgy, Moral and Pastoral Theology, and Canon Law.” In addition, “all aspects of Church History are also widely covered: Institutions, Orders, Congregations, Influential Figures, Hagiography, Political, Social and Economic History, Archaeology, Art History, Music, Architecture, Relations with Islam and Judaism” and much more.”

Features

  • Select your preferred language.
  • Start searching by keyword, author, title, year of publication, discipline, person, geographic area, ISBN/ISSN, etc.
  • Export records to email, Word, Excel, RefWorks or EndNote.
  • Keep abreast of current research by choosing the email alerts feature, which will notify you about new updates and records in your areas of interest.

index religiosus demo

 

Please see the detailed leaflet to peruse a list of the journals it indexes, searching tips, and other information about its features.

Where do I find it?

Access this resource through the Database A-Z list or the subject guides for theology and religious studies, philosophy, and humanities.

Want to keep it?

If you would like this resource to become permanent, please take advantage of the trial and let us know about your experience. Contact Alexander Williams, theology/humanities librarian, by email or by phone (ext. 8845).

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Theology/Humanities Majors! Get to know your (interim) subject librarian

Alex Williams theology liaisonAlexander (Alex) Williams, a recent graduate of Drexel University iSchool recently joined Falvey Memorial Library as the temporary theology/humanities librarian. Williams received his MSLIS (Master of Science in Library & Information Sciences) degree in Dec. 2013. While in graduate school he held an internship in Falvey’s Academic Integration team from Jan. to July 2013.

Williams, a native of Rhode Island, earned a master’s degree in English literature from Villanova in 2011. While attending Villanova, he worked in Access Services. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English literature and religious studies from Stonehill College, Easton, Mass. At Stonehill, Williams worked as a circulation aide in the library, an early indication of his future interests.

When asked what made him decide to become a librarian, Williams said, “Until quite recently I never realized that my work history was comprised primarily of library support-staff positions. … There was this impulse to both consume and to be physically near books and information …” He believes working with “research support through email and chat [helps] me understand how the methods of information seeking have recently changed, as well as ground my theory in practice.”

He is currently reading August: Osage County by Tracy Letts and The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia by Ursula K. LeGuin. His hobbies include “running, cooking, reconnecting with nature, playing the guitar, writing and reading (of course).” He loves animals of all kinds. His research interests are varied. “Just about anything could set me off in one direction or another.”

Williams says, “It is an honor and a pleasure to take on the role of theology/humanities librarian at Falvey Memorial Library while Darren Poley serves as interim director. I have the very good fortune to work with such an insightful and creative library staff once again and very much look forward to building relationships with our distinguished theology and humanities faculties.”


Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

 

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Smart Search Tips to Save You Time: Get the Most out of Google Scholar

Why do you still need a librarian when “everything” is online? It’s because librarians are experts in showing you how to retrieve the reliable and scholarly information you need from the endless possibilities the Internet offers. Watch this space for regular time-saving data searching suggestions and secrets that only librarians know! Please Ask Us if there’s a particular searching dilemma you’d like us to cover.

Get the Most out of Google Scholar

Did you know you can turn Google Scholar into a super search engine that will allow you to access the full text of the library’s journal articles, even from off campus? Just set the following options:

· Go to Google Scholar: http://scholar.google.com

· Click Settings.
ev.owa

Click “Library Links” and type “Villanova” into the search box. Then click the search icon. When options are displayed, be sure to check off “Villanova University – Click here for full text.” (Sometimes other options are also displayed, but “Click here for full text” is the most useful.) Then click “Save.”
ev-1.owa

Now when you do a search, look for the “Click here for full text” link. Click it, and at the next screen, click the Article link. You will be able to access the full text of the article, even from off-campus!

ev-2.owa

Bonus tip: Want to retrieve the most recent articles? Try the publication-date options on the left-hand side of your results page.

 


Quintiliano

Quintiliano

Barbara Quintiliano is a nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian. Contact her at 610-519-5207 or by email.

 

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Evangelii Gaudium Readings: A Conversation Series on the Catholic Church and the World

DIANE-POPE2TEFalvey Memorial Library and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will be presenting a three part series of conversations inspired by Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel). In this 47,560 word document, which is written in a highly accessible style, Pope Francis encourages the Christian faithful to embark upon a new chapter of evangelization and also points out new paths for the Church’s journey in the years to come.

But what exactly is an “apostolic exhortation?” According to the New Catholic Encyclopedia, it is a morally persuasive and significant expression of the magisterium, or teaching authority of the Church. Exhortations are quite influential because they are frequently the product of consensus. An exhortation can also be the base for further study and for special norms putting its teaching into effect, but it is neither legislative nor does it define church doctrine (MORRISEY, F. G. “Apostolic Exhortation.” New Catholic Encyclopedia. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 2003. 585-586. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.).

On Wednesday, Feb. 5, at 6:00 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner, Bernie Prusak, PhD, Sue Toton, PhD, and Jim Wetzel, PhD, will facilitate the first discussion of the Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel) will explore the theme, “I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting and dirty” (Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel), which entails a discussion of the role of the Church in the world today, where it is headed, and what it means to be poor and evangelical.

The second discussion, hosted by Mary Hirschfeld, PhD, Robert DeFina, PhD, and Gerald Beyer, PhD, takes place on Tuesday, Feb. 25, at 6:00 p.m. in Room 205 of Falvey and will explore the theme, “The worship of the golden calf has returned” (Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel). This discussion will address whether the socioeconomic system is unjust and promotes a “throw-away culture” and will also consider the idea that capitalism can be consistent with social justice.

The final discussion, led by Rebecca Winer, PhD, Hibba Abugideiri, PhD, Crystal Lucky, PhD, and Charlie Cherry, PhD, occurs on Tuesday, March 25, at 6:00 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner and will explore how “We can learn so much from one another” (Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel). This final installment will focus on world peace through interfaith understanding and our duties towards other in promoting this understanding.


Dig Deeper: Want to Learn More about Pope Francis I?

o-POPE-ROLLING-STONE-570Pope Francis (born: Jorge Mario Bergoglio), who named himself in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, has taken the world by storm. Friendlier in demeanor and less conservative than his predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI, who was the first pope to resign in almost 600 years, Pope Francis’ humility, compassion, and peaceful smile have charmed Catholics and non-Catholics alike. It’s not surprising he was named TIME’s “Person of the Year” for 2013 or that he’s been depicted in graffiti as the SuperPope on a street in Rome. As of this week, he’ll also be the first Pope to grace the cover of Rolling Stone. You can connect with him on Facebook and even follow him on Twitter! Clearly, Pope Francis is inspiring us on all fronts with messages that are truly universal. Some of his past tweets have included: “Let us pray for peace, and let us bring it about, starting in our own homes!” and “To be saints is not a privilege for the few, but a vocation for everyone.”

Here are a few resources that will help you learn more about the man:

·     Francis: Man of Prayer

This book describes the life of the new pope, from his beginnings as the child of Italian immigrants to becoming the first Jesuit pope and first pope from the Americas.

·     Francis: Pope of a New World

Written by a major Vatican reporter, this easy-to-read book contains all the essential information on Pope Francis as well as new impressions and insights on his character as well as his early days in office.

·     Francis, A New World Pope

A survey of Pope Francis’s journey to the papacy, his beliefs and writings, his character, and the new challenges he will face as Pope, which include church governance, consumerism, evangelization, tending to the poor, and much more.

·     Pope Francis on the Open Directory Project

The Open Directory Project is the largest directory of the web. Check out this page for a list of links about Pope Francis such as news and opinion, stories, commentaries, photographs, and more.

·     Pope Francis, Jorge Mario Bergoglio – Holy Father

The Vatican’s official website devoted to all things Pope Francis.

·     Pope Francis’ Channel on YouTube

This series is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and is free and open to the public.


Alex Williams theology liaisonAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, MS is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams.

Photo of Pope Francis by Diane Brocchi, Special Events Coordinator, College of Arts & Sciences

Our Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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Dig Deeper: Novelist David Gilbert on Being a Father and a Son

David Gilbert authorThe 16th Annual Villanova Literary Festival opens this Thursday, Jan. 30 at 7 p.m. with fiction writer David Gilbert, who will be reading excerpts from his acclaimed novel & Sons. Mr. Gilbert’s stories have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, GQ, and Bomb. His newest novel tells a sprawling tale of fathers and sons featuring two generations of writers and artists in orbit of a reclusive, Salinger-esque novelist named A.N. Dyer. A reception and book signing will follow the reading, along with the opportunity to meet Mr. Gilbert.

In preparation for the reading, we’ve compiled a list of resources to help our readers better understand the work of this fascinating young novelist.


Dig Deeper

In this Fresh Air interview, Terry Gross asks Mr. Gilbert about his life and upbringing as a way of better understanding the characters in & Sons. The author remarks upon his writing process, the difficulty of finding a voice and subject matter as a young writer, and the role Central Park played in the upbringing of an affluent Manhattan kid during the 1970’s and 80’s.

Speaking with Jonathan Lee at Guernica, Mr. Gilbert dives deeper into the nuts and bolts of & Sons, speaking on the novel’s tone, characters and form. In describing his decision to invent the entire fictional oeuvre of his character A.N. Dyer, Gilbert remarks that: “Since this is a book about books, and writing, I wanted it to contain every other kind of book within its pages. To have the satire, and to have the family drama, and suddenly have an Alice Munro style short story pop up. There’s even a bit of science fiction in there. I was just trying to throw between those covers as much as possible in terms of what a book can do.”

Book critic for The New Yorker James Wood reviews & Sons, describing Mr. Gilbert’s prose as “crisp, witty, and rightly weighted,” but questioning the sprawling, meandering nature of his narrative.

Emma Brockes praises the ambition and narration of & Sons in this article at the Guardian. She also calls attention to one of the novel’s strongest sentences, and Mr. Gilbert’s favorite: “Fathers start as gods and end as myths and in between whatever human form they take can be calamitous for their sons.”


2014-01-29 14.53.13Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Arnold is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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Continuum: Welcome 2014


Darren

As classes get back into full swing for the spring semester, I hope students continue to see their Library as a welcoming and inviting place to interact and explore intellectually. My concern is that, because they grew up in a digital world, students may not recognize that the Library is significant and also relevant to current learning and study needs.

A good contemporary academic library, such as Falvey, functions as a setting for group study, a collaborative environment for interacting around computers, a place to connect with complex digital resources while receiving instructional assistance from a librarian, and a venue for a broad mix of cultural and intellectual events, in addition to providing access to learning resources in print and digital forms. Falvey strives to provide students with a lively and diverse learning environment.

We know students come to study in Falvey and Falvey Hall, both individually and in groups, often using the group-study rooms, Reading Room and similar study spaces we have available. They come for quick access to email; if they don’t have their laptop with them, they borrow one of our laptops; and they use the wireless network to sit comfortably and read, write, browse the Web, or perform similar tasks. They come to Falvey to print documents (we have the busiest printers on campus!) and for assistance with class assignments. They come to access services on the second-floor Learning Commons: the Writing Center, the Math Learning Resource Center, Learning Support Services, Library Research Support.

Our mission is to provide a positive supportive experience from the start, so our users will see the Library as a place to come when they need assistance and support with academic and co-curricular pursuits. We very much see Falvey Memorial Library as essential to the Villanova experience.

DARREN SIG2

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Last Modified: January 21, 2014