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Test drive the African American Periodicals, 1825-1995 Collection

Black Panther cover, 1/4/1969

Black Panther cover, 1/4/1969

While mainstream newspapers and magazines are fairly well-represented in the library’s digital collections, minority publications are generally difficult to find in digital and print formats. The wildly popular African American Newspapers: The 19th Century collection from Accessible Archives, which includes the Christian Recorder, is a notable exception. Current news archives such as Lexis-Nexis Academic and ABI/INFORM include a sprinkling of minority news sources, but these are difficult to isolate and coverage is limited. Ethnic NewsWatch, a Proquest collection of minority news outlets, includes a number of important African American newspapers and magazines such as the Chicago DefenderEssence, the Philadelphia TribunePride, and Black Renaissance, but as with most other current newspaper archives, coverage goes only back to the early nineties.

African American Periodicals, 1825-1995 is a small boutique collection of often hard to find African American magazines and newsletters. Villanova University faculty and students currently have trial access to this collection through November 28. According to Readex, the collection is based on James P. Dansky’s African American Newspapers and Periodicals: A National Bibliography. This claim could lead to unrealistic expectations as Danksy identified 6,562 individual titles compared to the 172 titles included in the Readex collection. The content of the collection was in fact determined by the holdings of the Wisconsin Historical Society. With only 172 titles and over sixty percent of these represented with less than ten issues, the collection represents but a small segment of the rich African American periodicals world.

beauty-trade

Beauty Trade, 4/1/1960

Nevertheless, the collection has its merits. It includes periodicals published in the twentieth century which are generally hard to find in digital collections as a result of copyright restrictions. Students and faculty alike will appreciate access to primary sources which reflect unique African American perspectives on the civil rights and black power movements. The collection includes the Black Panther (1967-1975), the organ of the Black Panther party. There are noticeable gaps in the online collection and the lack of color digitization is unfortunate. On the other hand, the option to download a complete issue, as long as it does not exceed 75 pages, will be much appreciated by readers who prefer browsing to searching. Other noteworthy titles in the collection are the Black Worker (1929-1968), the official organ of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and the African Repository (1825-1892), which was published by the American Colonization Society. Titles such as Beauty Trade (1954-1978) and the music magazine Soul (1966-1976) make for interesting insights into African American popular culture. It is unfortunate that only the first ten years of Crisis: A Record of the Darker Races, the official organ of the NAACP, are included in the collection.

The trial will be running until November 28. Feel free to share the link with other Villanova University faculty and students and let us know what you think.

Trial access: 
African American Periodicals, 1825-1995
African American Periodicals Fact Sheet
African American Periodicals Title List


JuttaSeibertArticle and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

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The Highlighter: Use the Catalog’s Filters to Quickly Find Books

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Use the catalog’s filters to quickly find every book of a particular topic, genre or language. This video shows how to perform this advanced searching technique. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Dig Deeper: The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture

Composite3The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture will take place in Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Nov. 5 at 7:00 p.m. The annual event focuses on scholarship about Italian-American history, culture, and the immigrant experience. This year’s lecture will feature Joseph L. Tropea, PhD, retired professor and former chair, Department of Sociology, George Washington University.

Dr. Tropea’s previous research projects in institutional history have been published in Social Science History, Criminal Justice History, Journal of Education Quarterly, Journal of Management HistoryInternational Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, as well as in edited works in the U.S. and Europe. His recent research (his presentation’s focus) shifts to social history of the greatest mine disaster in U.S. History, which killed 361 persons, including 170 Italian migrants. His work, so far, includes findings which change the facts and interpretations of that 1907 disaster, especially for Italians (West Virginia History, 2013); a biography of a once-chastised northern Italian mother of five, widowed by the disaster (Women’s Studies, 2013); and a beguiling effort to document intimacies and intricacies of four Calabrian migrants to West Virginia’s Fairmont Coal Field, including a miner who died in the explosion (under review).

The presentation will reveal many bizarre but illustrative errors and myths that constitute too much Italian-American history and identity. Dr. Tropea’s grandparents migrated from four regions in Italy (Abruzzo, Lazio, Basilicata and Calabria) to settle in West Virginia, two of whom were present in Monongah at the time of the 1907 disaster. In addition, he was honored in Rome for his research and also as “Italian Man of the Year” in Clarksburg, West Virginia.

For more information on Monongah and Italian-American history, visit the resources below, selected by Alexander Williams, liaison librarian to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments.


Dig Deeper

The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella
Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture Blog Resources

 Resources by Joseph L. Tropea

Tropea, J. L. (2013). Monongah revisited: Sources, body parts, and ethnography. West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, 7(2), pp. 63-91. doi:10.1353/wvh.2013.0017

Tropea, J. L. (2013). Catterina DeCarlo Davia – A West Virginia donkey. Women’s Studies, 42(4), pp. 369-389. doi:10.1080/00497878.2013.773196

Tropea, J. L. (2008). Revisiting Monongah. [Review of the book Monongah: The tragic story of the worst industrial accident in US history by J.D. McAteer]. Appalachian Journal, 35(4), pp. 358-364.

Tropea, J. L., Miller, J. E., & Beattie-Repetti, C. (Eds.). (1986). Proceedings from AIHA ’86: Support and struggle: Italians and Italian Americans in a comparative perspective : proceedings of the seventeenth annual conference of the American Italian Historical Association. Staten Island, N.Y.: The Association.

 

More Resources

Argentine, P. (Producer & Director). (2007). Monongah remembered [Motion picture]. United States: Argentine productions.

Bartlett, M., & Grubb, W. The Monongah mine disaster and its social setting: A collage of newspaper accounts. Fairmont, WV: s.n.

How many at Monongah? (1995). Professional Safety, 40(3), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.v illanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/200413992?accountid=14853

McAteer, J. D. (2014). Monongah: The tragic story of the worst industrial accident in US history. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Monongah Mines Relief Committee. History of the Monongah mines relief fund: In aid of sufferers from the Monongah mine explosion, Monongah, West Virginia, December 6, 1907. [Whitefish, Mont.?]: Kessinger Pub..

Pitz, M. (2007, December 5). Italians arrive to honor immigrants killed in 1907 Monongah mine blast. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.post-gazette.com/life/lifestyle/2007/12/05/Italians-arrive-to-honor-immigrants-killed-in-1907-Monongah-mine-blast/stories/200712050217

Pitz, M. (2007, November 28). Bell from Italy to toll in Monongah. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.post-gazette.com/frontpage/2007/11/28/Bell-from-Italy-to-toll-in-Monongah/stories/200711280322

Rittenhouse, R. (2014). Monongah coal mine disaster 1907-2007: Pictorial history of a monumental tragedy. Westover, W.Va.: R. Rittenhouse.

Skog, J. (2014). The Monongah mining disaster. Minneapolis, Minn.: Compass Point Books.

Soladay, M. (2009). Remembering Monongah. Ambassador, 21, 11. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/204841924?accountid=14853

U.S. Department of Labor: Mine Safety and Health Administration. (1998, May 20). Mining disasters – An exhibition: 1907 Fairmont Coal Company mining disaster Monongah, West Virginia. Retrieved from http://www.msha.gov/DISASTER/MONONGAH/ MONON1.asp

 


Alex WilliamsDig Deeper links selected by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and liaison to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments. 

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Dig Deeper: W. Ian Lipkin, MD, Mendel Medal Recipient

LipkinVillanova University has named world-renowned epidemiologist and “microbe hunter” W. Ian Lipkin, MD, as the recipient of its 2014 Mendel Medal, in recognition of his groundbreaking work in the development of genetic methods for microbial surveillance and discovery, as well as his research into infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and West Nile Virus.

Named “the world’s most celebrated virus hunter” by Discover Magazine, Professor Lipkin’s scientific contributions include the first use of genetic methods to identify an infectious agent, discovery of the implication of West Nile virus as the cause of encephalitis in North America in 1999, invention of MassTag PCR and the first panmicrobial microarray, first use of deep sequencing in pathogen discovery, and molecular characterization of more than 500 viruses. In 2003, at the height of the SARS outbreak, Professor Lipkin traveled to China at the invitation of the World Health Organization, the Chinese Minister of Science and Technology and the Vice President of the Chinese Academy of Science to co-direct research efforts and train Chinese microbiologists how to test for the virus. More recently, he was the sole external investigator invited by the Ministry of Health in Saudi Arabia to assist in identifying reservoirs and vectors for transmission of the MERS coronavirus.

First awarded in 1929, Villanova’s Mendel Medal is given to outstanding contemporary scientists in recognition of their scientific accomplishments. The medal honors 19th century Augustinian friar and scientist Gregor Johann Mendel, Abbot of the Augustinian Monastery, Brünn, Austria, (now Brno, the Czech Republic), best known as “the father of modern genetics,” for his discovery of the celebrated laws of heredity that bear his name. Previous medalists have been Nobel Laureates, Lasker and MacArthur awardees, and recipients of the National Medal of Science.

(Copy Source: http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2014/0324.html)

Professor Lipkin will deliver the 2014 Mendel Medal Lecture “Of Microbes and Man: A Delicate Balance” at 2:00 p.m. on October 31 in the Villanova Room of the Connelly Center. The event is free and open to the public.

To learn more about epidemiology, consult the sources below, selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.


Dig Deeper

Major databases:

PubMed

Web of Science

Scopus

 

Our epidemiology journals:

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Search/Results?lookfor=Epidemiology&type=AllFields&sort=year&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Epidemiology%22&filter%5B%5D=format%3A%22Journal%22
A selection of the best introductory epidemiology books from our collection:

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/MyResearch/MyList/2665


RS4532_FML164_RobinBowles_019_EDITDig Deeper links selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.

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The Great War: WWI through a literary lens

WWI-era American Library Association ad; retrieved from http://boingboing.net/2010/02/14/wwi-pro-reading-ad.html

WWI-era American Library Association ad; retrieved from http://boingboing.net/2010/02/14/wwi-pro-reading-ad.html

Due to the shifting social and economic factors at the turn of the 20th century and the rise of the middle class, more people than ever before, from all levels of society, were literate. The rise in literacy contributed to not only the prolific creation of literature during and after WWI but also to the demand for and consumption of this literature.

Though both professional and amateur authors wrote throughout the period, much of the literature that we think of as World War I literature was written after the war during the 1920s and 30s and often dealt with issues such as shell shock, the difficulty that soldiers had returning to their old lives after the war, and the effect losses from war had on families.

The study of war literature was for a very long time, and still is to an extent, focused largely on male authors. It wasn’t until the late 20th century that the writing of women during and about the War began to receive attention. Catherine Reilly’s 1981 anthology, Scars Upon my Heart: Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War, is the first work strictly dedicated to examining women’s poetry and prose from World War I.

World War I also ushered in a new era of literature and heavily influenced literature in the decades following it. The world was faced with a sense of disillusionment that it had never faced in such a way before, and genres such as the hard-boiled detective novels sprung up with war veteran protagonists embittered and changed by their pasts, while authors such as H. P. Lovecraft explored themes of chaos, apathy and despair through a new kind of horror story.

Below I have selected a number of titles and web resources to literature written both during and following WWI that deals directly with the war and its impact.

Because not all literature written during the War directly deals with the War, I have also created a timeline depicting a selection of major literary publications alongside a selection of historical events between the years of 1914 and 1922.

Link to Timeline:

http://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline/latest/embed/index.html?source=0Avs0oI7XtkWUdEhzel9pNFRMdFlNOXVmNHdGbTY1M0E&font=Bevan-PotanoSans&maptype=toner&lang=en&height=650

Parade’s End by Ford Madox Ford (book and beautiful HBO mini series)

Ford, Parade's End old cover

Parade’s End is a tetralogy by the English novelist and poet Ford Madox Ford published between 1924 and 1928. It is set mainly in England and on the Western Front in World War I, where Ford served as an officer in the Welsh Regiment.

Originally published as four individual novels Some Do Not (1924), No More Parades (1925), A Man Could Stand Up (1926), and Last Post (1928) they are now typically combined into one volume as Parade’s End. In 2012 Parade’s End was adapted as a five part miniseries for the BBC/HBO, with script by Tom Stoppard, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Rebecca Hall.

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

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All Quiet on the Western Front, first published in 1929, is a novel by Erich Maria Remarque, a German veteran of World War I. “The book describes the German soldiers’ extreme physical and mental stress during the war, and the detachment from civilian life felt by many of these soldiers upon returning home from the front.”

Made into a film in 1930 only a year after its publication, All Quiet on the Western Front was the first all-talking non-musical film to win the Best Picture Oscar. In 2009 it was announced that there would be a remake, but thus far nothing has come of it.

Scars Upon My Heart: Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War by Catherine Reilly 1981

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Scars Upon My Heart is a poetry anthology collected by Catherine Reilly,” and is the first work strictly dedicated to examining women’s poetry and prose from World War I.

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks

harlem_hellfighters_cover_art_a_p

This is a contemporary graphic novel by Max Brooks, author of World War Z. It focuses on the 369th infantry, an African American unit that spent more time in combat than any other American unit and returned home to face extreme discrimination from the US government.


The Waste Land
By T.S. Eliot.

Though not directly about the war The Waste Land published in 1922 is clearly a modernist product of a post war world of disillusionment, a theme carried forward in Eliot’s other writings such as his 1925 poem “The Hollow Men.” When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Eliot tried to join the U.S. Navy but was rejected for physical reasons.

First World War Poetry Digital Archive

Link to Eliot’s registration for WWI

Link to war related resource from our new online Eliot resource

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The Highlighter: Explore Falvey’s Many Blogs

 

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

In addition to the Library News blog, Falvey publishes several subject-specific blogs on its site. This video shows how to access the library’s subject-specific blogs.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month in Falvey: Agnes Moncy, PhD

Portrait of a Man 1595-1600 Oil on canvas, 53 x 47 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Portrait of a Man
1595-1600
Oil on canvas, 53 x 47 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

To celebrate Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month, Agnes Moncy, PhD, professor of Spanish in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Temple University, will discuss El Greco. This event, held at 3:00 p.m. Oct. 23, in room 204, commemorates the 400th anniversary of El Greco’s death.

The eventco-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Sigma Delta Pi and the Hispanic Honor Societyis free and open to the public.

El Greco, born Doménikos Theotokopoulos (c. 1547 – 1614) in Crete (a Greek island), moved to Italy as a young man. There he visited Venice, where he was influenced by the paintings of Titian and Tintoretto; El Greco also traveled to Rome where he saw Roman and Florentine Mannerist works. By 1577, he had moved to Toledo,Spain, where he remained for the rest of his life.

El Greco (“the Greek”) is considered a major Spanish Renaissance artist although his personal style reflects strong elements of Late Byzantine and Late Italian Mannerist art. He painted portraits and intensely emotional religious paintings such as “The Burial of Count Orgaz,” 1586, in Santo Tomé, Toledo, Spain.

Dig Deeper: El Greco Resources

Videos—
El Greco: Christ Driving the Traders from the Temple (Great Britain: National Gallery, 1995).

Rubens, van Dyck and the 17th Century Flemish Painters; Rembrandt and the 17th Century Dutch Masters; Velazquez, El Greco, Goya and the Spanish Masters (Russia: Gosudarstvennyi Ermitazh,1992).

Books—
Alvarez Lopera, José. El Greco (Barcelona: Galaxia Gutenberg, 2003). Text in Spanish.

Alvarez Lopera, José. El retablo del Colegio de Doña Maria de Aragón de El Greco [The Retablo (Altarpiece) of the Colegio of Doña Maria of Aragon by El Greco] (Madrid: Tf. Editores, c.2000). Text in Spanish.

Calvo Serraller, F. Entierro del conde de Orgaz [Burial of the Count Orgaz] (Milano: Electra, c.1994). Text in Italian.

Figures of Thought: El Greco as Interpreter of History, Tradition and Ideas (Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 1982).

Guinard, Paul J. El Greco: Biographical and Critical Study (Lausanne: Skira, 1956).

Kelemen, Pál. El Greco Revisited: Candia, Venice, Toledo (New York: Macmillan, 1961).

Marías, Fernando. El Greco in Toledo (London: Scala, 2001).

Marías, Fernando. El Greco, Life and Work: A New History (London: Thames and Hudson, 2013).

Museo Thyssen Bornemisza. El Greco: Identity and Transformation: Crete, Italy, Spain (Milano: Skira, 1999).

Panagiötakës, Nikolaos. El Greco: The Cretan Years (Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2009).

Sérullaz, Maurice. Christ on the Cross (London: M. Parrish, 1947).

Sureda, Joan. La Gloria de los Siglos de Oro: Mecenas, Artistas y Maravillas en la España Imperial [The Glory of the Golden Age: Patrons, Artists and Wonders of Imperial Spain] (Barcelona: Lunwerg Editores, 2006). Text in Spanish.

Toledo Museum of Art. El Greco of Toledo (Boston: Little, Brown, 1982).

Wethey, Harold E. El Greco and his School (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1962).

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Dig Deeper: Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania

We Are HereThis year’s annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture, which will be held in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 12:30 p.m., will feature Ellen Cassedy, speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with “the dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, award-winning author Ellen Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Ellen Cassedy’s We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust (University of Nebraska Press, 2012), begins with a personal journey into the old Jewish heartland (land of her Jewish forebears), and then expands into a larger exploration.  The book won four national awards and was short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Jewish Book World calls it “brilliantly balanced, totally engaging, and constantly penetrating.”

For more information on Ellen Cassedy, the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania, and other resources both online and here in Falvey, see the following links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


Dig Deeper 

Ellen-head-shot-croppedSelected Internet resources

Ellen Cassedy site

Yad Vashem – The Beginning of the Final Solution, Murder of the Jews in the Baltic States

Holocaust Atlas of Lithuania

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

USC Shoah Foundation

Voices of the Holocaust

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

 

Selected Falvey Databases

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

ATLA Religion Database (EBSCO)

Historical Abstracts (EBSCO)

Opposing Viewpoints Resources in Context (Gale)

Oxford Bibliographies – Political Science, International Relations

Philosophy Documentation Center Collection (POIESIS)

Political Handbook of the World (Sage/CQ Press)

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (ProQuest)

 

Selected Guides

The Oxford handbook of genocide studies

Holocaust related encyclopedias

Course guide – Genocide and mass killing

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

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The Highlighter: Browse a Magazine or Journal in “Lexis Nexis Academic”

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Sometimes I do not need to find a specific article, but I want to browse the magazine or journal that publishes articles on my topic. This video shows how to peruse a publication in the Lexis Nexis Academic database.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage. Or you can find them on YouTube.

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Last Modified: October 21, 2014