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Librarians Welcome New Faculty at Annual Breakfast

FACREC MONT2

 

Falvey Memorial Library was again proud to host the traditional continental breakfast for Villanova University’s New Faculty Program, which took place Monday, Aug. 17. The program is hosted by VITAL, the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning, and tailored to support the needs of new faculty members by easing them into their new teaching positions, answering questions and introducing them to campus resources. The library’s Learning Commons meeting rooms provided a bright, spacious environment for the new professors to network with subject librarians and begin their Villanova experience.

Gabriele Bauer, PhD, and Director of VITAL also introduced the new faculty members to Falvey’s newest entrant, Millicent Gaskell, University librarian and library director, who began here in May.


Photos by Alice Bampton.

 


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‘Caturday: Falvey Wildcats in Action

Wet booksWhen a water pipe broke unexpectedly in Old Falvey Hall very early on Wednesday morning, the entire library staff and several University departments quickly mobilized to move the books, cover the stacks, clean up the water, repair the leak, and to keep regular library services operating smoothly. Students, library staff, the library director, custodians — everyone worked side by side. There was damage to a small percentage of books, but hundreds, if not thousands, were moved out of harm’s way.  It was the perfect example of Wildcat teamwork in action at Falvey!

 

 


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Thank you, God, for the gift of today – The Joe Hauck Memorial

Hauck stone

Anyone walking by Falvey Hall (aka Old Falvey) passes two memorials honoring Joe Hauck: a bench with a plaque and a small flowerbed planted at the base of a clock. Have they, as I have, wondered who Joe Hauck is and why he was commemorated?

hauck clockA bit of research discovered that Hauck, a sophomore in the fall of 1995, was a member of the orientation team for incoming freshmen and an orientation counselor for Group 72. Orientation that year ran from August 24 through 27, and Hauck became ill on Saturday, August 26, during orientation. He went to his residence-hall room to rest, and at 1:30 a.m. Sunday Villanova Emergency Medical Service (VEMS) transported him to Bryn Mawr Hospital. Hauck was initially treated intravenously for heat exhaustion and vomiting, but at 4 a.m. his blood pressure dropped, he became unresponsive and soon died.

His test results became available Sunday afternoon and showed that Hauck had meningoccal meningitis, a disease which is rare but very serious, evolves rapidly and can be fatal. Meningoccal meningitis causes the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord to become inflamed, and blood can become infected. It is contracted only through close personal contact, such as kissing, drinking from the same cup as an infected person or living in close quarters where the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions may occur.

The University, in response, offered students a preventative antibiotic, Cipro, and many students took it. No other students developed meningococcal meningitis, though. In 2005, far too late to help Hauck, a vaccine became available, recommended for children ages 11 – 12, for high school students and for first-year college students living in dormitories.

hauck flower

“Good morning God and thank you for the gift of today” – Joe

Hauck’s orientation team members and Group 72 described him as a free spirit with a warm smile; he was always happy and “[T]here was never a dull moment with Joe Hauck as our orientation counselor” (The Villanovan, 9/8/1995, p. 12). The memorials are gifts from the 1995 orientation team. The clock memorial was unveiled May 2, 1996, on the 24th anniversary of his birth.

hauck bench markerA 1994 graduate of St. Joseph’s Preparatory School, Philadelphia, Hauck had considered becoming a priest, but he wanted to have a family so instead he was planning to be a doctor. He had served as a Eucharistic minister on campus and the plaque below the clock reflects his devotion: “Good morning God and thank you for the gift of today” – Joe.

On the twentieth anniversary of this sad event, anyone walking past this memorial is reminded of just how transitory life can be, but also how one individual can be a positive influence on many others.


Article and photography by Alice Bampton. 

 


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Philosophy

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”RS9332_2014-01-29 14.34.20-5-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Philosophy Librarian Nikolaus Fogle

What’s new this year?

NF—Well, the Philosophy program is about to welcome six new graduate students, who I’ll get to meet in August. And of course the philosophy collection is constantly growing. We’ve recently acquired the online version of the Loeb Classical Library, which is great for people doing ancient philosophy. We’re getting more resources online generally, including Oxford Handbooks and a Bloomsbury e-book collection in political thought.

What are the challenges for philosophy students who want to use the Library? 

NF—People often just don’t know where to start. Depending on the project, they might need to use any number of different research tools. And once they figure out where to go, students don’t always know the right sorts of questions to ask themselves in order to use them effectively. A related problem, too, is waiting too long to ask for help.

What resources does the Library offer to help philosophy students overcome those challenges? 

NF—We try to make navigation as easy as possible. The subject and topic guides on the website are pretty helpful, but librarians are also here in person to provide guidance whenever it’s needed. In addition to individual research consultations, we also do in-class orientations and workshops on research skills, tools and techniques throughout the year.

What do you wish philosophy students knew about you, about the Library? 

NF—I guess I just want them to know that the Library is here to provide them with help, and with resources. There’s practically nothing you might need that we won’t be able to get a hold of for you. And it’s not just materials—we’re here to provide you with the knowledge and know-how to enable you to move through the research process as effectively as possible.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

NF—I love getting to help people, and finding out what they’re working on. I really enjoy collaborating with my colleagues in the Library and elsewhere on campus. And I love that I get to be a philosophy nerd in a really big way.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

NF—Villanova students have such a wide range of interests, and so much enthusiasm. The humanities curriculum here is really great. I like that I never know what the next question is going to be. I also like seeing people’s interests coalesce as they decide on a paper topic, or a major, or a dissertation.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “After your final exam or project, what’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

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Chantelle Casillas—“… go on vacation. I’m going to Barcelona.”

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Robert Carey—“Beach—go right to the beach, Rehoboth Beach, that’s where I’ll go.”

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Atena Hashemoghli—“I’m moving to New York. So the first thing is visiting Times Square or somewhere else to have fun, and enjoy the rest of the summer there.”

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Jeffrey Hupf—“going to visit my friends and family back home in New Jersey … Hammonton, New Jersey.”

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Ciara Sprance—“For fun? probably read a book that wasn’t assigned, read a book that I’m going to enjoy and not cry about or sweat about … I’m going to read a book by John Banville; he’s a good Irish writer. … I’m going to read The Sea, after I read this.”

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Daniel Shea—“That is a hard question. Usually I go home for break … I usually go immediately, so I don’t really do anything [for fun. My home is in] San Francisco.”

 


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Science

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

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Today’s subject librarian—Science Librarian Alfred Fry

What’s new this year?

AF—We don’t have any new science resources this year, but the Library just hired a new director. I expect there will be a lot of changes.

What are the challenges for science students who want to use the Library? 

AF—Our databases, particularly in chemistry, are very powerful. Although it is very easy to do simple searches, it can be challenging to discover all the advanced features without instruction. Also, many students are familiar with just one database and are unaware of others that would be more appropriate in some situations.

What resources does the Library offer to help science students overcome those challenges? 

AF—Me. I’m happy to teach classes or provide individual or small group instruction.

What do you wish science students knew about you, about the Library? 

AF—I majored in chemistry. Many students know about the subject guides, but I wish more did.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

AF—Helping students and faculty in all areas, but particularly in science and engineering.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

AF—Villanova students tend to be more patient than students at other places I’ve worked. So, I can take the time to demonstrate the most effective techniques for getting the best results. There are also a few people from the wider Villanova community who have asked very interesting questions.


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Business

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

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Today’s subject librarian—Business Librarian Linda Hauck

What are the challenges for business students who want to use the Library?

LH—Many of the key business sources are not designed with libraries in mind.  Their primary customers are business professionals; consequently, they don’t integrate well with library discovery systems making it challenging for students to find the specialized resources they need for course work.

What resources does the Library offer to help business students overcome those challenges?

LH—I design subject guides and course guides that highlight relevant databases. Because many of these databases look and feel very different from typical scholarly article databases, I make tutorials and videos to demonstrate how to use them. Of course, I encourage students to drop into my office at Falvey 222 or make an appointment (https://vubusinesslibrarian.youcanbook.me/ )  with me to learn about how to gather credible competitive intelligence on people, companies and industries.

What do you wish business students knew about you, about the Library?

LH— I recognize that students are juggling coursework, community commitments, athletics and jobs, leaving little room for wasted energy.  For most students research is not the ends, but the means to solving problems, understanding and assessing others work product or creating something new of value. At the library, we’re all about facilitating students goals by sharing efficient research tools and techniques.

What do you like best about being a librarian?

LH—Being a research support librarian allows me to wear different hats.  I select materials, teach, do consulting, assess services and negotiate with vendors.  Best of all there is always something new to learn!

What do you like best about working with Villanova students?

LH—Villanova students are bright and driven but still consistently courteous.


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Nursing

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

………………resource locators,

…………idea developers,

……database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

RS9338_2014-01-15 11.09.11-1-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Nursing/Life Sciences & Instructional Services Librarian Barbara Quintiliano 

What’s new this year?

BQ—By now, many students and faculty are familiar with our mobile research assistance cart, staffed either by my colleague Robin Bowles (pictured below) or me.

…..—We set up our cart on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the café area on the 2nd floor of Driscoll Hall. Our hours nursing librarians
for staffing the cart vary due to our other duties. This year, however, we are going to try to have regular hours and publicize them, so students will know when we will be there.

What are the challenges for nursing students who want to use the Library?

BQ—First of all, students must be aware that Google is not a gateway to all resources that they will need for nursing research. Nursing students need access to quite a few specialized resources—such as CINAHL (nursing database), PubMed, Cochrane Reviews, and the Community Health Data Base—and these can be found on the library’s website. Links for accessing these resources can be found on the nursing subject page (http://library.villanova.edu/research/subject-guides/nursing/).

…..—Second, these resources do not have Google-like search screens. They require just a little bit of technique to get the best results. However, if you are seeking specialized nursing or health data, these are the resources you need to use.

…..—Everything said in the previous paragraph goes double for students enrolled in distance courses, such as the University Alliance RN to BSN program. The library website is another interface that they need to discover because without those resources they will not be able to complete research assignments successfully.

What resources does the Library offer to help nursing students overcome those challenges?

BQ—All students in NUR1102 come to the Library during a regular class period for an introduction to the most important specialized nursing resources and for a primer in APA documentation style.

…..—Short instructional videos, linked on the nursing subject guide pages, illustrate how to search the specialized resources.

…..—My colleague Robin Bowles and I are available to assist students with any topic. I can be contacted by email at barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu and by phone at 610-519-5207. Robin can be contacted at robin.bowles@villanova.edu or 610-519-8129. We are also happy to make telephone appointments to work with distance learners.

What do you wish nursing students knew about you, about the Library?

BQ—Robin and I are as close as your email/phone. You can contact us anytime. We do our best to respond within 24 hours, if not sooner.

…..—No inquiry is too big or too small. We can assist you in doing literature searches, finding full text of articles when you have references, creating APA-Style bibliographies.

…..—I am available on Thursdays at Driscoll Hall 343 (when not staffing the research cart) and the other days of the week in Falvey Memorial Library, 2nd floor, Rm 225. Robin is available on Tuesdays at Driscoll Hall 343 and the other days of the week in Falvey, 2nd floor, Rm 230.

What do you like best about being a librarian?

BQ—I enjoy pursuing so many different topics and assisting with research of various levels of simplicity or complexity.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students?

BQ—I enjoy meeting and chatting with them (in person or by phone), as well as helping them with their assignments. They are remarkably cheerful under academic, clinical and work pressures. They brighten my day.


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The Curious ‘Cat: When you need a break from studying, what is a good way to refresh your mind?

Curious Cat

 

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “When you need a break from studying, what is a good way to refresh your mind or to relieve stress?”

RS9263_DSC_3570-scrYeji Seak—“I usually catch up on all the delayed text messages that I need to send back to people. Or I try to stretch a little bit and get some food to refresh my memory and just take a 10-to-15 minute break each time—use the bathroom if I need to … When I’m taking a break I don’t really think about what I just learned; I try to calm myself down and relax a little bit and then go back to studying and focus.”

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Wilson Capellan, OSA—“I go to the coffee shop. Just being alone makes my mind refreshed. And then surf the Internet and visit social media—while sipping a cup of coffee.”

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Aliyia N Patterson—“I cook—and run, either or—cooking or running. Sometimes when I’m running and we have a paper due next week I’ll be running and thinking about what I’m doing in the paper. Unless a car jumps out in front of me, then my mind is back on running. It’s happened a couple of times. So I like to cook and run.”

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Anna Fickenscher—“Sometimes I just take a break and watch stupid reality TV … or mindless Internet entertainment … reading different blogs or reading different articles—just kind of get my mind off of school work with something that requires less thought process.”

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Divya Bonagiri—“I’ll watch some comedy movie or comedy film, and I’ll have some refreshment for some time. And then I’ll go back to studies. Or I enjoy doing my hobby. … I get refreshed doing my hobby for some time and then get back to my studies.”

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Mervin Woodlin—“I have a family, so I spend time with them. I usually do most of my studying at home; the only reason I’m here is because I just started a summer program. Most of the time when I’m studying and I want to take a break, I spend time with them.”

 


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The Curious ‘Cat: What would you change? What would you keep?

Curious Cat
This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could change one thing about the Library, what would it be? What about the Library do you hope never changes?

RS9223_Christian LolkChristian Lolk—“I have a background in the humanities, so as many books and sections devoted to the humanities as possible … I’m a new student, but I checked around the Library this past semester, and I noticed there’s not much past the late ‘80s purchased or put on the shelves … I would prefer some newer books and more in the humanities.”

Editor’s Note—Browsing the collection often leads to discoveries of new books, connections among various subjects, or in-depth knowledge of a specific topic. Another strategy for finding new books, though, is to use Falvey’s powerful catalog either to sort your search results by date—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data descending 

 

 

 

 

—or to use the “Year of Publication” filter to set a date range—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data range

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John Costello—“[change—] more electrical outlets … not change—the calming environment”

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MJ—“I don’t know what I want to change about the printers, but something. I’m always so relieved when a printing problem is solved … I’m just grateful … I wish there was more lounge lighting for those late-night studies. And something I hope that never changes is the warmth of the café addition. I’m a returning student from 20 years ago, and my jaw dropped when I saw food in the Library. I thought there had been some kind of coup. But it’s made it so nice … it just makes me feel good. It makes me feel relaxed at times when things can be quite stressful.”

RS9231_Simhachalam PanduriSimhachalam Panduri—“I would like to increase the number of study rooms because every time I think of getting a study room it’s always busy. I can’t get any; I need to wait for one or two hours to get a study room.”

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Blessing Mbamalu—“I’m a fourth-floor kind of person, and I realize it’s not going to be that quiet, so I wish it was a little bit more [quiet]. I don’t know how you would be able to enforce it to make it stricter.”

RS9239_Anusha Mathur

 

 

 

 

 


Anusha Mathur
—“One thing I would like to change about the Library is more seating space. In the fall or spring [semesters] whenever I enter at 4:00 p.m. and the Library is extremely busy, I don’t find space to sit. Maybe that is one thing which can be done.”


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Last Modified: July 1, 2015