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Announcement: Millicent Gaskell Appointed Villanova University Librarian and Director of Falvey Memorial Library

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Feb. 13, 2015

Millicent Gaskell Appointed Villanova University Librarian and Director of Falvey Memorial Library

VILLANOVA, Pa. – Villanova University has announced the appointment of Millicent Gaskell as University Librarian and Director of the Falvey Memorial Library, effective May 29, 2015. This key appointment, the result of an extensive national search, will enable Villanova to build upon Falvey Memorial Library’s impressive legacy as a cornerstone of learning at the University.

Millicent GaskellMs. Gaskell comes to Villanova with broad experience in both higher education and the private sector. For the past 10 years, she held a number of leadership roles at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Most recently, Ms. Gaskell served as Department Head of Collections Strategy and Management, with oversight of collection development, analysis, acquisitions and metadata and had responsibility for MIT’s $10M collections budget and a 36-member staff. She was honored twice at MIT for outstanding communication and collaboration, as well as for innovation and creativity.

“We are pleased to welcome Millicent Gaskell to Villanova University and to this important position at Falvey Memorial Library,” said the Rev. Kail C. Ellis, OSA, PhD, Vice President for Academic Affairs. “Ms. Gaskell brings to Villanova a thorough knowledge of current and future technological trends impacting library and information services, as well as extensive experience in implementing digital content management initiatives.”

Falvey Memorial Library plays a central role in ensuring the interdependence of teaching, research and scholarship at Villanova. As University Librarian and Director of Falvey Memorial Library, Ms. Gaskell will oversee a facility that supports research and scholarly activities for faculty and students. Its collections include 1.68 million items with 551,236 stack items, 35,297 electronic journals, and 3,596 print journals.  In addition, its digital library initiative assembles, presents and preserves digital collections that support the teaching and research of the campus and the global community of scholars. Gaskell will oversee a staff of 50 employees at Falvey Memorial Library, including the University Archivist and software development programmers.

“The academic library of the future should be creative and agile as pedagogy continues to evolve,” said Gaskell. “The academic library needs to ensure the long-term preservation of scholarship. We should lead not only in preserving collections, but also in improving the discoverability of these collections. Libraries must engage with faculty, students, and administrators to ensure that the community has the information resources, services, spaces, and tools required in a rapidly changing educational environment.”

Prior to her tenure at MIT, Ms. Gaskell served as Librarian, Senior Librarian and then Manager of Information Services during a 10-year career at QVC. Previously, as Environmental Information Specialist at the South Jersey Environmental Information Center, she built the only public environmental collection and research service in New Jersey.  Gaskell earlier served as Paralibrarian for Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, LLP. Gaskell earned a Master’s of Science in Information Science and Technology from Drexel University and a Bachelor’s of Arts in English and Comparative Literature from Ursinus College.

“Ms. Gaskell’s unique background and expertise will allow Villanova to not only build upon the Library’s national recognition by the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Award for Excellence 2013, but also to successfully position the institution for the future,” Fr. Ellis added.

About Villanova University: Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University’s six colleges – the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University School of Law. As students grow intellectually, Villanova prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them.


Article written by Jonathan Gust, Director of Media Relations.

Contact:
Jonathan Gust
Director of Media Relations
Villanova University
(610) 519-5152
jonathan.gust@villanova.edu

 


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For “Who” the Bell Tolls?

Today, March 4, is National Grammar Day.

linguo Don’t worry. I’m not one of *those* people: you know, the self-appointed grammar police. I would no sooner correct someone’s spoken grammar than I would loudly “Shush!” someone in a library.

But I do wonder whether “whom” will be used five years from now.

And for how much longer should we write, “For each prospective student: give him or her his or her application before he or she leaves”? Is it acceptable just to say “… give them their application before they leave”? I don’t expect “… give them they’re application …” to become acceptable, though.

Until each of us can borrow Linguo, the grammar robot from The Simpsons, we can search Falvey’s catalog for resources. Also, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide to Better English in Plain English by Patricia T. O’Conner (available through E-ZBorrow) provides reader-friendly answers to challenging or confusing grammar questions.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.


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Art of Spring Break: Ruspoli and Droutzkoy Art Collections Will Be Reunited and Displayed

ARTOFSB

KRISTEN W PAINTING

Villanova owns a number of paintings donated by Princess Eugenia Ruspoli; her adopted daughter, Princess Maria Theresa Droutzkoy; and her daughter’s husband, Prince Alexis Droutzkoy. Who are these donors and what did they collect? The massive painting, “Triumph of David,” by Pietro da Cortona, which is currently undergoing conservation in Falvey Hall’s Reading Room, is only one of a number of paintings donated by the two families although it is certainly the largest.

Princess Eugenia Ruspoli, donor of “The Triumph of David,” was born Jennie Enfield Berry in Alabama in either 1861 or 1869 (date varies according to the source consulted), the oldest daughter of a Confederate army colonel and plantation owner, Thomas Berry, and his wife, Frances Margaret Rhea. Before her first marriage, young Jennie Berry had traveled and studied in Europe. On May 7, 1889, Berry married a wealthy, older man, Henry Bruton, head of the American Snuff Company. Bruton died in 1892, making Jennie Berry Bruton a wealthy, childless widow who soon resumed her European travels.

eugenia_ruspoli-108x150In March 1901 Jennie Berry Bruton married the 23-year-old Prince Enrico Ruspoli whom she had met in her travels. Prince Ruspoli, with a title but little fortune, had followed Jennie to Georgia where he proposed. They were married in Washington, D.C., by the Papal Nuncio and the couple took up residence in a palazzo in Rome. After her marriage, Jennie Ruspoli changed her first name to Eugenia, derived from the Greek “eugenes,” meaning “well-born.”

Castello Ruspoli, Vignanello, Italy

Castello Ruspoli

With funds provided by Eugenia, she and Enrico Ruspoli purchased the Castle Nemi, parts of which date to the 10th century. The castle, still standing, is 20 miles south of Rome and near the papal summer palace, Castel Gandolfo. She provided the cash; he provided a title to support their aristocratic Italian lifestyle. Prince Enrico Ruspoli died in 1909 only eight years after their marriage. Despite a verbal agreement with his wife, Prince Enrico Ruspoli wrote a will in which he left the castle and most of his property to his own Ruspoli family.

Princess Eugenia Ruspoli challenged the will and, after years of litigation, she received the title to the castle and whatever personal property it contained. Presumably, this personal property included the grand “Triumph of David” donated by Princess Ruspoli to Villanova University in 1950. Were the other paintings she eventually donated to Villanova part of the contents of Nemi Castle when she and her husband purchased it, or did they, with her funds, collect additional works of art? And did she continue to collect after the prince died?

After becoming a widow for the second time, Princess Eugenia Ruspoli frequently traveled between Italy and the United States and eventually made her home in New York City. After the outbreak of World War II she shipped some of her art and furniture from the castle to the United States, a wise choice because the castle was later damaged by a bomb, leaving “The Triumph of David” exposed to the weather. After the war, Nemi Castle was inhabited by families of Italian squatters who had little respect for the historic property. This and the war-time damages led to additional litigation which continued even after Princess Eugenia Ruspoli’s death.

In 1929 Princess Ruspoli adopted her six-year-old niece, Maria Theresa, who later married Prince Alexis Droutzkoy, a white Russian from St. Petersburg. Droutzkoy came to the United States in 1926 as a journalist, attended Columbia University, became a naturalized citizen and editor of Bachelor magazine and later editor of American Helicopter magazine. He and his wife were active socially. Prince Alexis Droutzkoy died in 1976.

His wife, Maria Theresa Ruspoli was born in Norwich, England, in 1923. She became an American citizen in 1945; by this time she was married and well-traveled. Additional information about Princess Maria Theresa Droutzkoy is sparse except in reports of various society events in New York and elsewhere. We do know that the Droutzkoys were Princess Eugenia Ruspoli’s heirs.

Radan and Cannuli

Radan and Cannuli

Now for their art collections: from information provided by the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, and in the Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide (1986) by George T. Radan and Father Cannuli, we can get a sense of their tastes as collectors. With only two exceptions, the paintings in both collections are Old Masters. These paintings are either Italian or Flemish works created from the 1500s through the 1700s.

The two exceptions are an undated work by an English artist, Samuel Prout (1783-1852), “Interior of a Cathedral Scene,” an oil painting on canvas, and an undated “Church Choir Boys,” oil on canvas, by C. De Antonio. The only C. De Antonio I discovered is Cristobal de Antonio, a Spanish artist (c.1862-after 1905). The subject of each of these paintings is the interior of a Gothic style cathedral or church, much like the paintings by the Dutch Baroque master, Saenredam. These paintings are listed in the Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide as gifts from the Droutzkoys, but are not in the recent inventory mentioned below.

According to the current inventory created by the University Art Gallery director, Princess Ruspoli donated seven paintings (including Cortona’s “Triumph of David”) and the Droutzkoys donated an additional seventeen paintings. The older list in the Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide says Princess Ruspoli donated six paintings (the Cortona included) and the Droutzkoys gave eight.

All paintings in the current inventory have been conserved with one exception. The works were brought from off-campus storage and locations on campus and briefly housed in the Reading Room last fall so that the conservators working on “The Triumph of David” could study them. I was able to visit this collection several times – a truly fascinating experience. Not all of the works are by famous masters, but they are all wonderful representations of their art historical periods. All feature religious subjects, including a “St. Thomas of Villanova Giving Alms” by Jacob Jordaens (Flemish, 1593-1678, attributed to or workshop of).

Paintings fr Ruspoli and Droutzkoy

Radan and Cannuli (Villanova University Art Collection, p. xv) say, “ …[T]he authorship supplied by the donors has been accepted by the curators of the collection.” And that leads to an interesting question: is there another painting by Pietro da Cortona in the University’s collection? Listed as a 1952 donation by Princess Alexis Droutzkoy is an oil painting, “Adoration of the Magi” by Pietro Berretini. Pietro Berretini is the birth name of Pietro da Cortona, the artist of the large painting undergoing conservation in the Reading Room.

Princess Ruspoli made her gifts in 1949 and 1950. The Droutzkoys gave the bulk of their gifts from 1952 through 1957 plus a “Resurrection” painted by an anonymous 16th century Italian which was donated by Princess Droutzkoy in 1973. Two large paintings, “Madonna of the Rosary” by Cosimo Daddi, donated by Eugenia Ruspoli, and a 1614 Nativity triptych (a three-paneled work) by an anonymous Flemish master donated by the Droutzkoys are especially impressive.

When the conservation of Cortona’s “Triumph of David” is completed, the works donated by Princess Eugenia Ruspoli and the Prince and Princess Droutzkoy will be united once more. “The Triumph of David” will be hung on the wall and the other paintings will be placed behind glass in the niches that once held books in the Reading Room. The huge windows which provide the room with wonderful daylight will be treated to filter the harmful sunlight so that all these beautiful, conserved paintings will not deteriorate as did “The Triumph of David.”

fatherfalveyAnd true to the wishes of the Rev. Daniel P. Falvey (1906-1962), the former library director for whom Falvey Memorial Library is named, the Library will once more display an art collection. “… [H]e wanted the objects of his collection to be permanently housed in the Library of Villanova College. The aesthetic pleasure of viewing the paintings would enhance any student’s visits to do research. … Not only did he himself place the objects strategically at various locations in the Old Library, but he also secured donations (such as those of the Droutzkoys) to improve the scope of his garden.” (Villanova University Art Collection, p. xiv).

How inspiring to be able to study in such a vast, high ceilinged space surrounded by Old Master paintings.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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Art of Spring Break: Mood Board with Dr. Amanda Norbutus

ARTOFSB
Keeping in theme with the Art of Spring week, this week’s mood board features Amanda Norbutus, PhD, Mendel Science Post-Doctoral Fellow and a faculty member here at Villanova. Dr. Norbutus is involved with the conservation treatment of Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David,”a large-scale oil on canvas that currently resides in “Old Falvey,” Falvey Memorial Library’s original wing.


AJN - MaastrichtAmanda Norbutus’ background has focused mainly on the surface analysis of art. She analyzed the materials and methods used in a Dutch genre painting as part of her master’s thesis research in analytical chemistry (M.S., Villanova University, 2008).  At the University of Delaware, Norbutus investigated the best practices of outdoor public mural production, protection, and preservation as part of her doctoral research; specifically, the assessment of commercially-available paints and protective coatings.  Her current research as a Mendel Science Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry involves protective coatings for modern art.  She is a lecturer in the science of art materials, art conservation, as well as criminalistics and forensics at Villanova University and an instructor for the NSF Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops & Communities of Scholars “Advanced Chemistry and Art” workshops.

(via Conserving a Giant: Resurrecting Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David”)


Condi_Rice

via Wikimedia Commons

I am inspired by the natural beauty of the world and trying to understand how it all works.

If I could be any person for a day, I’d be Condoleezza Rice. She is a powerful woman, and I would love to help shape the world like she has been able to with her career. Plus, the travel!

If springtime were an art piece, it would be an Impressionist painting, perhaps a Renoir.

The most useful tool I used today is my cell phone. Although I really should give credit to the old fashioned ink pen for writing down data.

Today I’m feeling the color green. I’m anticipating spring.

I’m listening to I heart Radio, the Florida Georgia Line station.

One Summer Adventure I’m daydreaming about is boating on the Cheasapeake or the James River.

flordia georgia lineHappiness is good friends, loving family, an intriguing book, and having adventures.

Everyone should know how to sew and cook. I took a Buzzfeed quiz on how long I’d survive the zombie apocalypse. Let’s just say, I think those two reasons are why I “lasted” at least 6 months.

I am amazed by my students. They tackle challenges outside of their comfort zones, either with science material or mastering a new artistic technique, and they impress me every time.

Thank you, Dr. Norbutus!


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‘Caturday: Heel’d – A Villanova Documentary About People & Pets

Heel'd For some, Spring Break is an opportunity to serve others. Next week Villanova ‘Cats will be traveling all over the world on service trips that benefit people and their communities.

Social justice, as noted on Villanova’s Center for Service and Social Justice website, is “action that seeks to bring about peace and justice in the world” and can be achieved “through service, advocacy, and justice education.”

Two years ago, as part of a social justice course, a short documentary was written, filmed and produced by a group of Villanova students. It tells the story of “a local Philadelphia nonprofit, Hand2Paw, and its mission to bring together homeless youth and homeless animals.” (Main Line Media News)

Here’s the official trailer.

 


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You are Invited to a Golden Anniversary Celebration to Honor Rev. Dennis J. Gallagher, OSA, PhD

FATHER-GALL-EVITE7
Falvey Memorial Library would like to cordially invite the Villanova Campus Community to a reception being held for Rev. Dennis J. Gallagher, OSA, PhD, in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination. Father Gallagher, the University’s Archivist since 1985, was ordained as an Augustinian priest in St. Thomas of Villanova Church on Jan. 30, 1965. Please join us for a light cocktail reception to give him your best wishes and to help us celebrate this landmark occasion. The reception will be held on Wednesday, March 18 in the President’s Lounge, Connelly Center, from 3:00-5:00 p.m.

To learn more about Father Gallagher’s current work as University Archivist, as well as his background and interests, please see Alice Bampton’s recent blog article, “A Golden Anniversary: Rev. Dennis J. Gallaher, OSA, PhD, Celebrates 50 Years as an Augustinian Priest.”

Please note that RSVPs are not required in order to attend the reception. Questions about this event can be directed to Gina Duffy, ext. 9-3872.


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Mood Board: The Writing Center

Just in time for midterms, this week’s Mood Board features Eric Doyle, an esteemed worker at the Writing Center right here in Falvey.


plato

You talkin’ to me?

How many students do you help on an average day?

“Help” is maybe a strong word, but I average two or three forced-improvement sessions per day. Mostly I add to their work load by telling them that, no, “Plato is dumb” isn’t a good thesis statement. And those commas are atrocious.

What’s the busiest time of the semester for the WC?

The day before anything is due. For freshmen, the day on which it’s due.

If you could give one general, very broad piece of advice to the students who might be too shy to visit you guys, what would it be?

Middle age woman showing thumbs up

#1 fan!

The most frequent advice I give is to pretend that your professor isn’t your audience. When I write, I imagine my mother (an educated person, but not an expert in my subject) as the reader; if she couldn’t follow along, then I haven’t explained myself clearly enough.

What is your biggest writing-related pet peeve?

I have an irrational hatred of the word “towards.” I know it’s perfectly acceptable, but “toward” is just so much classier.

What’s the most entertaining piece of writing you’ve ever reviewed?

One particular woman brought a paper wherein she’d confused the words “explore” and “explode.” Her essay was essentially a Michael Bay film.

What’s your information routine?

Reddit on my phone while getting ready in the morning, then NPR and The Atlantic once I get to campus and check email.REDIT

Android or iOS? What are you favorite apps?

Android. I use Mint for keeping track of my finances, and Zombies, Run! is the greatest thing since the invention of running. ZombiesRun

What kind of writing did you review during your latest Writing Center shift?

I had an ACS paper on Aristotelian happiness and contemporary consumerism. It was pretty good, but the author and I worked together to make it better.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Student Employees Study Abroad

Two students who work on the Access Services team at Falvey Memorial Library agreed to tell us about their study abroad experiences last semester.

Last semester, Erin Johnson studied abroad in Galway, Ireland with fifteen other Villanova students. During her time at the National University of Ireland, Galway, she studied global economics and Irish history. Despite being hundreds of miles away from campus, Erin was still able to use Falvey’s online resources to help write a few papers!

Erin Johnson at the Cliffs of Moher.

Erin Johnson friends study abroad

(From left to right) Ginny Lee, Marielle Sauvigne, Erin Johnson, Emma Goetzman, and Laura McMahon at Kylemore Abbey.

Molly McGuinness studied abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark for 4 months. She participated in a neuroscience program and her class had the opportunity to travel to Munich, Germany for one week to tour labs and listen to researchers. In addition to traveling to Germany, Molly also traveled to eight other countries throughout the semester. This experience was her first time in Europe. She loved being able to see and learn so much about other places and cultures.

Molly McGuinness study abroad

Molly took a side trip to Sweden for some abseiling!

Molly McGuinness copenhagen

This was an everyday sight for Molly while she stayed in Copenhagen.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication and Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services.


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‘Caturday: Midterms in the Commons

It’s hard to believe that only three short years ago, almost to the day, the Learning Commons in Falvey was officially dedicated. University President the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, ’75 CLAS, presided over the event and recounted “the long process of inspiration that led to the Learning Commons project.”

Students heading into midterms can take advantage of librarians in the Research Center, homework help from Learning Support Services (LSS), a staffed lab environment in the Math Learning Resource Center (MLRC) and one-on-one writing tutorials in the Villanova Writing Center.

The Learning Commons is a great example of how ‘Cats came together to make amazing things happen for the “Greater Great!”

learning commons dedication fr. Peter

Father Donohue

 


Article by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication and Service Promotion Team, and team leader, Access Services Team.

Photograph by John Welsh, University Communication.


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Share the Love on ‘Caturday

kitten heart pages

Some cats become well known because of the role they play in a good book or because they live with an author or simply because they love how the pages of a good book feel. Here are some real and imaginary cats who love books almost as much as we do.

Cheshire_Cat_Tenniel

The Cheshire Cat from Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

Ginger reading book

This ginger loves phrasal verbs.

 

Ted_Geisel_Cat Hat

Ted Geisel, aka Dr. Suess, reading The Cat in the Hat.

 

Puss-in-boots-book

Puss in Boots by John Murray

 

Ernest Hemingway and his sons playing with kittens.

Ernest Hemingway and his sons playing with kittens.

Happy Valentine’s Day to all the cool literary ‘Cats out there!

Images link to their sources and are free to use and share.

‘Caturday feature written by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services.


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Last Modified: February 14, 2015