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Easter Sunday: Dig Deeper

Easter Good Wishes Card

Easter Bunny Postcard, 1900.
Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

For a long time, Easter Sunday meant no more to me than the day my brothers and I reluctantly got out of bed and put on over-starched shirts so we could arrive at our local church for 7:30 a.m. Mass. Trapped in what we thought was a seemingly endless cycle of sitting, standing, kneeling (repeat), all we wanted to do was run home, for we knew that, if we were lucky, the Easter Bunny had come and left plastic eggs in the backyard for us to find and discover their mysterious contents. In other words, The Mystery was a complete mystery to me.

Now, when the spring rains come and the wind carries the smell of fecund earth, I don’t think about having to wake up early and putting on a suit. I think of the Greek myth of Persephone who, returning from her stay with Hades in the Underworld, signals the end of winter and the beginning of new life on earth. I think of the rabbit, that fertile animal who symbolizes the coming of spring. I think of the egg, that really simple yet powerful symbol of fertility, purity and rebirth, and of new life breaking through the eggshell much as Christ came forth from the tomb. I think about how these eggs were originally stained red, as in the postcard above, in memory of the blood Christ shed during the Crucifixion for us.

The most important of Christian feasts, Easter, “the great day,” celebrates the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has given us new life by dying for our sins. I wish this time of the year reminds you, too, what a gift of hope the light of spring is after so much winter darkness.

Easter – Dig Deeper:

Here are just a few of the resources on Easter available at Falvey:

Passover and Easter: Origin and History to Modern Times 

An excellent and exhaustive study treating the histories and comparisons of Passover and Easter. Recommended for undergraduates and graduate students alike.

Journey to Easter: Spiritual Reflections for the Lenten Season

Written by Pope Benedict XVI, this title discusses the meaning of the Easter season, the birth, death, passion and resurrection of Christ, and more, in a very meditative style.

Easter Vigil and Other Poems 

A collection of Poems written by Pope John Paul II before he became Pope.

The Challenge of Easter

A very short and highly accessible introduction to what Easter means and why we celebrate it.

Easter in the Early Church: An Anthology of Jewish and Early Christian Texts 

A very thorough collection of texts with commentary on Easter in the early church from Jewish, Greek, Latin and New Testament writers.

Revisiting the Empty Tomb: The Early History of Easter 

Explores how the Gospels vary on what happened at the empty tomb of Christ and provides careful discussions of the origins of Easter.

Urbi et Orbi Message of Pope Francis – Easter 2013

This papal address and blessing Urbi et Orbi (“to the City [of Rome] and the World) was given by Pope Francis on Easter in 2013 and explains how Easter is the exodus, the passage of human beings from slavery to sin and evil to the freedom of love and goodness.

Warmest wishes on Easter from everyone at Falvey Memorial Library.


Alex Williams theology liaisonAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams. He is currently pursuing an MS in Library and Information Science at Drexel University’s iSchool.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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Easter Poem

Last Supper Da VinciI remember mourning, hiding,
Afraid of barbarous soldiers,
Of being recognized again,
Failing, denying You … again.

My staunch resolve of willpower
Melted, crumpled in just hours.

And You knew; You predicted it.
Yet Your words, the way You said it
Did not accuse but let You show,
You love me despite what You know.

Remembering our last exchange,
I had wished to go back and change
My words to appreciation
And not ones of trepidation.

Your arrest, trial, torture, death
Thrust upon us, on me, so fast,
No final words with fervid breath
Nor time to process all that passed.

Where shall I go? Back to time in
Capernaum, to safeness, fishing?
Can I resume being Simon
Without yearning for more, wishing?

After these past three years, could I
Now pretend not to know the Truth?
Could I, for a fourth time, deny
My allegiance and Your worth, too?

Had plans for me, named me Peter,
Said You’d use me to build Your church,
Why, Lord, did You choose me leader,
And leave Your faithful in a lurch?

Did my brother apostles see
My fear, denials, failure, guilt?
How could one so weak ever lead
Them, build upon what You have built?

Had I known then what I know now,
To walk by faith and not by sight,
I’d not dwell on fear, I’d allow
Your fealty to be my might,

To trust in You, accept Your plan
Even though I don’t understand,
To let go of biased notions
And keep heart and spirit open.

Thank you, Lord, for sending Your Son,
For His example—how to live.
Your Gift is the essential one:
The prime love only You can give.

Poem written by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

Image courtesy of  the Wikimedia Foundation. This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.

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Mary Grace Mangano: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Mangano poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

“First Impressions”
by
Mary Grace Mangano

I’m convinced we never see
people properly
the first time.
You can’t look at someone
and see him
until you know him.
Have seen him writing
with pencil
or patting a dog
or sneezing
putting on socks
buttoning a coat
blowing on an eyelash
to make a wish.

Mary Grace Mangano, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “I’ve heard that the most imaginative space is the moment when a person wakes, somewhat startled to find herself in a new day. Maybe this is because all of the scattered thoughts a person has while sleeping and dreaming remain on the surface and introduce themselves. Writing–especially poems–seems to happen like this for me. It will start with a thought, feeling, or idea that presents itself to me and the more I sit with it, the more I want to say something about it. The writing itself is a way to explore that flash of an idea, to find a way to say what I’m feeling or thinking. In a way, the poetry is being able to find a moment to explore these ideas and share it with words, on the page, to other people.”

Mary Grace Mangano is an English major seeking an honors degree with a concentration in writing and rhetoric and an Italian minor. She is from Clinton, New Jersey, has enjoyed creative writing since she was a young girl, and also loves to run, dance, cook, read and travel.

Like this poem? Come to the Open Mic Poetry ReadingWed., April 23, 12 – 1 p.m. and you may get to hear this author read her poems. You’re also welcome to share your own. 

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End-of-Term Prep Tips: APA Basics & Common Mistakes

apa style

 

 

Come to an open APA Style workshop on Tuesday, April 22, from 7 – 8 p.m. in the Griffin Room on the first floor of the Library.

We will cover APA basics and common mistakes. Students can also bring projects they are working on for assistance with citing properly.

For more information, contact the subject librarian for psychology, Kimberley Bugg.

 

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And the Best Literary Character Is…

BRACKETOLOGY-LOGOThe time has finally come: today we crown Falvey Memorial Library’s top literary character. After three weeks of fierce voting and competition, the tournament draws to a close with two titans in the Championship matchup: Atticus Finch, lawyer extraordinaire, and Gandalf, White or Gray depending on your preference. But before we name a victor let’s take a look at a few of the match-ups these two characters had to get here.

2014-04-16 19.45.14Gandalf v. Ebenezer Scrooge:

Gandalf’s opening match-up was an intense showing of geriatric prowess. You’d think that Gandalf would take this one in a landslide, as Scrooge is famously crotchety and smells like Metamucil and IcyHot, but the final count was closer than anyone expected. In the end Gandalf proved too much for old man Ebenezer, and we all learned a valuable lesson about generosity and the ancient Istari order. So that was nice.

Gandalf v. Winnie the Pooh

No one, and I mean no one, could have predicted the tournament that Winnie the Pooh ended up having. You’d think a character whose single motivation is a desire for condensed milk and “hunny” wouldn’t stand a chance against the psychological complexity of Elizabeth Bennett. But then again this is March, and anything can happen I guess. Luckily, Gandalf escaped the bear with minimal lumps, probably because he’s an all-powerful white wizard and not a hopelessly naïve, snack-grubbing cartoon bear JEEZ. I’m sorry guys. I just—I flew off the handle.  Let me be the first to apologize to the Disney Corporation and all the Pooh lovers out there, wherever you are. This one’s for you.

Atticus Finch v. Tom Sawyer

Well, we were expecting a very cordial match-up between these two Southern gentlemen. We were expecting a sporting competition between two good-ol-boys, one in a white suit and the other in overalls, just sippin’ ice tea at the general store. What we got was an absolute beatdown, and it wasn’t pretty. Atticus Finch trounced Tom Sawyer in the Elite Eight, with Tom Sawyer receiving just two measly votes on the big board. Two. I feel kinda bad for the guy. He can barely look Becky Thatcher in the eye after that.

2014-04-16 19.26.12But our final match was the most contentious yet, garnering over 80 votes! When the dust settled, we were looking at a 52-30 victory by none other than…Gandalf! Congratulations my man, we knew you could do it.

Thanks to everyone who voted this year. Stay tuned to find out who won the drawing and will receive a free copy of a book featuring one of these fine characters. And as always, happy reading.

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Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online

Brill's New Pauly OnlineFalvey Memorial Library is pleased to announce that it now offers Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online, which serves as a complement to Brill’s New Pauly Online: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World. The supplements consist of six distinct reference titles that provide in-depth information on ancient authors and texts, historical atlases, the history of classical scholarship, the reception of myth and classical literature, and more. This resource is highly recommended for humanists and scientists alike.

With Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online, you now have access to the following titles:

1)      Chronologies of the Ancient World - This is an exhaustive list of names, dates and facts about the rulers and dynasties that have played significant roles in the course of history.

2)      Dictionary of Greek and Latin Authors and Texts - Provides an overview and history of ancient authors and their works up to the present and contains lists of manuscripts; scholia; early, modern and bilingual editions; translations; and commentaries.

3)      Historical Atlas of the Ancient World - Covering the ancient Near East, the Mediterranean world, the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic world and the Holy Roman Empire from 3000 B.C. to the 15th century A.D., this new atlas illuminates the political, economic, social and cultural developments of key areas in history.

4)      The Reception of Myth and Mythology - Explores how and where the myths of Greece and Rome have spread into literature, music and art over the centuries.

5)      The Reception of Classical Literature - This supplement provides an overview of the reception and influence of ancient literary works on the literary, visual and musical arts from Antiquity to the present.

6)      History of Classical Scholarship – A Biographical Dictionary - Offers an overview of the history of classical studies and contains biographies of over 700 scholars from the 14th century to the present in social, political and cultural contexts.

After completing a quick and simple registration online, you will find a series of “personal user tools” that can catapult your research experience into another world. Some of these added features include the ability to label and “star” entries, to email entries to yourself or classmates, and to share links on social media (Facebook and Twitter). You can save your searches and easily return to those lists of results, manage them from “My Account,” and even subscribe to Brill’s RSS Feed to learn when new or revised content is added.

As an additional bonus, try out the “Cite this Page” feature found at the end of each entry. If you are using this resource for an assignment, copy and paste citations to create your reference list in just seconds. You can also use the “export citation” feature to send the bibliographic information to EndNote or RefWorks, or you can even save it as a document in either MLA or Chicago Style.

Be sure to browse the bibliography at the end of each entry so you can easily find other sources that explore your topic of interest.

Alex Williams theology liaisonIf you have any questions pertaining to this resource, please contact Alexander Williams via email or telephone (ext. 8845).

 

 

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Sarah Garland: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Sarah Garland poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

“Taken”
by
Sarah Garland

Shutters splintered
Basement flooded
Black mold creeps like ringworm
In the recesses of the crawlspace
Spores soar, invading our breathing space.

When Jake was young I lost him in the crowd.
He had been holding my hand, and I turned around,
Just for a second.
It’s like that, the quickened pulse, tight chest,
Over-firing neurons – panic.

If FEMA can’t help,
Where will he go?
Sandy will rip us apart,
More inconvenient debris
scattered across the city.

Sarah Garland, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “‘Taken’ was written as part of a project for my literary festival class, for which we were asked to write a series of poems from different narrative points of view.  The speaker in ‘Taken’ was inspired by the stories and people I met on my break trip to areas destroyed and slow to recover from the devastation of Hurricane Sandy.”

Sarah Garland is a senior English major from Severna Park, MD.  She is has been on two break trips and is involved with sorority and Villanova Ambassadors.

Like this poem? Come to the Open Mic Poetry ReadingWed., April 23, 12 – 1 p.m. and you may get to hear this author read her poems. You’re also welcome to share your own. 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Add Comments to an Item

Did you know you can add a comment to an item’s catalog record? This video shows how to add comments to an item right from within the catalog.

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Kimberly Julien: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Kimberly Julien poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

Excerpt from “We Might Be Dead By Tomorrow”
by
Kimberly Julien

……“The way he suddenly sounds so serious makes me want to run back into the hotel. He knows the way we live. He knows the type of people we are.
……He knows why I visit the tree every year, and show up in his club right after, looking for every escape possible.
……Because we might be dead by tomorrow, and heaven forbid we die alone.
……A part of me wants to say all this, wants to ask him if it’s really okay. This isn’t my place. It’s a foreign land.”

Kimberley Julien, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says ”I do a lot of writing in the middle of class. I don’t set out to write in class. My mind just wanders a lot. My notes from all my classes are filled with story fragments, some pages long. Before computers got big, it used to be a real hassle. Now I can collate everything when I get home.”

Kimberly Julien is an English major from Lakewood, New Jersey. She enjoys foreign languages, film scores, lucid dreaming and writing. Her least favourite Shakespeare play is Romeo and Juliet.

 

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End-of-Term Prep Tips: Chicago Style Workshops

chicago manual of style

Are you working on a final project or paper that requires Chicago Style formatting? Attend one of these helpful sessions to brush up before your deadline.

Sessions will be held in Falvey 204 in the second-floor Learning Commons.

Monday, April 14:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 23:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Tuesday, April 29:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert.

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Last Modified: April 13, 2014