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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 7

ADVENT-DAY-7

19 Days Till Christmas

“The Wicked Fairy At The Manger” by U.A. Fanthorpe
Read by John Warner
Submitted by Barbara Quintiliano

Barbara Quintiliano is the nursing, life sciences, and instructional services librarian at Falvey Memorial Library, and she submitted this cheeky little poem, which has fun with the story of Jesus’s birth and life. In Fanthorpe’s poem she sends a wicked fairy with a “gift” to baby Jesus, like Maleficent to Aurora in sleeping beauty.


“The Wicked Fairy At The Manger” 
by U.A. Fanthorpe

My gift for the child:
No wife, kids, home;
No money sense. Unemployable.
Friends, yes. But the wrong sort —
The workshy, women, wogs,
Petty infringers of the law, persons
With notifiable diseases,
Poll tax collectors, tarts;
The bottom rung.
His end?
I think we’ll make it
Public, prolonged, painful.
Right, said the baby. That was roughly
What we had in mind.

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 6

ADVENT-DAY-6

20 Days Till Christmas

“If—” by Rudyard Kipling
Read by Michael Caine
Submitted by Darren Poley

Darren Poley is the Scholarly Outreach and Theology librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. “If” was first published in 1920 in Kipling’s collection Rewards and Fairies, series of historical fiction short stories with linking contemporary narratives.

In his posthumously published autobiography Something of Myself, Kipling claimed that his poetic inspiration for the poem was based the military service of Leander Starr Jameson, who lead the failed Jameson Raid (December 1895 – January 1896) against South Africa to overthrow the Boer Government.

Read by Michael Caine:

Featured in The Simpsons:

http://youtu.be/YJQPFmictmo


“If—”
By Rudyard Kipling
(‘Brother Square-Toes’—Rewards and Fairies)

If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

 

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

 

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

 

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 5

ADVENT-DAY-5

21 Days Till Christmas

“Arriving Again and Again Without Noticing” by Linda Gregg
Read by Sarah Wingo
Submitted by Laura Hutelmyer

Laura Hutelmyer is the Electronic Resources and Special Acquisitions coordinator for Falvey Memorial Library.

“Arriving Again and Again Without Noticing” is a poem from Gregg’s poetry collection In the Middle Distance, her 6th book.

If you’re interested in reading more by Gregg, you can check out two of her poem collections here at Falvey Memorial Library:
In the Middle Distance
Too Bright To See

You can also listen to Gregg speak briefly about her approach to writing and read one of her other poems here.


“Arriving Again and Again Without Noticing”
By Linda Gregg

I remember all the different kinds of years.
Angry, or brokenhearted, or afraid.
I remember feeling like that
walking up a mountain along the dirt path to my broken house on the island.
And long years of waiting in Massachusetts.
The winter walking and hot summer walking.
I finally fell in love with all of it:
dirt, night, rock and far views.
It’s strange that my heart is as full
now as my desire was then.

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 4

ADVENT DAY 4

22 Days Till Christmas

“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost
Introduced by Garrison Keillor
Read by Robert Frost
Submitted by Laura Bang

Laura Bang is Falvey Memorial Library’s Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant, and she submitted “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” perhaps one of Frost’s most well known and beloved poems. It was included in Frost’s collection New Hampshire, published in 1923, for which he won the first of his four Pulitzer Prizes.

The speaker of “Stopping by Woods” is caught in a moment of choosing between the tranquility of nature and the responsibilities of life and society. One well-known interpretation suggests that the poem is a meditation on death and draws the distinction between eternal peace, rather than natural tranquility, and the hustle and bustle of daily life.

With the holiday season upon us it is easy to imagine oneself in the speaker’s shoes and the desire for moments of peacefulness at odds with all of the responsibilities that this time of year brings. If you find yourself feeling as though you have far too many miles to go before you sleep, try to find a few moments throughout the day to stop by your own metaphorical wood and take a few deep breaths to get you through all that lies ahead.


Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
By Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 3

ADVENT-DAY-3

23 Days Till Christmas

“A Sword In A Cloud Of Light” by Kenneth Rexroth
Read by Kenneth Rexroth (@29:02)
Submitted by Michael Foight

Michael Foight is Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator at Falvey Memorial Library and submitted this poem with the comment, “my favorite poem of all time.”

The recording provided is from the Poetry Center Digital Archive* and is Kenneth Rexroth reading many of his poems including “A Sword In A Cloud Of Light,” which is at 29:02. You can also download the recording or listen to it on the Poetry Center Digital Archive’s site.


“A Sword In A Cloud Of Light”
By Kenneth Rexroth

Your hand in mine, we walk out
To watch the Christmas Eve crowds
On Fillmore Street, the Negro
District. The night is thick with
Frost. The people hurry, wreathed
In their smoky breaths. Before
The shop windows the children
Jump up and down with spangled
Eyes. Santa Clauses ring bells.
Cars stall and honk. Street cars clang.
Loud speakers on the lampposts
Sing carols, on juke boxes
In the bars Louis Armstrong
Plays White Christmas. In the joints
The girls strip and grind and bump
To Jingle Bells. Overhead
The neon signs scribble and
Erase and scribble again
Messages of avarice,
Joy, fear, hygiene, and the proud
Names of the middle classes.
The moon beams like a pudding.
We stop at the main corner
And look up, diagonally
Across, at the rising moon,
And the solemn, orderly
Vast winter constellations.
You say, “There’s Orion!”
The most beautiful object
Either of us will ever
Know in the world or in life
Stands in the moonlit empty
Heavens, over the swarming
Men, women, and children, black
And white, joyous and greedy,
Evil and good, buyer and
Seller, master and victim,
Like some immense theorem,
Which, if once solved would forever
Solve the mystery and pain
Under the bells and spangles.
There he is, the man of the
Night Before Christmas, spread out
On the sky like a true god
In whom it would only be
Necessary to believe
A little. I am fifty
And you are five. It would do
No good to say this and it
May do no good to write it.
Believe in Orion. Believe
In the night, the moon, the crowded
Earth. Believe in Christmas and
Birthdays and Easter rabbits.
Believe in all those fugitive
Compounds of nature, all doomed
To waste away and go out.
Always be true to these things.
They are all there is. Never
Give up this savage religion
For the blood-drenched civilized
Abstractions of the rascals
Who live by killing you and me.

*The Poetry Center Digital Archive is a Project of The Poetry Center at San Francisco State University.

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 2

ADVENT-DAY-two

24 Days Till Christmas

As I Walked Out One Evening, By W.H. Auden
Read by Tom Hiddleston
Submitted by Sarah Wingo

“As I Walked Out One Evening” was written in the mid-1930s, early in Auden’s career. In technical terms the poem is a literary ballad with ABCB quatrains and other elements of the lyric poem. The poem deals with love, mortality, and the steady march of time. Although there is melancholy in this poem, one of my favorite take aways from it is that although life is fleeting, and perhaps even more so because it is so fleeting “Life remains a blessing.” My favorite line comes near the end of the poem:

“You shall love your crooked neighbor
With your crooked heart.”

This line acknowledges the deep imperfections of humanity, while at the same time celebrating the human capacity for love.

As we count down to Christmas you will hear my voice and other voices from the library reading some of the poems that have been selected, but to start us off with a little treat I found an audio clip of Tom Hiddleston reading “As I Walked Out One Evening”:

As I Walked out One Evening 
by W. H. Auden
 
As I walked out one evening,
   Walking down Bristol Street,
The crowds upon the pavement
   Were fields of harvest wheat.
 
And down by the brimming river
   I heard a lover sing
Under an arch of the railway:
   ‘Love has no ending.
 
‘I’ll love you, dear, I’ll love you
   Till China and Africa meet,
And the river jumps over the mountain
   And the salmon sing in the street,
 
‘I’ll love you till the ocean
   Is folded and hung up to dry
And the seven stars go squawking
   Like geese about the sky.
 
‘The years shall run like rabbits,
   For in my arms I hold
The Flower of the Ages,
   And the first love of the world.’
 
But all the clocks in the city
   Began to whirr and chime:
‘O let not Time deceive you,
   You cannot conquer Time.
 
‘In the burrows of the Nightmare
   Where Justice naked is,
Time watches from the shadow
   And coughs when you would kiss.
 
‘In headaches and in worry
   Vaguely life leaks away,
And Time will have his fancy
   To-morrow or to-day.
 
‘Into many a green valley
   Drifts the appalling snow;
Time breaks the threaded dances
   And the diver’s brilliant bow.
 
‘O plunge your hands in water,
   Plunge them in up to the wrist;
Stare, stare in the basin
   And wonder what you’ve missed.
 
‘The glacier knocks in the cupboard,
   The desert sighs in the bed,
And the crack in the tea-cup opens
   A lane to the land of the dead.
 
‘Where the beggars raffle the banknotes
   And the Giant is enchanting to Jack,
And the Lily-white Boy is a Roarer,
   And Jill goes down on her back.
 
‘O look, look in the mirror,
   O look in your distress:
Life remains a blessing
   Although you cannot bless.
 
‘O stand, stand at the window
   As the tears scald and start;
You shall love your crooked neighbour
   With your crooked heart.’
 
It was late, late in the evening,
   The lovers they were gone;
The clocks had ceased their chiming,
   And the deep river ran on.

 

 


SarahArticle by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


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Advent Poetry Calendar: Day 1

ADVENT DAY ONE

Advent derives from the Latin word “adventus,” meaning approach or arrival. Advent is a time of expectation, a buildup and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity at Christmas (Christ’s first coming), and a reminder to prepare one’s soul for Christ’s expected return to earth on judgment day.

Advent is celebrated in different ways, but one cherished tradition that our readers in both religious and secular households may have grown up with is that of the Advent Calendar. In the spirit of the holiday season, Falvey Memorial Library has asked its staff to contribute one or two of their favorite poems to a Poetry Advent Calendar, which we will be creating on our blog. During Advent you can check in everyday for a new poem as we count down to Christmas.

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Fall Workshop Series: Digital Humanities (Resources Galore!)

This semester, Falvey Memorial Library presented a fall workshop series on Digital Humanities, organized by Laura Bang.  Laura works in Special and Digital Collections and she is actively involved in the Philadelphia Digital Humanities community.

The fantastically informative workshops provided an introduction to DH techniques and applications and took place in Falvey on various Saturdays from 9AM to noon. Since we were provided with tons and tons of resources, I’d be glad to share some with you! For an overview of the individual workshops and the projects/softwares explored, keep scrolling.

September 6: Intro to Digital Humanities 

dirtOur five-session workshop began with an introductory lecture by Mitch Fraas, the Schoenberg Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. As you might guess, we talked about the most popular question on the block: what are digital humanities? As this intro lecture proved, the best way to figure it out is to jump into one of the many projects you can find online. Definition by application! Fraas provided tons of resources; here are some excellent places to start.

Voyant-tools.org
viraltexts.org
historyharvest.unl.edu
earlynovels.org
mappingbooks.blogspot.com
http://vpcp.chass.ncsu.edu/
http://dirtdirectory.org *Reading about these tools will really give you a good sense of the applications of DH.

 

September 20: Coding Basics

The second workshop was a fun and approachable introduction to coding by Kate Lynch. We used Processing, which is not only a programming language, but also a development environment with an enormous online community. The software is free to download and open source. The Processing site is loaded with beginner tutorials.

I pointillized ‘Lil Bub! On the left behind the kitty, you can see the Processing window and code.

DH Bub 2

October 4: Audio Editing

audacity-windowsWorkshop number three covered basic audio editing. We played around with Audacity, a free, open source audio recording and editing software. You can download it right from the Audacity page. You can find plenty of royalty free sounds and tracks on the web for your projects on websites like freesound.org. The Audacity page also has plenty of tutorials, but I find YouTube tutorials are the most helpful for software training. Search “Audacity” and you are sure to find hundreds!

 

October 25: WordPress as a Content Management System

wordpress-logo-stacked-rgb
The fourth workshop explored WordPress as a content management system. WordPress.com, as you might already know, allows you to create a free blog, but it is not highly customizable. Based on your wants and needs, it might be perfect for you. However, if you’re looking for a software script to create a website, check out WordPress.org. According to the About page,

WordPress started as just a blogging system, but has evolved to be used as full content management system and so much more through the thousands of plugins and widgets and themes, WordPress is limited only by your imagination. (And tech chops.)

To get started with the WordPress software you’ll need a web host, but the software itself is free and open source.

 

November 8: Mapping/GIS

DH MappingThe fifth and final workshop introduced basic data mapping and visualization. Using CartoDB and openly available data sets from OpenDataPhilly, we learned how to import and create tables and how to customize maps based on those tables.

Sarah Cordivano, the workshop instructor, enthusiastically expressed the importance of projects such as OpenDataPhilly, a resource that

“…is based on the idea that providing free and easy access to data information encourages better and more transparent government and a more engaged and knowledgeable citizenry… By connecting people with data, we’re hoping to encourage users to take the data and transform it into creative applications, projects, and visualizations that demonstrate the power that data can have in understanding and shaping our communities.”

For more information on OpenDataPhilly, visit the About Us page.

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month in Falvey: Agnes Moncy, PhD

Portrait of a Man 1595-1600 Oil on canvas, 53 x 47 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Portrait of a Man
1595-1600
Oil on canvas, 53 x 47 cm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

To celebrate Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month, Agnes Moncy, PhD, professor of Spanish in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Temple University, will discuss El Greco. This event, held at 3:00 p.m. Oct. 23, in room 204, commemorates the 400th anniversary of El Greco’s death.

The eventco-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Sigma Delta Pi and the Hispanic Honor Societyis free and open to the public.

El Greco, born Doménikos Theotokopoulos (c. 1547 – 1614) in Crete (a Greek island), moved to Italy as a young man. There he visited Venice, where he was influenced by the paintings of Titian and Tintoretto; El Greco also traveled to Rome where he saw Roman and Florentine Mannerist works. By 1577, he had moved to Toledo,Spain, where he remained for the rest of his life.

El Greco (“the Greek”) is considered a major Spanish Renaissance artist although his personal style reflects strong elements of Late Byzantine and Late Italian Mannerist art. He painted portraits and intensely emotional religious paintings such as “The Burial of Count Orgaz,” 1586, in Santo Tomé, Toledo, Spain.

Dig Deeper: El Greco Resources

Videos—
El Greco: Christ Driving the Traders from the Temple (Great Britain: National Gallery, 1995).

Rubens, van Dyck and the 17th Century Flemish Painters; Rembrandt and the 17th Century Dutch Masters; Velazquez, El Greco, Goya and the Spanish Masters (Russia: Gosudarstvennyi Ermitazh,1992).

Books—
Alvarez Lopera, José. El Greco (Barcelona: Galaxia Gutenberg, 2003). Text in Spanish.

Alvarez Lopera, José. El retablo del Colegio de Doña Maria de Aragón de El Greco [The Retablo (Altarpiece) of the Colegio of Doña Maria of Aragon by El Greco] (Madrid: Tf. Editores, c.2000). Text in Spanish.

Calvo Serraller, F. Entierro del conde de Orgaz [Burial of the Count Orgaz] (Milano: Electra, c.1994). Text in Italian.

Figures of Thought: El Greco as Interpreter of History, Tradition and Ideas (Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 1982).

Guinard, Paul J. El Greco: Biographical and Critical Study (Lausanne: Skira, 1956).

Kelemen, Pál. El Greco Revisited: Candia, Venice, Toledo (New York: Macmillan, 1961).

Marías, Fernando. El Greco in Toledo (London: Scala, 2001).

Marías, Fernando. El Greco, Life and Work: A New History (London: Thames and Hudson, 2013).

Museo Thyssen Bornemisza. El Greco: Identity and Transformation: Crete, Italy, Spain (Milano: Skira, 1999).

Panagiötakës, Nikolaos. El Greco: The Cretan Years (Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2009).

Sérullaz, Maurice. Christ on the Cross (London: M. Parrish, 1947).

Sureda, Joan. La Gloria de los Siglos de Oro: Mecenas, Artistas y Maravillas en la España Imperial [The Glory of the Golden Age: Patrons, Artists and Wonders of Imperial Spain] (Barcelona: Lunwerg Editores, 2006). Text in Spanish.

Toledo Museum of Art. El Greco of Toledo (Boston: Little, Brown, 1982).

Wethey, Harold E. El Greco and his School (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1962).

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Last Modified: October 22, 2014