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Quick Hits: Halloween

This Halloween, as you indulge in the typical horror film, candy eating and apple bobbing, try to think about all of the scary things that surround you daily. You might not even realize how terrifying the Villanova experience actually is, so the following are some of the top scary moments at Villanova that we all experience year-round:

1. Losing Your Wildcard

The two phases you go through when you lose your Wildcard are extreme shock/frustration and depression when you realize the replacement card costs $30.

 

2. Falvey West

I am pretty sure I see this guy every time I go into the Falvey West Stacks

 

3. Scary Tunnel

It is scary enough walking underneath a train line, but the fear is compounded by the sound of a million crickets chirping and the flickering lights.

pic

I feel like every time I make it to the other side I just escaped from the cave in The Descent.

descent

4. Running out of points before the end of the semester

Cue the frantic call to Mom detailing how you are on the verge of death from starvation.

 

5. Tolentine Hall

Frankly, the entire building deserves to be on this list, with the seemingly endless hallways and the 19th century Gothic look. Even the chairs in the basement are meant to scare you

 

6. Squirrels

The squirrels around campus are vicious and bold. I would not be surprised if I saw this on campus this Halloween:

Pumkin

 

7. Amtrak Trains

The exact expression on people’s faces when they first experience the Amtrak train careening down the tracks:

 

 

8. Getting around on campus at night and just missing the shuttle

The campus is especially eerie at night, and your only escape from loneliness and despair is slowly pulling away from you:

 

9. Losing a library book

 


No, we will not steal your soul like in the movie Mortal Kombat, but it is still a scary experience. To avoid this, remember to check your library account online and renew your material.

Browse our collection for Halloween inspired movies and books. Have a fun and safe Halloween.

(Gifs provided by Reactiongifs.com and Giphy.com.)

Quick Hits by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

 

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Dig Deeper: W. Ian Lipkin, MD, Mendel Medal Recipient

LipkinVillanova University has named world-renowned epidemiologist and “microbe hunter” W. Ian Lipkin, MD, as the recipient of its 2014 Mendel Medal, in recognition of his groundbreaking work in the development of genetic methods for microbial surveillance and discovery, as well as his research into infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and West Nile Virus.

Named “the world’s most celebrated virus hunter” by Discover Magazine, Professor Lipkin’s scientific contributions include the first use of genetic methods to identify an infectious agent, discovery of the implication of West Nile virus as the cause of encephalitis in North America in 1999, invention of MassTag PCR and the first panmicrobial microarray, first use of deep sequencing in pathogen discovery, and molecular characterization of more than 500 viruses. In 2003, at the height of the SARS outbreak, Professor Lipkin traveled to China at the invitation of the World Health Organization, the Chinese Minister of Science and Technology and the Vice President of the Chinese Academy of Science to co-direct research efforts and train Chinese microbiologists how to test for the virus. More recently, he was the sole external investigator invited by the Ministry of Health in Saudi Arabia to assist in identifying reservoirs and vectors for transmission of the MERS coronavirus.

First awarded in 1929, Villanova’s Mendel Medal is given to outstanding contemporary scientists in recognition of their scientific accomplishments. The medal honors 19th century Augustinian friar and scientist Gregor Johann Mendel, Abbot of the Augustinian Monastery, Brünn, Austria, (now Brno, the Czech Republic), best known as “the father of modern genetics,” for his discovery of the celebrated laws of heredity that bear his name. Previous medalists have been Nobel Laureates, Lasker and MacArthur awardees, and recipients of the National Medal of Science.

(Copy Source: http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2014/0324.html)

Professor Lipkin will deliver the 2014 Mendel Medal Lecture “Of Microbes and Man: A Delicate Balance” at 2:00 p.m. on October 31 in the Villanova Room of the Connelly Center. The event is free and open to the public.

To learn more about epidemiology, consult the sources below, selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.


Dig Deeper

Major databases:

PubMed

Web of Science

Scopus

 

Our epidemiology journals:

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Search/Results?lookfor=Epidemiology&type=AllFields&sort=year&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Epidemiology%22&filter%5B%5D=format%3A%22Journal%22
A selection of the best introductory epidemiology books from our collection:

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/MyResearch/MyList/2665


RS4532_FML164_RobinBowles_019_EDITDig Deeper links selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.

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Foto Friday: HAPPY Halloween!

Pumpkin

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Throwback Thursday: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Semester

It was Fall 2012, the Sorcerer’s Semester, and we spent the whole semester, every Wednesday, reading all 7 of the Harry Potter books.

“Our readers came away with fond memories, a rekindling of their childhood love of the Potter books, and a few extra ounces (pounds?!) in the form of tasty snacks, including “authentic” butterbeer, contributed and arranged by our fabulous Outreach team.”

sorcerers

 

Winner of the Sorcerers' Semester marathon reading prize!

Winner of the Sorcerers’ Semester marathon reading prize, Chelsea Peláez!

harry missing

 

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‘Cat in the Stacks: This Is Halloween

Cat Pumpkin Head

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


One of my favorite holiday movies ever, in a bizarre and subtly terrifying sort of way, is Disney’s The Nightmare Before Christmas. It’s a sort of cute moniker, too, for the weeks before finals. Finals—the nightmare before Christmas.

But let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves.

Instead, let’s talk about the ways in which this oddball stop-motion Tim Burton film mirrors the college experience in a few genuinely poignant and completely uncontrived ways!

The Seven Holiday Doors

Holiday Doors

Kind of like how you set endurance goals during a long run by mile markers, college is often about breaks and holidays and classes off. Halloween is usually the last hurrah before the bear of the stretch toward finals—Thanksgiving is like a feast at a pit stop—and Christmas Town is the finish line.

 

“And I, Jack – the Pumpkin King – have grown so tired of the same old thing.”

Jack snowflake

The Nightmare Before Christmas is all about a skeleton questioning his major. Or, rather, his career as the Pumpkin King. But he’s so good at what he does! It’s his calling, his purpose! But he needs to kidnap Santa and have a Christmas expedition to figure that out. Look, sometimes you get bored doing the at which things you’re best. Don’t let it discourage you. Ride it out and soon enough you’ll often recall what made you love what you’re doing in the first place.

 

“Everyone, please now, not so fast – there’s something here that you don’t quite grasp.”

Town Meeting

When Jack tries to explain what Christmas is to the residents of Halloween Town, they can only compare it to Halloween. They just don’t get it. It seems clear as day to Jack, but is a foreign language to the Halloween Town ghouls and monsters. Sounds a lot like the beginning stages of writing a thesis, doesn’t it? Keep at it.

 

Zero, with your nose so bright…

Zero nightmare

Jack had Zero, his ghost dog (essentially Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer), to light his way for his sleigh.  You have Google, librarians, and professors. Onward!

 

The Mayor of Halloween Town

Mayor Halloween

I have nothing enlightening to say about this one—only that if you feel like this is you, every day or every hour of the semester, you’re in good company.

Have fun on Halloween! Be safe.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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The Great War: WWI through a literary lens

WWI-era American Library Association ad; retrieved from http://boingboing.net/2010/02/14/wwi-pro-reading-ad.html

WWI-era American Library Association ad; retrieved from http://boingboing.net/2010/02/14/wwi-pro-reading-ad.html

Due to the shifting social and economic factors at the turn of the 20th century and the rise of the middle class, more people than ever before, from all levels of society, were literate. The rise in literacy contributed to not only the prolific creation of literature during and after WWI but also to the demand for and consumption of this literature.

Though both professional and amateur authors wrote throughout the period, much of the literature that we think of as World War I literature was written after the war during the 1920s and 30s and often dealt with issues such as shell shock, the difficulty that soldiers had returning to their old lives after the war, and the effect losses from war had on families.

The study of war literature was for a very long time, and still is to an extent, focused largely on male authors. It wasn’t until the late 20th century that the writing of women during and about the War began to receive attention. Catherine Reilly’s 1981 anthology, Scars Upon my Heart: Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War, is the first work strictly dedicated to examining women’s poetry and prose from World War I.

World War I also ushered in a new era of literature and heavily influenced literature in the decades following it. The world was faced with a sense of disillusionment that it had never faced in such a way before, and genres such as the hard-boiled detective novels sprung up with war veteran protagonists embittered and changed by their pasts, while authors such as H. P. Lovecraft explored themes of chaos, apathy and despair through a new kind of horror story.

Below I have selected a number of titles and web resources to literature written both during and following WWI that deals directly with the war and its impact.

Because not all literature written during the War directly deals with the War, I have also created a timeline depicting a selection of major literary publications alongside a selection of historical events between the years of 1914 and 1922.

Link to Timeline:

http://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline/latest/embed/index.html?source=0Avs0oI7XtkWUdEhzel9pNFRMdFlNOXVmNHdGbTY1M0E&font=Bevan-PotanoSans&maptype=toner&lang=en&height=650

Parade’s End by Ford Madox Ford (book and beautiful HBO mini series)

Ford, Parade's End old cover

Parade’s End is a tetralogy by the English novelist and poet Ford Madox Ford published between 1924 and 1928. It is set mainly in England and on the Western Front in World War I, where Ford served as an officer in the Welsh Regiment.

Originally published as four individual novels Some Do Not (1924), No More Parades (1925), A Man Could Stand Up (1926), and Last Post (1928) they are now typically combined into one volume as Parade’s End. In 2012 Parade’s End was adapted as a five part miniseries for the BBC/HBO, with script by Tom Stoppard, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Rebecca Hall.

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

imgres-1

All Quiet on the Western Front, first published in 1929, is a novel by Erich Maria Remarque, a German veteran of World War I. “The book describes the German soldiers’ extreme physical and mental stress during the war, and the detachment from civilian life felt by many of these soldiers upon returning home from the front.”

Made into a film in 1930 only a year after its publication, All Quiet on the Western Front was the first all-talking non-musical film to win the Best Picture Oscar. In 2009 it was announced that there would be a remake, but thus far nothing has come of it.

Scars Upon My Heart: Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War by Catherine Reilly 1981

1797237-1

Scars Upon My Heart is a poetry anthology collected by Catherine Reilly,” and is the first work strictly dedicated to examining women’s poetry and prose from World War I.

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks

harlem_hellfighters_cover_art_a_p

This is a contemporary graphic novel by Max Brooks, author of World War Z. It focuses on the 369th infantry, an African American unit that spent more time in combat than any other American unit and returned home to face extreme discrimination from the US government.


The Waste Land
By T.S. Eliot.

Though not directly about the war The Waste Land published in 1922 is clearly a modernist product of a post war world of disillusionment, a theme carried forward in Eliot’s other writings such as his 1925 poem “The Hollow Men.” When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Eliot tried to join the U.S. Navy but was rejected for physical reasons.

First World War Poetry Digital Archive

Link to Eliot’s registration for WWI

Link to war related resource from our new online Eliot resource

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The Highlighter: Explore Falvey’s Many Blogs

 

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

In addition to the Library News blog, Falvey publishes several subject-specific blogs on its site. This video shows how to access the library’s subject-specific blogs.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Foto Friday: Say it with flowers

VU-Flowers2

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

 

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Throwback Thursday: Homecoming 1962

The crowning of a Homecoming Queen is no longer part of the Homecoming tradition at Villanova University, but new events have been added. This year’s festivities include the football game (v. Morgan State), an outdoor festival, evening receptions, Hoops Mania, and the Dream for Eileen 5K. (If your interests this weekend are more scholarly, the library will maintain regular hours.)

Check out the October 31, 1962 issue of the The Villanovan in the Digital Library to read more about Homecoming in 1962.

Homecoming queen

Alumni Association President, Edward Donahue, crowns the Homecoming Queen, Pat Farren, on November 2, 1962. (Photo courtesy of University Archives)

 

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Last Modified: October 23, 2014