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‘Twas the Week Before Finals: Chicago-Style

chicago manual of style

Are you working on a final project or paper that requires Chicago Style formatting? Attend this helpful session to brush up before your deadline.

The workshop will be held in Falvey 204 in the second-floor Learning Commons on Tuesday, April 29:  4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert.

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Gianni Carr: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Gianni Carr poem photo formalTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

My Loyal Light
by
Gianni Carr

Again I find myself sitting in the dark with a lit candle
At this point
My thoughts are fragile and can break me
That’s if too many thoughts are to keep occurring
On things unchangeable in my life
So I choose to watch the flame flicker
And I even try to count the steps of the dancing flame
It is a beautiful distraction
Gianni Carr poem photo artsyOne that is loyal and punctually at my command
Once I’ve had enough
I blow it out
And I receive a gratifying whiff of sweet vanilla smoke
Then once I need this dancing flame back
I strike a match to awaken it and it’s punctual
At my command
But all the while a loyal friend
For me to watch melt away it’s problems and
To teach me how to melt away mine
It is strange
My flame doesn’t seem to grieve about burning to the last of its flesh
It is like it knows something
Like that last dance it takes
Its partner the wind
Somehow frees him and takes him away
to infinite kept promises.

Gianni Carr, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “My Loyal Light was not written in a time of brightness. In fact, the setting was quite dark, matching my state of mind during that time. The personification of the light and its loyalty gives insight to the speaker’s vulnerability. The candle gives the speaker hope and control over ‘things unchangeable.’ If only we could ignite change and positivity as simply as striking a match – that would be a beautiful dream come true! But there would be less darkness and less desire to change the unchangeable. Therefore, like a candle, we keep on burning and lingering in the darkness until it is our time to present ourselves to the light.”

Gianni Carr is a liberal arts and communication major from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Her specialization is in media productions, and she feels as if her light as an artist shines the most in this area of her studies at Villanova University. She not only loves writing but also tries to integrate and visualize it in her films and paintings.

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James Giblin: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

James Giblin poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ poems or prose excerpts, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

The Walk Home
by
James Giblin

I
A pair of twenty-somethings, shuffling past train stations,
their wheels still running smoothly with the oil of conversation;
fears of the future fresh in their minds.

II
Corcaigh; cork-eared from the deafening pub music just gone by…
halfway across the world where we’ve only just arrived. Walking home to hostel,
past minstrels present on street corners, playing tunes familiar to foreigners.

III
Aran. Shipwrecked from one island to the next, taking pride in
only the moonlight and poorly paved road as our guide.
A car-load of locals speeds past us, shouting profanities
we haven’t heard the last of.

IV
Cousin and cousin, a single generation spread across nations.
Nettles keep me in place: a one-lane street hidden amid
a choir of cows, crickets, and unidentifiable insects.
Walk off the sting those sprigs and bigots bring.

V
Once again walking roads close to my home away from home.
Navigating snowdrifts that force hopscotch along sidewalks.
Words slip from lips like feet on ice, clumsily cleaning up
revelations given away at too low a price.

James Giblin, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “‘The Walk Home’ presents the stark contrast of the loud, bustling atmosphere of a pub’s interior with the resulting, ear-ringing quietness of walking home. This deafening quiet and the free time of a walk lends me a certain mental clarity with which I can evaluate past, present, and future circumstances in my life. That’s the kind of pensiveness out of which my best writing comes.”

James Giblin is an English major from Plymouth, Massachusetts. In addition to creative writing, he enjoys foreign languages, singing and studying philosophy.

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Megan Plevy: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Megan Plevy poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ entries, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

“Rushing”
by
Megan Plevy

Between shadowy streets
Morning amber light creeps through
The buildings she darts around, as she drags Mia
By the hand to the barred nursery door,
Where she tells her, Don’t you dare
Leave, hermana, I’ll be back around.

Three blocks away to get to her own school
Of the arts and sciences where the “gifted” go
Become those happy people on the peeling, faded
Posters line the hall as she rushes past and sneaks into class
Into the back broken desk before the piercing bell
Rings over her winded breath and gives her a chance
To catch up with her friends who gossip about Mrs. Garcia.

Disappeared this month, along with Mr. Reed, their counselor
Comes only once a week now, just to make sure no one else has gone
Insane from all of the mierda the city has put them through.
All of those special tests to receive District approval, but how do they approve
The lack of toilet paper in the stalls, the bloody hate words on the cracked mirrored
Walls are crumbling yet this school must running with or without her.

Life becomes a series of let downs which she’s only rushing towards,
To keep from falling behind, suffocated by
The taut red tape of a sinking system,
Lost between shadowy streets.

Megan Plevy, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “Having interned with an educational reform non-profit this past fall, I personally saw the deficiencies in Philadelphia schools and met with students that deal with school budget cuts and the consequential issues every day. In “Rushing,” I try to convey their enormous struggle for a fully funded, stable education and their chaotic lives as a result through the diction and structure of the poem.”

Megan Plevy is an English major with a writing and rhetoric concentration and education minor from northern New Jersey. Besides writing, she enjoys skiing on the Villanova Ski & Snowboard Team, eating copious amounts of frozen yogurt and traveling.

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Foto Friday: Falvey Scholars

2014-04-25 09.09.22

Each year, the Falvey Scholar presentations showcase the talents of Villanova’s most promising undergraduates and highlight the resources and opportunities afforded to them by their mentors and the library. This year, six students will present their research.

The Falvey Scholars Award is an annual program established by Falvey Memorial Library to recognize outstanding undergraduate research. It is a collaborative initiative of the Library, the Honors Program, and the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships.

The recipients of this award are selected from a pool of candidates that is generated by applications submitted by nominated Villanova University students or a group of nominated students working on a senior project together. Senior students must be nominated by their faculty advisor and submit a completed application to be considered for the Falvey Scholars Award. Read more about this year’s successful applicants here.

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16th Annual Literary Festival Features Adelle Waldman

Adelle WaldmanPlease join us in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner on Thursday, April 24, at 7:00 p.m. for a 16th Annual Villanova Literary Festival event featuring Adelle Waldman. Waldman is author of The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, the New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Slate, The Village Voice, and other publications. In addition, she worked as a reporter for the New Haven Register and the Cleveland Plain Dealer, and wrote a column for the Wall Street Journal‘s website before turning to fiction. The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. is her first novel.

Love affairsAt this event, Waldman will read selections of her work. Following the reading, there will be book sale and signing.

This event, co-sponsored by the Department of English and Falvey Memorial Library, is free and open to the public.

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Christine Tergis: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Christine Tergis poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ entries, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

“Prometheus, the Poet”
by
Christine Tergis

With stolen lines and tawny colored pen,
His brutish strength defied all ordered form.
He brought the words that flicker to all men,
To them, he shows a fire that can deform.
Now chained to rock it seems his power expir’d
His clay creations bleed into a stain.
I know free flame was all he had desired,
Yet meter claws and forces the refrain.
How did his yearning bring him such a fate,
Can iron fetters stop his hands from molding?
While all the while he fights against the strait
Inside a burning song is nearly smold’ring…
But once released, he could not seem to thank
The freeing verse that felt so very blank.

Christine Tergis, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “Poetry (to me) means that I am not weird for wanting to look at the world while standing on my head, alternately blinking both eyes and yelling into an empty cave. As a Shakespearean sonnet, ‘Prometheus, the Poet’ explores the tension between form/content as restricting/enabling creative expression.”

Christine Tergis is an English major and Spanish minor from Yonkers, New York. She enjoys yoga, cooking yumtastic food, speaking in accents and spontaneously erupting into interpretive dance (with or without music).

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An Open-Mic Event to Remember

open_micWhat will you remember? At graduation or many years from now, what good memories will come to mind when you look back on your life as a Villanova student? I remember the Open Mic Poetry Readings—seeing a finance major, followed by a mathematics professor, then a star athlete approach the open mic. I did not expect to have something meaningful in common with these diverse strangers. But I experienced a connection with each of them as they shared either poems they wrote or someone else’s poems they enjoy. I appreciated their willingness to share their creativity, their passion, their honesty. And I remain grateful for those fond memories.

Do something worth remembering. Come to the Open Mic event. Listen to your colleagues. Or better yet, contribute to everyone else’s good memories; share a poem of your own or a favorite poem by someone else.

The Department of English and Falvey Memorial Library’s annual Open Mic Poetry Reading will take place on Wednesday, April 23, from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the Library’s Speakers’ Corner.

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13th Annual Falvey Scholars Awards: Recognizing Exceptional Undergraduate Achievement at Villanova

SCHOLAR-LOGO

The annual Falvey Scholars Award—established by Falvey Memorial Library in conjunction with the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships and the Honors Program—recognizes and celebrates the academic excellence of some of Villanova’s finest undergraduate scholars. This year, six Falvey Scholars have been selected under each of the following categories: business, engineering, liberal arts, science, nursing and our new category, social science, which was added given the overwhelming response and volume of excellent candidates in the liberal arts.

The Falvey Scholars will be recognized at our awards presentation and reception ceremony on Friday, April 25 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. At the event, which is free and open to the public, each of the Falvey Scholars will present a 30-minute summary of their winning project and will then be officially presented with the Falvey Scholars Award by our Interim Library Director, Darren Poley.

Falvey is delighted to announce the following undergraduates as the 2014 Falvey Scholars:

Aurora Vandewark (nursing); mentor: Michelle M. Kelly, PhD, CRNP; Project: “Evidence-Based Practices to Reduce Psychosocial Distress Among Parents of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Patients.”

Jerisa Upton (social science); mentor: Maghan Keita, PhD; Project: “Understanding Bureaucratic Politics and the Origins of the Great Leap Forward.”

Mark Bookman (liberal arts); mentors: Maghan Keita, PhD, and Edwin Goff, PhD; Project: “Re-imagining Discourse: Shingon Buddhism and Western Epistemologies.”

Noor F. Shaik (science); mentor: Dennis D. Wykoff, PhD; Project: “Using Fluorescent Markers in Cells and Flow Cytometry to Measure the Selective Pressures in Yeast.”

Olivia Ferguson (business); mentor: Peter Zaleski, PhD; Project: “Metropolitan Manufacturing Decline, 1980-2005, and Subsequent Effects on Residents.”

Robert McGrane (engineering); mentor: Noelle Comolli, PhD; Title: “Chitosan Thin-Films for Post-Surgical Drug Delivery.”

Please join us on April 25 to help us congratulate them and to recognize their great achievements!

Falvey Scholars is just one of the many events that comprise the Undergraduate Research Exposition, or EXPO 14: a week-long series of programs that recognize the research undergraduates accomplish throughout the year. Villanova is proud to highlight the contributions of its undergraduate student community!

Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator for the Scholarly Outreach team.

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Mary Lister: Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant

Mary Lister poem photoTo honor the University’s Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards, the Library is publishing contestants’ poems or prose excerpts on Falvey’s blog. The Library also has created posters for the contestants’ entries, which will be displayed throughout the library’s first floor.

This year the contest includes both poetry and prose (in previous years it was “the Senior-Class-Poet Contest”). The Department of English will announce the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards winners later this month.

Excerpt from “Mango Machete”
by
Mary Lister

“Do you have a history of mental illness or violent tendencies? Have you ever been convicted of a crime?”

Our medical clinic was half-way completed, and I silently wondered if they would take him there to be treated by the single nurse who sat in the single room all night long. I am white. I am American, and they sent me home without thinking about my clinic or our small stone house surrounded by a moat of glass but consumed by my sticky machete that cut more than a mango that night.

“Where did you get the knife? Why were you walking in the dark carrying a lethal weapon?”

It was just like the times before, it was dark and he treaded toward me, not even hiding his heavy approach. I was drunk and stoned and clutching two sweating chocolate milk cartons in one hand. It felt like I was swimming through the thick air that ached for monsoon season. He came from behind but I was ready this time. My shoulders tingled with effort as something hot dripped down the side of my leg. Later, I found a straight cut about the length of my pinky I made against my hip while pulling out the sticky mango machete, like one from a razor. I thought about Skokes and her ring of tears and her tired boots. I thought about Asia in the hamper, surrounded by a sea of her own dark red blood, looking like a vampire after a meal. I thought about the Twizzlers I had been on my way to retrieve, the Twizzlers not-Sesie’s girlfriend had sent me the day before. Flailing through the blackness, I made contact with flesh as Mat Kearney played in my head. Skin is tougher than you’d think and bones make a funny clinging sound when they meet metal, like a bell underwater. I heard a yell, but I don’t know if it was mine or his. It must’ve been mine, because the mob came running. And so did Sesie.

“How did you know the man you attacked? Where did you meet the people who came to your aid? Was this attack premeditated?”

That’s why I’m here. I like this place because I can hear the electricity crackling and there isn’t a machete on my hip. I am staying here to recover from that last night, but they don’t understand that it started with a sign that read “Luluu” and a glass ocean and a white sand beach. Here, I’m becoming not-Lulu, but they want me to remember being Lulu without being sad, so they feed me medicine to make my thoughts slow down. I think I should be in jail because they told me later that he died. They didn’t tell me that I killed him because they only found his charred body after the mob came. The mob that showers mwizi in gasoline, wraps them in a rubber tire and throws a torch at them. I said mwizi and mwizi is a death sentence—they put a tire around him and lit up the night.

Mary Lister, a Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards contestant, says “This piece follows a group of young women through their journey and battles as volunteers in and East African city. I utilized my basic knowledge of Swahili to try and give an air of authenticity and I hope the story gives off a bit of thriller-esque drama—it’s meant to!”

Mary Lister is a senior Political Science and Honors major from West Chester, Pa. She likes piña coladas, getting caught in the rain and snuggling with her kitten named Cat while pretending she is a blond Audrey Hepburn.

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Last Modified: April 21, 2014