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Faculty member and playwright Michael Hollinger’s new play, Under the Skin, to premiere

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Fans of Villanova Theatre may be interested to know that faculty member and playwright Michael Hollinger’s new play, Under the Skin, will be premiering this month at the Arden Theatre Company. Directed by Terrence J. Nolen, Under The Skin will run January 15, 2015 – March 15, 2015.
 
The Arden Theatre Company has a long history of partnership with Hollinger and has been host to the world premiere of eight of his works: Under the Skin, Opus, Ghost-Writer, Tooth and Claw, Red Herring, Tiny Island, Incorruptible and An Empty Plate in the Café du Grand Boeuf.
 
Villanova theatre goers will be familiar with Hollinger’s work most recently from fall 2013’s production of Red Herring.
 
Tickets for Under the Skin can be purchased from the Arden Theatre Company’s website
 
Please see this article for details on Under the Skin and Hollinger’s relationship with the Arden Theatre Company. 

SarahArticle by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (1/12)

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Here’s your daily dose of  library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!
 

WELCOME

Welcome to Spring Semester 2015! Best of luck with your new classes, and please remember to come to the Library when you need help! Here’s some first week survival tips!


THIS IS NEW!
And, welcome to The 8:30 – a daily blog post that will provide you with a quick rundown of all that day’s events in the Library and other interesting news and links to check out before you start your busy schedule. We’re here, as well, to make the thought of an ‘8:30′ something to look forward to in the morning! Anyone who’s ever had an 8:30 class will probably know what we’re talking about! ;-)


TRYING TO PUT HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES IN CONTEXT?

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Explore the text and media materials in the Human Rights Studies Online database. Reportedly covering the years 1900 -2010, streaming video and documentation support analysis and interpretation of major human rights violations and crimes worldwide.


CONGRATULATIONS TO…

Mercedes Julia, PhD., professor of modern and contemporary literature and cultural studies in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, for inclusion of her book, Dias de mi Vida, first volume of Vida by Juan Ramon Jimenez on the @el_pail list of Top Ten Books in 2014. Dr. Julia presented a lecture on Jimenez work at the Library this past September, in honor of Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month.


QUOTE OF THE DAY

“And now we welcome the new year, full of things that have never been”
― Rainer Maria Rilke


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


 

 

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‘Caturday: Firsts

The new year brings with it the expectation of firsts: The first day of the new year, the first day of a new resolution, or for Villanovans, the first day of the spring term.

In ancient Egypt, the Thoth Festival was celebrated in the first month of the new year. And we all know that ancient Egyptians worshiped cats. We don’t necessarily worship the cat, or consider it a deity, but Will D. Cat makes a darn good mascot, don’t you think? Welcome back, ‘Cats!

wildcat finals

 

Photo by Alice Bampton, photographer, Communication & Service Promotion Team.

‘Caturday is a weekly feature by Luisa Cywinski, Communication & Service Promotion Team and Team Leader, Access Services.

 

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Foto Friday: Heading South

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To the Thawing Wind

Come with rain, O loud Southwester!

Bring the singer, bring the nester;

Give the buried flower a dream;

Make the settled snow-bank steam;

Find the brown beneath the white;

But whate’er you do to-night,

Bathe my window, make it flow,

Melt it as the ice will go;

Melt the glass and leave the sticks

Like a hermit’s crucifix;

Burst into my narrow stall;

Swing the picture on the wall;

Run the rattling pages o’er;

Scatter poems on the floor;

Turn the poet out of door.

Robert Frost

A Boy’s Will

1913

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Librarian Voices: #WoolFreeWinter

Alex Williams

Alexander Williams is the research support librarian for the social sciences and liaison to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments. 


#WoolFreeWinter

Sheep

(Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Winter is coming. No, seriously. I’m not just quoting the motto of House Stark from George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series. Winter is really coming and, to many of us, that means getting out the wool blankets, scouring online stores for the most fashionable wool clothing, and getting ready for the holiday shopping season. However, many of us perhaps aren’t aware that the wool industry is an inhumane one and that buying wool directly contributes to the suffering of sheep. Please join me and millions around the globe by participating in #WoolFreeWinter (warning: some viewers may find the content upsetting).

Q: What is #WoolFreeWinter?

A: As first reported by NBC, eyewitness investigations into the wool industry led by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) revealed the horrific conditions under which sheep are raised and sheared in the United States and Australia, the world’s biggest wool exporter. As a result of this international exposé, PETA initiated the campaign #WoolFreeWinter to educate the public about this cruel industry and to raise awareness about ethical alternatives to wool before the winter season.

Q: But don’t sheep need to be shorn?

A: Unlike wild sheep, which naturally shed their wool, domesticated sheep have been bred for increased wool growth and do need to be shorn. While this industry sounds humane theoretically, it is, in reality, a nightmare.

Undercover investigators found that sheep were killed, mutilated, stomped upon and brutally beaten during the shearing process. These acts occur because shearers are paid by volume, not by the hour.

An experienced shearer can “handle” more than 350 sheep a day over a four week period. Shearing sheep as quickly as possible for profit inevitably leads to a disregard for their wellbeing.

A sheep’s skin is quite wrinkly because it is maximized for wool growth, but it also collects moisture making it prone to infection. Flies are attracted to this moisture and lay eggs in the folds of skin (flystrike), leaving fly larvae (maggots) to nest and then eat the sheep alive. In the wool industry, a barbaric operation called “mulesing” is performed to prevent this condition, during which strips of flesh are cut from a lamb’s back and buttocks to create scar tissue that won’t collect moisture. However, this procedure is not always effective. Mulesing, in addition to castration, dehorning, and tail docking, is often performed without anesthetics, and infections from these mutilations can lead to a slow and agonizing death. Once sheep cease to produce quality wool, they are then shipped worldwide in overcrowded, multilevel ships to slaughterhouses without concern for their welfare.

Q: What can I do?

A: The best thing you can do is to not buy wool products. Check clothing labels and, if an item includes wool, put it back on the shelf. Wool may also be listed as mohair, pashmina, shahtoosh, or cashmere, but any kind of wool amounts to animal suffering.

If this information shocks you, you can help save the lives of animals everywhere from the horrors of the fur, leather, angora and down feather industries, too.

Q: Is there such a thing as “humane wool?”

A: While PETA states that “there is no such thing as humane wool,” wool suppliers have taken significant steps to establish more humane wool practices since PETA’s initial investigations into the industry, which caused widespread protest and millions of dollars in company losses. If you would still prefer wool clothing, be sure to enquire of the retailer whether their products are ethically sourced. The Merino Company, (http://www.merinocompany.com/index.asp), New Merino (http://newmerino.com.au/wp/brand-owners/mulesing/), and Plevna Downs (http://www.plevnadowns.com.au/index.htm) are three companies that pride themselves on supplying non-mulesed wool to numerous brands and retailers. Humane companies like these usually undergo auditing, on-site veterinarian evaluations, and something called a traceability, traceback, or “Sheep to Shelf” system, so that one can identify the growers (or even the individual sheep themselves!) who produced the wool. It might also be worth investigating smaller farms, societies, and organizations in your area that shear sheep as a heartfelt hobby and create only small amounts of wool products for limited distribution.

Q: What are the alternatives to wool?

Alternatives to wool include cotton, cotton flannel, hemp, bamboo, polyester fleece and other cruelty-free fibers. Two other options include Tencel, a new durable and biodegradable substitute, and Polartec Wind Pro, which is made from recycled plastic bottles and offers four times the wind resistance of wool. Check out PETA’s cruelty-free shopping guide for revealing information about the fashion industry and ethical alternatives to animal products.

By choosing an alternative, you will not only directly help the lives of sheep but also avoid the common problems with wool: prone to retaining unpleasant odors, open to moth and mildew damage, not very durable, expensive, difficult to clean, able to shrink and stain easily, very itchy and/or can cause allergies.

Do more for these gentle and intelligent beings that share many characteristics with us. Spread the word by sharing on Facebook and Twitter and ignite change this #WoolFreeWinter.

 

Online Resources

Schecter, A. (2014, July 19). PETA: There’s no such thing as humane wool. NBC News. Retrieved from http://www.nbcnews.com/news/investigations/peta-theres-no-such-thing-humane-wool-n151326

Withnall, A. (2014, July 10). US and Australia wool industries exposed in shocking undercover footage captured by animal rights group. The Independent. Retrieved from http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-and-australian-wool-industries-exposed-in-shocking-undercover-footage-captured-by-animal-rights-groups-9597552.html

PETA. (2014). The wool industry. Retrieved from http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-clothing/wool-industry/

PETA. (2014). Inside the wool industry (with bibliographic references). Retrieved from http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-clothing/animals-used-clothing-factsheets/inside-wool-industry/

PETA. (2014). International Expose: Sheep killed, punched, stomped on, and cut for wool. Retrieved from http://investigations.peta.org/australia-us-wool/

Galbraith, F. (2009). Died in the wool (with bibliographic references). Retrieved from http://www.thebigcoverup.org.uk/wool/

 

Animal Rights @ Falvey

Aaltola, E. (2012). Animal suffering: Philosophy and culture. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.

Cohen, C., & Regan, T. (2001). The animal rights debate. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Garner, R. (2013). A theory of justice for animals: Animal rights in a nonideal world. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gruen, L. (2011). Ethics and animals: An introduction. Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Linzey, A., & Clarke, P. A. B. (2004). Animal rights: A historical anthology. New York: Columbia University Press.

Regan, T. (2003). Animal rights, human wrongs: An introduction to moral philosophy. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Rowlands, M. (2009). Animal rights: Moral theory and practice (2nd rev. ed.). Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Waldau, P. (2011). Animal rights: What everyone needs to know. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press.

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Falvey Memorial Library 2014 Year in Review

2014 was a busy year for Falvey Memorial Library. We acknowledged successes, welcomed new faculty and nationally acclaimed authors, waxed nostalgic over Choose Your Own Adventure books, said goodbye to old friends and even opened a 3D ‘automatic virtual environment’ – the first CAVE ever situated in a library setting with reserved time for public access.  The following is a sample of our year in pictures. Enjoy!

Falvey Memorial Library 2014

Falvey Memorial Library 2014

2014-02-14 16.06.01

Who can forget “Spring” Semester of 2014…

...a wintry winter...

…a wintry winter…

...that eventually thawed.

…that eventually thawed.

A very busy event season gave patrons lots of choices!

A very busy event season gave patrons lots of choices!

Poets, scholars, politicians...

Poets, scholars, politicians…

Shakespeare turned 400...

Shakespeare turned 450…

Wilbur the Pig took on Oedipus...

Wilbur the Pig took on Oedipus…

Peeps took over the study rooms...

…Peeps took over the study rooms…

...and we celebrated Smart Money Week.

…and we celebrated Smart Money Week.

We offered tips...

We offered tips…

Help and smiles...

Help and smiles from now retired Donna Chadderton

...and opportunities to "Choose Your Own Adventure" at VU Pop II, which celebrated Interactive Fiction.

…and opportunities to “Choose Your Own Adventure” at VU Pop II, which celebrated Interactive Fiction.

We said goodbye to some old friends...

We said goodbye to some retiring old friends…Mimi DeLenge, Sue Connor and Marie R.,

Librarian Kimberley Bugg (off to pursue a PhD!)

Librarian Kimberley Bugg, (off to pursue a PhD!)

Kelly Forst and Corey Arnold

Graduate Assistants Kelly Forst and Corey Arnold

Susan Markley

and Librarian Susan Markley, who retired after 35 years of service to the University.

...and miss dear ones, like Jim Fox.

And we miss dear ones, like former Access Service ace and proud Villanova alumni Jim Fox, who passed away this year.

And we celebrated our Falvey Scholars

And we celebrated our Falvey Scholars, including

Noor F. Shaik

Noor F. Shaik

Student and community poets at our annual Open Mic Poetry exhibition

…and student and community poets at our annual Open Mic Poetry exhibition.

The Class of 2014 moved on...

The Class of 2014 moved on…

..and the CAVE began to move in

..and the CAVE began to move in

Along with improvements to Falvey Hall side patio

Along with improvements to Falvey Hall side patio

Continued progress on the daCortona masterpiece

Continued progress on the daCortona masterpiece

..and kudos for Dave Uspal, here celebrating his FACULTAS award with fellow tech team members, Dave Lacy and Chris Hallberg.

..and kudos for Dave Uspal, here celebrating his FACULTAS award with fellow tech team members, Dave Lacy and Chris Hallberg.

Before we knew it, summer was over and we were welcoming the Class of 2018!

Before we knew it, summer was over and we were welcoming the Class of 2018…

New Faculty Reception

New Faculty Reception

Multicultural Student Reception

Teresa A. Nance, PhD, Assistant Vice President, Multicultural Affairs Associate Professor at the annual Multicultural Student Reception in the Holy Grounds lounge, and

New interim director, Robert DeVos, PhD

and the Library’s new interim director, Robert DeVos, PhD.

Fall brought a new ACS display, a collaboration between First Year Experience Librarian Robert LeBlanc and ACS program faculty mentor Gregory Hoskins, PhD

Fall brought a new ACS display, a collaboration between First Year Experience Librarian Robert LeBlanc and ACS program faculty mentor Gregory Hoskins, PhD,

multiple WWI centennial exhibits, including Home Before the Leaves - wwionline.org - a collaboration between our Digital Library and other Great War scholars

multiple WWI centennial exhibits, including Home Before the Leaves – wwionline.org – a collaboration between our Digital Library and other Great War scholars,

A visit from Wes Moore, author of the One Book Villanova 2014-15 selection, The Other Wes Moore

A visit from Wes Moore, author of the One Book Villanova 2014-15 selection, The Other Wes Moore,

...and the opening of the CAVE facility.

…and the opening of the CAVE facility.

As fall semester rolled on

As fall semester rolled on

We reminded students to text a librarian,

We reminded students to text a librarian,

...ask questions!...

…ask questions!…

..and NOT get their pretzels in a twist over finals!!

..and NOT get their pretzels in a twist over finals!!

We said congrats to Access Services' Bill Greene for his 40th Year Service Anniversary (here he's getting a congrats kiss from Ann Stango!)

We said congrats to Access Services’ Bill Greene for his 40th Year Service Anniversary (here he’s getting a congrats kiss from Ann Stango!)

Business librarian and USC rep Linda Hauck made a beautiful contribution to the Villanova Holiday Bazaar (thanks, Linda!),

Business librarian and USC rep Linda Hauck made a beautiful contribution to the Villanova Holiday Bazaar (thanks, Linda!),

...and we decorated a tree!

…and we decorated a tree!

As 2014 rocks on into 2015, we want to thank all of the Villanova Community for a wonderful year. As Edith Lovejoy Pierce once said, "the book is called Opportunity and its first chapter is New Year's Day."

As 2014 rocks on into 2015, we want to thank all of the Villanova Community for a wonderful year. As Edith Lovejoy Pierce once said, “the book is called Opportunity and its first chapter is New Year’s Day.” Let’s all embrace this new, blessed opportunity to get it right.

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 25

ADVENT DAY 25

1 Day Till Christmas

“Trust” by Gerald Dierkes
Read by Gerald Dierkes
Submitted by Gerald Dierkes

Gerald Dierkes is an information services specialist, and one of three Falvey staff members to submit one of their own poems for the Advent calendar.

With this final post I would like to thank everyone who has followed along with our Advent calendar as we made our way towards Christmas, my colleagues for contributing their favorite poems, especially my colleagues who bravely shared their own beautiful work with us, and our graduate assistant Michelle for working with me to get each one of these posts up on our blog.

I hope you enjoy our final poem, written and read by Gerald Dierkes, a reflection on trust.

Trust

Joseph, Mary’s husband, did you feel shocked
to learn of Mary’s unplanned pregnancy?
_____________________________Betrayed
by her apparent infidelity
so soon after your commitment to each other?
_____________________________Confused
by Mary’s joy in anticipating her child’s birth?
_____________________________Overwhelmed
by her implausible explanation?
_____________________________Love
as you protected her from legal consequences
of her alleged adultery?
_____________________________Duty
as you accepted responsibility for her child?
_____________________-_______Judged
by your neighbors in your small community?
_____________________________Puzzled
by God’s plan?
_____Why didn’t God arrange things differently?

When Caesar Augustus’ decree forced you to
leave your home in Galilee,
journey to Bethlehem, and
cause Mary to travel in the ninth month of her pregnancy and
give birth away from her home, away from her family, did you ask,
_____Why didn’t God time things differently?

When you sought shelter at an inn for your obviously pregnant wife
—and were refused—
did you think, What gives, God? I’m trying to follow your will, aren’t I?
You persevered, though, finding a shelter for animals in which Mary could give birth,
without her mother, without a midwife, with only you at her side.
Mary did give birth, and God’s Son was born into our world.
_____Why didn’t God plan things differently?

Mere days later, the angel again directed you to change your plans,
this time fleeing to Egypt for an unspecified length of time,
causing your father, Jacob, and Mary’s mother, Ann, to wait years before seeing their grandson.
_____Why didn’t God do things differently?

Did you expect God’s will to be predictable, logical (by human standards), and non-challenging?
Did you ever pause, in your struggle to trust God, to consider how much He trusts you?

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 24

ADVENT DAY 24

2 Days Till Christmas

“Fra Moses And The Flowers” by Eleanor C. Donnelly
Read by Sarah Wingo
Submitted by Laura Bang

Laura Bang is Falvey’s Digital and Special Collections Curatorial Assistant, and she is found this wonderful historical poem to share. This poem comes from page 2 of the first issue of The Villanova Monthly, from January 1893. The Villanova Monthly was the first student newspaper, running from 1893-1897. Returning after a hiatus in 1916, the paper was renamed The Villanovan.

The poem itself is by Eleanor C. Donnelly (1838-1917), a local Philadelphia Catholic poet. Falvey has digitized the Eleanor C. Donnelly Papers from the American Catholic Historical Society, which can be viewed in our Digital Library.

Dec 23rd FraMosesAndTheFlowers

 

 

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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 23

ADVENT DAY23

3 Days Till Christmas

little tree, by: E.E. Cummings
Read by Alan Davis Drake
Submitted by Melanie Wood

Melanie Wood is Falvey’s Academic Integration Technical Specialist. This poem is, to me, a simple and sweet reminder to take notice of and appreciate the beauty of the little things in life.


 

little tree, by: E.E. Cummings

 

little tree

little silent Christmas tree

you are so little

you are more like a flower

 

who found you in the green forest

and were you very sorry to come away?

see i will comfort you

because you smell so sweetly

 

i will kiss your cool bark

and hug you safe and tight

just as your mother would,

only don’t be afraid

 

look the spangles

that sleep all the year in a dark box

dreaming of being taken out and allowed to shine,

the balls the chains red and gold the fluffy threads,

 

put up your little arms

and i’ll give them all to you to hold

every finger shall have its ring

and there won’t be a single place dark or unhappy

 

then when you’re quite dressed

you’ll stand in the window for everyone to see

and how they’ll stare!

oh but you’ll be very proud

 

and my little sister and i will take hands

and looking up at our beautiful tree

we’ll dance and sing

“Noel Noel”

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What We Were Reading in 2014

Though we’re not a public library, sometimes we get asked about what types of items were charged out the most. Of course, those may not always be the most popular items. So, taking a look back at the rapidly fading year 2014, finds the New York Times bestseller, Me Before You by JoJo Moyes, charged out as many times as any of our works. This is followed by perennial favorites, such as the The Holy Bible: New International Version-Containing the Old Testament and the New Testament, Oxford Spanish Dictionary, Mckay’s Modern Italian-English and English-Italian Dictionary, The Grammar Book: an ESL/EFL Teacher’s Course, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution (now also online), Phaedo, Catch-22, Ulysses, Lolita, Beloved: a novel and Catcher in the Rye.

Screenshot 2014-12-12 10.51.18

Popular this year too was the New York Times bestseller Flash Boys, followed by titles such as Gone Girl: a novel, the Gabriel García Márquez novel, El Coronel No Tiene Quien le Escriba, All Names Have Been Changed, Organic Chemistry as a Second Language: First Semester Topics (second semester topics not as popular), Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches (2014), The Fault in Our Stars, and The Laramie Project.

Screenshot 2014-12-12 10.51.45

Popular leisure reading material this year can be summed up in one sentence (more or less): Good News, for the Best of Me, in America’s Great Game, don’t Blink but Would It Kill You to Stop Doing That since 1345, or do you want a Casual Vacancy because you’ll have No Easy Day if you’re an Alchemist, English German Girl or a Racketeer.

Some of the most selected movies this year include perennial favorites like Citizen Kane; Groundhog Day; 2001, A Space Odyssey; and The Tree of Life. Other movies, The Corporation, Taxi to the Dark Side, Adaptation, Nun’s Story and La Jetée Sans Soleil were also charged out several times.

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Very requested subjects and books borrowed through our interlibrary loan and E-ZBorrow services were The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, The Goldfinch: a Novel, and books about counseling, statistics, public speaking and science fiction.

Screenshot 2014-12-12 10.51.56

Happy holidays from all of us to all of you – and we hope Santa puts some of your favorite reading material in your stocking. But if not, you know the first place to visit once you get back on campus! Click here for Christmas and New Year break hours.

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Last Modified: December 22, 2014