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Continuum: Collections and Access Make Falvey Distinctive


Darren

In an era when the uniqueness of a library’s collections are distinguished by not only what books it has in the stacks but also what it has in terms of special and digital collections, it is interesting to note a few exceptional examples of rare and unique items that are of interest to scholars: in this case, Latin and Irish manuscripts.

Recently Kenneth B. Steinhauser, PhD, a professor in the Department of Theological Studies at Saint Louis University published a survey of Latin medieval and Renaissance manuscripts he studied at Villanova University. He catalogs the thirteen manuscripts in Falvey Memorial Library and the two in the Augustinian Historical Institute collection. Dr. Steinhauser states in his published article on the subject, “In summation, the manuscript collection at Villanova University emphasizes the Augustinian tradition, specifically works of Augustine himself, Augustinian liturgical material and writings of medieval Augustinian theologians.” See Manuscripta 57.2 (2013): 205-77 (DOI 10.1484/j.MSS.1.103704).

Irish history and heritage is another unique focus of our special collections. A Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in Villanova University, Pennsylvania by William J. Mahon was published by the School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2007.

Villanova University’s Special Collections and Digital Library assembles, presents and preserves physical and digital collections that support teaching and research of the campus community and the global network of scholarship; the Rare Book Room houses over 15,000 rare and unique physical documents and artifacts requiring special handling and preservation ranging from medieval manuscripts to early popular American newspapers, while online over 20,000 items are available. The historical record of Villanova University is available in the University Archives, which is also in Falvey.

The physical library collection has more than 500,000 printed volumes, including books and historical runs of major academic journals. Web-accessible resources include over two hundred general and discipline-specific research databases, approximately ten thousand full text electronic journals, and extensive microfilm and audiovisual collections. Online collections also include almost 650,000 digital volumes encompassing the corpus of English-language books from the earliest days of the movable type printing press through scholarly literature of the early twenty-first century. Beyond Villanova’s collection, the regional E-ZBorrow system in which Falvey participates provides one-stop searching and access to over 35 million books from 50 college and university libraries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and West Virginia. In addition, materials can be requested from libraries world-wide through Inter-Library Loan. See http://library.villanova.edu/about/services/illservices/.

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Don’t be a Buzzkill – Help Save the Bees!

BEE

Busy on the coreopsis in front of the Chapel.

His labor is a chant,
His idleness a tune;
Oh, for a bee’s experience
Of clovers and of noon!

- From “The Bee,” by Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

Although we may not necessarily think of the summer season as a time for work, we depend greatly upon one sweet friend to humankind that is always keeping busy in the sun – the honeybee. We use the Chaucerian phrase “busy as a bee” because these insects commonly fly three to four miles a day (although it can be twice as much) to gather pollen and nectar. It is estimated that a one pound jar of honey requires almost 10 million foraging trips to produce it. That’s pretty busy! Unfortunately, these gentle beings are often confused with more aggressive insects like certain hornets and wasps (learn how to tell the difference), so don’t fear if a honeybee lands on you. Stay calm and it will carry on. Otherwise, it can smell the pheromones that are released when we experience fear and anger; these can become a trigger for bees to sting.

Bees and honey have featured prominently in mythology, religion, birth rituals, weddings, funerals, traditions and superstitions for millennia. The ancient Greeks believed that a baby whose lips were anointed with honey would become a great poet or a mellifluous speaker. The Roman poet Virgil called honey “a gift from heaven” (Georgics, IV) for very good reasons becaluse honey not only tastes divine, but also contains many nutritional and medicinal properties. Gathering wild honey is one of the most ancient human practices, as rock paintings from circa 13,000 BCE indicate. However, there is a relatively recent phenomenon that is threatening the well-being of the honeybee and the viability of current agricultural practices.

In 2006, a syndrome called colony collapse disorder (CCD) was widely publicized because of a significant rise in the disappearances of honeybee colonies. In short, CCD is “a pathological condition affecting a large number of honeybee colonies, in which various stresses may lead to the abrupt disappearance of worker bees from the hive, leaving only the queen and newly hatched bees behind and thus causing the colony to stop functioning” (Dictionary.com). Although the exact causes remain unknown, scientists have proposed pesticides, mite infection, malnutrition, genetic factors, loss of habitat, changing beekeeping practices, or a combination of the above for the increasing occurrence of CCD.

beeportAs we depend upon these pollinators for many domestic crops, it is imaginable that we could live in a world without about a third of the food we are accustomed to eating. Although the disappearance of colonies has occurred in the past, it has not been on such a scale as in 2012-2013, when about half of the honeybee hives in the United States were thought to have been lost to CCD. Rudolf Steiner, an Austrian philosopher, predicted in a 1923 lecture that, if we continued to disturb the natural process of hive society and manipulate queen bees, a mass disappearance would occur within 80 years. Unfortunately, it appears that his prediction is coming true.

While research continues to expand our understanding of CCD, there are many ways we can help support the honeybee community and our own well-being. Below is a list of resources available online and at Falvey Memorial Library to help you become more bee-friendly.

Dig Deeper: Resources for You and the Honeybee

Online Resources

10 Things You Can Do to Help!

10 More Things You Can Do to Help!

Two lists of easy things you can do to make a difference. Whether it’s abstaining from chemical and pesticide treatments on your lawn, planting a few flowers, buying local, organic food and honey, or setting out a birdbath or bee-waterer, there are many ways you can combat the global bee crisis on a local level.

Queen of the Sun (DVD)

“Taking us on a journey through the catastrophic disappearance of bees and the mysterious world of the beehive, this engaging and ultimately uplifting film weaves an unusual and dramatic story of the heartfelt struggles of beekeepers, scientists and philosophers from around the world including Michael Pollan, Gunther Hauk and Vandana Shiva. Together they reveal both the problems and the solutions in renewing a culture in balance with nature.”

Find a copy in your area today with WorldCat or through one of our interlibrary loan services.

Best Bee Plants

Make your garden, outdoor containers, or windowsill planter bee-friendly! This list of beneficial plants includes everything from traditional garden flowers, fruits, and herbs to trees, shrubs, lawn tips, and more. The site also provides instruction on making difficult gardening conditions (e.g. clay soil) fruitful and eco-friendly.

Resources at Falvey

The Honey Bee 

This is a highly accessible and well-written Scientific American Library Series book by renowned author James L. Gould and his wife. Gould is known for the experiment he conducted that demonstrated how bees can communicate the location of food to other bees through a complex dance system.

Anatomy of the Honeybee 

Written and illustrated by R. E. Snodgrass, this is the classic text on the anatomy of the honeybee.

Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

This scholarly article is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations.

The Colony Collapse Disorder Progress Report

Since 2009, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s internal agency ARS (Agricultural Research Service) has published an annual progress report as they strive to increase our understanding of CCD as well as to promote more sustainable bee management practices.

Feel free to contact me by email alexander.williams@villanova.edu or phone (ext. 8845) if you have any questions. You are always welcome to leave a comment below, too.

 


Alex Williams theology liaisonAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, MS is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams. Bee photos by Joanne Quinn.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Dig Deeper: Everything’s on the line – and online for US Soccer

Nigeria at United States, friendly

There’s no shortage of online reading material for FIFA soccer fans between matches! And despite Thursday’s Best. Loss. Ever, U.S. Men’s Soccer has moved into the Knockout bracket of 16 - sort of like the Sweet 16 for you college hoops fans. Anyway, soccer fever shouldn’t be dissipating anytime soon.

Fortunately, readers of the Library News blog have help to sort though it all – it’s good to know someone in the library business, isn’t it?  Librarian and Liaison Team Leader for Geography and Political Science Merrill Stein has curated a handful of interesting links for background info on the sport of soccer, World Cup 2014 host country Brazil, the best ways to stream the games and lots more to satisfy your inner soccer geek. Got to yellow card you, though: you’ll need a lot of time to get through it all!

Don’t forget: it’s one and done for the U.S. vs. Belgium on Tuesday in Salvador. The loser of that match goes home; the winner heads to the quarterfinals. Game starts at 4 p.m.


Dig Deeper:

Viewing options:

Links to news radio TV services –Full 2014 FIFA World Cup Schedule on ABC, ESPN, Univision, Canadian TV and radio:

http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/thegoalkeeper/Complete-2014-World-Cup-game-schedule-fixture-list.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/soccer-insider/wp/2014/06/09/streaming-the-world-cup/

On Soccer:

FIFA: http://www.fifa.com/

MLS soccer: http://www.mlssoccer.com/worldcup/2014

At-a-glance Groups & schedule:  http://www.bbc.com/sport/football/world-cup/2014/schedule/group-stage

Top 5 strikers you can’t miss:  http://www.mlssoccer.com/worldcup/2014/news/article/2014/06/08/world-cup-top-5-who-are-strikers-you-cant-miss-brazil

Of course – fantasy runs into reality…  http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/09/brazil-uneasy-start-world-cup-strikers-protests-sao-paulo

On Brazil:

Brazil in the World Cup spotlight: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-27635554

Brazilian Federal Government website on the 2014 FIFA World Cup (The latest news, links, photos): http://www.copa2014.gov.br/en

BBC Special reports: Brazil:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-radio-and-tv-19481328

BBC News: Latin America/Caribbean:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-27635554

BBC Travel visits Brazil:  http://www.bbc.com/travel/video/soccer-cities/20140609-where-football-meets-sun-and-samba

CNN coverage:  http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/11/world/americas/brazil-world-cup-tent-city/

South Africa’s World Cup advice to Brazil:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-27731564

Databases for searchable news/background:

Sports Business Research Network

Lexis Nexis Academic

ProQuest Central

Don’t hesitate to ask us for help with research navigation!

Trivia

The Physicist Who Can Tell You All About the New World Cup Ball:

Vanishing spray:  a World Cup first

See the 12 World Cup venues in Brazil on a Google Earth tour

Social Media

Stay in the game: Twitter guide for the 2014 World Cup

FIFA on Facebook (33M fans!!)

US Soccer on Facebook

Fun:

Choose your all-time World Cup XI - and share it with friends.

Movies you can borrow from the library: 

Invictus  Morgan Freeman, as Nelson Mandela, unites apartheid stricken South Africa through World Cup rugby.

Bend it like Beckham Follows two 18 year old girls as they pursue their dream of playing professional soccer.

30 for 30.  Inspirational documentaries from the world of sports produced by ESPN

O ano em que meus pais saíram de férias A boy is left alone in a Jewish neighborhood in the year of 1970, where both World Cup and dictatorship happen in Brazil.

Brazil world cup images via Google 

Classic World Cup moments, Lego Style!


SteinMerrill Stein is team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science. Joanne Quinn is the team leader for Communication and Service Promotion. 

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Foto Friday: Don’t leave home without one (or two)

 

Books-03

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Home Before the Leaves Fall: World War I Online Exhibit Launch

WIONLINE COUNTDOWN

Home Before the Leaves Fall: A Great War Centennial Exposition,” an online exhibit, will be launched Thursday evening, June 26, at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Peter John Williams—an attorney, an amateur historian with a special interest in World War I, and a life-long Philadelphia resident—will speak on life in Philadelphia during World War I (1914-1919). Williams is the author of Philadelphia: The World War I Years. Both digital and physical materials will be on display at the launch and reception.

keep-him-freeVillanova University, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society, Chemical Heritage Foundation, College of Physicians, Library Company of Philadelphia and Swarthmore College are current participants in the exhibit, which commemorates the centennial of World War I. The exhibit highlights little-known primary and secondary sources held by various institutions in the Delaware Valley region.

 

Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator, says “[T]his sprang out of an initial collaboration with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, with Villanova’s Special Collections and Digital Library team as the coordinators and hosts of this project. A large and growing number of institutions in the Mid-Atlantic currently contribute content as well as a number of academically affiliated and independent scholars and researchers, including several Villanova University faculty and graduate students.”

kaisar77-191x300

Foight explains, “The goals over the next four years include to prioritize digitization of little-known primary and secondary sources on the Great War held by institutions in the mid-Atlantic and to share descriptions of held content for both the public and the scholarly community. The website itself will host a set of curated shorter articles authored with illustrations drawn largely from this newly available content. A number of Digital Humanities projects, including an independent crowd-sourced genealogical data collection and mapping of the Great War dead of Philadelphia, will be worked on with the scholars involved in the exhibition.”

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania explains that the website will contain images, memoirs, diaries, periodicals, “contextual essays, news of commemorative events, interactive data, and geographical information system (GIS) mapping. The project aims to promote the use of these materials to students, scholars and the public, and to commemorate the services and sacrifices of soldiers and civilians a hundred years ago.”


Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Poster image from National Archives. Photo Kaiser William II. Digital Library@Villanova University

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Frances (Mimi) DiLenge Retires

MIMI

Mimi DiLenge

Frances (Mimi) DiLenge, Academic Integration technical specialist, retires at the end of June after working for more than twenty years in Falvey Memorial Library. She was hired by Susan Markley in the Periodicals Department.

After the Library was reorganized by former Library Director Joe Lucia, DiLenge began working for Jutta Seibert, Academic Integration team leader. As part of her duties with Academic Integration, DiLenge works with the reference librarians. She is also among a group who trained to work at the Information Desk, working first for Theresa Bowden, then with Jackie Mirabile (both now retired). When the Information Desk was discontinued, DiLenge became a supervisor in Access Services as her secondary assignment. She also transcribes handwritten documents for the Digital Library, reporting to Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator.

Interim Library Director Darren Poley says, “Her work with Academic Integration and at the desk is appreciated. … [Her] smiles and good cheer have been a great encouragement to staff and patrons/guests alike.”

“Mimi,” says Jutta Seibert, “has been an Academic Integration team member since the very beginning in 2006. Her positive outlook and approachable nature will be much missed. Mimi never got tired of tracking down missing books and clearing up local holdings information so that catalog records could be updated. This is important behind-the-scenes work that is often neglected because it takes so much time and dedication and yet it is such critical information for librarians and patrons alike. Mimi made sure that documentaries and feature films which are actively used in the classroom were converted from VHS to DVD. She managed the annual review of lost and long overdue books and recently assisted librarians with a long overdue inventory of the print collection. Most patrons will know Mimi from her work at the information and circulation desk where she assisted patrons for many years,” Seibert adds.

DiLenge lived in Broomall as a child. She graduated from Immaculata College (now Immaculata University) with a bachelor’s degree in French. She received her master’s degree in Library Science from Villanova University and worked as an elementary school librarian before starting her family. DiLenge worked as a travel agent for a number of years before coming to Falvey and says “I continue to keep my hand in the travel business.”

“My retirement will allow me to spend more time with grandchildren, travel, garden, sew and do some volunteer work,” she says.


Article and photo by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Demian Katz receives Lifetime Pop Culture Achievement Award

FOIGHT-&-KATZ2

Michael Foight (right) presenting the award to Demian Katz (left).

As part of the VuPop Popular Culture and Materials Conference each year, a worthy conference attendee is awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award for activities related to the preservation and scholarship of that specific material type. This year’s recipient is Demian Katz, library technology development specialist from Falvey Memorial Library. Demian is one of the world’s foremost acknowledged bibliographers and collectors of print interactive fiction and appreciated by gamebook fans all over the internet for Demian’s Gamebook Web Page, an international reference guide to interactive books, solitaire role-playing, and game-inspired fiction.

Katz recently donated more than 2,500 print game books and other related materials to the Department of Special Collections at the University of California Santa Barbara.  The Demian Katz Gamebook Collection (Mss 294) is now currently open for research using the Online Archive of California primary resource finding aid.

For more information on this year’s VuPop conference, visit here. For more on the interactive fiction genre, visit here.


 

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Let the light shine

Light

Happy Summer!

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Say Hello to Summer: What to Read on the Longest Day

2014-06-04 15.57.00After a long, blustery and snow-filled winter, many of us were more than eager to prematurely whip out the sunscreen and sandals and hit the beach this Memorial Day, which has been dubbed by most as the start of the summer season. However, what most people don’t realize is that summer doesn’t officially begin until the summer solstice, which takes place this year on June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere. This day is often referred to as “the longest day” because we experience the most hours of sunlight that we will all year long. The extra hours of light will be a welcomed gift for many, especially after the cold and dreary winter that we’ve had.

So, wondering how you can embrace impending summer and take advantage of the extra precious hours of light? Here at Falvey Memorial Library we can make one inspired suggestion: sit outside and catch some of those rays with a big fat book and an ice-cold drink! In fact, there are a number of books that you can check out directly from Falvey to help you properly celebrate the “the longest day.”

Several prominent authors have written stories that take place over the course of a single day. As you will discover after reading these books, a lot of action can transpire within a mere 24 hours!

Books that take place over the course of one day:

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Saturday by Ian McKellan

Seize the Day by Saul Bellow

Ulysses by James Joyce

Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry

Or why not slow down and take on an extra-long book to help kick-off summer? You will have enough reading light to last you all day!

Long books that we suggest reading:

A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

Make sure to check out a book from Falvey and, if you’re feeling especially ambitious, even snag two from our shelves. You might as well take full advantage of the longest day that we’ll see all year and give a proper welcome to the summer season!

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David Uspal Upholds Library Tradition – Receives the Latest Facultas Award

Uspal & Facultas AwardDavid Uspal, senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications, received the Spring 2014 Facultas Award on May 20 at the annual University Faculty Staff Picnic. Uspal is the seventh Falvey Memorial Library employee to receive the Facultas Award. The late Therese Dougherty received the Fall 1996 Facultas Award, followed by Bente Polites, Special Collections and reference librarian, fall 2004; Phylis Wright, Interlibrary Loan Office, spring 2006; Domenick Liberato, Access and User Assistance, fall 2007; Barbara Quintiliano, Instructional Design Librarian, fall 2008; and Susan Ottignon, research librarian, spring 2012.

The Facultas Award is presented each fall and spring semester by the Faculty Congress to “acknowledge and honor the contributions of staff members of the Villanova community,” “focus attention on the vital, yet often unnoticed, services essential to the smooth and efficient functioning of the Villanova community, especially the academic faculty,” “recognize persons who would not be otherwise recognized …” and “reinforce among our fellow faculty the importance and diversity of staff support work in all areas of the University.” The Facultas Award constitutes a plaque and a Wildcard gift certificate.

This is Uspal’s second University award. The University Staff Council presented a Work Process Improvement (WPI) award to him in spring 2013 for the interactive map of Falvey Memorial Library that he developed.

Uspal says, “I want to thank Villanova University and Falvey Memorial Library for bringing me on board three years ago and the Technology Development team and the Digital Library team for being supportive of our efforts in the realm of Digital Humanities. A big thank you to all the students and faculty for helping us pilot our way through our initial Digital Humanities projects. Finally, a special thanks to Laura Bang, the Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Aurelius Digital Scholarship initiative, who has masterminded Villanova’s push into the Digital Humanities universe and without whom this award would have been impossible.”

Interim Library Director Darren Poley comments, “David Uspal is a wonderful asset to Falvey. His blend of deep knowledge as an information technologist with an ever cheery disposition and excellent people skills is incredibly rare. We are indeed fortunate to have David in the Library where he works so well with both staff and the patrons we serve.”

Uspal relaxes by reading and playing board and video games/interactive fiction. His interest in interactive fiction is aptly shown by his involvement with VuPop 2, an annual conference which explores pop culture and mass media.

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Last Modified: June 18, 2014