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Librarians Welcome New Faculty at Annual Breakfast

FACREC MONT2

 

Falvey Memorial Library was again proud to host the traditional continental breakfast for Villanova University’s New Faculty Program, which took place Monday, Aug. 17. The program is hosted by VITAL, the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning, and tailored to support the needs of new faculty members by easing them into their new teaching positions, answering questions and introducing them to campus resources. The library’s Learning Commons meeting rooms provided a bright, spacious environment for the new professors to network with subject librarians and begin their Villanova experience.

Gabriele Bauer, PhD, and Director of VITAL also introduced the new faculty members to Falvey’s newest entrant, Millicent Gaskell, University librarian and library director, who began here in May.


Photos by Alice Bampton.

 


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Falvey Memorial Library welcomes new faculty members to Villanova

Falvey Memorial Library welcomed all new faculty members to Villanova to a breakfast reception this morning. If you are a faculty member who was unable to attend, we’re reprinting the general handout that was provided here, which gives a brief rundown of key contact information and services (double click graphic for expanded view). Contact us anytime if you have any further questions or suggestions for library staff.

FACULTY SERVICES INFOGRAPHIC3

 


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Introducing Falvey Memorial Library’s Scholarship Open Access Reserve (SOAR) Fund

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Falvey Memorial Library’s Scholarship Open Access Reserve (SOAR) Fund

Falvey Memorial Library has committed to support open access journal publication in the 2015-16 fiscal year with the Scholarship Open Access Reserve (SOAR) Fund.  This program is designed to provide financial support to Villanova faculty who are interested in publishing in high quality open access journals.  Faculty may be eligible to have article processing fees incurred publishing in open access journals paid by Falvey Memorial Library.

In the grand scheme of scholarly publishing, open access journals are a relatively new development.  Unlike conventional journals disseminated by paid subscriptions, open access journals make articles freely available to all without paywall barriers.  The emergence and expansion of open access journals have the potential to significantly improve access to new ideas and thinking for scholars and students while acting as a moderating force on exponential library journal price increases.  However, for faculty doing research not funded by grants or gifts that cover article processing charges, publication in open access journals can be prohibitively expensive.  This is where Falvey Memorial Library’s SOAR Fund can help promote both open access and research at Villanova.

Who:  Full- time (tenure and non-tenure track) Villanova faculty are eligible.

What: Falvey Memorial Library may pay up to $2000 in article processing fees on behalf of faculty for an accepted article’s publication in an open access journal.   Sponsored research covered by grants or gifts that provide for article processing fees are exempt.

Where:  Publication in true, sometimes called gold, open access journals are qualified.  Journals that accept article processing fees on the article level to enhance access will not be considered.  Falvey Memorial Library Resource Council will assess targeted journals based on additional quality criteria before granting funding.

Why: By nurturing open access publishing Falvey Memorial Library aspires to support the University’s commitment to a just dissemination of knowledge

When: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis with total funding capped at $10,000 in the 2015-2016 budget.

How: Visit the Open Access Fund Pilot Program page, read the Terms and Conditions and apply!


imagesArticle by Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, business librarian and team coordinator for the Business Research team.


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‘Caturday: Podcasting Wildcats

novanation logoHey, NovaNation! Want to know who else is podcasting on campus?

Take a look at the podcast posts on our blog this week, then jump over to some of the links below.

The Villanova University channel on College Sports Live is getting ready for a year of on demand podcasts of Villanova games!

There are some excellent podcasts on Sports Law from The Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova School of Law.

And don’t miss the Villanova University lecture and event podcasts on iTunes U.

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If you’re thinking of creating your own podcasts, check out the resources offered by UNIT on the University website. They also have some helpful podcasting FAQs.

podcasting bookWant more help? The Library has current print and online resources about “do it yourself” podcasting.

 


‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of Access Services.
 

 


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Philadelphia Researching Tips

Even though Philadelphia is only 13 miles away, navigating the city may seem like another world in some sense. With world class institutions, museums, and parks, coupled with a rich history running throughout the city, it is no wonder people can feel overwhelmed when visiting Philadelphia. Luckily Falvey has access to many resources to help navigate and research any topic on Philadelphia. Whether the resource is in print or online, the Library can help resolve any confusion when it comes to researching the City of Brotherly Love.

Books

Falvey has a vast collection of books on Philadelphia; where that collection is located in the Library depends on your subject of research. Start with “Philadelphia” in the subject line to narrow your results.

 

subject

Use the facets on the right to filter the results down to your area of interest:

refine

 

In this example, the results are filtered down into books about Philadelphia politics. The picture below displays that books on this subject can be found in the F 158 call number section of the library.

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Online Resources

Jutta Seibert, History Librarian and Academic Integration Team Leader, suggests the following free resources readily available online:

Historical Images of Philadelphia – 20,000 historical images of the city dating back to 1841 courtesy of the Free Library.

Library Company of Philadelphia – The Library Company was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin and remains to this day an independent cultural institution. Its rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art are worth a visit to its Locust Street location. The Library Company currently hosts “Fashioning Philadelphia – the Style of the City, 1720-1940.” Selected exhibits such as the “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic” are available online.

Digital Maps of Philadelphia – Digital access to city maps ranging from 1834 to 1962 courtesy of the Free Library.

 

This is a short, starting point for researching tips on Philadelphia. Remember to always contact your subject librarian for a more in depth search.


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Pluto—the Second of Two Dwarf Planets Seen at Close Range in 2015

Before New Horizons captured the first-ever detailed images of Pluto this month, it had traveled for nine-and-a-half years to reach the edge of our Solar System. When that spacecraft launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. on January 19, 2006, Pluto was still classified as a planet.

Pluto

Pluto discovered—Clyde Tombaugh, working at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona, discovered Pluto February 18, 1930. But the first such object, albiet smaller than Pluto, had been discovered more than a century earlier.

Ceres discovered—A Catholic priest, Giuseppe Piazzi, who held a PhD in mathematics, was also an astronomer. His catalog of almost 7,000 stars earned him the L’Institut de France prize for “best astronomical work published in 1803″ (Barr). On January 1, 1801, while working on his catalog, he discovered an object whose changes in position were more like those of a planet than a star. “Piazzi had found the first [and the largest] of many thousands of ‘asteroids’ or ‘minor planets’ whose orbits lie mainly in a belt between Mars and Jupiter” (Barr).

Eris discovered—The next such discovery, after that of Pluto, came more than two centuries later, on October 21, 2003.

Eris

This sphere, at the Solar System’s limit and orbiting the Sun, was larger than Pluto and had its own moon (Pluto has five known moons). This find begged the question: If Pluto is a planet, how could this larger globe, Eris, not also be considered a planet?

Haumea discovered—Its discovery was officially announced in 2005.

Makemake discovered—The International Astronomical Union officially recognized Makemake as a dwarf planet in 2008.

More dwarf planets?—Scientists have estimated that “dozens or even more than 100 dwarf planets” may be awaiting discovery. The likelihood of additional yet-to-be-discovered globes has left astronomers asking, “Just what constitutes a planet?”

 “Planet” (re)defined— At the International Astronomical Union (IAU) General Assembly in Prague, 2006, astronomers “debated vigorously” over the definition of “planet.” They established a definition that would classify Ceres, Pluto, Eris, Makemake and Haumea as “dwarf planets,” leaving our Solar System with eight planets.

planets

Why, then, is Pluto the second dwarf planet to be seen at close range in 2015?

Dawn makes history—Earlier this year, another space probe reached another dwarf planet, capturing detailed images and, this time, discovering a mystery. NASA’s Dawn space-probe entered into orbit around Ceres March 6, 2015, becoming “the first mission to achieve orbit around a dwarf planet.” Dawn’s photos revealed “a cluster of mysterious bright spots” on Ceres’ surface, which have intrigued scientists.

Ceres' spots

Father Giuseppe Piazzi would undoubtedly be pleased that his discovery has generated such interest more than two centuries after he identified it.

Works Cited

Barr, Stephen, and Dermott Mullan. “Planets, Priests and a
……..Persistent Myth.” Wall Street Journal, Eastern edition ed.
……..May 22 2015. ProQuest. Web. 15 July 2015. Gerald Dierkes


Check out these Villanova resources for additional information:

The Library’s Astronomy and Astrophysics subject page

Falvey resources on dwarf planets

The Villanova Astronomical Society

The Villanova Public Observatory


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The Highlighter: Who is the Ultimate Fact-Checker?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Need to check your facts before turning in that big paper? This video shows how to contact a University librarian: the ultimate fact-checker. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Alice’s Adventures and Mock Turtle Soup

Alice's Adventures in WonderlandSince this is a library food blog, I like to find recipes that will connect to a book or to reading in general. So this month, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, I decided to read this childhood favorite again in the hopes of finding culinary inspiration.

The story begins with Alice half-dozing outside on a hot summer day as her older sister reads a book with “no pictures or conversations in it.” As her mind wanders, she enters another world where animals talk, playing card soldiers double as croquet arches, and a Queen randomly orders executions for trivial infractions. But it’s the Mock Turtle who gets my attention. He goes to school, sings, dances and plays games. We learn of the sad Mock Turtle’s schooling in chapter 9 and he performs the Lobster Quadrille in chapter 10. Both chapters are filled with songs, puns and word play.

I’m not sure if it was the Queen’s mention of Mock Turtle Soup or if it was the Turtle Soup song that inspired me to make soup. And there was no doubt in my mind that it would be the mock version of turtle soup. The ingredients would be easier to find and cheaper than using real turtle. That, combined with the happy childhood memories of finding cute little turtles near Fern Hill Lake, prevented me from considering turtle meat.

mock turtleIn the earliest publication of Alice’s Adventures, the Mock Turtle was beautifully illustrated by Sir John Tenniel, who showed the character with a calf’s head and hoofs instead of flippers on his hind legs. He may have been inspired to draw the Mock Turtle this way because of the transition to “dull reality” as Alice’s sister thought of how “the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle’s heavy sobs.”

Instead of making the traditional Victorian mock turtle soup, which calls for calf’s head and heels, I adapted a Louisianan recipe from the In a While, Crocodile cook book that had a little more kick to it. In addition to ground beef, I added ground veal, as a nod to the traditional calf ingredient.

¾ lb. ground sirloin

¾ lb. ground veal

6 stalks celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup chopped onion

3/4 cup butter

15 oz. tomato puree

30 oz. chicken broth

30 oz. beef broth

1/2 cup flour mixed with 1 cup water

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce

1 cup ketchup

1 teaspoon hot sauce (more if you like it hotter)

2 bay leaves

1-1/2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup lemon juice

1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

6 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

6 slices lemon, for garnish

1 cup sherry (or to taste)

Mock turtle saute stepSaute the meat, celery, garlic, and onion in butter until meat is brown and veggies are translucent. Add to the slow cooker (6 quart or larger).

Add tomato puree, chicken broth, beef broth, flour mixture, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, hot sauce, bay leaves, thyme, salt, and pepper to the slow cooker. Stir.

Cook on low heat for 3 ½ hours.

Add lemon juice, parsley, and eggs. Stir well and cook for another 30 minutes. If desired, skim and discard fat from top of soup.

IMG_8535Immediately before serving, remove bay leaves, add sherry to taste, and garnish individual bowls with lemon slices. Enjoy with buttered bread.

 

 

 

If you’re looking for a historically accurate mock turtle soup recipe, try the one copied below, from Martha Lloyd’s Household Book. (Martha was a close friend of Jane Austen.)

Mrs. Fowle’s Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf’s head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop’t very small. A ¼ of a pint of oysters chop’t very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop’t. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.

“The Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and began, in a voice sometimes choked with sobs, to sing this:—

‘Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,

Waiting in a hot tureen!

Who for such dainties would not stoop?

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beautiful Soup!

 

‘Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,

Game, or any other dish?

Who would not give all else for two

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beauti—FUL SOUP!’”


Food blog by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services team.

Mock Turtle Soup recipe adapted from In a While, Crocodile: New Orleans Slow Cooker Recipes by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, © 2014 by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.


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The Highlighter: Browse a Magazine or Journal in “Lexis Nexis Academic”

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Sometimes you do not need to find a specific article, but you want to browse the magazine or journal that publishes articles on your topic. This video shows how to peruse a publication in the Lexis Nexis Academic database.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage. Or you can find them on YouTube.


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The Highlighter: How Do I Contact a Librarian?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Need help citing sources, checking style guidelines or answering other questions before turning in that big paper? This video shows the many ways to contact a University librarian. How many ways are available? Watch the video to find out. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Last Modified: June 23, 2015