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New Graduate Assistant Joins Communication and Service Promotion Team

Michelle Callaghan, Graduate Assistant, Communication and Servic

Michelle Callaghan, a native of Williamstown, N.J., joined Falvey’s Communication and Service Promotion team at the end of August. In 2013, Callaghan graduated from Widener University, Chester, Pa., with a bachelor of arts degree in English. She is currently enrolled in Villanova’s Department of English graduate program.

After receiving her master’s degree, she hopes to teach English but explains, “I am exploring career options that incorporate my passion for digital technologies, multimedia, internet communities and writing. Over the next two years I intend to work on diversifying my skills in a way that may be applicable to many fields, so I’m not planning a future path too concretely – I only plan to approach the creative working world with a sense of play and entrepreneurship.”

Reporting to Joanne Quinn, Communication and Service Promotion team leader, Callaghan writes for the library blog, promoting and reporting campus events; she also edits articles for Falvey’s print newsletter. She says, “I am thrilled to be working at Falvey Memorial Library. I feel like I’m becoming involved in modern library functions at a very pivotal time in library history. I’m excited to explore the implications of the changing information landscape and excited to see how I can contribute.”

Her hobbies include indoor rock climbing, musical theater and video games. “I’m a geek,” she adds, “I’m involved in a few internet fandoms.”

Watch for Michelle’s new column, Cat in the Stacks, which will appear most Thursdays in the Library News.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

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Foto Friday: For those we lost

Window

I have climbed the highest mountains
I have run through the fields
Only to be with you
Only to be with you.

I have run, I have crawled
I have scaled these city walls
These city walls
Only to be with you

But I still haven’t found
What I’m looking for
But I still haven’t found
What I’m looking for.

Song Lyrics from I still haven’t found what I’m looking for by U2.
Stained glass window in Corr Hall Chapel.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management

 

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September 11, 2001 Remembered

Since the attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, when many American lives were lost or changed forever, thousands of books and articles have been written on the subject. A small sampling of books, along with special issues of the Villanova magazine and a copy of The Villanovan, are on display on the first floor near the service desk. A basic search of the library catalog for “September 11″ will bring results of more than 5000 books and many more thousands of articles. An advanced search combining September 11 and terms such as terrorism, national security or emergency management will give you more specific results.

Never forget.

remembering 911 b

remembering 911 a

remembering 911 c

 

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Falvey Welcomes its New Interim Director

BOB DEVOS

Robert DeVos, PhD, associate vice president for instructional analysis, professor, mathematics and statistics, became Falvey Memorial Library’s new interim director this summer. He has accepted this new role in addition to his existing responsibilities with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Dr. DeVos agreed to an interview to discuss his new position.

GD (Gerald Dierkes)—Why did you take on the role of interim library director? 

RD—I have worked closely with [Rev. Kail C. Ellis, PhD, OSA, vice president for academic affairs, Department of Political Science] since 1997 as associate dean when he was the dean and again for the last 3 years as associate vice president and he as the VPAA. He asked me to take on the additional responsibility and I accepted it.

GDWhat do you consider the library director’s role/purpose at Falvey Memorial Library?

RD—I can only give you my perspective. Anyone in an administrative position has the responsibility of dealing with resources. These resources can be people, money, equipment, etcetera. The library director’s position is to administer the resources given to the Library. These involve trying to make good decisions:

  • On hiring (There are several vacancies, and I felt strongly that we should hire permanent staff in the non-librarian positions. A new director might change how the Library functions with regard to librarians, but the non-librarian staff will be needed independent of a new direction for the Library);
  • On the use of current staff;
  • On space allocations (possible change in some office space); and
  • On the use of the budget.

GDWhat do you find most exciting about this job? Why?

RD—I have had many roles at VU and enjoy the challenge of learning something new. In all of my previous roles, I have found that when I leave a position, I leave with having made some new friends. I look forward to that happening here.

GDWhat about the Library surprised you when you started working here?

RD—The many different roles of the librarians—I did not know much about the large educational role that they carry. I also was surprised as to the many events run by the Library.

GDWhat do you consider the Library’s role/purpose at VU? What do you think are the major issues facing the Library today? 

RD—I will mention a few major issues that I see.
1. Given the changes in administration, the morale is low. This is
…..difficult to change, but I hope by being open and available we
…..can move forward.
2. Structure of the staff: When the new director is appointed, that
…..person will probably reorganize. I am trying to make things work
…..and will avoid a reorganization since we can’t keep changing.
3. Resources: With budgets being cut or not rising at the same level
…..as costs, journals, etc. need to be cut. Space is always a problem.
4. OLE [Open Library Environment]: Many staff want to implement
…..[OLE] next summer, but there are also a large number who are
…..saying let’s wait. I am having difficulty in knowing the best path.

GDWhat is an area of improvement you would like to make in the Library?

RD—Ask me this in a few months.

GDWhat role does/will the Library have in Villanova University’s Strategic plan, for example, to become a national research university?

RD—One cannot have quality programs without journals, data bases and books. These costs need to be built into the budget as programs are added. Whenever any new degree is proposed, the library director does get to comment. That person should make sure these costs are added.

Although the library staff knows that at some point a new, permanent library director will be hired, it’s been challenging not knowing who or when, or what changes to the Library that person will make. It helps to have an interim library director who recognizes and understands this challenge. The library staff is grateful for Dr. DeVos, his leadership and his support.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Mood Board: Robert LeBlanc

Ever wonder how your favorite librarians soak up information in their everyday lives? Wonder no longer! Today, in the first of a series of link-laden, resource-ridden micro-interviews with a series of smart people, First Year Experience/Humanities Librarian Robert LeBlanc shares his ‘mood board’ of modern information consumption … and how he feels about consuming ice cream and espresso.


Rob LeBlanc and Helpers packing books for distribution

So, Rob, where do you get your news?
Reddit and Huffington Post… but mostly Reddit… LOTS of Reddit… probably TOO much Reddit…

Do you have a favorite app?
Shazam. How else do you find new music?

iOS, Android, or other?
iOS, because I like things that are simple and work.

What are you currently reading?
Ghost Story by Jim Butcher and The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. Both are awesome.

Very nice. What podcasts are you into?
Radiolab and This American Life are my go-to podcasts, but I listen to various science/geek-oriented ones as well.

ROB-MOODHow do you feel about social media? If you use it, who do you follow?
I feel about social media the way I feel about ice cream; a little bit now and then is nice, but any more than that makes me feel bloated and unhappy. I follow Ricky Gervais, George Takei, and Jon Stewart to name a few.

What is your morning information routine?
I wake up and do some local area research to locate espresso beans. I utilize my manual dexterity, intense training and an analog machine to make the espresso. I drink said espresso. I then wait an hour or so before checking email, Facebook, etc. I’ve found that’s the safest way for all involved.

I agree! Non-caffeinated emailing is mighty risky. Now, the big question, if you could only have access to one database for the rest of your life, what would it be?
As a civilian, Wikipedia, because it’s wicked huge and wicked comprehensive. As a librarian, JSTOR, because it is academically huge and academically comprehensive.

Thanks, Rob!


For more information on Rob LeBlanc’s role as a First Year Experience/Humanities Librarian, and his advice to first year students, check out last year’s interview.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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In Honor of the Birthday of Our Lady, Sept. 8

attachment

Truly you are worthy to be blessed,
Mother of our God, the Theotokos,
You the ever blessed one, and all blameless one,
And the Mother of our God.

You are honored more than the Cherubim,
And you have more glory, when compared, to the Seraphim;
You, without corruption, Did bear God, the Logos;
You are the Theotokos; You do we magnify.

Higher than the heavens above are you,
And you are much purer than the radiance of the sun;
You who have redeemed us from the curse which is upon us;
The Lady of all people, in hymns, do we honor you.

From the great multitude of my sins, ill am I in body, ill am I also in my soul;
I am fleeing to you, the one who is all-blessed,
The hope of all the hopeless,
Please come bring help to me.

Lady and the Mother of Him who saves,
Receive the supplications of the lowly who pray to you;
Mediate between us and the One you brought forth;
O Lady of all people, intercede for us.

More than a beautiful piece of ancient poetry translated into English, the above is a hymn of magnification (a megalynarion) to the Blessed Virgin Mary, which incorporates a prayer of earnest and humble request to her as the Mother of God. This liturgical ode to Our Lady is slightly modified in the Office of Consolation in the Byzantine Catholic tradition, a tradition which is an Eastern rite of the Catholic Church.

Although broken into stanzas above, the Megalynarion is sung as a whole in the service of Paraklesis in Eastern Orthodox churches. A beautiful recording of this prayer of supplication to the Theotokos is performed by Eikona on “PARAKLESIS – The Mother of Light.”

The first two stanzas are the  Ἄξιον ἐστίν = Axion estin (in Greek) or Достóйно éсть = Dostóino yesť (in Slavonic), a classic theotokion; a hymn-prayer to the Theotokos, Mary, Mother of God. For more on this title for Mary, read “Mary the Theotokos (‘Birth-Giver of God’),” Dr. Mary B. Cunningham’s chapter in the collection of essays entitled The Orthodox Christian World, p. 189 ff.

The first part of the Axion estin (the first stanza above) is a troparion revealed AD 980 by the Archangel Gabriel to a monk on Mount Athos. (“Mt. Athos is the monastic republic on the Chalkidiki Peninsula in Greece. It is in many respects the spiritual heart of the Orthodox world.” Clark Carlton, The Truth: What every Roman Catholic Should Know About the Orthodox Church, p. 15.) An older sticheron (the second stanza above and the second half of the Axion estin) was originally composed ca. AD 750 in honor of the Theotokos by Saint Cosmas of Jerusalem, the 8th cen. hymnographer, and Bishop of Maiuma the ancient port city of Gaza.

The remaining three stanzas are from the “Canon of Supplication to the Most Holy Theotokos” (aka, the Little Paraklesis), which originated with Theophanes of Nicaea who died AD 818 (and who is also remembered as Theophanes the Confessor). He is quoted as having written, “It cannot happen that anyone, of angels or of men, can come otherwise, in any way whatsoever, to participation in the divine gifts flowing from what has been divinely assumed, from the Son of God, save through his Mother” (Michael O’Carroll, Theotokos; a theological encyclopedia of the Blessed Virgin Mary, p. 241).

The understanding of the Virgin Mary as Mother and Mediatress is further developed in the West by authors such as St. Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort (in the 17th century). In fact her role in salvation history, the maternal love of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and her spiritual maternity to the all the faithful was fully recognized by the fathers of the Second Vatican Council (cf., Chapter 8 of Lumen Gentium), and in the writings of many popes before and after Vatican II.

Pope Paul VI in the 20th century wrote, “The Blessed Virgin’s role as Mother leads the People of God to turn with filial confidence to her who is ever ready to listen with a mother’s affection and efficacious assistance” (Marialis Cultus §57) in an apostolic exhortation “For the Right Ordering and Development of Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary,” which is included in the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops publication Mary in the church[remove extra spave]: a selection of teaching documents.

St. Pope John Paul II, in the late 20th century, spoke often of the Mother of God (see Mary, God’s yes to man : Pope John Paul II Encyclical letter, Mother of the redeemer, and  Theotókos : woman, mother, disciple). Pope Benedict XVI, in the early 21st century, wrote in his first encyclical letter God is Love, “Mary has truly become the Mother of all believers. Men and women of every time and place have recourse to her motherly kindness and her virginal purity and grace, in all their needs and aspirations, their joys and sorrows, their moments of loneliness and their common endeavours. They constantly experience the gift of her goodness and the unfailing love which she pours out from the depths of her heart. The testimonials of gratitude, offered to her from every continent and culture, are a recognition of that pure love which is not self- seeking but simply benevolent” (Deus Caritas Est §42).

For a good introduction to the Byzantine Catholic tradition overall, see the DVD, “An Introduction to the Eastern Catholic Church.” Some useful books in the reference collection (on the Learning Commons in Falvey) that are good for exploring the Eastern Christian tradition are The Blackwell dictionary of Eastern Christianity, The encyclopedia of Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and Creeds & confessions of faith in the Christian tradition.

Photo from the National Catholic Register http://www.ncregister.com/site/article/byzantine-beauty


darren_edArticle by Darren G. Poley, Scholarly Outreach team leader and theology librarian. 

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Foto Friday: Catalog Week – Then & Now

Which do you prefer, the card catalog or the online catalog?

Austin Hall library

 

online catalog

 

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Catalog Week: How to Add Comments to an Item

CATALOG2

Did you know you can add a comment to an item’s catalog record? This video shows how to add comments to an item right from within the catalog (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Throwback Thursday: Remembering Mary Ann Griffin, DA

Mary Ann Griffin

Has it really been 30 years since Mary Ann Griffin, DA, first took on the position of library director? Dr. Griffin, whose life and career were cut short in 1995 and for whom the library’s Griffin Room is named, made a lasting impression on the staff who worked with her and on colleagues across campus.

As Rev. Dennis Gallagher, OSA, PhD, said in a previously published blog, “Dr. Griffin always kept [the Beatitudes] of Jesus Christ before her as her own personal ‘plan of action.’” Fr. Gallagher honored Dr. Griffin as “a dreamer” and “a seeker of truth,” like St. Augustine.

 

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‘Cat in the Stacks: Healthy Minds

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, ‘Cat in the Stacks.’ I’m the ‘cat.’ Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.

“Mens sana in corpore sano” is a Latin aphorism typically translated as “a sound mind in a sound body.”

As we finish off the second week of the semester, your brain might be feeling a little fuzzy. Your feet might be dragging. You might be marking up your fall calendar with all of the projects, due dates, readings and lectures noted within your looming pile of syllabi. You’re thinking, hey, is teleportation a thing yet? Or maybe you’re considering replicating Hermione Granger’s Time-Turner because there just isn’t enough time in a day for all of these commitments in your life.

I feel you. I have been known to madly tailor my daily agenda in desperate search of an hour to breathe, and just for the sake of saving time I sometimes skip that trip to the gym or sacrifice sleep or eat a fast grab-n-go meal instead of a healthy dinner.

Don’t do that.  As you can guess, it’s not a good idea.

When it comes to education, physical and mental health can define your success. Study skills and research tools are fantastic, but they can only go so far when the gray, lumpy organ in your skull is in no mood to cooperate. We all have heard how to stay healthy – eat well, sleep well, get exercise, take mental health breaks – but when our schedules fill up, these goals might be the first to slide down the priority list. We think we’re saving time by skipping these healthy habits to work and work and work some more, but by skipping them, we are in effect making our reading, writing and research hours less efficient, and losing more time overall.

hand draws brain sign

In order to realize our potential as scholars, we have to try to maintain sound minds in sound bodies. Although intense study sessions and long hours in front of a computer can make you feel like an amorphous brain floating around, bodiless, in some unreality far beyond your chair, you are not. All of your knowledge, education and skills are bundled up inside your actual physical head in your actual physical body, and that actual physical body needs to be maintained. Only when the body is healthy can the brain work at full capacity.

hiding face bookI throw down the gauntlet. Move around. Eat some leafy food. Avoid sleep debt. Meditate. Be gentle with yourself. Then, next time you delve into a thick article for class, you might not have to reread the opening sentence twelve times before it sinks into your sleep-deprived mind (been there, done that).

Mens sana in corpore sano.

We can do this.

 


Resources:

Student Health Center, which also houses the University Counseling Center

Fitness Centers on campus

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Last Modified: September 4, 2014