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Smart Search Tips to Save You Time: How to Send References from Google Scholar to RefWorks or EndNote

Why do you still need a librarian when “everything” is online? It’s because librarians are experts in showing you how to retrieve the reliable and scholarly information you need from the endless possibilities the Internet offers. Watch this space for regular time-saving data searching suggestions and secrets that only librarians know! Please Ask Us if there’s a particular searching dilemma you’d like us to cover.  

Last time we learned how to customize Google Scholar so that the search engine will allow us to access the full text of the library’s journal articles even from off campus. But did you know that you can export the citations you retrieve to several reference management software systems (such as RefWorks, EndNote, or even Bibtex) to make doing your bibliographies a snap?

Here’s how it’s done:

At the Google Scholar homepage, click Settings:settings

At the Google Scholar settings screen, scroll down to Bibliography manager.  Click Show links to import citations into … and then choose your citation management software from the dropdown menu. As an example, we’ll  choose RefWorks: choose_manager

bibliography manager

Click the SAVE button at the top of the screen.  This returns us to the Google Scholar search box.

Let’s try this search: search

Under each of our results we now see the Import into RefWorks link.  Just click to capture the citation information into your RefWorks account.  If you’re not already logged into RefWorks, you will receive a prompt to do so.

import_into_refworks

What’s that? You don’t have a RefWorks account?  You mean you’re still typing bibliographies the old fashioned way?  Watch this brief video to see what RefWorks can do for you. Then click here to find out how to sign up for your own account.

Did you notice …

This reference also features the Click here for full text link.  So even from off campus you will be able to access this Falvey Library subscription article.click_here2

 

 


Quintiliano

Quintiliano

Barbara Quintiliano is a nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian. Contact her at 610-519-5207 or by email.

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate ProQuest-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through ProQuest, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate ProQuest-provided databases. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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How Easy is E-ZBorrow?

ezborrow logoWhen current Villanova University students, faculty or staff can’t find the book they need in our collection, they turn to E-ZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad).

The recently upgraded E-ZBorrow service, which delivers books to Villanova library patrons within 4-5 days of their requests, is popular because it’s easy to search for and request books from 50 participating Mid-Atlantic libraries. The newest library to join E-ZBorrow is New York University with close to 4 million volumes in its collection. Once a requested item arrives, it can be borrowed for up to 12 weeks (6-week loan with optional 6-week renewal).

Very often, when a Falvey title is unavailable, the library’s catalog provides the user a “Search E-ZBorrow” link.

ezb vufind charged

 

ezb facetedThe E-ZBorrow link can also be found on our homepage. The E-ZBorrow web interface was recently improved with better advanced searching and faceted results that offer the patron related headings, like author and subject. Its advanced search is more robust, allowing users to combine search words in several fields, including author, title, keywords and ISBN.

Also new on the E-ZBorrow service site are icons that indicate the format of the material at lending libraries. Although regular print books can always be requested, only some libraries will have copies available. As shown below, libraries with requestable copies are listed, but E-ZBorrow also shows that Villanova (PVU) has a copy available and provides a link to the Falvey catalog.

ezb link to pvu

 

If the E-ZBorrow system deems that no copies are available, it will prompt the user to click on a link to Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad), another excellent service that provides users with materials from libraries all over the world.

ezb link to ill

 

ILLiad policies are a bit more limited (2-3 week loans), but some users prefer ILLiad because they can find and borrow unusual or rare materials not held by the E-ZBorrow libraries. ILLiad is also used by patrons to request articles from print and electronic collections. We can very often deliver requested articles within 24-48 hours.

If you need additional assistance, don’t hesitate to call the Information Desk at 610-519-4270. You can also contact a subject librarian for more specialized help.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, team leader of Access Services and editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team.

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Over Six Million Images for You to Use: ARTstor and AP Images

imagesAre you giving a presentation or writing a paper that would benefit from including images? Rather than Googling, why not investigate Falvey’s two image databases, ARTstor and AP Images (Associated Press Images). In both of these collections you will find high quality, properly identified images.

ARTstor is a digital library containing over 1.6 million images that go beyond the traditional arts – painting, sculpture, graphics and architecture. ARTstor also contains images in the humanities and sciences: music, photography, literature, world history, American studies, Asian studies, classical studies, Medieval studies, Renaissance studies, literature and more.

ARTstor can be found in Falvey’s Databases A-Z or you can go directly to ARTstor. Although anyone can log on to ARTstor from Falvey, registered users with valid Villanova University e-mail addresses are allowed additional privileges: they can save image groups, create shared folders, add notes to images and download the offline viewer. Once you have an account, you can access ARTstor from outside the Library or from a mobile device.artstor-mobile3

You can search for images using a keyword or by an advanced search of such terms as creator, culture, subject, title, geography, a date range or other features. Once you’ve located an image, you can pan or zoom in on the image to look at details. And, of particular interest to art history students, you can even make flashcards for studying. The other image database to which Falvey subscribes is AP Images (listed in Databases A-Z as Associated Press Images).

AP Images contains over 4.6 million photographs dating back to the 1800s, more than 4,500 hours of audio files from the 1920s forward and news stories from 1997 forward. AP Images can be searched by keywords, dates, people’s names, events, locations, photographers and more. Materials found in AP Images are considered primary sources and according to AP Images, the Associated Press “is the most credible source for non-biased reporting.” The database also contains a comprehensive, easily understood “AP Images Quick Reference Guide,” which not only provides thorough information about searching for images and viewing them but also has an appendix that lists topics and their contents.

Screen Shot 2013-12-10 at 12.03.21 PM

While both of these databases are easy to use, if you need help using them or finding specific images, please contact Jutta Seibert, Academic Integration team leader and liaison to the Dept. of History, 610-519-7876, room 228, or any of Falvey’s research support librarians.


Photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

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Faculty Forum #3: Airing views on an Institutional Repository for Villanova Scholarship and Data

The final Faculty Forum in a series of three was held on Nov. 11 in the Connelly Center cinema. The Faculty Forums were co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs (ORPG). Villanova faculty, researchers and students came to hear panelists discuss “the challenges that researchers now often face in relation to the dissemination and eventual disposition of the products of their scholarship …”

Alfonso (Al) Ortega, PhD, College of Engineering, and associate vice president for research and graduate programs, and the James R. Birle professor of energy technology in the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, welcomed the attendees. Members of the Faculty Forum #3 panel included David Lacy, team leader for Library Technology Development, Falvey Memorial Library; Edward (Ed) Sion, PhD, Dept. of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, professor; A. Maria Toyoda, PhD, Dept. of Political Science and associate dean for Interdisciplinary Studies and Global Initiatives; Aaron Wemhoff, PhD, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, assistant professor; Ryan P. Jorn, PhD, Dept. of Chemistry, associate professor; Paul Hanouna, PhD, Dept. of Finance, Villanova School of Business (VSB); and Daniel McGee, director, strategic planning and consulting, University Information Technologies (UNIT).

David Lacy

David Lacy

The first panelist, David Lacy, presented the library’s perspective on the creation of an institutional repository “to provide a historical record of Villanova University’s scholarly output.” Lacy reported that Falvey has already begun to create a repository with its Community Bibliography, which is designed to house the entire publications of the University community. He discussed the configuration and workflow of an institutional repository and said, “[Its] ultimate success comes from an institutional mandate.”

Dr. Edward Sion discussed the research database containing the “Catalog of White Dwarf Stars” (a white dwarf is a star that has exhausted its nuclear fuel) and libraries of theoretical models constructed to compare data from Hubble Space Telescope and other orbiting observatories. Dr. Sion created the Catalog with a colleague, George P. McCook, PhD, Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Hamada

A. Maria Toyoda

Dr. A. Maria Toyoda discussed a database, the Quinn-Toyoda CAPITAL, which she and Dennis P. Quinn, PhD, Georgetown University, created. The Quinn-Toyoda CAPITAL is a dataset used in her research on financial openness and political economic issues in East Asia.

The next presenter, Dr. Aaron Wemhoff, showed data from his research in molecular dynamics simulations and the data storage strategies he used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Dr. Ryan P. Jorn, who joined Villanova’s Dept. of Chemistry in August 2013, discussed his research computational methods and the data generated in his quantitative chemistry studies.

The final researcher to address the need for an institutional repository, Dr. Paul Hanouna, discussed the data he has generated in his financial research and the resources already housed in the VSB Dept. of Finance.

Daniel McGee discussed UNIT’s views on creating an institutional repository for Villanova scholarship and data.

The speakers joined Dr. Ortega and Darren Poley, interim library director, for a lively question and answer session and open discussion with the audience.


Photos and article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

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CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment Comes to Villanova

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Imagine stepping into a room-sized enclosure, donning a pair of 3D glasses, and having the experience of touring the basilicas in Rome or exploring Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary or standing in the Sistine Chapel—all without leaving the Library. Well, technically Falvey Hall, which was the Villanova College Library before Falvey Memorial Library was built, will house this new facility, called CAVE.

What does CAVE mean?

CAVE stands for Cave Automatic Virtual Environment. I know some of you are asking, “Then, what does that “Cave” stand for?” MerriamWebster.com has your answer. The University’s version of this technology is called the Villanova Immersive Studies System (VISS).

The VISS allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even circle around the 3D image of an object, such as vase on a pedestal, as though they were in the actual setting. The VISS, in addition to the visual dimension, includes sound. For historical sites that have begun to deteriorate, such as the Eastern State Penitentiary, it preserves them for posterity. For sites of limited space, such as the Santa Rosa Necropolis under Vatican City that cannot accommodate large groups, the VISS allows 10-15 people at a time to examine that location.

How does it work?

The VISS enclosure—18’ wide, 10’ deep, 7.5’ high—features three walls and a ceiling. An opening, where the fourth wall would be, allows access. Rear-projected HD screens form its walls and ceiling, and it has a front-projected floor. To minimize shadows from viewers, strategically placed projectors create the floor imagery.

In addition to the CAVE’s capability to display images, the VISS has a camera component for capturing images and video. The custom-made camera cart actually holds several cameras mounted in a spherical array (software combines the cameras’ input into a single image or video). This camera system includes lights and microphones, all mounted atop a telescopic pedestal that extends to raise the cameras from their five-feet-high retracted position up to a height of twelve feet. Not only can the camera record images and video, it can also stream live images from remote locations.

How will this system benefit Villanova?

University professors will have the ability to record artifacts, settings, and events to be studied—unencumbered by distance, climate, or time of day—by their students on campus. Faculty may also include such recordings when developing their course curriculums.

Non-Villanova researchers, aka “off-campus collaborators,” will have the opportunity to access to the VISS for their own research projects. This collaboration with non-Villanova researchers illustrates a trend in which academic libraries provide environments called “collaboratories.”

Klassner, Poley, Dougherty

Klassner, Poley, Dougherty

The project is under the direction of Frank Klassner, PhD, professor of computing sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with Edmond Dougherty, assistant professor in the College of Engineering, and Darren Poley, interim director of Falvey Memorial Library.

According to the University’s Oct. 23 press release, the first component of the VISS, the CAVE structure itself, “is expected to be completed late in the spring of 2014.”

Gerald Dierkes is an information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copyeditor for the Communication and Service Promotion team, and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Forums Explore Ways to Make Villanova University Scholarship More Accessible

nsf1The National Science Foundation has extended its “where discoveries begin” initiative to include not just  principal investigators but anyone interested in perusing publically funded data through the promulgation of rules requiring funding recipients to have data management plans in place. Instead of researchers seeing this request as another chore in an unending to-do list, data management plans (DMP) can be considered a beneficial and valuable impetus to organize and archive resources with potential for enhancing a researcher’s profile. As Alfonso Ortega, PhD, associate vice president for research and graduate programs and the James R. Birle professor of energy technology in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, says “DMP’s are not just about fulfilling regulations but also about making your good work available.”

Intermim Director Darren Poley

Interim Director Darren Poley

The imperative to make Villanova University scholarship more accessible drove Falvey Memorial Library Interim Library Director Darren Poley to organize a series of forums with Dr. Ortega on three emerging developments in scholarly communication: data management plans (Sept. 16), open access journals (Oct. 21st) and institutional repositories (Nov. 11). All forums will take place in Connelly Center cinema from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Both Dr. Ortega and Mr. Poley recognize that a “build it and they will come” philosophy can lead to costly missteps and that faculty input is critical to success. With this guiding principle in mind, the forums are designed to facilitate conversations about these trends and generate ideas about how they ought to be tackled at Villanova.

At the first forum on data management plans, Dr. Ortega introduced the topic by commenting on the challenges researchers face in the day to day management and storage of data of all stripes (big, proprietary, and sensitive), the dilemmas researchers face about pressure to archive and share data, and the importance of clearly articulating how solutions to data management will advance the University Strategic Plan and are essential for them to be resourced sustainably. Poley spoke about how libraries are natural partners in the scholarly enterprise with deep expertise in organizing and archiving resources that ought to be extended to research data.  Linda Hauck, business librarian, surveyed how data management services are progressing at other higher-education institutions.

Ortega and Hauck

Ortega and Hauck

The highlight of the program was talks by Assistant Professor Melissa O’Connor, PhD, MBA, RN, COS-C (College of Nursing) and Professor Amy S. Fleischer, PhD, (College of Engineering) and the discussion they generated. Dr. Fleischer described the National Science Foundation’s data-management-plan requirement from the inside out. Dr. O’Connor illuminated the technical and physical security safeguards that need to be in place when using Medicare data and National Institutes of Health funding as well as the costs associated with data extraction. Comments and questions were volleyed about how to balance intellectual property rights with public access and scholarly reputations, whether Villanova has a research data policy, who should curate and provide stewardship of data a Villanova, and what secure methods for data back-up are available at Villanova.


Clockwise from top left, Spiro, Fogle, Hoskins and Bauer.

Clockwise from top left, Spiro, Fogle, Hoskins and Bauer.

At the second forum, held Oct. 21st on open access journals, Nikolaus Fogle, PhD, subject librarian for philosophy, provided an overview of the open access journal publishing movement including quality issues, tenure and promotion dilemmas, faculty initiated open access policies, and sustainability challenges.  He detailed how the traditional journal-publishing-business model employed by for-profit, non-profit and association publishers alike are straining library budgets. Next up was Professor Aaron M. Bauer, Gerald M. Lemole endowed chair in integrative biology, presenting the researcher point of view, noted that publication fees for high quality open access journals range from $1350 to $3000 per paper and that those fees cannot reasonably be recouped for externally funded research given the volume of papers some projects spawn (one such project alone lead by Dr. Bauer generated 68 papers!). He observed that publication fee discounts are among the benefits of institutional membership in open access publishing organizations, such as PLoS (Public Library of Science) and Biomed Central, and many of our peer institutions have made the commitment. Finally, he commented that the transition to open access will not be simple or quick as pressure to publish in high impact and h-index journals is a fact of life for academics establishing careers and striving to advance professionally. Dr. Bauer implored Villanova academic departments, Colleges and the Library to commit to finding sustainable solutions to the National Science Foundation’s impending mandates for open access publishing. Interim Library Director Darren Poley discussed library supported journals. Gregory D. Hoskins, PhD, Lawrence C. Gallen fellow in the humanities, took attendees for a deep dive into how Concept has become a professional-looking online journal powered by graduate student editors and reviewers. Finally Professor John-Paul Spiro shared the joys and difficulties that came with starting up the online journal, Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, including managing subscriptions and submissions to cultivate readership.

Faculty Forum #2 panel

Faculty Forum #2 panel

Contribute to the ongoing conversation by attending the final forums on institutional repositories (Monday, Nov. 11, 3:30-5 p.m., Connelly Center Cinema).


Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, is a business librarian. Photographs by Alice Bampton. 

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Learn RefWorks in 30 minutes: Never Type a Bibliography Again!

ev-2.owaGot 30 minutes? Learn how RefWorks can organize your references and then produce your bibliography in a snap – and in any of the major documentation styles. Workshops are open to students, faculty and staff.

Participants should bring their own laptops (PC or Mac).
All sessions held in Rm 204, Learning Commons, 2nd floor, Falvey Memorial Library

Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013 -  4 p.m.

Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 – 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013 -  4 p.m.

Questions? Need more info? Contact Barbara Quintiliano at 610-519-5207 or by email (barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu)


BQBarbara Quintiliano is nursing and life sciences liaison and instructional services librarian.

 

 

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Last Modified: October 22, 2013