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Throwback Thursday: Villanova’s 10th President was first college librarian

Rev Thomas Middleton

According to an article written by Rev. Dennis Gallagher, O.S.A. and Laura Hutelmyer, electronic resource and special acquisitions coordinator, in a 2006 edition of the “News from Falvey” newsletter, the Rev. Thomas C. Middleton, O.S.A.,Villanova College president from 1876 to 1878, was also the first college librarian, serving in that capacity for 58 years, from 1865-1923.
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Dig Deeper: Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, researches a major US women’s prison

Breaking Women

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library, Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, associate professor, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, will deliver a Scholarship@Villanova lecture about her recently published book, Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment. Dr. McCorkel will discuss how her four years of research in a major U.S. women’s prison helped her to uncover the reasons tougher drug policies have so greatly affected those incarcerated there, and how the very nature of punishment in women’s detention centers has been deeply altered as a result. Lauded as “prison ethnography at its best” (Lorna Rhodes, author of Total Confinement: Madness and Reason in the Maximum Security Prison), her book is published by New York University Press and was a finalist for the 2013 C. Wright Mills Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

This event—co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Sociology & Criminology, the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, and the Center for Peace and Justice Education—is free and open to the public.


Dig Deeper:

jill_mccorkelvillanova_edu

Resources by and about Dr. Jill McCorkel

Attending the lecture? Now read Dr. McCorkel’s new book: Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment.

Find out more about the professor’s work and research interests by visiting her Villanova webpage

Keep up to date with the professor by following her on Twitter!

Check out Dr. McCorkel’s collaborative photo essay with prisoners from SCI Graterford @ Strongbox Magazine – Vol. 1 2009.

Becker, S. & McCorkel, J. (2011). The gender of criminal opportunity: The impact of male co-offenders on women’s crime.
Building on ethnographic research and feminist labor market analyses, this study explores how gender affects access to criminal opportunities. Using National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, the authors examine the effect a male co-offender has on women’s offending. They find that the presence of a male co-offender broadens women’s criminal involvement in distinctive ways.

McCorkel, J. (2003). Embodied surveillance and the gendering of punishment.
This ethnography explores the enactment of “get tough” politics in a state prison for women and considers whether the implementation of seemingly gender-neutral programs and policies implies that women’s prisons are no longer operating as “gendered organizations.”

McCorkel, J. (2004). Criminally dependent? Gender, punishment, and the rhetoric of welfare reform.
This study relies on ethnographic data collected from a state prison for women to examine whether and to what extent welfare and criminal justice policies were coordinated during the drug and poverty wars of the past decade. Findings reveal that drug war policies did indeed transform punishment practices on the feminine side of the penal system, but such transformations were ultimately premised on changes to institutional interpretive structures that altered the ways state actors conceptualized gender, crime and women’s needs.

More Resources on Women and Imprisonment

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU): Women in Prison
The ACLU “fights to ensure that the criminal justice system treats women and girls fairly, that it protects the health and safety of women in its custody, and that it facilitates their successful reentry into their communities.” Check out this web resource for general information, statistics, videos and its personal testimony series called “Words from Prison.”

Women’s Prisons in the United States
A list of United States federal and state prisons which either currently or once did contain female prisoners.

Female offenders: critical perspectives and effective interventions
This classic text explores a variety of topics on female offenders from the nature of female offending, its patterns and explanations, power-belief theory and relational theory to institutional assessment, classification and programs.

Interrupted life: experiences of incarcerated women in the United States
This is a “gripping collection of writings by and about imprisoned women in the United States, a country that jails a larger percentage of its population than any other nation in the world. This eye-opening work brings together scores of voices from both inside and outside the prison system including incarcerated and previously incarcerated women, their advocates and allies, abolitionists, academics and other analysts” (see the full description at the University of California Press).

Women’s mental health issues across the criminal justice system
An accessible guide to women’s mental health in criminal justice systems, this text touches on meeting the needs of juvenile and adult offenders, measuring traumatic events in the lives of incarcerated girls, crisis intervention teams training, policy implications, and the ethics of justice and mental health systems.

A list of all books with the subject “Female offenders Rehabilitation United States.”

A list of all books with the subject “Women prisoners Services for United States.”

Explore more about corrections in the United States with this comprehensive list of print and online titles.


Alex Williams

Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments. For questions or more information, feel free to contact him by email (alexander.williams@villanova.edu) or phone (ext.8845).

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Blog round-up: ten quick hits from across campus

TEN QUICK HITS2

The first article in this series concentrated on content update from Falvey’s reference blogs. From here on out, this blog content roundup will feature ten quick hits from across campus, including highlights from blogs of the library.

1. Find out if that “perfect idea” of yours has some merit.

2. This student played tic-tac-toe against a Supreme Court Justice over the summer break.

3. Wonder if there were any werewolf sightings?

4. Alert to all political science, French major, and study abroad aficionados.

5. The one interview question (directive?) you should be prepared to answer.

6. Pretty cool to be a part of this.

7. At least one new student is enjoying their time here.

8 The Department of Public Administration has two new professors, one who loves to cook beef wellington and the other can weld!

9. The English Department hosted a happy hour at the Library!

10. Speaking of happy hours, Villanova Theatre shows us how to make cocktails as classy as the cast from Fallen Angels.

 


Blog roundup by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

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New Graduate Assistant Joins Communication and Service Promotion Team

Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and Servic

Michelle Callaghan, a native of Williamstown, N.J., joined Falvey’s Communication and Service Promotion team at the end of August. In 2013, Callaghan graduated from Widener University, Chester, Pa., with a bachelor of arts degree in English. She is currently enrolled in Villanova’s Department of English graduate program.

After receiving her master’s degree, she hopes to teach English but explains, “I am exploring career options that incorporate my passion for digital technologies, multimedia, internet communities and writing. Over the next two years I intend to work on diversifying my skills in a way that may be applicable to many fields, so I’m not planning a future path too concretely – I only plan to approach the creative working world with a sense of play and entrepreneurship.”

Reporting to Joanne Quinn, Communication and Service Promotion team leader, Callaghan writes for the library blog, promoting and reporting campus events; she also edits articles for Falvey’s print newsletter. She says, “I am thrilled to be working at Falvey Memorial Library. I feel like I’m becoming involved in modern library functions at a very pivotal time in library history. I’m excited to explore the implications of the changing information landscape and excited to see how I can contribute.”

Her hobbies include indoor rock climbing, musical theater and video games. “I’m a geek,” she adds, “I’m involved in a few internet fandoms.”

Watch for Michelle’s new column, Cat in the Stacks, which will appear most Thursdays in the Library News.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

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Falvey Welcomes its New Interim Director

BOB DEVOS

Robert DeVos, PhD, associate vice president for instructional analysis, professor, mathematics and statistics, became Falvey Memorial Library’s new interim director this summer. He has accepted this new role in addition to his existing responsibilities with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Dr. DeVos agreed to an interview to discuss his new position.

GD (Gerald Dierkes)—Why did you take on the role of interim library director? 

RD—I have worked closely with [Rev. Kail C. Ellis, PhD, OSA, vice president for academic affairs, Department of Political Science] since 1997 as associate dean when he was the dean and again for the last 3 years as associate vice president and he as the VPAA. He asked me to take on the additional responsibility and I accepted it.

GDWhat do you consider the library director’s role/purpose at Falvey Memorial Library?

RD—I can only give you my perspective. Anyone in an administrative position has the responsibility of dealing with resources. These resources can be people, money, equipment, etcetera. The library director’s position is to administer the resources given to the Library. These involve trying to make good decisions:

  • On hiring (There are several vacancies, and I felt strongly that we should hire permanent staff in the non-librarian positions. A new director might change how the Library functions with regard to librarians, but the non-librarian staff will be needed independent of a new direction for the Library);
  • On the use of current staff;
  • On space allocations (possible change in some office space); and
  • On the use of the budget.

GDWhat do you find most exciting about this job? Why?

RD—I have had many roles at VU and enjoy the challenge of learning something new. In all of my previous roles, I have found that when I leave a position, I leave with having made some new friends. I look forward to that happening here.

GDWhat about the Library surprised you when you started working here?

RD—The many different roles of the librarians—I did not know much about the large educational role that they carry. I also was surprised as to the many events run by the Library.

GDWhat do you consider the Library’s role/purpose at VU? What do you think are the major issues facing the Library today? 

RD—I will mention a few major issues that I see.
1. Given the changes in administration, the morale is low. This is
…..difficult to change, but I hope by being open and available we
…..can move forward.
2. Structure of the staff: When the new director is appointed, that
…..person will probably reorganize. I am trying to make things work
…..and will avoid a reorganization since we can’t keep changing.
3. Resources: With budgets being cut or not rising at the same level
…..as costs, journals, etc. need to be cut. Space is always a problem.
4. OLE [Open Library Environment]: Many staff want to implement
…..[OLE] next summer, but there are also a large number who are
…..saying let’s wait. I am having difficulty in knowing the best path.

GDWhat is an area of improvement you would like to make in the Library?

RD—Ask me this in a few months.

GDWhat role does/will the Library have in Villanova University’s Strategic plan, for example, to become a national research university?

RD—One cannot have quality programs without journals, data bases and books. These costs need to be built into the budget as programs are added. Whenever any new degree is proposed, the library director does get to comment. That person should make sure these costs are added.

Although the library staff knows that at some point a new, permanent library director will be hired, it’s been challenging not knowing who or when, or what changes to the Library that person will make. It helps to have an interim library director who recognizes and understands this challenge. The library staff is grateful for Dr. DeVos, his leadership and his support.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Mood Board: Robert LeBlanc

Ever wonder how your favorite librarians soak up information in their everyday lives? Wonder no longer! Today, in the first of a series of link-laden, resource-ridden micro-interviews with a series of smart people, First Year Experience/Humanities Librarian Robert LeBlanc shares his ‘mood board’ of modern information consumption … and how he feels about consuming ice cream and espresso.


Rob LeBlanc and Helpers packing books for distribution

So, Rob, where do you get your news?
Reddit and Huffington Post… but mostly Reddit… LOTS of Reddit… probably TOO much Reddit…

Do you have a favorite app?
Shazam. How else do you find new music?

iOS, Android, or other?
iOS, because I like things that are simple and work.

What are you currently reading?
Ghost Story by Jim Butcher and The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. Both are awesome.

Very nice. What podcasts are you into?
Radiolab and This American Life are my go-to podcasts, but I listen to various science/geek-oriented ones as well.

ROB-MOODHow do you feel about social media? If you use it, who do you follow?
I feel about social media the way I feel about ice cream; a little bit now and then is nice, but any more than that makes me feel bloated and unhappy. I follow Ricky Gervais, George Takei, and Jon Stewart to name a few.

What is your morning information routine?
I wake up and do some local area research to locate espresso beans. I utilize my manual dexterity, intense training and an analog machine to make the espresso. I drink said espresso. I then wait an hour or so before checking email, Facebook, etc. I’ve found that’s the safest way for all involved.

I agree! Non-caffeinated emailing is mighty risky. Now, the big question, if you could only have access to one database for the rest of your life, what would it be?
As a civilian, Wikipedia, because it’s wicked huge and wicked comprehensive. As a librarian, JSTOR, because it is academically huge and academically comprehensive.

Thanks, Rob!


For more information on Rob LeBlanc’s role as a First Year Experience/Humanities Librarian, and his advice to first year students, check out last year’s interview.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Throwback Thursday: Remembering Mary Ann Griffin, DA

Mary Ann Griffin

Has it really been 30 years since Mary Ann Griffin, DA, first took on the position of library director? Dr. Griffin, whose life and career were cut short in 1995 and for whom the library’s Griffin Room is named, made a lasting impression on the staff who worked with her and on colleagues across campus.

As Rev. Dennis Gallagher, OSA, PhD, said in a previously published blog, “Dr. Griffin always kept [the Beatitudes] of Jesus Christ before her as her own personal ‘plan of action.’” Fr. Gallagher honored Dr. Griffin as “a dreamer” and “a seeker of truth,” like St. Augustine.

 

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‘Cat in the Stacks: Healthy Minds

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, ‘Cat in the Stacks.’ I’m the ‘cat.’ Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.

“Mens sana in corpore sano” is a Latin aphorism typically translated as “a sound mind in a sound body.”

As we finish off the second week of the semester, your brain might be feeling a little fuzzy. Your feet might be dragging. You might be marking up your fall calendar with all of the projects, due dates, readings and lectures noted within your looming pile of syllabi. You’re thinking, hey, is teleportation a thing yet? Or maybe you’re considering replicating Hermione Granger’s Time-Turner because there just isn’t enough time in a day for all of these commitments in your life.

I feel you. I have been known to madly tailor my daily agenda in desperate search of an hour to breathe, and just for the sake of saving time I sometimes skip that trip to the gym or sacrifice sleep or eat a fast grab-n-go meal instead of a healthy dinner.

Don’t do that.  As you can guess, it’s not a good idea.

When it comes to education, physical and mental health can define your success. Study skills and research tools are fantastic, but they can only go so far when the gray, lumpy organ in your skull is in no mood to cooperate. We all have heard how to stay healthy – eat well, sleep well, get exercise, take mental health breaks – but when our schedules fill up, these goals might be the first to slide down the priority list. We think we’re saving time by skipping these healthy habits to work and work and work some more, but by skipping them, we are in effect making our reading, writing and research hours less efficient, and losing more time overall.

hand draws brain sign

In order to realize our potential as scholars, we have to try to maintain sound minds in sound bodies. Although intense study sessions and long hours in front of a computer can make you feel like an amorphous brain floating around, bodiless, in some unreality far beyond your chair, you are not. All of your knowledge, education and skills are bundled up inside your actual physical head in your actual physical body, and that actual physical body needs to be maintained. Only when the body is healthy can the brain work at full capacity.

hiding face bookI throw down the gauntlet. Move around. Eat some leafy food. Avoid sleep debt. Meditate. Be gentle with yourself. Then, next time you delve into a thick article for class, you might not have to reread the opening sentence twelve times before it sinks into your sleep-deprived mind (been there, done that).

Mens sana in corpore sano.

We can do this.

 


Resources:

Student Health Center, which also houses the University Counseling Center

Fitness Centers on campus

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Embracing a Fresh Beginning: Upcoming Events in Falvey this Fall

FALLEVENT-HEAD

The sun is setting on the summer season, and you know what that means—a new semester is upon us! With hesitation we traded in our strappy sandals and beach tags in exchange for new text books and 3-ring binders. And, while we could start to wallow in self-pity, we should remind ourselves that the new semester brings with it a chance for a fresh start and a new opportunity to be productive. For, as T.S. Eliot once said, “Every moment is a fresh beginning.” At Falvey Memorial Library, we are preparing to embrace the challenges that the fall semester will present us with a newfound energy and focus.

In fact, the Scholarly Outreach team has been working behind the scenes this summer to strategically plan a semester full of interesting, engaging events to keep Villanova students, staff, faculty and community members busy. There is a lot to look forward to! Falvey will offer a great range of events this semester, all of which will appeal to varied interests.

James Hedtke, PhD

James Hedtke, PhD

As always, we will continue to offer informative, insightful events. For instance, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will present an Alumni Author series talk on Sept. 29  titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk will be based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944 and will focus on the crash of an American military aircraft into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944.

Ellen Cassedy

Ellen Cassedy

Falvey is also fortunate to host Ellen Cassedy—speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator—at our annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture on Oct. 22. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with its “dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Joseph L. Tropea, PhD

Joseph L. Tropea, PhD

Falvey will also be welcoming Joseph L. Tropea, PhD, retired Professor and former chair, Department of Sociology, George Washington University on Nov. 5 for our annual event that focuses on scholarship about Italian-American history, culture and the immigrant experience: The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture. Dr. Tropea will discuss his recent work, which draws focus to social history, particularly on the 1907 Monongah, West Virginia mine disaster, which killed 361 persons, including 170 Italian migrants.

Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips

Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips

On the lighter side, Falvey is planning a graphic-novels event featuring Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of Dirty Diamonds (an all-female comic anthology) on Thursday, Oct. 30. Claire and Kelly will discuss their experiences in editing, in being involved in a Kickstarter project and in working with all female contributors.

Additionally, this fall we will continue to co-sponsor an wide array of regularly scheduled events like the VSB peer-tutor office hours and Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts club for those looking to get a bit of extra study help or those simply looking for a break from all of the studying!

And, as always, we will continue to serve as the host site for faculty, staff, and official student organizations to plan their campus events and meetings and need space. We are happy to be able to offer several event/meeting locations for all types of events, such as open houses, panel discussions, lectures, round table meetings, and so on. Requests should be submitted at least 10 days in advance via Falvey’s “Request a Venue” form.

Make sure to mark your calendars now and keep checking Falvey’s Events and Displays page for details about upcoming events!

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VITAL Resources for New & Continuing Faculty!

The Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning (VITAL) sponsored a new-faculty orientation program on August 18 and 19 in several locations across campus. As part of this program, new faculty were welcomed to Falvey Memorial Library on Tuesday, August 19, for a breakfast meet and greet. Interim Director Robert DeVos, PhD, welcomed librarians, and Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration as well as the coordinator of the liaison team to the departments of history, sociology and criminal justice, eagerly introduced librarians and staff to new faculty. New faculty members also had the opportunity to gather according to disciplines for informal discussions with liaison librarians in their subject areas. The event provided new faculty a strong sense of what services the Library has to offer the Villanova Community!

Gabriele BauerFollowing the event, I (Gina Duffy) interviewed Gabriele Bauer, PhD, director of the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning (VITAL), to discover more about the new faculty orientation program as well as VITAL’s activities and general campus mission.

RD: How many new faculty members did you welcome to Villanova this year during the new-faculty orientation program?

GB: VITAL, in co-sponsorship with the Office of Academic Affairs, welcomed 33 faculty colleagues at the new faculty program held August 18 and 19. While many colleagues are new to Villanova, some are (also) new to their full-time instructional roles. With over 40 presenters from across Villanova on hand, faculty were offered context for their central role in helping to support, inform, and advance Villanova’s mission, vision, and future direction. Among the program topics addressed were professional development support, students’ expectations, academic support services, instructional policies and resources, and teaching in the inspiration of St. Augustine. Attendees represented 22 departments across colleges: Accountancy, Augustine and Culture Seminar Program, Biology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computing Sciences, Economics, Ethics, Finance, Geography and the Environment, History, Human Resource Development, Marketing and Business Law, Mathematics and Statistics, Naval Science, Nursing, Political Science, Psychology, Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology, Theatre, and Theology and Religious Studies.

RD: What are the highlights of the new faculty program?

GB: Given the comprehensive program, it’s challenging to identify just a few highlights. Based on feedback, the sessions that provide faculty with personalized insights into their teaching and scholarly roles at Villanova seem to be most appreciated. Among these sessions were the sessions addressing our students, academic support services, and the roundtable discussions with Falvey Memorial Library’s departmental liaisons. A faculty panel discussion on the subject, “What I wished I had known in my first year at Villanova” elicited vital advice for our colleagues.  Key examples included creating a folder of all teaching records–such as unsolicited student emails, peer observations, CATS reports, syllabi, assignments, and advising activities—as a repository of material for the annual and three-year review; the importance of being patient when adjusting to a new professional environment, new courses, and new colleagues; setting realistic goals; accepting that things will not always go as planned; and viewing mistakes as opportunities for learning and growth.

new faculty orientation 3

New faculty orientation

RD: Do you have any insider tips or advice for “newbies” on campus?

GB: Being a “newbie” myself last year, I would suggest taking the time to listen, engage in conversation with colleagues, staff, and students in your department. Don’t be reluctant to ask questions or ask for clarification of procedures and conventions that might differ from those at your former institution (that may be more difficult to do for some of us introverts).

Yes, the Villanova website provides extensive, detailed information, yet how long will it take us to find the one kernel that we are looking for? I have discovered that reaching out to colleagues by phone not only expedites the process but helps me meet new colleagues, learn about their work and deepen my understanding and appreciation for the Villanova culture and context. Plus I have found it most enjoyable to talk with colleagues-such conversations add a human touch to our mainly digital work world.

Try and venture out of your department, participate in campus events that interest you or resonate with your values and passion. Take advantage of the many cultural offerings, such as superb theater performances that are offered free to faculty and staff on Tuesdays, or participate in an exercise class.

RD: Can you describe VITAL’s main role on campus?

GB: VITAL provides and coordinates services and resources for faculty members from all disciplines who are interested in helping their students become more effective learners. We collaborate with departments and University offices to identify and support student learning needs and help advance instructional goals. We offer opportunities to meet and learn from nationally known experts and serve as a clearinghouse for higher education materials.

RD: What services that VITAL offers do you believe are the most valuable to Villanova faculty (both new and continuing)?

GB: We provide a range of services that are designed to support faculty at various stages in their careers. Among the services we offer are confidential instructional consultations with individuals, departments or other groups; confidential classroom observations with constructive feedback; tailored sessions to meet departmental needs; mini-grants to support innovative teaching, learning, e-Learning and assessment of student learning; topical workshop sessions and campus-wide events that provide opportunities to engage with colleagues across the University.

RD: Anything else you would like to mention to new and continuing faculty?

GB: We are delighted to bring to faculty members’ attention three teaching resources: Teaching Professor, monthly online newsletter that offers evidence-based, nuts-and-bolts teaching practices for all disciplines; IF-AT, a multiple-choice tool for group feedback, testing of students’ comprehension and ability to apply, and differentiate concepts; and Faculty Online Café to keep your teaching fresh, discuss current topics, exchange teaching experiences and practices with colleagues. To access the Faculty Café, go to elearning.villanova.edu, select the university seal to sign in, and click “Faculty Online Café.”

We wish all of our faculty colleagues—both new and continuing—a fulfilling and productive new academic year and look forward to supporting them. You will always find a free cup of coffee or tea at the VITAL office, 106 Vasey Hall.

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Last Modified: September 2, 2014