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Foto Friday: Author Wes Moore Book Signing

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Falvey Memorial Library was pleased to host a book signing for Wes Moore on Thursday, September 25 as part of the OneBook Villanova’s tenth year anniversary. Close to one hundred students and members of the community turned out for the occasion. Moore signed books for over an hour, with the line for those waiting to meet and greet the genial author snaking out past the elevator bank.

Posters of book covers for each of the OneBook Villanova selections since the program began in 2004 were hung in the windows surrounding the Speakers’ Corner. Moore signed the oversized cover of The Other Wes Moore, and took home his ‘Big Head‘ decoration reportedly to show it to his mother!


Photo by Alice Bampton.

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Meet Wes Moore, 2014 “One Book Villanova” Author in the library today at 4:30

1398353001099The One Book Villanova Program is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year!  In honor of this landmark occasion, the One Book Villanova committee  proudly announced the 2014-2015 book selection: The Other Wes Moore by author Wes Moore. WESMOREThe book follows the lives of two young men who are about the same age, live in the same city and who also share the same name. Despite their many striking similarities, the young men’s lives take very different paths: one Wes grows up to be a scholar, war veteran, White House aide and prominent business leader while the other Wes becomes a convicted criminal serving a life sentence for allegedly committing murder. The Other Wes Moore leads the reader to contemplate how these two people turned out so differently despite some of their remarkably similar circumstances growing up in poverty-stricken Baltimore.

Throughout the past ten years, the Villanova One Book selections have varied greatly in topic and theme and have led readers through many diverse cultural settings and landscapes.
Good Kings Bad Kings took us to Chicago and showed us the harsh realities of institutional life for adolescents with disabilities.
Little Princes
exposed the human trafficking issues that orphaned children face in Nepal.
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
described for us what the Japanese Internment camps were like for families during WWII.
The Unforgiving Minute placed us in the shoes of a West Point educated soldier as he led his platoon through the savagery and uncertainty of combat in Afghanistan.
Rooftops of Tehran described life in Iran under its oppressive regime.
- In The Glass Castle, we learned what it was like for the author to grow up homeless with highly dysfunctional parents.
Left to Tell poignantly described one woman’s experience surviving the Rwandan genocide.
- In Blood Done Sign My Name, we witnessed the civil rights struggle in the American south.
- In The Kite Runner, our very first One Book selection in 2004-2005, we traveled to both Afghanistan and America and experienced the harsh Taliban takeover of the country and felt the hardships of immigration.
Each of these book selections has helped to strengthen the ties of the Villanova Community and has also forced us to confront the sometimes harsh realities of human nature. The One Book Villanova Committee hopes to continue this tradition with the tenth anniversary One Book Villanova selection, The Other Wes Moore.

ONE-BOOKSAll rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors received a copy of the 2014-2015 One Book Villanova selection in early May, and all incoming freshmen were mailed a copy of the book over the summer. In addition, the One Book Villanova Committee decided to change the format and timing of the program. The author’s visit will occur on Thursday, September 25, as part of the St. Thomas of Villanova weekend festivities. The entire Villanova Community is encouraged the read The Other Wes Moore in preparation for the author’s visit on September 25! Those students, staff and faculty who were not able to pick up a copy of the book in early May should visit the Office of Student Development (Room 214/217 Dougherty Hall), the Office for Multicultural Affairs (Room 102 Dougherty Hall), or Falvey Memorial Library anytime during normal business hours to receive a book. For students, the book is free of charge and for faculty and staff the cost is $6 per book.

Wes Moore, author of The Other Wes Moore

Wes Moore, author of The Other Wes Moore

The One Book Committee is also in the midst of planning a series of topical programs throughout the academic year in support of the 2014-2015 book selection and to promote the tenth anniversary of the program.

More information about the author’s visit and One Book Villanova tenth anniversary programming can be found on the One Book website.


News From Falvey Winter 2008 - Gina McFaddenArticle by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator for the Scholarly Outreach team.

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Pragya Singhvi, Graduate Assistant for the Technology Development Team

Pragya SinghviPragya Singhvi, a native of Jodhpur, India, is beginning her second year as a graduate assistant with the Technology Development team.

She graduated from the University of Rajasthan in 2004 with a bachelor of engineering degree, majoring in electronics and communication. Singhvi is enrolled in the master’s degree program in the Department of Computing Sciences, studying software engineering. She anticipates graduating in May 2015 and hopes to be a software architect.

Singhvi reports to David Lacy, Technology Development team leader. She assists team members with various software projects, such as enhancement and production support to the Catholic portal of Notre Dame University; maintaining Git repository for the Catholic portal; implementing the Aurelius Digital Scholarship Initiative project, “El Perú en sus tradiciones, en su historia, en su arte,”; and updating the building map on the Falvey Memorial Library website.

Her hobbies are playing tennis, basketball and volleyball. Singhvi’s special interest is playing with her three year old daughter.

She says, “It’s my pleasure to work with a great technical team that makes awesome software using the latest technologies. … I feel like I am working in a real technical industry. It’s a great place to work and learn.”

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Dig Deeper: Kevin Spacey at Villanova

Kevin-Spacey-as-Clarence-Da-528x7061

Parents Weekend offers an opportunity for the parents of students, new and seasoned, to visit Villanova’s campus. Parents Weekend 2014 will be held from Sept. 19-21. This year’s guest speaker for the Saturday evening program is the inimitable Kevin Spacey. Spacey, an Academy Award-winning actor, currently executively produces and stars in the hit Netflix original series House of Cards. He is perhaps most known for his breakout role in The Usual Suspects and his memorable characters in American Beauty and L.A. Confidential.

But Spacey’s involvement in the arts does not end at producing and acting—he also funds emerging artists through the Kevin Spacey Foundation; has his own production company, Trigger Street Productions; and since 2004, he has worked with The Old Vic Theatre Company in London as Artistic Director.

If you’d like to learn more about Spacey, or delve into his filmography here at Falvey Memorial Library, check out the resources compiled by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English literature and theatre.

 


Dig Deeper:

Fun fact: Spacey’s Wiki page notes that his “first professional stage appearance was as a spear carrier in a New York Shakespeare Festival performance of Henry VI, part 1 in 1981.”

Falvey Memorial Library has two articles and two documentaries.

Here is the full list of films on VHS & DVD at Falvey.

And see how even Kevin Spacey pixelated can steal the show in an upcoming video game.

 


Sarah

Dig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

 

 

 

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Throwback Thursday: Villanova’s 10th President was first college librarian

Rev Thomas Middleton

According to an article written by Rev. Dennis Gallagher, O.S.A. and Laura Hutelmyer, electronic resource and special acquisitions coordinator, in a 2006 edition of the “News from Falvey” newsletter, the Rev. Thomas C. Middleton, O.S.A.,Villanova College president from 1876 to 1878, was also the first college librarian, serving in that capacity for 58 years, from 1865-1923.
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Dig Deeper: Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, researches a major US women’s prison

Breaking Women

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library, Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, associate professor, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, will deliver a Scholarship@Villanova lecture about her recently published book, Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment. Dr. McCorkel will discuss how her four years of research in a major U.S. women’s prison helped her to uncover the reasons tougher drug policies have so greatly affected those incarcerated there, and how the very nature of punishment in women’s detention centers has been deeply altered as a result. Lauded as “prison ethnography at its best” (Lorna Rhodes, author of Total Confinement: Madness and Reason in the Maximum Security Prison), her book is published by New York University Press and was a finalist for the 2013 C. Wright Mills Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

This event—co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Sociology & Criminology, the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, and the Center for Peace and Justice Education—is free and open to the public.


Dig Deeper:

jill_mccorkelvillanova_edu

Resources by and about Dr. Jill McCorkel

Attending the lecture? Now read Dr. McCorkel’s new book: Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment.

Find out more about the professor’s work and research interests by visiting her Villanova webpage

Keep up to date with the professor by following her on Twitter!

Check out Dr. McCorkel’s collaborative photo essay with prisoners from SCI Graterford @ Strongbox Magazine – Vol. 1 2009.

Becker, S. & McCorkel, J. (2011). The gender of criminal opportunity: The impact of male co-offenders on women’s crime.
Building on ethnographic research and feminist labor market analyses, this study explores how gender affects access to criminal opportunities. Using National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, the authors examine the effect a male co-offender has on women’s offending. They find that the presence of a male co-offender broadens women’s criminal involvement in distinctive ways.

McCorkel, J. (2003). Embodied surveillance and the gendering of punishment.
This ethnography explores the enactment of “get tough” politics in a state prison for women and considers whether the implementation of seemingly gender-neutral programs and policies implies that women’s prisons are no longer operating as “gendered organizations.”

McCorkel, J. (2004). Criminally dependent? Gender, punishment, and the rhetoric of welfare reform.
This study relies on ethnographic data collected from a state prison for women to examine whether and to what extent welfare and criminal justice policies were coordinated during the drug and poverty wars of the past decade. Findings reveal that drug war policies did indeed transform punishment practices on the feminine side of the penal system, but such transformations were ultimately premised on changes to institutional interpretive structures that altered the ways state actors conceptualized gender, crime and women’s needs.

More Resources on Women and Imprisonment

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU): Women in Prison
The ACLU “fights to ensure that the criminal justice system treats women and girls fairly, that it protects the health and safety of women in its custody, and that it facilitates their successful reentry into their communities.” Check out this web resource for general information, statistics, videos and its personal testimony series called “Words from Prison.”

Women’s Prisons in the United States
A list of United States federal and state prisons which either currently or once did contain female prisoners.

Female offenders: critical perspectives and effective interventions
This classic text explores a variety of topics on female offenders from the nature of female offending, its patterns and explanations, power-belief theory and relational theory to institutional assessment, classification and programs.

Interrupted life: experiences of incarcerated women in the United States
This is a “gripping collection of writings by and about imprisoned women in the United States, a country that jails a larger percentage of its population than any other nation in the world. This eye-opening work brings together scores of voices from both inside and outside the prison system including incarcerated and previously incarcerated women, their advocates and allies, abolitionists, academics and other analysts” (see the full description at the University of California Press).

Women’s mental health issues across the criminal justice system
An accessible guide to women’s mental health in criminal justice systems, this text touches on meeting the needs of juvenile and adult offenders, measuring traumatic events in the lives of incarcerated girls, crisis intervention teams training, policy implications, and the ethics of justice and mental health systems.

A list of all books with the subject “Female offenders Rehabilitation United States.”

A list of all books with the subject “Women prisoners Services for United States.”

Explore more about corrections in the United States with this comprehensive list of print and online titles.


Alex Williams

Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments. For questions or more information, feel free to contact him by email (alexander.williams@villanova.edu) or phone (ext.8845).

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Blog round-up: ten quick hits from across campus

TEN QUICK HITS2

The first article in this series concentrated on content update from Falvey’s reference blogs. From here on out, this blog content roundup will feature ten quick hits from across campus, including highlights from blogs of the library.

1. Find out if that “perfect idea” of yours has some merit.

2. This student played tic-tac-toe against a Supreme Court Justice over the summer break.

3. Wonder if there were any werewolf sightings?

4. Alert to all political science, French major, and study abroad aficionados.

5. The one interview question (directive?) you should be prepared to answer.

6. Pretty cool to be a part of this.

7. At least one new student is enjoying their time here.

8 The Department of Public Administration has two new professors, one who loves to cook beef wellington and the other can weld!

9. The English Department hosted a happy hour at the Library!

10. Speaking of happy hours, Villanova Theatre shows us how to make cocktails as classy as the cast from Fallen Angels.

 


Blog roundup by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

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New Graduate Assistant Joins Communication and Service Promotion Team

Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and Servic

Michelle Callaghan, a native of Williamstown, N.J., joined Falvey’s Communication and Service Promotion team at the end of August. In 2013, Callaghan graduated from Widener University, Chester, Pa., with a bachelor of arts degree in English. She is currently enrolled in Villanova’s Department of English graduate program.

After receiving her master’s degree, she hopes to teach English but explains, “I am exploring career options that incorporate my passion for digital technologies, multimedia, internet communities and writing. Over the next two years I intend to work on diversifying my skills in a way that may be applicable to many fields, so I’m not planning a future path too concretely – I only plan to approach the creative working world with a sense of play and entrepreneurship.”

Reporting to Joanne Quinn, Communication and Service Promotion team leader, Callaghan writes for the library blog, promoting and reporting campus events; she also edits articles for Falvey’s print newsletter. She says, “I am thrilled to be working at Falvey Memorial Library. I feel like I’m becoming involved in modern library functions at a very pivotal time in library history. I’m excited to explore the implications of the changing information landscape and excited to see how I can contribute.”

Her hobbies include indoor rock climbing, musical theater and video games. “I’m a geek,” she adds, “I’m involved in a few internet fandoms.”

Watch for Michelle’s new column, Cat in the Stacks, which will appear most Thursdays in the Library News.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

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Falvey Welcomes its New Interim Director

BOB DEVOS

Robert DeVos, PhD, associate vice president for instructional analysis, professor, mathematics and statistics, became Falvey Memorial Library’s new interim director this summer. He has accepted this new role in addition to his existing responsibilities with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Dr. DeVos agreed to an interview to discuss his new position.

GD (Gerald Dierkes)—Why did you take on the role of interim library director? 

RD—I have worked closely with [Rev. Kail C. Ellis, PhD, OSA, vice president for academic affairs, Department of Political Science] since 1997 as associate dean when he was the dean and again for the last 3 years as associate vice president and he as the VPAA. He asked me to take on the additional responsibility and I accepted it.

GDWhat do you consider the library director’s role/purpose at Falvey Memorial Library?

RD—I can only give you my perspective. Anyone in an administrative position has the responsibility of dealing with resources. These resources can be people, money, equipment, etcetera. The library director’s position is to administer the resources given to the Library. These involve trying to make good decisions:

  • On hiring (There are several vacancies, and I felt strongly that we should hire permanent staff in the non-librarian positions. A new director might change how the Library functions with regard to librarians, but the non-librarian staff will be needed independent of a new direction for the Library);
  • On the use of current staff;
  • On space allocations (possible change in some office space); and
  • On the use of the budget.

GDWhat do you find most exciting about this job? Why?

RD—I have had many roles at VU and enjoy the challenge of learning something new. In all of my previous roles, I have found that when I leave a position, I leave with having made some new friends. I look forward to that happening here.

GDWhat about the Library surprised you when you started working here?

RD—The many different roles of the librarians—I did not know much about the large educational role that they carry. I also was surprised as to the many events run by the Library.

GDWhat do you consider the Library’s role/purpose at VU? What do you think are the major issues facing the Library today? 

RD—I will mention a few major issues that I see.
1. Given the changes in administration, the morale is low. This is
…..difficult to change, but I hope by being open and available we
…..can move forward.
2. Structure of the staff: When the new director is appointed, that
…..person will probably reorganize. I am trying to make things work
…..and will avoid a reorganization since we can’t keep changing.
3. Resources: With budgets being cut or not rising at the same level
…..as costs, journals, etc. need to be cut. Space is always a problem.
4. OLE [Open Library Environment]: Many staff want to implement
…..[OLE] next summer, but there are also a large number who are
…..saying let’s wait. I am having difficulty in knowing the best path.

GDWhat is an area of improvement you would like to make in the Library?

RD—Ask me this in a few months.

GDWhat role does/will the Library have in Villanova University’s Strategic plan, for example, to become a national research university?

RD—One cannot have quality programs without journals, data bases and books. These costs need to be built into the budget as programs are added. Whenever any new degree is proposed, the library director does get to comment. That person should make sure these costs are added.

Although the library staff knows that at some point a new, permanent library director will be hired, it’s been challenging not knowing who or when, or what changes to the Library that person will make. It helps to have an interim library director who recognizes and understands this challenge. The library staff is grateful for Dr. DeVos, his leadership and his support.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Mood Board: Robert LeBlanc

Ever wonder how your favorite librarians soak up information in their everyday lives? Wonder no longer! Today, in the first of a series of link-laden, resource-ridden micro-interviews with a series of smart people, First Year Experience/Humanities Librarian Robert LeBlanc shares his ‘mood board’ of modern information consumption … and how he feels about consuming ice cream and espresso.


Rob LeBlanc and Helpers packing books for distribution

So, Rob, where do you get your news?
Reddit and Huffington Post… but mostly Reddit… LOTS of Reddit… probably TOO much Reddit…

Do you have a favorite app?
Shazam. How else do you find new music?

iOS, Android, or other?
iOS, because I like things that are simple and work.

What are you currently reading?
Ghost Story by Jim Butcher and The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. Both are awesome.

Very nice. What podcasts are you into?
Radiolab and This American Life are my go-to podcasts, but I listen to various science/geek-oriented ones as well.

ROB-MOODHow do you feel about social media? If you use it, who do you follow?
I feel about social media the way I feel about ice cream; a little bit now and then is nice, but any more than that makes me feel bloated and unhappy. I follow Ricky Gervais, George Takei, and Jon Stewart to name a few.

What is your morning information routine?
I wake up and do some local area research to locate espresso beans. I utilize my manual dexterity, intense training and an analog machine to make the espresso. I drink said espresso. I then wait an hour or so before checking email, Facebook, etc. I’ve found that’s the safest way for all involved.

I agree! Non-caffeinated emailing is mighty risky. Now, the big question, if you could only have access to one database for the rest of your life, what would it be?
As a civilian, Wikipedia, because it’s wicked huge and wicked comprehensive. As a librarian, JSTOR, because it is academically huge and academically comprehensive.

Thanks, Rob!


For more information on Rob LeBlanc’s role as a First Year Experience/Humanities Librarian, and his advice to first year students, check out last year’s interview.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Last Modified: September 9, 2014