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Aurelius Digital Humanities Launch Ardmore Project Website

Icon-edThe Ardmore Project, an Aurelius Digital Humanities initiative, launched its website on March 11. Craig Bailey, PhD, associate professor of history, conceived of the Ardmore Project for his Social History and Community Research class, a junior-year research seminar.

Dr. Bailey’s students collected and analyzed data from primary and secondary sources to create a profile of a local community in the early 20th century: Villanova’s neighboring town of Ardmore, in this case. One goal of their research was to produce a website featuring profiles of some notable community members and an interactive map of Ardmore.

To accomplish this goal, Dr. Bailey collaborated with Falvey staff members Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant, and David Uspal, senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications, to create the site.

Bang describes the project as the first completed project for Aurelius. She notes that this is only the first phase and that subsequent classes will be able to add layers to the preexisting data and interactive map.

Uspal explains the technology behind the project as follows: Using image mapping, Uspal’s goal was to teach the students HTML, digital scanning and how to build a website. Of the 11 students who participated in the project, none had HTML experience or appreciable experience with scanning items and website creation. However, as the students became comfortable with the technology, they became more innovative.

A map of Ardmore, Pa. from the mid - 1920's.

A map of Ardmore, Pa. from the mid-1920s.

Dr. Bailey received his inspiration for the course in 2012 when he recognized his students’ need for greater experience using primary sources. At the time, Dr. Bailey’s research for the Friends of Linwood Park had impressed him with the rich source of material available. He decided to shift his focus to mid-1920s Ardmore, Pennsylvania, and engage his students in this real-world research opportunity.

Craig

Dr. Bailey demonstrates the interactive map.

Each student was responsible for charting 200 individuals and writing a biography for one resident. The students also researched one organization, in this case the Ardmore YMCA. To do their research, the class used the Main Line Atlas from 1860-1926, census returns, the Ardmore Chronicle from 1904, the Philadelphia Inquirer and probate records. Dr. Bailey noted that a lot of advance preparation went into making the project a success. For instance, he visited Norristown ahead of time to confirm that wills could be found before sending students to do their research.

Ardmore Chronicle

Masthead from the Ardmore Chronicle. Click to link to copies in Falvey’s Digital Library.

The Ardmore project proved to be a valuable experience for the students. Besides being introduced to multiple ways of finding primary sources, the students learned practical things, such as how to talk in a professional manner; how to manage their time; how to do research when book bags, pens, etc. are banned from the archives; and how to solve problems as a group. Dr. Bailey noted that instead of the project being a “cloistered” one, it brought students out into the surrounding communities and allowed them to make valuable connections.

Article by Laura Hutelmyer, photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management.

Photographs by Alice Bampton

Images courtesy of the Digital Library

 

 

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Dig Deeper: 50 years with the Beatles

Beatles photo by United Press International, photographer unknown [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Beatles photo by United Press International, photographer unknown [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

It was 50 years ago this winter that the Beatles brought their synergistic mix of rock and roll, whitewash respectability and cynical working-class edge to America and touched off a revolution in music and youth culture that continues to reverberate to this day.

Now is the perfect time to dig deeper into the history of the Fab Four, and Falvey Memorial Library provides access to a wide range of entry points of various types into research of their incredible music and cultural impact, including chronological biographies, musicological and critical works and publication and song indexes.

If your interest is piqued by commemoration of their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, or images of Shea Stadium, the Cavern, the rooftop or Abbey Road, consider checking out some of the following resources.


Dig Deeper

BIOGRAPHY

Can’t Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain, And America, by Jonathan Gould

This recent chronological biography centers on musicology and historical context. Other biographies that focus more on the lives and careers of the Beatles are available through EZ-Borrow:

The Beatles, by Hunter Davies (1968)

Shout! : The Beatles in Their Generation, by Philip Norman (1981)

MUSICOLOGY/CRITICISM

We own several works that offer academic treatment of the Beatles, musicological, sociological, historical:

The Cambridge Companion To The Beatles

Features lots of musicological reverie and ample discussion of the Beatles in their cultural context.

Artificial Paradise: The Dark Side Of The Beatles’ Utopian Dream, by Kevin Fourier

Seeks to demonstrate that the Beatles’ history parallels the rise and fall of 1960’s “utopian dreams.”

Tomorrow Never Knows : Rock And Psychedelics In The 1960s, by Nicholas Knowles Bromell

Uses the Beatles as a springboard into a sociological study of ‘60’s drug culture.

The Beatles: Untold Tales, by Howard A. DeWitt

Reads like a conference proceeding, covers obscure topics such as the place of the pub in the development of Lennon’s craft and the role of Brian Epstein’s brother, Clive.

SONG INDEXES/REFERENCE WORKS

Revolution In The Head: The Beatles’ Records And The Sixties, by Ian McDonald

Tell Me Why : A Beatles Commentary, by Tim Riley

These two works contain song-by-song analyses of the entire Beatles catalog, with much historical context and musicological interpretation–and much author opinion to boot.

Here, There & Everywhere : The First International Beatles Bibliography, 1962-1982, by Carol D. Terry.

A sprawling bibliography of press coverage, reviews, books and other Beatles resources through the years.

Additionally, for an exhaustive annotated chronology of the Beatles in the studio, check E-ZBorrow for The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions: The Official Story of the Abbey Road Years 1962-1970, by Mark Lewisohn.

The extent of writings on the Beatles is practically limitless, and one source tends to lead into another: for instance, my desire for more context to enrich the dryness of the Lewisohn book pointed me in the direction of recording engineer Geoff Emerick’s fascinating memoir (Here, There and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles).

stephen-spatz-aeb-thumbnailIf this golden anniversary year finds you seeking to study up on the Beatles, Falvey can start you on the path. Let me know if I can be of assistance: stephen.spatz@villanova.edu


Our Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops!

 

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Smart Search Tips to Save You Time: Search, Capture … Done!

refworkssm

zotero

 

 

girl-writingAre you still typing bibliographies the old-fashioned way? Or are you typing references into online templates (such as Son of Citation Machine) to generate more-or-less correct citations? Here’s your chance to learn about two powerful software products, RefWorks and Zotero. With just  a couple of clicks, you can capture references from databases and search engines and then generate a bibliography in the style of your choice. Bring your laptop or Mac to try them out!  Attend any of the following sessions. Take note of the locations.

4-4:45pm, Falvey 207 – Tuesday, 3/18;  Wednesday , 3/19; Wednesday, 4/2
4-4:45pm, Driscoll 244 – Thursday, 4/10

For more information, contact barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu.

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Villanova’s Irish Studies Program & Falvey Memorial Library Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, Kick off Weeklong Nova Feis

NOVAFEIS-blog-logo2

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, Villanova’s Irish Studies Program and Falvey Memorial Library have joined forces to offer a weeklong series of events to celebrate Irish culture. The series, playfully dubbed Nova Feis, will offer a great variety of programming ranging from film viewings and talks to Gaelic football and dance. All events are free and open to faculty, staff, students and the community.

So what exactly is a feis? According to the Nassau County Ancient Order of Hibernians, “feis” (pronounced “fesh”) “is an Irish word meaning ‘festival’ and has come to describe a traditional Gaelic arts and culture festival.” It also explains that “Today the Feis has experienced something of a rebirth, both for ethnic Gaels and for enthusiasts of the Gaelic culture in Ireland and Scotland, as well as throughout the world. Typically they are community-based festivals seeking to promote and maintain Gaelic Culture, tradition, and pride.” This is a tradition that Joseph Lennon, PhD, associate professor and director of Irish Studies, hopes to continue at Villanova.

Joseph Lennon, PhD and Ciarán Ó Braonáin

Joseph Lennon, PhD, and Ciarán Ó Braonáin

One of the main organizers of the Nova Feis 2014 series of events is Ciarán Ó Braonáin, a Fulbright FLTA and a visiting instructor who is teaching the Irish language here at Villanova for one year. In a recent interview about the series, he said, “I am very excited about this year’s Nova Feis festival. I think it is hugely important that Villanova recognizes and celebrates its Irish roots and fosters the significant bonds that the University and its students continue to hold with Ireland. Through both student- and faculty-run events, we have done exceptionally well this year in this regard.

“To cast a quick glance over some of the highlights of the year so far: we were visited by renowned novelist Colum McCann, conducted a fascinating fall series of events in partnership with Villanova’s Africana Studies [Program], held our annual James Joyce birthday celebration despite threatening weather, witnessed Irish Studies attain ‘minor’ status as a degree component and, most impressive of all, we cheered as the Villanova Irish Dance team organized and hosted the first ever intercollegiate Irish Dance competition.

“I myself am really looking forward to Nova Feis as I feel it has something to offer everyone, from film and sports, music and dance to literature and much more. I see Nova Feis as being the icing on the cake of what has already been a wonderful year for the ‘Nova Irish community.”

This is the second Nova Feis that has been held in Falvey Memorial Library. The first Nova Feis celebration took place in March 2012 when both Irish Studies and Falvey started their collaboration with a wonderful celebration of Irish culture featuring music, dancing and poetry readings at a single event.

This year, we continue this wonderful tradition, so remember to join the craic! Come to our events from March 17-21! See the full line-up of events here.


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator for the Scholarly Outreach team.

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What’s Happening with David and Goliath (“The Triumph of David” attributed to Pietro da Cortona)?

Kristin deGhetaldi, conservator, University of Delaware, and her interns, Maggie Bearden and Ellen Nigro, have been diligently cleaning “The Triumph of David” located in the Falvey Hall Reading Room.

Cleaning is performed inch by inch: moistening a small cotton swab in solvent, using the swab to clean a small area and then discarding that swab for a fresh one. “What size area do you clean?” I ask Bearden, one of the interns. She explains that it varies according to how much varnish or overpaint is present. She shows me a pure cotton swab she had been using; it is filled with a brownish-black substance – discolored varnish. Once the swab is filled with varnish or overpaint, it is replaced by a fresh one. The lower half of the huge painting has been cleaned, and deGhetaldi and Bearden and Nigro are now cleaning the top half, working from a scaffold.

Painting---marksWhat is newly visible? When I examine the painting today, I first notice a number of brilliant white areas—our eyes are drawn to white. I see some places where the bare canvas is visible, some bright colors that had been obscured by the dark varnish and, for me an art historian, an exciting discovery: some visible paint strokes. The brilliant white areas, I learn, are fill added by the conservators in places where the original paint is missing. Later in the conservation process they will inpaint those areas, using materials that are archively safe and easily removed if needed.

BlueLarge expanses of bright pink and lapis lazuli blue, previously hidden under the discolored varnish, are now visible. The presence of the large amount of lapis lazuli – on a blue dress on the right side of the painting – tells us something about the patron (the person who originally commissioned the painting). Lapis lazuli is a gemstone that is finely ground to make artists’ pigments.

When “The Triumph of David” was painted, the only source for lapis lazuli was a mine in Afghanistan. Because this stone was so expensive, the patron could specify how much money the artist would be allowed to spend on this color in a painting.

Painting---brush-strokesAlso visible in two areas are brush strokes known as impasto. The Renaissance concept of a painting was that it was a window on the world; to create this illusion, the means of creation had to be concealed. Beginning in the Baroque (later 16th and 17th centuries) some artists used touches of impasto in their painting, and this practice expanded; in Impressionism entire paintings are filled with impasto. The two areas of impasto in the David and Goliath painting fascinate me because here are the visible brushstrokes of the master himself (or perhaps a trusted apprentice).

In discussing this painting I use the word attributed with the artist’s name, Pietro da Cortona. Why? No documentary evidence exists to connect the painting to the artist – no contract, no signature on the painting, nothing. According to George T. Radan, PhD, (Villanova University Art Collection: A Guide, with the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA) the University accepted the donor’s attribution. What her evidence was is unknown to this writer.

Pietro da Cortona (1597-1669) (born Pietro Berretini in Cortona, Italy) is a major Baroque painter and architect who appears in numerous art history textbooks. Unfortunately, I have found no monographs in English and my Italian is limited, so information about him must be drawn from textbooks, art encyclopedias and art dictionaries. He is widely acknowledged as one of the three most important Italian Baroque architects, and he is also considered a major Baroque painter. Cortona (named for his home town) worked for many wealthy, influential patrons. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to discover who commissioned “The Triumph of David” and to document that it is indeed the work of Pietro da Cortona?

If you have time, please visit the project and talk to the conservators. DeGhetaldi, Bearden and Nigro will readily answer questions about their work. They usually work Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays If you cannot visit in person, this live feed shows them at work.


Article written by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Discover Drama in Special Collections

Special Collections at Falvey Memorial Library offers a wide array of fascinating collections from the early printed works of Saint Augustine to Dime Novels, and many of these collections can be discovered on the Special Collections website and through the Digital Library.

However, many library users may not be fully aware of everything Special Collections has to offer or that they are free to make appointments to use the collections in person. As the library liaison for the departments of English and theatre, I would like to introduce you, the library user, to two related collections, housed in Special Collections, that may be of particular interest to theatre faculty and dramaturgy students.

norma shearer romeo julietThe DiOrio Theater Ephemera Collection, donated by Villanova alumni Eugene L. DiOrio, spans almost 60 years of theatrical history from 1946 to 2012. The collection consists of music and theatre programs for plays, musical theatre productions, musical performances and opera productions in the Philadelphia and New York metropolitan areas. Playbills form the bulk of this collection, but it also includes many subscription advertising brochures and other musical and theatrical ephemera. Film ephemera is also featured; on the left you will see the playbill and production stills from the Astor Theatre’s showing of the 1936 film Romeo and Juliet directed by George Cukor and starring Norma Shearer, Leslie Howard and John Barrymore.

longwood gardensIn addition to the materials donated by Mr. DiOrio, other materials have been added to the collection from James Kerr, spanning 1931-2012, that focus mostly on New York City productions. Like DiOrio’s original contribution to the collection, these materials are primarily playbills but also include news clippings about performances and obituaries for actors. On the right are two playbills from The Savoy Company. The first theatre company in the U.S. to fully produce the works of Gilbert and Sullivan without altering them to avoid copyright issues, The Savoy now claims to be the oldest amateur theater company in the world dedicated solely to the production of the works of Gilbert and Sullivan.

le theatre combinedThe Le Theatre collection may also be of interest to Villanova’s theatre department. This collection consists of issues of the late 19th-/early 20th-century French periodical Le Theatre. While the periodical itself is mostly in French, the issues contain stunning images of costumes and set design from turn of the century French theatre. This sample, on the left, illustrates the kinds of images to be found in this collection.

If you’re interested in viewing such items, please visit the Special Collection’s website, check for hours of availability, and make an appointment. Special Collections librarians encourage visitors to make appointments even if they intend to come during normal opening hours. Advance notice will ensure that the items are available and ready for use at the time of your visit.

Special thanks to Laura Bang, digital and special collections curatorial assistant, for informing me of these collections and providing me with background information about them.


SarahArticle by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Collection-and-Services Data Tell a Story

Out of the 570,000 print titles in our collection, about 60,000 circulated to Villanova patrons last year. This doesn’t include the journals, group study rooms or laptops. Many print materials are also used in-house without being checked out to patrons.

It’s perhaps not surprising that the main stacks titles with the heaviest circulation in the Falvey collection are a mix of fiction and non-fiction, including business, history and literature titles that can be associated with actively taught courses. Looking at the top five titles below, I’m going to have to say that Catching Fire is probably evidence that patrons still want to read for enjoyment and not just for assignments.

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins. (10 loans)

AchebePragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty by Colin Koopman. (10 loans)

Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success by Rodney Stark. (10 loans)

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. (9 loans)

Business of Sports: edited by Brad R. Humphreys and Dennis R. Howard.  (7 loans)

While the most popular books borrowed in 2013 weren’t necessarily predictable, they showed us what students and faculty were interested in last year. By comparing this internal data with the external data below, we also see where gaps may exist in our collections.

between menBehavioural ecology (7 requests), Programming the World Wide Web (5 requests) and Centering Prayer and Inner Awakening (4 requests) were the top three requested titles through Interlibrary Loan, spanning the humanities and sciences. The two books borrowed most through E-ZBorrow were Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (4 requests) and Introduction to Software Testing (4 requests), also representing the arts and sciences equally.

Moving on from monographs (print books), we have statistics showing the number of articles requested through Interlibrary Loan from other libraries’ journal holdings and through Document Delivery services from our own journal collection.

What is Document Delivery, you may ask? It’s a service rendered only to Villanova students, staff and faculty who need a scanned (digitized) copy of a print journal article from our collection.

It’s interesting to note the fifteen most requested journal titles through Interlibrary Loan are a mix of many disciplines, but most predominantly philosophy, theology, nursing and engineering, as evidenced by the top five titles from that list.

Critical care medicine (43)

Water Science and Technology (20)

Theology and Science (19)

The Leibniz review (17)

American family physician (17)

As you can see, journal data from the Document Delivery system shows that faculty and patrons are making good use of this service, although theology, nursing and engineering emerge as the frontrunners.

Journal of Ecumenical Studies (74 requests)

Tetrahedron Letters (35 requests)

JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association (22 requests)

National Catholic Register (20 requests)

Journal of Heat Transfer (19 requests)

Falvey librarians use all available data to make purchasing decisions in consultation with individual academic departments. We also strive to improve patron access to our immediate collection and to offer services that extend the collection beyond our walls.


Article by Luisa Cywinski, editorial blog coordinator, Communication & Service Promotion team; team leader, Access Services.

 

Critical care medicine

Water Science and Technology

Theology and Science

The Leibniz review

American family physician

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Navigate ProQuest-Provided Databases

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through ProQuest, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate ProQuest-provided databases. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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The Violent and the Fallen: a Reading from James Matthew Wilson

WILSON-BOOKThis Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 2:30 p.m. Falvey Memorial Library will be hosting a poetry reading and Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring James Matthew Wilson, PhD, an assistant professor of literature in the Department of Humanities and Augustinian Traditions. Dr. Wilson will be reading poems from The Violent and the Fallen, his forthcoming chapbook soon to be published through Finishing Line Press. The Violent and the Fallen delves deep into the lives of poetic speakers across the open expanses of Midwestern America and features an array of characters as seemingly disparate as bankers, lifeguards and alcoholic balloon vendors, each in search of redemption in the face of violence and desire. The reading will be held in room 205 and begins at 2:30 pm.


Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre, has compiled the following Dig Deeper links for this exciting event, including several poems written by Dr. Wilson:

Dig Deeper:

Dr. Wilson has made available several of his papers and articles through academia.com

He is a regular contributor to Front Porch Republic

His poem Living Together, from the journal Per Contra

Another poem, entitled A Note for Ecclesiastes

Many of Dr. Wilson’s articles are available through Falvey Memorial Library databases


Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

Sarah WingoLinks prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Last Modified: February 19, 2014