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All Dressed Up and Somewhere To Go: A Chill Lineup of Spring 2015 Events

Window Shopping: All dressed Up and Somewhere To Go

The current exhibit in Falvey’s cultural window to the left of the entrance to Holy Grounds is “All Dressed Up and Somewhere To Go: Spring 2015 Events: Scholarship, Culture, Poetry.” Especially appropriate for this January weather, the exhibit features penguins and snow. “All Dressed Up and Somewhere To Go …” promotes events which will be held in Falvey during the spring semester. Window Shopping: All dressed Up and Somewhere To Go

Three shelves are filled with glass blocks displaying photographs and signs advertising planned events. Books written by speakers are also included as are some origami penguins.

A large sign hangs at the top center of the window. On the left is a photograph of a penguin’s head; on the other side is the title of the exhibit. The three shelves in the window are filled with glass blocks; books by some of the speakers are beside their photographs. Small black signs provide the date, time and location of various events. Artificial snow is scattered on the shelves and on the glass blocks.

Window Shopping: All dressed Up and Somewhere To GoFraming the exhibit, Kallie Stahl, graduate assistant for the Outreach team, painted snow in the upper left and right corners of the window. She also painted snow across the bottom of the window. On each side stands a group of three penguins.

Joanne Quinn designed the exhibit and its graphics. Molly Quinn, a work study student for the Outreach team, assembled the photographs and text panels in the glass frames, created the origami and scattered the snow, creating the wintery ambience.


imagesArticle and photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (1/28)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


CAVE Information Session(s). For faculty from across campus. Q&A session with a tour of the facility led by Dr. Frank Klassner. Wednesdays throughout the semester from 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. in room 206. Questions? Contact: frank.klassner@villanova.edu


Resume Review Day. Recruiters from local businesses will be available to critique resumes and perform mock interviews one-on-one with students. 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Questions? Contact: maureen.piotti@villanova.edu


What is ‘America’s Unofficial Ambassadors’ Internship Program? The Center for Arab and Islamic Studies present, Stefan Cornibert, program coordinator for America’s Unofficial Ambassadors. 4:30-5:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: joyce.harden@villanova.edu


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


Charlie Hebdo Où est Charlie?

Charlie Hebdo Où est Charlie? A conversation about the recent events in Paris, for the entire university community. Speakers’ Corner, Falvey Memorial Library, Thursday Jan. 29, 5:30-7 p.m. ACS Approved. Faculty, staff and students are invited to participate in an open conversation about the recent events in Paris. Following brief remarks by several members of the faculty, the moderated forum will be open to all. Organized by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures’ program in French and Francophone Studies and the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies.

If you have questions, please contact: joyce.harden@villanova.edu


IT’S NATIONAL #LIBRARYSHELFIE DAY!

Who knew, right? Following the lead of our friends from the New York Public Library, today has been declared National #LibraryShelfie Day! So we’ll join in on the fun. Visit the library and post a pic of yourself in front of your favorite bookshelf (Selfie + shelf = shelfie. Get it?) Hashtag it #libraryshelfie along with a Villanova identifying hashtag as well, and post it on your favorite social media platform. If we spot them we’ll feature our favorites on our blog and social media channels.


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OH CANADA

Today is fiftieth anniversary of the iconic and stunning Canadian flag. Queen Elizabeth II proclaimed its usage on January 28, 1965, after long, acrimonious debate. The single, red maple leaf was chosen over the usage of a Union Jack, fleur-de-lis or any stars and stripes so as to be “sufficiently Canadian” according to the Dean of Arts at the Royal Military College of Canada, George F. G. Stanley’s memorandum to Parliament member John Matheson, which also includes his original doodles of the flag’s projected design.

Here, a excerpt from ex-Poet Laureate Billy CollinsCanada. How many of the books that he refers to have you read?

O Canada, as the anthem goes,
scene of my boyhood summers,
you are the pack of Sweet Caporals on the table,
you are the dove-soft train whistle in the night,
you are the empty chair at the end of an empty dock.
You are the shelves of books in a lakeside cottage:
Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson,
Anne of Avonlea by L. M. Montgomery,
So You’re Going to Paris! by Clara E. Laughlin,
and Peril Over the Airport, one
of the Vicky Barr Flight Stewardess series
by Helen Wills whom some will remember
as the author of the Cherry Ames Nurse stories.
What has become of the languorous girls
who would pass the long limp summer evenings reading
Cherry Ames, Student Nurse, Cherry Ames, Senior Nurse,
Cherry Ames, Chief Nurse
, and Cherry Ames, Flight Nurse?
Where are they now, the ones who shared her adventures
as a veterans’ nurse, private duty nurse, visiting nurse,
cruise nurse, night supervisor, mountaineer nurse,
dude ranch nurse (there is little she has not done),
rest home nurse, department store nurse,
boarding school nurse, and country doctor’s nurse?


FOLLOW US

Follow us to find out what’s happening at Falvey!

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QUOTE OF THE DAY
“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who’ll decide where to go…” – Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.

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The Highlighter: Where can you post announcements in the Library?

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

You want to post your announcement in Falvey, but where are the approved posting sites?

This video shows how and where to display your announcement in the Library. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (1/27)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


Legal Writing Guest Speaker: Erik Lillquist, Esq. 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. in room 205. Questions? Contact: michael.j.pennington@villanova.edu


Food For Thought Discussion-VITAL. Faculty is invited to join in the discussion each month features a different topic. The discussions provide a forum for networking and exchanging ideas with colleagues from across campus. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: gabriele.bauer@villanova.edu


CAVE Information Session(s). For faculty from across campus. Q&A session with a tour of the facility led by Dr. Frank Klassner. Tuesdays throughout the semester from 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. in room 206. Questions? Contact: frank.klassner@villanova.edu


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


CHARLIE HEDBO OÙ EST CHARLIE?

Charlie Hedbo Où est Charlie? A conversation about the recent events in Paris, for the entire university community. Thursday Jan. 29, 5:30-7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. ACS Approved. Faculty, staff and students are invited to participate in an open conversation about the recent events in Paris. Following brief remarks by several members of the faculty, the moderated forum will be open to all. Organized by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures’ program in French and Francophone Studies and the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies.

Questions? Contact: joyce.harden@villanova.edu


ARE YOU READING ALONG WITH MARK?

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He already broke Amazon with his first choice, Moises Naim’s The End of Power. Now Mark Zuckerberg has his second pick, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, one that you’ll find in Falvey’s catalog as well as through E-Z Borrow and ILL.

The Facebook founder and CEO, who has over 30 million followers, has launched a new book club on Facebook as part of a challenge to himself, for 2015, to read a new book every two weeks. Whether or not he’ll have Oprah’s golden touch remains to be seen, but you have to love someone using their influence to get folks to read.


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

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Do you follow the library on YouTube? We have a great array of Falvey-produced videos old and new that are instructional and entertaining. Newcomers to the channel are archival copies of Gerald Dierkes’ Highlighter videos, which debuted last semester, featuring helpful insider tips on getting the most out of the library’s resources. View and rewind to your heart’s content!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Be steady to your purposes and firm as a rock. This ice is not made of such stuff as your hearts may be; it is mutable and cannot withstand you if you say that it shall not.” – Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.

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Alert: Library Hours on Tuesday, January 27

The library will follow the University decision and open at 10 a.m. today, January 27.

610-519-4271

610-519-4270

 

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Mood Board: Bill Greene talks Triceratops, Sci Fi, and 40 Years at Falvey

This week’s Mood Board features Falvey Memorial Library staff member Bill Greene. Bill’s varied spectrum of interests and skills makes him one awesomely multifaceted person! Read on to learn more about Bill, dinosaurs, science fiction, and to follow some links to great books and resources.


BILL MOODBOARD

Hi, Bill! So I saw on Facebook that you had a major work anniversary recently. How many years have you been here now?

40. It’s hard to believe, isn’t it?

What is your earliest Falvey memory?

Actually, it wasn’t much of a memory, but it was my first day here. I was a student. Way back—I can tell you the date! I was a student. I knew it was gonna be a life-changing thing, y’know. The date was May 7, 1968. It was a Wednesday, and I was working in acquisitions. I was working with books in print. I was checking the orders to make sure they were correct. The whole first day was really strange, because the previous day, I had known nothing about working in a library. But then my mother said to me “[one of our neighbors] called, and she wanted to know if you’d like to work at Villanova’s library. “ So I said, “Yeah, why not?” I just could’ve said, you know, “Nah, forget it, I don’t wanna do that” and that would’ve totally changed my life. But I said yes. Next day, I was in there, that quick. It just grew from there, it wasn’t planned.

And forty years later, look at you!

Yeah, still here!

What are the first three words that come to mind when you think of Falvey Memorial Library?

Fun. Novel.* People.

*”I was considering, I still am, writing a novel with this place as the background. With so many experiences, I have plenty to pick from.”

Read any periodicals, magazines, journals?

I read Discover Magazine, because mainly, it’s science, which I am interested in. It’s science, but they write it so I can understand it. Once in a while I read Scientific American… and I wonder, why did I bother reading this? I didn’t get anything out of it. They’re too technical, I think, in some cases. Discover is a good magazine, especially if you find an article on something you care about.

Smithsonian-Triceratops-skull-cast-0002a

via Wikimedia Commons

What’s your favorite dinosaur?

My favorite dinosaur is Triceratops. Do you have any idea what Triceratops looks like?

 I do!

Very good! I figured you would. He’s one of the more common ones, the three horn face, that’s what it stands for in Latin, I guess. I couldn’t tell you why I like him. My favorite dinosaur is not Tyrannosaurus Rex because that’s who everybody’s favorite dinosaur is. [Triceratops] is always defending himself against Tyrannosaurus Rex, supposedly.

I can’t even pronounce my favorite.

Yeah, what is it?

 I think it’s… Parasaurolophus?

Parasaurolophus, you like him? He’s cool! Thinking about this question [of my favorite dinosaur], he came up. Parasaurolophus is the one with the horn. He’s the one they’re thinking, recently, in the past five years or so, they’re figuring, the reason for the horn? All of the duck-billed dinosaurs, which she is one of, went around making noises and the different noises they made could tell each one what individual was from his group, what species it was from. The air went through the horn, and made all kinds of honking noises.

That would be so neat to hear!

Wouldn’t it? A herd of ‘em?

Kubla_Khan_titlepage

via Wikimedia Commons

Current favorite poet? Any poet you’ve read, new or old, that makes you think “yeah, them!”

One that pops to mind is Coleridge. “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” “Kubla Khan.” When I was reading him, he hit me right away.

What is your information routine? How do you get news and info?

Most of my news I probably get from TV. I don’t get any papers, because they all come to the library. I don’t have time from it, for one thing. Yeah, the news. Channel 6 is what I usually have on.

Do you visit any websites on a regular basis?

Amazon. Goodreads.

What are you going to do after this interview?

Probably going to continue work. A lot of the things I do, I have to wait for someone to bring it to me, like the mail, and the stuff from UPS, and the stuff that’s over in Garey waiting to come over to be scanned. But chances are pretty good that I’ll probably go down and start scanning stuff. Lot of books to scan, articles.

Can I mention something you haven’t asked me? I’m a big science fiction person.

Great! When did you discover you love science fiction?

I was around 12, give or take a year. I think the first book I read was R is for Rocket by Ray Bradbury, short story collection. And I read the whole book, and I kept thinking – this is just my state of mind at the time, you know, I’m 11 or 12 – I’m thinking, “gee, these are good stories, he writes them so well and they’re good, but they all end badly! I don’t like that, they all end badly!” And now I’m coming from a different perspective, being as old as I am; they do end badly, but you know, they’re really cool stories. I wish I had written them. It doesn’t bother me quite as much, and I can see why he did it the way he did it. ‘Cause it would’ve been a stupid story if it didn’t have a bad ending.

What is your favorite Bradbury work?

Fahrenheit 451, of course.

Any other favorite science fiction authors besides Bradbury?

Alfred BesterTheodore Sturgeon. Any of the best [science fiction] novels are written back in the fifties, I think, because now science fiction just can be anything. How do you define science fiction anymore? There is a definition for it, but a lot of the science fiction today is really on the edge. There’s no science in it! So what if it takes place on Mars? There’s no science in it.

I just read a book called The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber. The thing that makes it different is it’s a combination of science fiction and romance, and I’m thinking, I can’t think of any books, good books, like that. I would highly recommend it.

Thanks for chatting with me, Bill!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (1/26)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


Food For Thought Discussion-VITAL. Faculty is invited to join in the discussion each month features a different topic. The discussions provide a forum for networking and exchanging ideas with colleagues from across campus. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: gabriele.bauer@villanova.edu


CAVE Information Session(s). For faculty from across campus. Q&A session with a tour of the facility led by Dr. Frank Klassner. Mondays throughout the semester from 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. in room 207. Questions? Contact: frank.klassner@villanova.edu


English Department Coffee Break. 4:00-6:00 p.m. in the second floor lounge. Questions? Contact: heather.hicks@villanova.edu


THIS!!
Oreo-Red-Velvet
These puppies are hopefully hitting the stores soon! Enter the name of a book you lurve at the front desk beginning Monday, Feb 2 to win one of five boxes we’ll be giving away on Valentines Day!!


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

pinterest-icon-vectorAre you a pinner? We are, too! Check out our Pinterest.

 

 

 


HERE’S ONE BOOK WE WON’T BE ADDING TO THE COLLECTION

…at least not for any longer than a day or so.


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“As long as the heart beats, as long as body and soul keep together, I cannot admit that any creature endowed with a will has need to despair of life.” – Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.

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Burns Night Supper: Celebrating the Poet and the Haggis

What follows is a two-part article: part one is about Robert Burns, Scotland’s favorite poet, and part two is about The Haggis Project. 

Robert Burns: The Poet

bard robert burnsBurns is widely considered Scotland’s national poet and was at the forefront of the Romantic Movement. Burns wrote poetry in both Scots, a form of Gaelic spoken in Scotland, and English. In addition to his Romantic poetry, Burns was known for his political and civil commentary, and for writing and collecting folk songs.

Burns Night is a celebration of the life and work of Robert Burns, and is held on 25 January each year (Burns’ birthday). One of the traditions of Burns night is to have a Burns Supper, involving traditional Scottish dishes and poetry recitations. The National Trust for Scotland Foundation USA has information and videos for how to organize your own Burns night, which can be found here.

They also offer these “Top Tips” for a successful Burns Supper:

  • For dinner, serve haggis with neeps (turnips) and tatties (potatoes). Before eating, recite two poems by Robert Burns: the Selkirk Grace and ‘Address to a Haggis.’
  • After dinner, two humourous toasts are made over a dram of whisky. ‘The “Toast to the Lassies” is given by a male guest to the women present. In the “Reply to the Laddies,” a female guest responds humourously to the earlier toast.
  • End the evening with Burns’ best known song ‘Auld Lang Syne.’

Robert Burns: The Haggis Project

In search of the main ingredients for a Burns Night Supper, and looking forward to a road trip, I invited my sister, Michele, to join me for a leisurely drive to Berks County. We had great weather and bantered on about what would come to be known as The Haggis Project (or That Which Shall Not Be Named).

bechtelsville signAfter passing through the village of Bechtelsville, which took a few seconds, we wound our way through hills and trees as the sun created shadowed landscapes.

It was beautiful, even in winter. We could just as easily have been in the hills of Scotland. When we arrived, we found the Manieri Meats office and main building located next to the Manieri family home. Across the street was a picturesque barn and behind the main building was a small waterfall.

manieri barnThe Manieri family has been in business for four generations beginning with the first generation in Abruzzi, Italy. Stephen, Gwen, and their adult daughter, Lorena, were very open about all aspects of their business. A USDA agent, also very friendly, was on site the whole time. The Manieri’s only take advance orders by phone and don’t have a storefront for walk-in business.

manieri officeVisiting this small, family-owned operation in Bechtelsville was like seeing old friends. The office probably hasn’t changed much since Elmo Manieri started the business and the whole family seems to be on a first-name basis with their customers. We waited while another customer oversaw the handling of his order, ensuring that everything was done according to Dhabihah methods, and conforming to halal as dictated by the Muslim faith.

Bobbie sheep

We named the sheep Bobbie.

Now it was our turn. Lorena brought out my order of sheep stomach, heart, liver, and tongue. I’ll spare you the gory details. Luckily, I had brought along a cooler and we stopped for ice on the way back. When I got home, I wrapped the offal in Ziploc bags and stowed it in the fridge. I had researched many recipes, read the history of Robert “Bobbie” Burns, visited websites on the history of haggis, and watched videos of other people making haggis, but nothing prepared me for the awful truth of handling sheep offal.

My favorite video featured Chef Jochen Kern at the Berjaya University College of Hospitality, which ends with an authentic Scots recitation of Robert Burn’s Address to a Haggis. After all was said and done, I decided to loosely follow Alton Brown’s recipe with hints from other recipes when I thought it made sense or looked interesting. Little did I know that his parting words, “if you serve it at all,” would haunt me for days.

Finding the other non-sheep ingredients wasn’t too difficult, but the only store to sell mace (the spice) was the Bhavani food market in Exton, Pa. Most authentic recipes call for sheep lungs, however, the sale of them is banned in the United States.

The first step requires soaking the sheep stomach in heavily salted water overnight. Use a large plastic container with a tight-fitting lid and several tablespoons of kosher salt. The next day I rinsed the stomach several times with white vinegar and water.

Ingredients:

1 sheep stomach (Feel free to substitute with sausage casing. Really. I’m completely serious.)

1 sheep liver

1 sheep heart

1 sheep tongue

½ lb. steel cut oats, toasted

3 medium yellow onions, minced

½ lb. beef kidney suet (found at Wegman’s in meat freezer section)

1 tsp. mace (found at Bhavani food market)

½ tsp. each of dried herbs (rosemary, thyme, sage)

1 ½ tsp. kosher salt

½ tsp. black pepper

1 tsp. nutmeg (freshly ground if you have it)

Optional: Beef stock

After you have soaked the sheep stomach overnight, start cooking the sheep offal in the largest stock pot you own. Fill the pot with water, or beef stock, add some kosher salt, and cook at a slow simmer for 2 hours. Save the strained broth; you’ll need it later.

bowl of haggis mixWhile the offal is simmering, start chopping the onions, measure the spices into small bowls, mince the suet, and toast the oats on a large baking sheet. Once the offal is finished simmering, remove it and let it cool. Most recipes instruct one to mince the offal, and one site advised using a meat grinder (who has a meat grinder at home?), but one site, to which I am eternally grateful, suggests using a food processor. It works beautifully, breaking down the meat into more of a sausage texture.

Using the largest bowl you own, combine all of the above ingredients, including the meat and about 2 cups of the broth you saved and, using your hands, mash it all together until it holds together a bit.

Stuff the filling into the sheep stomach leaving enough space to either tie the stomach closed or stitch it closed with a chef’s needle and string. For the first time in my life, I used latex kitchen gloves. It was the only way I could bring myself to handle the sheep stomach.

haggis cutUsing the same large stock pot, add fresh water or beef stock and simmer the haggis for 3 hours. Be prepared for an odor that will be reluctant to leave your nostrils. I even started a homemade potpourri on the stove. Truthfully, that only made matters worse.

Serve the haggis with neeps and tatties (mashed turnips and potatoes). I know that Robert Burns and others toast the haggis with a dram of whiskey, but I toasted mine with a glass of Elderberry Black Ale. Bagpipes and drums are optional.

haggis serving

In closing, and in all honesty, I tasted the haggis and will probably never eat it again. My son-in-law, Mike, loved it. He’s right up there with Andrew Zimmern when it comes to food.

Further Reading:

www.RobertBurns.Org is also a great source for Burns information, and they too have a set of instructions for a Burns Supper.

The Poetry Foundation

Book- Burns : poems

Book – A Burns companion

Robert Burns: The Poet and and Further Reading written by Sarah Wingo, Team Leader of Humanities II Liaison Team & Subject Librarian for English Literature and Theatre.

Robert Burns: The Haggis Project written by Luisa Cywinski, writer on Communication & Service Promotion Team and team leader, Access Services.

 

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‘Caturday: Cat Clan

“Wearing of the plaid on a snowy day. It just makes sense. What’s that you say? Haggis? I won’t hear another word of that Burns verse, lassie. It should be an Address to the Noble Cat!”

(Look for the Burns Night Supper blog on January 25!)

caturday cat clan

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Foto Friday: Weekend Concert

Music

From the Daily Graphic, v.VI, no.597, Saturday, February 6, 1875.

Image compliments of Falvey Digital Library.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Last Modified: January 23, 2015