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The Curious ‘Cat: What would you change? What would you keep?

Curious Cat
This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could change one thing about the Library, what would it be? What about the Library do you hope never changes?

RS9223_Christian LolkChristian Lolk—“I have a background in the humanities, so as many books and sections devoted to the humanities as possible … I’m a new student, but I checked around the Library this past semester, and I noticed there’s not much past the late ‘80s purchased or put on the shelves … I would prefer some newer books and more in the humanities.”

Editor’s Note—Browsing the collection often leads to discoveries of new books, connections among various subjects, or in-depth knowledge of a specific topic. Another strategy for finding new books, though, is to use Falvey’s powerful catalog either to sort your search results by date—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data descending 





—or to use the “Year of Publication” filter to set a date range—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data range

RS9226_John Costello
















John Costello—“[change—] more electrical outlets … not change—the calming environment”

MJ from Curious 'Cat - 2015-07-01









MJ—“I don’t know what I want to change about the printers, but something. I’m always so relieved when a printing problem is solved … I’m just grateful … I wish there was more lounge lighting for those late-night studies. And something I hope that never changes is the warmth of the café addition. I’m a returning student from 20 years ago, and my jaw dropped when I saw food in the Library. I thought there had been some kind of coup. But it’s made it so nice … it just makes me feel good. It makes me feel relaxed at times when things can be quite stressful.”

RS9231_Simhachalam PanduriSimhachalam Panduri—“I would like to increase the number of study rooms because every time I think of getting a study room it’s always busy. I can’t get any; I need to wait for one or two hours to get a study room.”

RS9235_Blessing Mbamalu







Blessing Mbamalu—“I’m a fourth-floor kind of person, and I realize it’s not going to be that quiet, so I wish it was a little bit more [quiet]. I don’t know how you would be able to enforce it to make it stricter.”

RS9239_Anusha Mathur






Anusha Mathur
—“One thing I would like to change about the Library is more seating space. In the fall or spring [semesters] whenever I enter at 4:00 p.m. and the Library is extremely busy, I don’t find space to sit. Maybe that is one thing which can be done.”


“The audience is half of the poem”: the First Latino Poet Laureate

Library of Congress appoints the 1st Latino Poet Laureate

Connecting to people through performance is crucial for Herrera. “I used to stand on the corner in San Diego with poems sticking out of my hip pocket, asking people if there was a place where I could read poems,” he recalls. “The audience is half of the poem.”

(Retrieved from LA Times, 6/22/15)
Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Congratulations to Juan Felipe Herrera, who was appointed the 21st poet laureate on June 10 by the Library of Congress. Herrera will be the first Hispanic-American person to be chosen as poet laureate in the United States in the 79 years since the program’s inception. His tenure will begin in September—national Hispanic heritage month.

Herrera, the son of migrant farmers, spent much of his youth travelling and living in tents in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Though terribly underprivileged, he was presented with the remarkable opportunity to attend UCLA as a young adult. From there, he went on to attend Stanford University and the University of Iowa’s Writing Workshop, where he earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

Through his education and experiences as a young Hispanic-American, Herrera developed a deep passion for writing and performing in both English and Spanish. He penned several pieces, including collections of poetry and children’s books in honor of his heritage and worldview. In addition to his writing and performing, Herrera has been an avid teacher and has also served as the poet laureate of California from 2012-2014.

Villanova University was lucky enough to welcome Juan Felipe Herrera as one of the featured speakers during the 14th annual Villanova Literary Festival, organized by Alan Drew, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing. The talk took place on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner. A jam-packed audience had the opportunity to listen to Herrera as he read and performed selected poems in both Spanish and English. With great enthusiasm and detail, Herrera shared his past experiences and showed poignant images to illustrate his work.

It’s been reported that Herrera’s main focus during his tenure as poet laureate will likely be to connect people of all different cultural backgrounds through poetry and to help highlight the stories of those people who are typically overlooked.

Interested in learning more about Juan Felipe Herrera? Check out Falvey Memorial Library’s holdings by this author.

Also, visit the following sites for additional information on Herrera and the position of Poet Laureate, provided by librarian Susan Ottignon.

Juan Felipe Herrera, Current Poet Laureate

List of works by Juan Felipe Herrera

Past Poets Laureate: 2011-present

About the Position of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry

Dig Deeper links provided by Sue Ottignon, subject librarian for romance languages and literatures.


The Curious ‘Cat: Would you rather … ?

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could choose between having the current library and current earning potential when you graduate OR having a library without online electronic databases, an online catalog, or online research help but also having double the earning potential when you graduate, which would you prefer?


1. Danielle FarerDanielle Farer—“The first one … It’s really hard to find what you need in a library without the assistance of people to help you and without the computers to help you and having to do all that work by yourself … I remember when I was younger and you actually had to flip through the card catalog; that’s really time-consuming … I’d much rather make less and have the process be a lot easier.”

2. Sushmita Arjyal



Sushmita Arjyal—“I would definitely go with the second choice: electronic suppliances have helped in past and also will help in future … If we can have more, then it would be nice … it has helped the online catalog and the online sources that we can find books online; we can find the [building] map and find where the books are.”

3. Craig Gilbert




Craig Gilbert—“I’d prefer the first. … The more information you have, the better off you’re going to be. The money comes by itself later; the money doesn’t have to be connected to the information. We’re not in school to make money; we’re in here to learn.”

4. Susheel Bajaj





Susheel Bajaj—“I would prefer the “all” one. It has all the online stuff—online books, online materials—because you don’t need to carry a hardcopy of the book. That would be very easy, and you can read the stuff anywhere you want … on the go, on the mobile device, on the tablet, anywhere on the go. So that would be good if we had more of the online materials instead of hardcopy of the books.”

5. Matthew Zarenkiewicz



Matthew Zarenkiewicz—“[I prefer] the current library. My earning potential … I’m worried about, obviously, but not so much that I would sacrifice the amount of time that I save using the online database and things like that to do research, especially this summer when I’m doing research. So I’m very happy for all of that.”

6. Indu Priya Eedara




Indu Priya Eedara—“The first one: It’s always better to have online catalogs or online stuff, which would be easier to access.”


The Curious ‘Cat: What Do Villanova Students Really Think about the Library?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you wish the Library knew about your needs as a student?

CC 2015-06-17 - #1 Black Shirt - Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku-scr

Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku—“In computer science every semester they would introduce some new courses … and some [new] textbooks … But when we go to the Library website, we never find those books. It would be helpful if you would coordinate with the other departments and … get the information, like what the new courses they are offering, and get in contact with the faculty who are offering those courses and order the books, not to issue them to the students but at least two or three different copies in the Library. That would be great because one of the courses we have … I did not get … even a PDF version, anything like that in the Library. So it would be great if you would coordinate with the different departments and get at least the online versions rather than the printed versions of the books.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #2 Purple Shirt - Thomas Modayil Jacob 1-scr

Thomas Modayil Jacob—“And the need [for computer science textbooks] is urgent in the computer science and the computer engineering departments ‘cause there a lot of fields we have courses on, like semantic web and big data, which don’t have textbooks as yet. So I think that the Library needs to coordinate with the professor to at least have those relevant papers or, if there is a textbook, then the textbook, at least in the PDF form.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #3 Army Shirt - G. Ramesh Krishna-scr

Ramesh Krishna—“Since we don’t have the books, we need to take a loan from other libraries … we need to get the books that are not available here we need to get the loan from others libraries. So that would be helpful if … instead of loaning from other libraries it would be better if have those books in our Library.”

Editor’s note—The Library does not purchase textbooks for current courses unless the titles are specifically ordered by faculty.
One reason – Expense: New editions are often published in a year or so, rendering the textbook we would have purchased obsolete.
Another reason – Competition: The Library doesn’t want to be in competition with the University Shop.
Library staff, however, have begun to explore ways that Falvey can better meet our students’ need for textbooks. Keep checking this blog for updates.

CC 2015-06-17 - #4 Rebecca Snow-scr


Rebecca Snow—“I think it’s important to have quiet places. We have one upstairs, but maybe another room would be good. [Otherwise,] I like the way it’s set up; I think it’s good.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #5 - Shaina Smolowe-scr






Shaina Smolowe—“More printing for free would be incredibly helpful.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #6 - Stephanie Mader-scr








Stephanie Mader—“I like the quiet study room upstairs. I like the access to the computers. I like the coffee room; it might be nice if that were open during the summer.”


Philosophy Librarian Nik Fogle Wins Above and Beyond Award


Nikolaus (Nik) Fogle, PhD, received the Above and Beyond Award, one of three awards given by the Villanova University Staff Council each year to members of the University staff. He received the award at the University Staff Council Awards Luncheon on May 1.

The criteria for the award are that the recipient “will have performed a significant action or service that: surpasses the requirements of their job description, is voluntary, is unexpectant of compensation in time off or payment, [and] is either within or outside of their scheduled work hours.”

Dr. Fogle joined Falvey in 2012 as the philosophy librarian and Philosophy, Theology and Humanities team coordinator. He works with several humanities departments and programs on campus, providing research assistance, information literacy instruction, and support for a range of collaborative projects.

For the last two years he has held a fellowship in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowships provide recent PhDs with “a unique opportunity to develop expertise in the new forms of scholarly research and the information resources that support them.”

Asked about receiving the award, Dr. Fogle said, “I’m really grateful and honored. I’m so lucky to get to work with so many brilliant, encouraging and thoughtful people.”

imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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The Curious ‘Cat: Taking Accelerated Courses? Tips to Help You Succeed

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks four library professionals: “What tips, suggestions, or advice do you have to offer for students taking accelerated courses this summer?”

Nik-Fogle crNik Fogle wants students to know that “the Library is here to provide them with whatever resources they need to succeed in their coursework. … the Library is a great place to turn for background readings, or resources that go into more depth than can sometimes be covered in class. If their coursework is research-intensive, our goal is to provide them with everything they’ll need for well-informed research projects and papers—from books and journal articles to news sources, original data, government documents, etc. And the Library is probably the quietest and most peaceful place to study, which really helps when you need to focus and get through a lot of material.”

AlfredFryAlfred Fry recommends the “Live Chat” feature on the Subject Guides pages (lower, right corner). He also encourages each student to “get sources for your project early.  Don’t wait until the weekend before a project is due.  Subject specialists don’t work on weekends and may take vacation.”


RS4522_FML164_LindaHauck_003_EDITLinda Hauck—“Research in summer classes is by necessity condensed and intense.  There just isn’t time to allow for serendipity to guide your research path. Find out if there is a course guide for your project, and if there isn’t make an appointment with a librarian.  Bring your research prompt to the meeting, so that the librarian can hone in on just what you need.”

FML164_BarbaraQuintiliano_011_EDITBarbara Quintiliano encourages students to reach out to the contact librarian for their subject area (From the “Subject Guides” page on Falvey’s site, click the subject name to find contact info. for the librarian who specializes in that subject). Barbara adds that “the Library has a wealth of specialized resources that are not available for free to the general public but that they can access as Villanova students.

“The subject librarians really want to be contacted so that they can help students save time. So, if students are looking for specialized information for their course work, they should not spend valuable time searching at random on Google but should contact their subject librarian right away.”

Be on the lookout! The Curious ‘Cat (Gerald Dierkes) and his trusty roving photog (Alice Bampton) may be stopping you next time you visit the library! 😉


The Highlighter: Explore Falvey’s Many Blogs



In addition to the Library News blog, Falvey publishes several subject-specific blogs on its site. This video shows how to access the library’s subject-specific blogs.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


New Week: Summer Event listings, Hours & More!


OK, Monday – Let’s Do This!
If you’re coming to Falvey this summer, here’s all you need to know to get you through the week!

This week’s hours:

Monday-Thursday, June 8 – 11: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Friday, June 12: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, June 13: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

This week’s events:

Monday, June, 8:

Grant Application Discussion. Room 204. 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. (private event)

Tuesday, June, 9:

University Advancement Department Retreat. First Floor Lounge. 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Joint CFDV and DVMSDG Meeting. Reading Room. 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Wednesday, June, 10: 

Think Tank. Room 204. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Did you catch the ‘Caturday photos of Alumni Wildcats at Reunion University? Click on the photo below to go there now!


Alumni Author Panel Discussion kicked off Reunion Weekend activities at the library with presentations from (clockwise,) playwright Michael Hollinger and authors Sean Harvey and Judy Lee Burke. Photos by Alice Bampton.


It’s Monday and you’re knackered, but look. how. cute.
Though it’s inconceivable that this could be your first viewing of this photo, what better way to start your week than with a kingly dose of royal cuties, Prince George and Princess Charlotte. Also inconceivable to have first official royal portraits snapped and then tweeted by their mom, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. Bit quicker than waiting for Hans Holbein’s paint to dry! I do think I see a little of Alfred the Great in her, don’t you? Around the eyes, maybe?

Digital Library Content Roundup – First Week – June 2015

Front cover, Chicago Ledger, v. XXXVII, no. 16, Saturday, April 17, 1909

Front cover, Chicago Ledger, v. XXXVII, no. 16, Saturday, April 17, 1909

This week finds a number of resources newly available including more of the Falvey Daily Doodles (for more on Joanne Quinn’s work, see:The Falvey Whiteboard Artist), more Story Paper issues, and more Great War content! And of special note in the World Collection is the additional of an early Photograph Album depicting daily life in the Philippine countryside. There’s something new every week! See all this week’s items by clicking here.


Draggin’ your wagon this morning? Oh, don’t be so dramatic

Maybe you shouldn’t have stayed up so last night to watch the Tony Awards, AKA the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre!

This year’s Broadway productions may have piqued the interest of bibliophiles more than usual, as several Best Play and Best Musical nominations were based on popular books. Fun Home, subtitled A Family Tragicomic, is a graphic memoir written by Alison Bechdel in 2006 and is a riveting examination of a father-daughter relationship. Fun Home was adapted into a Broadway musical and was nominated for 12 Tony Awards. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Tony-nominated for Best Play, is a 2003 novel by Mark Haddon which tells the story of Christopher, a 15 year old boy with an autistic spectrum condition who decides to investigate death of his neighbor’s dog for which he’s been accused. And nominated for eight Tonys, including Best Play, is Wolf Hall, Parts One and Two, which is based on Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize winning historical novels, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, and center on Thomas Cromwell and political intrigue in Henry VIII’s court and the king’s desperation for a male heir.

P.S., we hear through the grapevine that at least one Falvey librarian has already put in the 6 hours needed to view Parts 1 and 2. Can you guess who?

icloudIn The Cloud:

It was another busy year. Who had time to figure out the iCloud? Now that summer is here, this book, How to Do Everything iCloud, could be the answer to your cloud questions. Since it’s an eBook, you can easily dig into it while your toes dig into the sand. See you in the Cloud!

WB_Yeats_ndBirthdays abound

Birthdays this week include acknowledgments of architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) former First Lady (and First Mother?) Barbara Bush who turns 90 today and Maurice Sendak, who passed away in 2012. English Stuart lyricist and poet Ben Jonson and Game of Thrones actor Peter Dinklage share a birthday on Wednesday, and on Thursday, another Bush family member, former President (and First Father?) – George Herbert Walker Bush (41) turns 91. Wednesday is also the birthday of diarist and Holocaust victim Anne Frank. Sadly, Saturday would have been Nobel-prize winning mathematician John Nash‘s 87th birthday. And, believe it or not, Mary Kate & Ashley will turn 29. You wanted birthdays? You got it, dude! :-)

We’ll end with a quote from another June 13 birthday celebrant, Irish poet William Butler Yeats (1865-1939): an invocation to end writer’s block for all beginning to form their midterm papers. It comes up quick in summer semester!

writerblockHANDS, do what you’re bid:

Bring the balloon of the mind

That bellies and drags in the wind

Into its narrow shed.

Have a great week! Let us know how we can help!


‘Caturday: Alumni Wildcats at Reunion University

russian downton

Dean Lindenmeyr brought to life the period of the Russian revolution with research and anecdotes about the Countess Sophia, her family, and the politics of that era.

Unlike 8:30 a.m. classes that students sometimes have during the school year, the first session of Reunion University started at 10:30 a.m. and featured the newly appointed Dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Adele Lindenmeyr, who presented her research on A Russian Downton Abbey: A Countess, a Great Estate, and the Russian Revolution.

There was a buzz of energy and lots of chatting just before the reclassification session began.

There was a buzz of energy and lots of chatting just before the reclassification session began.

After lunch, old friends and alumni association colleagues gathered for On the Move: Preparing for Villanova’s 2016 Reclassification and Re-ranking. Ann Diebold and Jim Trainer explained the process that leads to a Carnegie Foundation reclassification. Re-ranking of Villanova University by U.S. News & World Report would follow suit and place Villanova in the national, rather than the regional, category.

Talented and passionate faculty, staff, students and alumni are proof positive that Villanova will continue to ignite change. Go Nova!



Reunion Weekend FAQs: Falvey Alumni Questions

WILDCAT QUESTION MARK2Other than where are the restrooms (through the lounge doors, to your left) and when is Holy Grounds open (a bit trickier during summer months – check their website), here are the questions most often asked by visiting alumni!


Am I able to look at past issues of The Villanovan?

Yes! The collected issues of the Villanovan and the Villanova Monthly are available here. Issues are fully searchable from the Library Catalog and are in pdf format for easy reading, printing and downloading.

Search the fulltext in the Digital Library search box or in the library Search tab.  Selected content is available to the Villanova Community members from 1995-current in the Lexis-Nexis database.

Print copies of articles published since 1995 can be requested at the front desk.  When requesting an issue, please use the call number LD4834 .S75V (Garey Hall).

Falvey has an index, in excel format, to assist in finding specific articles published in the Villanovan from 1992 through 2006.


Can I look at old Belle Air yearbooks?

Yes! These are not digitized, but the library does has paper format only of the yearbooks available for browsing during library hours. Check our home page for hours – which do often vary during this time of year.

Here is the following information on the title and holdings:

Title: Belle-air. Publisher: [Villanova, Pa. : Villanova College, 1922- . Call Number: LD4834 .S75

Available Volume  Holdings: 1922, 1924-1941, 1943-2004, 2006- to present. Ask at Circulation for the specific volume.

GRADPICTOAm I still entitled to use the library as an alumni?

Yes! VU alumni are eligible for a free courtesy membership that allows borrowing privileges and on-site access to most of our online databases. To apply, simply come to the Falvey circulation desk with a photo ID.  Check out the  ‘Alumni — Courtesy Membership’ and ‘Courtesy Member Borrowing’ pages for more information:

Villanova Alumni and Residents of Radnor or Lower Merion townships may apply annually for borrowing privileges and on site access to subscription databases. There is no membership fee for these privileges.

Villanova University Catalogs

Are you on social media?

Heck yeah! We are on social media! Follow both the main library and the digital library on a wide selection of platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GoodReads, Google+ and Pinterest! Or, get a great sampling of all of them on our new Rebelmouse account.


Thanks to Sue Ottignon, the Great Place to Start Librarian for her help on this post!


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Last Modified: June 5, 2015