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‘Cat in the Stacks: Meowdterms

CAT-STAXI’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


So here we are – it’s midterm.

Sheldon Bag

We’re all like, where did the time go? And we’re all like, why is there so much studying and writing to do? Can I please just procrastinate and consume hundreds of kitten gifs?

If that’s what you want, that’s what you’ll get. I’ve never been known to turn down a request for kitten gifs.

Crush Cat

Observe: the kitten gif in its natural habitat. This kitten, like you, is being crushed by deadlines and projects. But notice how he slips free, and is shocked—nay, flabbergasted—when the mat rolls on by and he’s left unharmed. Like the rolling mat of doom, this week will pass. And if you work hard, so will you.

How, you ask? How can I survive this?

Make Plans cat gif

Strategy, of course. Plan your days, plan your hours. Hey, plan your half-hours. And if you can, squeeze in a mental health hour—even if you don’t get the full sixty minutes of relaxation, it’ll at least give you some wiggle room between studying, writing, eating, and hopefully…

Cat Sleep

Sleeping. Avoid the all-nighters with all your might. Twenty minutes of Reddit or Facebook here and there might seem like a fun distraction, but if the trade-off is a messed up sleep schedule, try to reconsider.

Take Care of Yourself gif

Because you have to take care of yourself. Remember mens sana in corpore sano? It’s more important now than ever. Groggy brains make groggy work. Frustration makes everything harder to accomplish. But if you get frustrated (and you probably will), don’t be frustrated that you’re frustrated. Be gentle with yourself, pause, and be hypnotized by Lil Bub.

Lil bub face

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Dig Deeper: Journalism and the Great War

NYTimes-WWI headline 1918

When the Great War changed the course of the 20th century, it also greatly impacted the world of communication. Until this time, muckraking was the dominant journalistic movement, which was an incarnation of investigative writing that sought to unveil corruption and scandal (to “rake” up “muck”), especially regarding politics and social issues.

Some of the most influential journalists in the Progressive Era included Lincoln Steffens, Ida Tarbell, and Ray Stannard Baker, all three of whom wrote for McClure’s Magazine, which played a significant role in establishing the muckraking movement. While Steffens (1866-1936) focused on exposing government and political corruption, Tarbell (1857-1944) is perhaps best known for her work exposing John D. Rockefeller and the ills of his oil monopoly. Stannard (1870-1946) was an advocate of Woodrow Wilson during his presidential candidacy and was later asked by him to investigate the war in Europe. The muckraking movement, however, was to meet its end during World War I, during which government in general became adversarial toward journalism.

George Creel journalist

George Creel

Seven days after the United States entered the global conflict, President Woodrow Wilson created the Committee on Public Information (CPI), which strove to publicize the war through print and visual media in only constructive ways. Although the CPI did not have the ability to censor, its head, George Creel, a muckraking journalist himself, did advocate for voluntary self-monitoring and even issued a Preliminary Statement to the Press in May 1917 that urged editors to prevent publication of any news that could compromise military operations. As Creel was also a member of the government Censorship Board, which monitored communication over telegraph, telephone and cable, he was able to scrutinize periodicals as well as magazines, which were required to present their articles for the board’s review before publication.

The Espionage Act of 1917 and a 1918 sedition amendment frustrated attempts to publish an objective view of the war even further. The former barred any materials that ostensibly advocated disloyalty, insubordination, treason or obstruction of military recruitment, while the latter deemed criminal any published content disloyal to the government or military. In the hands of a manipulating Wilson administration, the freedom of domestic reporting was severely restricted.

Although operating under difficult conditions, there were numerous journalists who were able to distinguish themselves for their courage, intelligence and integrity.

Nellie_Bly_2

Nellie Bly

During what she thought only to be a vacation in Europe, Nellie Bly (1864-1922) witnessed the outbreak of the Great War. Previously, Bly had written for the New York World about government corruption, poor working conditions, and the Pullman labor strike, and even had the opportunity to interview American social reformer Susan B. Anthony. After taking a hiatus from investigative journalism, she was asked by a former World editor to write for the New York Evening Journal about her experiences in war-torn Europe. She ultimately accepted and is now known as America’s first female war correspondent reporting from the front lines.

John Reed (1887-1920) was another war correspondent who sailed to Europe soon after Germany declared war on France. He viewed the war largely as a product of commercialism and was frequently thwarted by censorship in the press. Reed is famously known to have shouted, “This is not my war, and I will not support it. This is not my war, and I will have nothing to do with it” (Homberger, John Reed, 1990, p.122). After President Wilson announced the involvement of the United States, Reed went on to publish vitriolic anti-war articles in the Socialist magazine The Masses, whose editors were eventually charged with conspiring to obstruct conscription.

After the war, author and journalist Georges Seldes (1890-1995) conducted an exclusive interview with the supreme commander of the German army, Paul von Hindenburg, who actually broke down in tears during the interview and discussed how pivotal America was strategically in winning the war.

With the efforts of these journalists and many others, it seems only appropriate that the Pulitzer Prizes, established by one of the most famous journalists and publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World, Joseph Pulitzer, were first awarded for achievement in journalism in 1917.


Dig Deeper: Resources about Journalism through the Great War

For a topic overview, check out the entry “Journalism, World War I” from our online reference Americans at War: Society, Culture and the Homefront. This entry concludes with a bibliography with sources that further investigate the history of journalism.

For primary sources, try browsing through a list of periodicals published during WWI.

Resources on Muckrakers past and present

A list of books about Ida Tarbell

Read more about Lincoln Steffens.

Discover the World War I diary of Ray Stannard Baker and more.

How well do you know Nellie Bly, the woman who travelled around the world in 72 days?

Find out more about the radical politics of John Reed.

Learn about the extraordinary career of Georges Seldes.

Resources about Joseph Pulitzer, the history of the prizes, and the works of individual prize-winning authors are all right here.

For more information about journalism throughout World War I, please email me, Alexander Williams, or call 610-519-8845.


Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments.

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The Highlighter: Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases Like a Pro

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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‘Cat in the CAVE

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


CAVEToday at 2:00, Villanova’s CAVE is officially open. In honor of opening day, this week’s blog post will be all about immersive virtual reality—for those of us who might not even know where to begin thinking about the creative and academic applications of virtual environments.

Disclaimer: I’m not an expert. I’m a virtual reality noob. I’m writing this with no in-depth technical expertise—just a whole lot of geeky excitement. But I do play (and, by way of literary theory, study) video games, and my personal interest in virtual reality’s possible applications is heavily biased towards, well, play. And by “play” I don’t mean to imply the installment is only for entertainment (nor do I think its entertainment and audio/visual/tactile immersion possibilities should be minimized, especially for the arts and humanities). I mean “play” as in stepping inside a world and getting your hands virtually dirty, like a kid in a sandbox.

But before we talk Earth science and data visualization, whet your VR palette with the incredibly cool Tilt Brush (aka “Microsoft Paint for the Year 2020”).

Oculus_vs_Morpheus-740x580-580x450Depending on your hobbies, you might have already heard about the VR movement in video games a la Oculus Rift  and Project Morpheus. These are headset-based immersive mechanisms, while the CAVE is quite literally a virtually immersive walk-in cave. Still, if you want to explore discussion of virtually reality without scholarly pressure, the gaming community is a good place to start.

If you feel like you’re ready to brave the technical background and scholarly applications of virtual reality, The Verge posted a feature video on The Virtual Reality CAVE, featuring UC Davis’s setup, KeckCAVES. A little digging into UC Davis’s ongoing projects, which include applications in Earth science, data visualization, and responsive media, is a fun way to get your feet wet!

Based on a little internet reading, the possibilities of virtual reality in scholarly, scientific and creative application are innumerable—but are not all fully realized, or even drafted. And that’s the cool part: if this is the forefront of a new wave, this is your chance to brainstorm, too.

How could you imagine immersive virtual reality used in your field of study?

 


Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and ServicArticle by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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The War to End All Wars: Great War Resources at Falvey

By Canadian Official photographer, Castle, W I (Lieutenant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Canadian Official photographer, Castle, W I (Lieutenant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When a nation enters war, it often justifies its actions with promises of a better and more just world. The Great War, which consumed much of Europe and its colonial outposts from 1914 to 1918, was no exception. H.G. Wells called it the “war that will end war,” which later morphed into “the war to end all wars.” Wells coined this phrase in a Times editorial. His 1914 editorials are easily accessible in a book: The War That Will End War.

2014 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the war: A war that started with Austria’s declaration of war against Serbia on July 28, 1914, following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife a month earlier. Much has been written about the war since then, and 2014 promises a bumper crop of new scholarship. The Library will showcase new publications in a small exhibit in the Learning Commons throughout the fall semester.

WWI CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT WILL CONTINUE THROUGH THE FALL SEMESTER

WWI CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT WILL CONTINUE THROUGHOUT THE FALL SEMESTER

Here are some titles you can expect to see in the exhibit. Aside from run-of-the-mill general surveys, a number of these books explore previously neglected aspects of the war.

The historiography of the Great War has gone through many changes, and the amount of scholarship can be overwhelming. The three volumes of the Cambridge History of the First World War, particularly the excellent bibliographic essays included in each volume, are a good starting point for interested readers.

Among the excellent primary sources available at Falvey are the complete archives of the New York Times and the London Times. Your Villanova id. will allow you either to open the New York Times from Sunday, August 9, 1914 and browse through pages after pages of war coverage or to read the detailed coverage of the war declaration in the Times of London on July 29, 1914.

Online exhibitions commemorating the Great War abound: The National World War I Museum has a series of exhibitions ranging from War Art to War Fare. Europeana 1914-1918 features untold stories and official histories of the war from archives and museums across Europe. Last but not least, Falvey hosted Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4 p.m. for a talk about the origins of the war: “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.”


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

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Dig Deeper: The Village That Cried

HedtkeAs part of the Alumni Author series, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will be giving a talk titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk is based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944. The talk will focus on the crash of an American B-24 bomber into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944. The crash and ensuing firestorm killed 61 people, including 38 children in the village elementary school. This tragic event destroyed an entire generation of children in the village of 900 people. In addition, Hedtke’s talk will also touch upon the communal funeral and the village’s almost 70-year attempt to recover from this horrendous incident.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public, and will be held on Monday, Sept. 29 at 2:30 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

To learn more about the Freckleton, English Air Disaster, explore the resources provided below, chosen and organized by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

 


Dig Deeper

Freckleton: The Village That Cried

Freckelton

Freckleton, known as “the village that cried,” is located on Britain’s beautiful Fylde Coast, situated in the historic Ribble Valley. It is approximately 230 miles northwest of London in Lancashire county.

BBC- Remembering the Freckleton air disaster of 1944  - with recording of eyewitness testimony

The Times Digital Archive 1785-1985 (Gale)Aircraft Crash on School

Historical New York Times: 1851-2009 (ProQuest)MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED: Soldiers Built Playground Where U.S. Plane Crashed in Britain

Washington Post Historical: 1877-1996 (ProQuest)Bomber Crash Kills All But 6 Of British Town’s 41 Children

Cabrini College news

Lancashire Aircraft Investigation Team (LAIT)

Ribble Valley

 

Books:

Freckleton HedtkeBlackpoolAtWar

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for Geography and Political Science.

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‘Cat in the Stacks: Yodaisms

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


5030681_orig

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Yoda was a student in a university and had to write a paper. Wise guy that he was, he had some axioms on the topic (as he often does), and luckily with the aid of the fine resources at Falvey Memorial Library (for real though, scout those Star Wars holdings), I’ve been able to scour the archives for his best nuggets of research wisdom.

After all, your best research tool is your brain—but without some meditation on your processes, it can be an agent of the dark side.

Yoda on Research

“Train yourself to let go of everything you fear to lose.”

When you come up with a research direction, don’t marry it. Follow it as far as it deigns to take you, but don’t be surprised if you end up in totally different territory than you’d initially planned. Writing workshops for years and years have called this “killing your darlings.” You aren’t wasting your time compiling sources on topics that, by the nature of research, might become irrelevant later on—you are using them as footholds to climb the mountain. Train yourself to stay objective and open-minded with your research, even if it means having to ditch the very thesis you set out to prove.

 

ahsoka-lightsaber

“Many of the truths that we cling to depend greatly on our point of view.”

Okay, this was technically Obi-Wan, not Yoda, but it’s important. Some of the strongest arguments are ones that continually engage opposing points of view. If you’re aware of a counterargument to your point, so is your reader. Address these counterarguments and duel them. With a lightsaber.

 

“Pass on what you have learned.” 

Papers and theses and scholarship aren’t just personal projects or measures of intellectual success. They are your voice in the scholarly conversations happening all around you. Remembering this will not only help you take control of your own work, but will also keep your writing penetrable. Yoda knew, like you and me, that reading dense articles is a total slog. So, his inverted syntax notwithstanding, he always made sure his papers clearly passed on what he learned in his research. After all, “If you can’t  explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” – Yoda Einstein (Fun fact: Yoda’s design is partly based on ol’ Albert.)

Yoda 2

“Do or do not. There is no try.”

Get out there and research! It’s all well and good for big thoughts to be in your brain, but get them out there, put them into words and do work.

 

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Dig Deeper: Noel Coward and Villanova Theatre’s New Comedy “Fallen Angels”

Fallen AngelsNoël Coward was a teenager 100 years ago when he began writing plays. Among the more than 50 plays he published, several continue to be performed and to draw audiences, including Hay Fever, Private Lives, Design for Living, Present Laughter and Blithe Spirit. When a skilled and capable director prepares a Noël Coward play, audience members enjoy an entertaining and memorable experience.

The Villanova University Department of Theatre’s production Noël Coward’ Fallen Angels promises to give audience members such a hilarious and memorable experience. The Rev. David Cregan, OSA, PhD ably directs a cast of talented, charismatic performers in this lively comedy.

Order your tickets soon before performances become sold out.

Noël Coward, in addition to creating enduring plays, wrote numerous songs, musical theatre works, poetry and short stories. Sarah Wingo—liaison librarian for English, literature and theatre—has assembled the following resources about this prolific playwright:


Dig Deeper

Noel Coward

Official website: http://www.noelcoward.com/

Noël Coward Society: http://www.noelcoward.net/

Resources at Falvey: https://library.villanova.edu/Find/MyResearch/MyList/2588

IMDb page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0002021/

Artists Rifle
In light of the 100th anniversary of World War I, it is interesting to note that in 1918, Coward was conscripted into the Artists Rifles but was assessed as unfit for active service because of a tubercular tendency, and he was discharged on health grounds after nine months.

 


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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The Highlighter: You Are Going to Love Falvey’s Website Upgrade

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

 

Just a single search in Falvey’s catalog now yields not only books, media and articles but also Falvey-website items and books from other libraries—all on one page (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Dig Deeper: Jeffrey Johnson, PhD on “The Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe”

Jeffrey_JohnsonIn honor of the 100th anniversary of World War I, Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, professor of history, will be giving a lecture titled “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.” The talk will take place Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4:00 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

During the lecture, Dr. Johnson will discuss the background to the European diplomatic crisis of July 1914 that followed the assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and the various factors that led to war rather than a peaceful resolution of the crisis. He will then outline the initial phase of the fighting, as shaped by the Schlieffen-Moltke Plan that called for an all-out German attack on France through neutral Belgium while maintaining a defensive stance in the East. This plan and its subsequent failure transformed what might have been another localized Balkan war (like two previous ones in 1912 and 1913) into a long global war costing millions of lives and billions in property and resources. Finally, Dr. Johnson will briefly reflect on the broader historical significance of the First World War as the self-destruction of the ancient ideal of European empire, ultimately to be replaced by the modern ideal of international democracy.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public.

Below, Falvey’s team leader for academic integration, Jutta Seibert, has compiled a collection of resources should you wish to further study the topic of Dr. Johnson’s lecture.


Dig Deeper

Books by Dr. Jeffrey Johnson

Johnson, Jeffrey A. The Kaiser’s Chemists: Science and Modernization in Imperial Germany (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990).

Johnson, Jeffrey A. and Roy M. MacLeod, eds., Frontline and Factory: Comparative Perspectives On the Chemical Industry At War, 1914-1924 (Dordrecht: Springer, 2006).

New Books About World War I Available at Falvey

Selected Surveys of World War I History:
John Horne, A Companion to World War I (Chichester, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).

J.M. Winter, The Cambridge History of the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Selected Online Encyclopedias:
Tom Pendergast, Sara Pendergast and Christine Slovey, eds. World War I Reference Library (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002)

John M. Merriman, J. M. Winter, Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction (Detroit, Mich.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006).

Alexander DeConde, Richard D. Burns and Fredrik Logevall. Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy. 2nd ed. (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002).

Robert D. Johnston, ed., Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History. Vol. 4: From the Gilded Age through the Age of Reform, 1878 to 1920 (Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010).


JuttaSeibertDig Deeper links selected by Jutta Seibert, team leader for academic integration.

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Last Modified: September 22, 2014