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‘Cat in the Stacks: Journals by the Poolside (Try BrowZine!)

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Every so often, you’ll have classmates or colleagues who seem to know so much trendy information about your shared field and you’ll wonder when these fine folks have the time and how they have the energy to read for fun on top of studies and working hours. (Hint: they’re cyborgs. I wasn’t supposed to tell you that. Don’t make eye contact.)

Of course, there are the lucky breed of academics whose work is their studies and whose studies are their hobbies and whose hobbies are their tasks. But that’s not everyone, and you certainly shouldn’t feel bad if that sort of overlap is not your experience. The average person can stay just as in-the-know with certain information routines that hardly take extra time out of their days.

Combining your academic interests with your social media pursuits is a solid option. The cosmic harmony achieved when a Star Wars meme is counterbalanced by a Shakespeare article promoted by JSTOR’s Facebook page is quite satisfying. Tons of academic journals, databases, and organizations have a social media presence, and following them alongside your fun favorites is an excellent way to stay on top of the academic buzz—and hardly noticing you’re feeding your brain. Search Twitter or Facebook or Instagram or whatever platform you can think of for database names or journal organizations, and I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Especially during nice summer walks and runs and lounging in the sun on the beach, podcasts are quick and easy ways to stay in the loop.

You can use apps like Feedly to subscribe to different sites and blogs.

Last but certainly not least, check out BrowZine, because we have a trial until May 15th and it’s pretty super cool. Straight from the creators, “BrowZine works by organizing the articles found in Open Access and subscription databases, uniting them into complete journals, then arranging these journals on a common newsstand. The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines.” Oooooooooo. Now, if you’re anything like me, logging into Villanova’s site and checking out the catalog on a computer to print out a journal article is not exactly something that screams leisure and poolside reading. But put it on my phone or tablet, and I’m there! Not only that—journal articles waste a whole lot of paper if you want to be mobile with your academia! In honor of Earth Day, perhaps its time to use BrowZine as your stepping stone to an ecofriendly research experience.

As you can see…

cat ipad…my alternate tablet activities without BrowZine are decidedly less, uh, elevated.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Dig Deeper: Earth Day 2015

earthblogHappy Earth Day! Today at 10:00 a.m. a panel discussion on working towards sustainable solutions will be held in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library. Panelists who have devoted their careers to some aspect of sustainability will discuss their work. The challenges and opportunities of working daily to address environmental issues will be discussed. Questions and discussion between panelists and the audience are encouraged. A light continental breakfast will be provided.

Panelists will include the following:

JoAnn Garbin KnowE, Aircuity, Sustainable Business Network

David Masur PennEnvironment

Brenda Gotanda Manko Gold, Katcher & Fox LLP

Rob Fleming Engineering & Design Institute, Philadelphia University

Adam Agalloco Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Sustainability

*Moderated by Liesel Schwarz, Villanova University Sustainability Manager*

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Earth Day Committee, is free and open to the public.

See here for more acitivties in celebration of Earth Day 2015 at Villanova University.

To dig deeper into Earth Day celebrations, sustainability and climate resources, and to get involved, check out the links below selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


Dig Deeper

United States/North America

Earth Day Across America – see what’s happening in your state
Original Earth Day - on the first Earth Day
Climate Central – sea level rise
EPA Earth Day
North American Carbon Program – interagency coordinated program

International

International Mother Earth Day
Earth Day Network – economic growth and sustainability join hands
http://www.climatecentral.org/news/archive/2015
World Health Day – World Health Organization
Global Citizen Earth Day
http://www.earthday.org/greencities/events/
GEO Carbon Strategy
Economic Growth and Sustainable Development

Tools and Social Media

Facebook Earth Day – It’s our turn to lead
Carbon Tracker – NOAA
Globe at Night – impact of light pollution

 

Past Falvey Blogs

2011

2014


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


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Upcoming Workshop for Chicago-Style Footnotes and Bibliographies

9780226103891_p0_v2_s260x420Are you confused by the different formats required by Chicago-style for footnotes and bibliographies? Are you unsure about how and when to use “ibid.”? — Answers to your questions are just around the corner.
Come to Falvey Memorial Library for a quick introduction to Chicago-style rules for footnotes and bibliography. The session will be held Wednesday, April 22: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., in Falvey 207 in the second-floor Learning Commons. For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu).


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Information provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for history.


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Upcoming Workshops for Chicago-Style Footnotes and Bibliographies

9780226103891_p0_v2_s260x420Are you confused by the different formats required by Chicago-style for footnotes and bibliographies? Are you unsure about how and when to use “ibid.”? — Answers to your questions are just around the corner.
Come to Falvey Memorial Library for a quick introduction to Chicago-style rules for footnotes and bibliography. Sessions will be held in Falvey 207 in the second-floor Learning Commons. For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu).

Tuesday, April 14: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 22: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Information provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for history.


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Women’s History Month: Power & Magic in the Kitchen

Historically speaking, the kitchen is a woman’s domain. Women were chained to their stoves for hours on end. Cooking skills were right up there with other desirable traits, such as purity, appearance, and obedience to men. As Laura Schenone puts it in her book, A thousand years over a hot stove, “cooking reveals itself as a source of power and magic, and, at the same time, a source of oppression in women’s lives.”

To paraphrase Schenone, what women learned and what they knew wouldn’t be found in a book. It was passed down in the oral tradition, shared with daughters and friends. Women shared information and found support for more than just cooking. They relied on each other to learn healing remedies, to craft utensils and containers, to secure moral support, and to learn survival skills.

When times made life difficult and challenged even the most experienced cook, women found ways to feed their families with what little food was available. They would pool their resources or come to the aid of a hungry family. Women created new recipes to stretch the limited types and quantities of food.

Not unlike other American households, during World War II, Eleanor Roosevelt’s housekeeper, Ms. Henrietta Nesbitt found ways to deal with meat rationing and developed “meat-stretcher” recipes. There is one such recipe in The Husbandman, an agricultural newspaper. This newspaper was published during America’s Gilded Age, a period when the women’s suffrage movement was strengthening in the United States.

The original recipe for scrap pie is below. My adaptation follows the image.

Scrap Pie – 1886

The husbandman, v. XIII, no. 640, Wednesday, November 24, 1886

Scrap Pie Women's History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scrap Pie – 2015

1 lb. ground beef

1 lb. white or red potatoes, peeled and chopped into large chunks

½ large onion, finely chopped

2 tbsp. chicken, beef, or vegetable broth

1 egg, beaten

4 tbsp. butter

¼ tsp. pepper

½ tsp. salt

Preheat oven to 375°. Prepare and assemble all ingredients.

Brown the ground beef in a skillet. Drain and set aside. Sauté onion and set aside. Use 1 tbsp. butter to coat the inside of a 9” pie plate. Cover the inside bottom of the pie plate with ground beef. Drizzle broth over beef. Layer the sautéed onion over the beef. Boil chopped potatoes in large pot of water until potatoes are tender. Turn off burner, drain and return potatoes to pot. Mash potatoes until smooth. Add the beaten egg, 1 tbsp. butter, salt, and pepper to the mashed potatoes. Whisk by hand or use an electric hand mixer until smooth. Cover the beef with the mashed potato mixture. Use a dinner fork to create a design on the potatoes. Use remaining 2 tbsp. of butter to dot the top of the potatoes.

beefbeef onionsbeef potato

 

 

 

 

 

Bake at 375° until top is browned, about 30 – 35 minutes.

Scrap Pie done

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makes 4-6 servings. Serve with salad or cooked vegetables.

Below are links to books, articles and blogs for your reading, watching and listening pleasure.

A thousand years over a hot stove can be requested through E-ZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan.

What we lose in losing Ladies’ Home Journal (Thanks to Laura Bang, Special Collections, for the link.)

The First Kitchen

Women’s History and Food History: New Ways of Seeing American Life

#FoodieFriday: 5 Kitchen Appliances and Food Creations that Transformed Women’s Lives in the 20th Century

Women’s History Month – Audio and Video

My thanks to Michael Foight, Special Collections, for sending me the link to our digitized copy of The Husbandman.


LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnailMonthly food blog feature by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion, and team leader, Access Services.


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The Highlighter: I’ve clicked “find it.” What do I do next?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

When you search for articles, clicking “find it” often connects you to the article. But sometimes “find it” will connect you to a “find it” results page.

This video shows how to navigate the “find it” results page. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

Special thanks to Jesse Flavin for this topic. Special thanks also to Jesse Flavin and to Trisha Kemp for sharing their wisdom and expertise in response to my questions.


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Dig Deeper: Helene Moriarty, PhD

MoriartyOn Tuesday, March 24 at 2:30 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Helene Moriarty, PhD, RN, Professor at the College of Nursing will present a Scholarship@Villanova/Endowed Chair lecture. Dr. Moriarty is a nurse advocate for military veterans and their families who has targeted her scholarly work on the health needs of those who have served in the military. Her lecture will focus on her research with interprofessional teams at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She will present findings from an intervention study, funded by NIH, that evaluates the impact of an innovative in-home intervention for veterans with traumatic brain injury and their families.

Dr. Moriarty is the inaugural appointee to the College of Nursing’s first endowed faculty chair, the Diane L. and Robert F. Moritz, Jr. Endowed Chair in Nursing Research. This award was established in 2013 by Robert F. Moritz, Jr. DDS ’51 VSB and his wife Diane to advance research and scholarship within the College and its academic programs.

This event, co-sponsored by the College of Nursing, Falvey Memorial Library and the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC), is free and open to the public.

For more information related to Dr. Moriarty’s area of expertise, check out today’s Dig Deeper, organized by Barbara Quintiliano, nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian.


Dig Deeper 

Challenges Faced by Veterans Suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been called the “signature wound of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.” It is caused by trauma to the head, most often from an explosive device, vehicle accident or fall. Since 2001, the number of active U.S. service personnel suffering from TBI has been rising, and almost 25,000 new cases emerged in 2014 alone. In 2013, the directors of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a joint report to Congress in which they stated that TBI had become “a public health problem, the magnitude and impact of which are underestimated by current civilian and military surveillance systems.”

Even mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly termed a “concussion,” can have detrimental consequences for returning veterans, their spouses and others who love and care for them. However, unlike more severe cases, mTBI often goes undiagnosed, and resulting cognitive and emotional problems may not appear until long after the vet returns home. Some of the challenges associated with mTBI include short- and long-term memory loss, attention deficits, impaired executive function and strained interpersonal relations.

Dr. Moriarty and her colleagues have been conducting innovative research sponsored by the Philadelphia VA Medical Center and funded by the NIH. In this controlled study they are investigating the efficacy of a veterans’ in-home program (VIP). Dyads composed of a veteran who has sustained mild to moderate TBI and his/her spouse or partner are recruited for participation. Through in-home intervention the researchers hope to facilitate increased understanding and deeper communication between veteran and partner so that both will enjoy an improved quality of life.

Learn more about TBI and its effects on vets and their families:

DoD Worldwide Numbers for TBI
http://dvbic.dcoe.mil/dod-worldwide-numbers-tbi

Family Caregiver’s Guide to TBI
http://www.caregiver.va.gov/pdfs/FamilyCaregiversGuideToTBI.pdf

‘Hidden’ Brain Damage Seen in Vets With Blast Injuries
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_150550.html

Hyatt, K.S. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (American Journal of Nursing)
http://tinyurl.com/mtbivets (VU LDAP ID and password required)
Loved Ones Caring for Brain-Injured Veterans May Face Health Risks
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_150855.html
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (video)
http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/topics-traumatic-brain-injury
Report to Congress on Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Understanding the Public Health Problem Among Current and Former Military Personnel
http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/pdf/Report_to_Congress_on_Traumatic_Brain_Injury_2013-a.pdf


Dig Deeper introduction written and resources selected by Barbara Quintiliano, nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian.


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Access a New, Powerful New Database for Theology and Religious Studies

Falvey now subscribes to Index Religiosus (IR), the new online international reference bibliography from KU Leuven, Université Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, and Brepols Publishers that indexes a vast array of academic publications in the areas of theology, religious studies, Bible, liturgy, archaeology, canon law, and Church history.

2015 - 03 Mar - Index Religiosus (IR) image

It includes publications, written in various European languages, on subjects ranging from ancient thought and society to contemporary systemic theology, ethics and culture. It has a wide geographic and ecumenical range, and incorporates the Revue d’histoire ecclésiastique (RHE) and the Elenchus Bibliographicus (EB), which are no longer published as separate bibliographies in print. IR gives the researcher the ability to limit a search to either of these two previously mentioned bibliographies, as well as making available to a user combined simple and advanced searching. It even features an email alert system for staying informed of new content.

A welcome newcomer to the databases offered by the Library, Index Religiosus already contains more than a half a million citations, and the number of fully searchable bibliographic records continues to grow. The content of more than one thousand scholarly journals is systematically checked so that references can be regularly added to IR. It covers the following publications, just to name a few:

Acta Apostolicae Sedis
Analecta augustiniana
Ancient Philosophy
Augustinian Studies
Augustiniana
Augustinianum
Augustinus
Biblical Archaeology Review
Biblical Theology Bulletin
Bibliotheca sacra
Bioethics
Bulletin for Biblical Research
Catholic Biblical Quarterly
Diakonia
Ecclesia Orans
Ephemerides theologicae Lovanienses
Estudio Agustiniano
Foi et vie
Geist und Leben
International Journal of Systematic Theology
Journal of Early Christian Studies
Journal of Eastern Christian Studies
Journal of Ecclesiastical History
Journal of Ecumenical Studies
Kerygma und Dogma
Logos
Near Eastern Archaeology
Recherches Augustiniennes et Patristiques
Revista Agustiniana
Revue d’éthique et de théologie morale
Revue d’Études Augustiniennes et Patristiques
Studia Theologica
Studia liturgica
Studia Missionalia
Studia Moralia
Theological Studies
Theologie und Glaube
Theologie und Philosophie
Theologische Literaturzeitung
Theology and Science
Theology Digest
Theology Today
Una sancta
Vigiliae christianae and
Voices from the Third World.

One can search the active list of periodicals in the database by clicking the coverage tab, once in the user interface for Index Religiosus.

Falvey’s access to IR strengthens a user’s ability to do library research and is, therefore, listed under core databases on the theology and religious studies subject guide. Other online resources from Brepols Publishers that Falvey subscribes to include a multidisciplinary bibliography of Europe, North Africa and the Near East (300-1500), The International Medieval Bibliography (IMB), and the Vetus Latina database of the digitized catalog of comprehensive patristic records related to the Old Latin translation of the Bible from the Vetus Latina Institute.


darren_edArticle by Darren Poley, the theology subject specialist, scholarly outreach librarian, and curator for the Augustinian Historical Institute. 

 


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The Curious ‘Cat: Which search engine(s) do you prefer?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks six library professionals, “Which search engine(s) (Google, Baidu, Yahoo, Bing, Ask, DuckDuckGo, etc.) do you prefer?”

JuttaJutta Seibert, team leader – Academic Integration

“I prefer Google mostly out of habit because I am familiar with it. I started using Google in 2000 and back then it performed superior when compared to other search engines. It was refreshingly uncluttered. I have tried other search engines on occasion, but none of them has performed as well as Google for me.”

 

2014-01-16 12.16.23-3Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre

“Google, only Google. Partly familiarity, I understand how Google works better than any of the others, which means that I can use that knowledge to produce better results through my searches. I also think Google has the best search metrics.”

 

 

 

2014-01-15 11.08.18-4Robin Bowles, nursing/life science librarian

“I personally use Google as my general-purpose search. It is fully featured with lots of search options (now hidden under the link “Search tools”) and will recommend results from other Google search products like Google Scholar when appropriate.

A few thoughts about the others: Baidu, sometimes called the “Chinese Google”, is Chinese language only so we don’t see much use of it here. Yahoo and Bing are the same search now. Although they are different websites, Yahoo Search has been “powered by” Bing since 2009 so their results will be the same. Bings results are very comparable to Google (so much so they have been accused of digitally “watching” users’ behavior on Google and using that data to adjust Bing rankings) and Bing is wildly with PC users popular due to its integration with Internet Explorer and Windows 8.

DuckDuckGo is a perennial favorite for people who are concerned about Google and Bing’s data retention policies as it promises to retain no data about you and show the same search results for any and all users. The results are generally as good as Google or Bing’s although it only searches webpages and has no image or map search functionality.”

2014-01-17 14.27.13-2Kristyna Carroll, research-support librarian for business and social sciences

“I prefer Google as my search engine. I like the way many tools that I use are integrated together through Google Chrome, and I only have to log in once (Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive). I use all of these Google tools every day, and sometimes additional ones.”

 

 

 

dave-uspal white bkg2USPAL

Dave Uspal, senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications

“Mostly Google.  Its fast and thorough, and it has features (word spellings if searching for a single word, Wikipedia definitions, built-in maps) I actually use. I know other browsers have their strengths (Bing for media browsing, Ask for whole question searching) but for what I need, Google is usually the best answer.”

 

 

2014-01-15 11.11.37-2-2Rob LeBlanc—first-year experience/humanities librarian

“I’m a hardcore Google search fan. It is still the most comprehensive, fastest, and most accurate engine. I also prefer its clear and elegant layout and advanced features (like Google maps). Bing is good for hardcore Microsoft users due to its MS Office Online interface options, and DuckDuckGo is the best for privacy (it does not track you at all) but Google works best for both PC and Mac in my opinion.”


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The Highlighter: What does it take to become a librarian?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Before earning the position of Falvey librarian, each applicant undergoes a rigorous screening process that includes the following:

1. Spell “Boolean,” “authentication,” “tertiary” and “plagiarism.”

2. Teach a class on college-level academic research while balancing Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged on his/her head (poise counts!).

3. Simultaneously show a first-year student how to find resources for her research project, answer a Live-chat question about citing sources in APA style, and help a caller limit his search results to only peer-reviewed, full-text articles.

4. Exit his/her office; hurdle a laptop computer, a taut power cord, and a studying student; and greet the patron standing at the Information Desk within 20 seconds.

Seriously,

to become a Falvey librarian, a person must be—

– an expert both in scholarly research and in one or more academic disciplines,

– a caring person who possesses a stalwart service ethic, and

– a dedicated professional committed to your success.

Whether you are exploring possible research topics, already have a well-developed research question, need help citing sources, or have other research needs, Falvey librarians look forward to helping you accomplish your goals.



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Last Modified: March 17, 2015