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CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment Comes to Villanova

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Imagine stepping into a room-sized enclosure, donning a pair of 3D glasses, and having the experience of touring the basilicas in Rome or exploring Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary or standing in the Sistine Chapel—all without leaving the Library. Well, technically Falvey Hall, which was the Villanova College Library before Falvey Memorial Library was built, will house this new facility, called CAVE.

What does CAVE mean?

CAVE stands for Cave Automatic Virtual Environment. I know some of you are asking, “Then, what does that “Cave” stand for?” MerriamWebster.com has your answer. The University’s version of this technology is called the Villanova Immersive Studies System (VISS).

The VISS allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even circle around the 3D image of an object, such as vase on a pedestal, as though they were in the actual setting. The VISS, in addition to the visual dimension, includes sound. For historical sites that have begun to deteriorate, such as the Eastern State Penitentiary, it preserves them for posterity. For sites of limited space, such as the Santa Rosa Necropolis under Vatican City that cannot accommodate large groups, the VISS allows 10-15 people at a time to examine that location.

How does it work?

The VISS enclosure—18’ wide, 10’ deep, 7.5’ high—features three walls and a ceiling. An opening, where the fourth wall would be, allows access. Rear-projected HD screens form its walls and ceiling, and it has a front-projected floor. To minimize shadows from viewers, strategically placed projectors create the floor imagery.

In addition to the CAVE’s capability to display images, the VISS has a camera component for capturing images and video. The custom-made camera cart actually holds several cameras mounted in a spherical array (software combines the cameras’ input into a single image or video). This camera system includes lights and microphones, all mounted atop a telescopic pedestal that extends to raise the cameras from their five-feet-high retracted position up to a height of twelve feet. Not only can the camera record images and video, it can also stream live images from remote locations.

How will this system benefit Villanova?

University professors will have the ability to record artifacts, settings, and events to be studied—unencumbered by distance, climate, or time of day—by their students on campus. Faculty may also include such recordings when developing their course curriculums.

Non-Villanova researchers, aka “off-campus collaborators,” will have the opportunity to access to the VISS for their own research projects. This collaboration with non-Villanova researchers illustrates a trend in which academic libraries provide environments called “collaboratories.”

Klassner, Poley, Dougherty

Klassner, Poley, Dougherty

The project is under the direction of Frank Klassner, PhD, professor of computing sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with Edmond Dougherty, assistant professor in the College of Engineering, and Darren Poley, interim director of Falvey Memorial Library.

According to the University’s Oct. 23 press release, the first component of the VISS, the CAVE structure itself, “is expected to be completed late in the spring of 2014.”

Gerald Dierkes is an information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copyeditor for the Communication and Service Promotion team, and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Forums Explore Ways to Make Villanova University Scholarship More Accessible

nsf1The National Science Foundation has extended its “where discoveries begin” initiative to include not just  principal investigators but anyone interested in perusing publically funded data through the promulgation of rules requiring funding recipients to have data management plans in place. Instead of researchers seeing this request as another chore in an unending to-do list, data management plans (DMP) can be considered a beneficial and valuable impetus to organize and archive resources with potential for enhancing a researcher’s profile. As Alfonso Ortega, PhD, associate vice president for research and graduate programs and the James R. Birle professor of energy technology in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, says “DMP’s are not just about fulfilling regulations but also about making your good work available.”

Intermim Director Darren Poley

Interim Director Darren Poley

The imperative to make Villanova University scholarship more accessible drove Falvey Memorial Library Interim Library Director Darren Poley to organize a series of forums with Dr. Ortega on three emerging developments in scholarly communication: data management plans (Sept. 16), open access journals (Oct. 21st) and institutional repositories (Nov. 11). All forums will take place in Connelly Center cinema from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Both Dr. Ortega and Mr. Poley recognize that a “build it and they will come” philosophy can lead to costly missteps and that faculty input is critical to success. With this guiding principle in mind, the forums are designed to facilitate conversations about these trends and generate ideas about how they ought to be tackled at Villanova.

At the first forum on data management plans, Dr. Ortega introduced the topic by commenting on the challenges researchers face in the day to day management and storage of data of all stripes (big, proprietary, and sensitive), the dilemmas researchers face about pressure to archive and share data, and the importance of clearly articulating how solutions to data management will advance the University Strategic Plan and are essential for them to be resourced sustainably. Poley spoke about how libraries are natural partners in the scholarly enterprise with deep expertise in organizing and archiving resources that ought to be extended to research data.  Linda Hauck, business librarian, surveyed how data management services are progressing at other higher-education institutions.

Ortega and Hauck

Ortega and Hauck

The highlight of the program was talks by Assistant Professor Melissa O’Connor, PhD, MBA, RN, COS-C (College of Nursing) and Professor Amy S. Fleischer, PhD, (College of Engineering) and the discussion they generated. Dr. Fleischer described the National Science Foundation’s data-management-plan requirement from the inside out. Dr. O’Connor illuminated the technical and physical security safeguards that need to be in place when using Medicare data and National Institutes of Health funding as well as the costs associated with data extraction. Comments and questions were volleyed about how to balance intellectual property rights with public access and scholarly reputations, whether Villanova has a research data policy, who should curate and provide stewardship of data a Villanova, and what secure methods for data back-up are available at Villanova.


Clockwise from top left, Spiro, Fogle, Hoskins and Bauer.

Clockwise from top left, Spiro, Fogle, Hoskins and Bauer.

At the second forum, held Oct. 21st on open access journals, Nikolaus Fogle, PhD, subject librarian for philosophy, provided an overview of the open access journal publishing movement including quality issues, tenure and promotion dilemmas, faculty initiated open access policies, and sustainability challenges.  He detailed how the traditional journal-publishing-business model employed by for-profit, non-profit and association publishers alike are straining library budgets. Next up was Professor Aaron M. Bauer, Gerald M. Lemole endowed chair in integrative biology, presenting the researcher point of view, noted that publication fees for high quality open access journals range from $1350 to $3000 per paper and that those fees cannot reasonably be recouped for externally funded research given the volume of papers some projects spawn (one such project alone lead by Dr. Bauer generated 68 papers!). He observed that publication fee discounts are among the benefits of institutional membership in open access publishing organizations, such as PLoS (Public Library of Science) and Biomed Central, and many of our peer institutions have made the commitment. Finally, he commented that the transition to open access will not be simple or quick as pressure to publish in high impact and h-index journals is a fact of life for academics establishing careers and striving to advance professionally. Dr. Bauer implored Villanova academic departments, Colleges and the Library to commit to finding sustainable solutions to the National Science Foundation’s impending mandates for open access publishing. Interim Library Director Darren Poley discussed library supported journals. Gregory D. Hoskins, PhD, Lawrence C. Gallen fellow in the humanities, took attendees for a deep dive into how Concept has become a professional-looking online journal powered by graduate student editors and reviewers. Finally Professor John-Paul Spiro shared the joys and difficulties that came with starting up the online journal, Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, including managing subscriptions and submissions to cultivate readership.

Faculty Forum #2 panel

Faculty Forum #2 panel

Contribute to the ongoing conversation by attending the final forums on institutional repositories (Monday, Nov. 11, 3:30-5 p.m., Connelly Center Cinema).


Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, is a business librarian. Photographs by Alice Bampton. 

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Write, Cite, Sync and Share

On May 15, Nursing/Life Sciences and Instructional Services Librarian Barbara Quintiliano presented a 45-minute session on the benefits of citation management software at the Teaching-and-Learning-Strategies event, a day of information sharing organized by the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning (VITAL).

Citation management software (also called reference management software) facilitates the collection and organization of references to all types of resources, whether scholarly articles, books, web pages, works of art or patents. These software products allow users to create and organize their own personal collection of references and then, with just a click or two, to format bibliographies according to any of the major documentation styles, such as MLA, APA and Chicago, or styles required by specific journals. Citation software will also work in conjunction with Microsoft Word to place footnotes or in-text citations as users type their papers.

Quintiliano demonstrated features of four popular citation management products, EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero and Mendeley. The first two are currently available to Villanova University students and faculty at no cost, and our Falvey Librarians provide instruction and support in their use. Zotero and Mendeley, two newer players in the field, have intriguing social web features that facilitate sharing and collaboration among researchers. While they can be downloaded for free, users must pay for additional storage as needed.

This comparison chart, created by MIT Libraries, can help you decide which product is best for you. For further information, please contact Research Support at ref@villanova.edu.

 

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Interview: Victoria Horn, a 2013 Falvey Scholar

Last week Falvey Memorial Library hosted a conference featuring this year’s Falvey Scholars. Representatives from our Library and each of the University’s colleges consider senior class Villanova applicants on the basis of outstanding undergraduate research. This selection committee then chooses five students to be distinguished as Falvey Scholars. The competition confers awards for each of the following five disciplines: the liberal arts, science, engineering, nursing and business.

Victoria Horn pic (2)We caught up with Victoria Horn, this year’s winner from the Villanova School of Business, and asked her about her project, entitled “Examining the Experiential Pedestal: The Negative Side of Experiential Consumption.”

CA: First, congratulations on being named a Falvey Scholar—I’m sure it feels great to see all that hard work paying off.

VH: Thank you! But I can’t celebrate just yet — there’s still a lot of hard work to be done since our study is not complete. I can assure you I will still be spending many of my nights in Falvey Library.

CA: What was the first germ of thought that directed you towards your larger research project?

VH: I’ve always had an interest in Consumer Research. Actually, one of my application essays to Villanova was about branding, materialism and the psyche behind needing a product. I’d say I’ve always had a Consumer Research seed planted in me, but Dr. Chaplin’s Buyer Behavior course was the one that really made it blossom. After her class I realized I wanted to pursue a larger, more intense, research project with her outside of a classroom setting.

CA: What’s the most exciting thing you discovered during your research process?  Anything that made you feel like you were really onto something unique?

VH: One of my favorite finds was an explanation of how experiences are difficult to compare, and thus tend to be safe from disadvantageous comparisons. The author wrote that it was “literally like comparing apples to oranges.” That description really helped put into perspective how unique my research was going to be since we’re trying to apply a set of standards to something that is inherently unique to each person. I also really loved reading one author’s notion of how materialism was evolving to include more than just traits or values, but extrinsic motivation. Basically, materialism wasn’t just about collecting objects anymore but included people having extrinsic (i.e. need validation from other people) goals and motives. This piece I thought would be vital to our study and it made me feel like my notions weren’t far-fetched.

CA: Where is your favorite spot in our Library, or just on campus generally, to hunker down when you have some serious reading, writing or researching to get done?

VH: The President’s Lounge in Connelly used to be my big go-to for work, but there were many times when it was closed for unknown reasons or there was a function going on inside so I had to go to Falvey instead. I typically do work on the first floor either at one of the tables near the printers or in the 24-hour lounge.

CA: Do you have a research tool you use that you think a lot of people on campus may not know about? A database or a resource you find useful.

VH: I think one of the best things someone can utilize is the [Course] Guide page on Falvey’s website. If you don’t know exactly what database or journal to use, you can just pull that up, click the appropriate subject, find the course/professor you’re taking and you’ll see recommended databases/journals. That page saved me so much time and energy when I first started my research because I really wasn’t sure where to begin my searches.

CA: What’s the best thing you bought this year so far?

VH: I’m a bit of a fitness nut, and I found a Groupon with some friends for 10 kickboxing classes in Ardmore. The classes were amazing and I loved going with some fellow Villanovans. I actually ended up buying more classes from a friend who wasn’t too into them so I can keep going once my work subsides.

CA: Do you have a favorite app?  If you don’t use a smart phone you can pretend I meant “appetizer.”  

VH: I’m probably one of the only Falvey Scholars that doesn’t have a smart phone. But hopefully I can get my hands on one soon. My favorite appetizer would have to be a spinach and artichoke dip; it’s too good.

Corey Waite Arnold is a writer and intern on the Communication and Publications Team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

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Plagiarism: Strategies in Research and Writing

Learning Commons LOGO-WEB2 smallWhat do Jane Goodall, Martin Luther King Jr., Vladimir Putin, Stephen Harper, George Harrison, J.K. Rowling, Maureen Dowd, and Joe Biden all have in common?

All of the above, as well as countless others, have been accused of plagiarizing their sources.

While we tend to think of plagiarism as some secret process done in the dark of night to cover for shoddy work, it is possible to engage in plagiarism simply by trying to incorporate information from sources you did not fully read or understand. Without a good grasp of your source and your topic, it can become all too easy to plagiarize your source without intending to be dishonest.

With this in mind we welcome Steven Schultz from the Writing Center with a few words about how to effectively use and attribute sources in your next paper.

Start by embracing the research process. Locate sources early and incorporate them into the very first draft of a paper. This approach produces better writing than shoehorning a couple quotes into the final version and gives you time to understand each source and its relationship to your topic. Sure, some sources—numbers, data, and statistics—may appear straightforward enough, but complex thinkers such as St. Augustine, Friedrich Nietzsche and Adrienne Rich probably won’t be. Also, use sources for more than just garden-variety support by including some whose perspective on your topic diverges from your own. Critical debate enriches a paper.

Writers use three techniques to integrate outside sources: summary, paraphrase, and direct quotation. An effective writer chooses among them like a painter chooses among paintbrushes with bristles ranging from broad to fine: each technique conveys a different level of detail. A summary offers the broadest overview of a source by restating a main idea, thesis statement, or a lengthy passage. Think of summary as the view from an airplane cruising at 30,000 feet: big features are enhanced but small ones may be invisible. Summary is effective technique for condensing long sources such as a research study or a book chapter.

Quotation is the opposite of summary: it preserves the original writer’s exact words and reproduces all the original detail. Quote when rephrasing an idea would lessen its impact or when including the original writer’s words enhances your credibility. We quote Ernest Hemingway, not paraphrase him.

Paraphrasing someone else’s idea means being able to explain it in your own words, not just restate it. If a writer includes an idea from an outside source by changing a few though not all of the words from the original but still provides a citation, is that an acceptable paraphrase? Not so much. Faulty paraphrases like this are called “patchwriting,” a term used to describe writing that attempts to paraphrase a source but fails because it either 1) retains most of its wording from the original source or 2) replaces select key terms with synonyms but otherwise reproduces the source’s syntax. Both are problems and usually happen when a writer doesn’t fully comprehend the material she or he is attempting to paraphrase. In fact, done well, paraphrasing is a great way to draw attention to a particular facet of an idea or offer a new interpretation of it.

Lastly, vary how you use these techniques. Not only will it make your writing style more engaging, but by adapting your technique to each source’s purpose, you’ll demonstrate to your audience that you’ve thought about each source’s unique relationship to your argument and therefore be more persuasive.

Are you having problems working with your sources? If so it is time to contact the Writing Center and make an appointment to work with one of their phenomenal tutors. Appointments can be made by phone at 610-519-4604 or in person at the Writing Center in the Learning Commons on Falvey’s 2nd floor. Act fast though because appointment slots fill quickly.

Robin Bowles is a research librarian on the Academic Integration Team and a liaison librarian to the Villanova University School of Nursing.

 

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Late Night Studying and Stress Busters @ Falvey

BigBoy signIt’s been a long haul, and you’re almost there! To help you prep for exams and finish those papers, the Library is providing extended hours for the next two weeks, so you can hunker down and study in comfort. We will stay open until 3 a.m. most nights and until midnight on Saturday. And as always, the 24-hour lounge will be available too!

We’re also working with the Campus Activities Team (CAT) to provide a stress-buster event on Friday, May 3, from 3-6 p.m. Massages and snacks for everyone!

Mon. – Fri., April 29 – May 3 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 a.m.
Sat., May 4 9:00 a.m. – Midnight
Sun., May 5 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 a.m.
Mon. – Thur., May 6 – 9 8:00 a.m. -  3:00 a.m.
Fri., May 10 8:00 a.m. -  5:00 p.m.

Luisa Cywinski is the team leader of Access Services and editorial coordinator on the Communication & Publications team.

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RefWorks in 30 Minutes: Never Type a Bibliography Again!

refworksRefWorks in 30 minutes: Never Type a Bibliography Again!

Got 30 minutes? Learn how RefWorks can organize your references and then produce your bibliography in a snap – and in any of the major documentation styles. Participants should bring their own laptops (PC or Mac). Students, staff and faculty welcome.

Sign up for a 30-min session. Registration encouraged but not required. Be sure to bring your laptop!

Rm 204, Learning Commons, 2nd floor, Falvey Library

4 pm on Wednesday, April 10, 2013

To register, please contact Barbara Quintiliano at 610-519-5207 or by email.

Barbara Quintiliano is a Nursing and Life Sciences Liaison and an Instructional Services Librarian.

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Writing a paper? Check out these helpful resources.

With Thanksgiving behind us and the end of the semester fast approaching, the season for paper writing has begun in earnest.  Here at the Library, we offer a number of resources to aid you as you research and write.  Take a look before you get too swamped—we might be able to help you with some of the heavy lifting:

  1. Citation Styles: A Primer with Resources—This topic guide features resources for all the major citation styles. If you’re having trouble collecting and arranging sources, or if you’re interested in the finer details of a certain style, this guide can point you in the right direction.
  2. RefWorks Tutorial—RefWorks is a tool which automates some of the work behind citation gathering. Here’s a tutorial detailing how to use this valuable resource—definitely worth checking out if you have a longer research paper.
  3. The Writing Center—The Writing Center is located in the Learning Commons on the second floor of the Library. Make an appointment with a member of the very capable staff there as you build or edit your work, and your paper will show for it. Tutors are available to help writers in any field, and with any amount of experience.

As always, check out the Library website often for more information. Happy writing!

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Librarians Promoted: Laura Bang, Robin Bowles and Kristyna Carroll

By Alice Bampton

Three junior librarians, Laura Bang, Robin Bowles and Kristyna Carroll, were promoted from Librarian I to Librarian II, University Librarian Joe Lucia recently announced. “They have each made a substantial contribution to the success of the Library, and all of them have been engaged professionally at a national level in advancing new ideas or promoting new initiatives that will help shape the future of academic libraries,” Lucia said.

 

Laura Bang, curatorial assistant in Special and Digital Collections, came to Falvey in 2010. Bang hires, trains and supervises students and staff in the Digital Library. She also develops and mounts the Special Collections exhibits, both online and physical, and catalogs Special Collections acquisitions. She has a master’s degree in library science from the University of Maryland. Bang’s undergraduate degree is in comparative literature from Bryn Mawr College.

 

 

 

 

Robin Bowles, Nursing and Life Sciences librarian, was appointed in 2009. She serves on the Biology/Nursing/Environmental Studies and Science/Technology subject teams. She earned her master’s degree in library and information science from Drexel University. Bowles holds a bachelor’s degree in liberal studies with a concentration in science and mathematics from West Chester University.

 

 

 

 

Kristyna Carroll, a research support librarian, graduated from Villanova with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and honors. She returned to Villanova in 2010 after graduating from Drexel University with a master’s degree in library and information science. Carroll serves on the Geography/Political Science/Naval/Cultural Studies and Communication/Education/Psychology/Sociology subject teams.

 

 

Librarians, like faculty, are appointed through the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

A librarian seeking promotion submits a dossier to the Library Promotion Committee comprised of librarians who hold the rank of Librarian II or higher. The Committee, chaired this year by Taras Ortynsky, descriptive services librarian, Resource Management Center, makes its recommendation to the University Librarian who sends his decision to the VPAA who takes the final action.

Lucia said, “Promotions are made on the basis of excellence in service to the University academic community, professional engagement at the local and national level, and contributions to the profession of academic librarianship as evidenced by a record of significant publication or presentation at major library conferences.”

Also contributing: Judy Olsen

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Scholarly Research Sharing Aided by Open Access Publishing

Falvey Memorial Library announces its institutional membership to Hindawi Publishing Corporation. Launched in 1997, Hindawi publishes a growing number of open access journals in engineering, medicine and the sciences, and now includes Nursing Research and Practice, as well as social sciences titles such as Journal of Anthropology and Urban Studies Research.

Read more about Hindawi and open access publishing on Barbara Quintiliano’s recent blog post.

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Last Modified: April 3, 2012