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New Week: Summer Event listings, Hours & More!

NEW-WEEK2

OK, Monday – Let’s Do This!
If you’re coming to Falvey this summer, here’s all you need to know to get you through the week!


This week’s hours:

Monday – Thursday:   8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday:   8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday:   10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sunday:   Closed


Save the Date:

Summer IGR Workshop. Tuesday, June 30. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Room 205. Dialogue about current events, personal identities, and how who we are influences how we see the world and interact within it. The summer workshop is an educational experience about issues of social justice, preparing faculty and staff to engage dialogues in situations where understandings and listening are needed. Questions? Contact: brighid.dwyer@villanova.edu

 


Selection, [2] p., “H. F. Hitchler, Jeweler, Plymouth, Pa.”, Trade card scrapbook - See more at: http://blog.library.villanova.edu/digitallibrary/2015/06/19/content-roundup-third-week-june-2015/#sthash.aN34pM2E.dpuf

Selection, [2] p., “H. F. Hitchler, Jeweler, Plymouth, Pa.”, Trade card scrapbook

Newly available in the Digital Library
A wide variety of digitized materials are newly available this week. Enjoy listening to the 11-part Wind Instrument Workshop from the Philadelphia Ceili Group! Read an issue of the Ardmore Chronicle newspaper from 1909 or one of the Irish Republic issues from 1868. Or consider getting lost in a scrapbook featuring trade cards – colorful 19th century business advertising – from Pennsylvania and other locals. – All this and more to explore!


Apple iOS9 Preview

Have you seen all  new enhancements coming in iOS9 and announced earlier this month at Apple WWDC? Apparently, Siri’s going to get a lot smarter, with our devices making proactive responses and suggestions about what we want before even we are aware of them. And since we’re total font geeks, we’re excited about the new San Francisco font – a bit of a Helvetica clone – which is specifically designed for legibility on Apple devices, even the smallest screens. Also new features are: split -screen multitasking on the iPad, a personalized news feed, keyboard commands for cut/copy/paste (ideal for those of us with uncoordinated fingers) and the simple pleasure we’re most excited about, checklists in Notes! Rumor has it the changes will be downloadable in the fall!


 New on bookshelves…

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…is Queen Victoria’s children’s book, The Adventure of Alice Laselles, written by young Princess Victoria in a marble composition book when she was just ten years old. The book will be published this week – almost 200 years after its writing – by Royal Collection Trust. The book tells the story of a young girl sent away to live at a boarding school.


Bloomsberg Businessweek devotes double issue to computer coding

You may be interested in last week’s issue of  Bloomberg Businessweek, which included a 38,000 word essay on the importance of coding written by programmer Paul Ford. According to editor Josh Tyrangiel, the issue addresses “widespread ignorance about code at a time when software plays an increasingly central role in people’s lives.” Find the issue in our current periodical section on the first floor.


There certainly must be an app for that

Since July 2008, 100 billion apps have been downloaded from the App Store; over 20% of them games.


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Ah, silly fly! will you advance?
I see you in the sunbeam dance:
Attracted by the silken glance
In that dread loom;
Or blindly led, by fatal chance,
To meet your doom.

-From The Spider and The Fly by Patrick Branwell Bronte, born June 26, 1817 and brother of Charlotte, Emily and Anne. Click here to read the rest of the poem – and for gosh sakes – close the screen door!



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St Joseph, Patron Saint of Fathers

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Saint Joseph is a protector of the Augustinian order. Early in the fifth century, Saint Augustine addresses the issue of how Saint Joseph can be said to be the ‘father’ of Jesus, since God is the father of Christ Jesus, the Incarnate Logos, and Saint Joseph never had any conjugal relations with the Theotokos, the Blessed Virgin Mary.

“On account of that faithful marriage both of them deserved to be called the parents of Christ. Not merely was [Mary] called his mother, but as the spouse of Christ’s mother, [Joseph] was called his father, for he was both of these by his mind, not by the flesh. Though he was [Jesus Christ’s] father only by his mind and she was his mother also by the flesh, they were both parents of his humble condition, not of his lofty condition, of his infirmity, not of his divinity.” (Augustine, “Marriage and Desire” I. 11.12. Translated by Roland J. Teske, S.J. The Works of Saint Augustine: A Translation for the 21st Century. Volume I/24: Answer to the Pelagians, II, 37. Edited by John E. Rotelle, O.S.A. Hyde Park, New York: New City Press, 1998. Many volumes from this contemporary edition in English of The Works of St. Augustine are available via the Past Masters database.)

In a signed article, “Marriage” (from Augustine Through the Ages: An Encyclopedia, edited by Allan D. Fitzgerald, O.S.A., available via Falvey’s Digital Library), David G. Hunter states: “Augustine’s initial response to Pelagian critics of his views on marriage is found in the first book of De Nuptiis Et Concupiscentia, addressed to Count Valerius (ca. 418).” De Nuptiis Et Concupiscentia, “Marriage and Desire,” book one by St. Augustine is the work quoted above.

Around the time of the writing of this work, Augustine’s doctrine of grace was vindicated. The Catholic Church affirmed against the perfectionism of Pelagianism that human will is ineffective in doing good, including in marriage, unless first perfected by God’s gracious gift of participation in the divine life of the holy Trinity. A preeminent father of the church and one of the four great doctors of the Latin, i.e., Western, church, the sobriquet of Saint Augustine, the spiritual father of the Augustinian order, is doctor of grace.


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Celebrate Freedom by Exploring Juneteenth and Harriet Tubman resources

 

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Today is the sesquicentennial of Juneteenth, the nineteenth of June, and the day that marks the end of slavery in the United States. Though the Emancipation Proclamation was signed two and a half years earlier in 1863, at that time without mass media, it actually took the physical arrival of Major General Gordon Granger and his Union soldiers in Galveston, Texas to announce to the last of the held slaves there that the Civil War had ended and that they were free. Hence, birthing a new Independence Day.

Juneteenth not only commemorates the abolition of slavery but also is growing to be a multicultural and global celebration of  freedom in general. Specifically, it is an opportunity to build cultural awareness, and in many communities, to educate young African-American generations about the struggles of their past and how their ancestors prevailed. Gratitude and pride, story and song make up many Juneteenth celebrations.

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Also in recent news is one of the country’s most legendary abolitionists, Harriet Tubman. Ms. Tubman recently emerged the winner of a public survey (Womenon20s.org) to nominate the first woman to appear on U.S. paper currency. Though the selection, and even the process, was subject to debate (e.g., some see it as hush money, some see it as ‘money’,) the accomplishments of this brave abolitionist in her very dangerous times cannot be minimized. News broke Wednesday, June 18, that the $10 bill, which now depicts Alexander Hamilton, will definitely feature the portrait of a woman, though her identity is yet to be determined. The Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew will determine the person by the end of 2015, with the new currency appearing in 2020 — the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment.

Dig Deeper

Explore further the intriguing times after the Emancipation through the following Falvey resources about Juneteenth and Harriet Tubman, curated by history liaison, Jutta Seibert. She’s also included some links on what actually goes into making the U.S. dollar bill. Contact Jutta here for her guidance through your research needs and also for her help navigating the wealth of books and online library materials.

1. African American Studies Center Online (AASCO)
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.oxfordaasc.com/
AASCO is a great source about African American history in general and Harriet Tubman’s life in particular. It includes the Encyclopedia of African American History: 1619-1895, Black Women in America, and the African American National Biography project. AASCO also includes primary sources and images.

2. Books about Harriet Tubman in the Falvey collection:

3. Black Abolitionist Papers, 1830-1865
Find numerous digitized primary sources written by and about Harriet Tubman.

4. African American Newspapers: The Nineteenth Century
Follow the life of Harriet Tubman as chronicled in the African American Press.

5. Historical New York Times, 1851-2009

Tubman’s obituary from March 14, 1913:

http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/97412990?accountid=14853

A report about the white resistance to emancipation in Texas from July 1865:
“The Negro Question in Texas.” New York Times (1857-1922), Jul 09, 1865.

http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/91903644?accountid=14853.

6. Secondary sources about the tradition of Juneteenth celebrations in the Falvey collection:
Kachun Mitch. “Celebrating Freedom: Juneteenth and the Emancipation Festival Tradition.” In Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial, edited by Thomas J. Brown, 73-91. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. [E641 .R45 2011]

7. A Brief History of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS66871

8. All you ever wanted to know about the dollar:
Currency Notes. [Washington, D.C.]: Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 2004.

http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS66873


Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What Do Villanova Students Really Think about the Library?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you wish the Library knew about your needs as a student?

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Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku—“In computer science every semester they would introduce some new courses … and some [new] textbooks … But when we go to the Library website, we never find those books. It would be helpful if you would coordinate with the other departments and … get the information, like what the new courses they are offering, and get in contact with the faculty who are offering those courses and order the books, not to issue them to the students but at least two or three different copies in the Library. That would be great because one of the courses we have … I did not get … even a PDF version, anything like that in the Library. So it would be great if you would coordinate with the different departments and get at least the online versions rather than the printed versions of the books.”

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Thomas Modayil Jacob—“And the need [for computer science textbooks] is urgent in the computer science and the computer engineering departments ‘cause there a lot of fields we have courses on, like semantic web and big data, which don’t have textbooks as yet. So I think that the Library needs to coordinate with the professor to at least have those relevant papers or, if there is a textbook, then the textbook, at least in the PDF form.”

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Ramesh Krishna—“Since we don’t have the books, we need to take a loan from other libraries … we need to get the books that are not available here we need to get the loan from others libraries. So that would be helpful if … instead of loaning from other libraries it would be better if have those books in our Library.”

Editor’s note—The Library does not purchase textbooks for current courses unless the titles are specifically ordered by faculty.
One reason – Expense: New editions are often published in a year or so, rendering the textbook we would have purchased obsolete.
Another reason – Competition: The Library doesn’t want to be in competition with the University Shop.
Library staff, however, have begun to explore ways that Falvey can better meet our students’ need for textbooks. Keep checking this blog for updates.

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Rebecca Snow—“I think it’s important to have quiet places. We have one upstairs, but maybe another room would be good. [Otherwise,] I like the way it’s set up; I think it’s good.”

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Shaina Smolowe—“More printing for free would be incredibly helpful.”

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Stephanie Mader—“I like the quiet study room upstairs. I like the access to the computers. I like the coffee room; it might be nice if that were open during the summer.”


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The Highlighter: Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases Like a Pro

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Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Happy Bloomsday!

Ireland-Bloomsday-Fest

Fans of James Joyce and his novel, Ulysses, commemorate the Irish author and that novel on June 16: Bloomsday. Named for Leopold Bloom, the main character in Ulysses, Bloomsday is celebrated on that date because Ulysses spans a single day—June 16—in Dublin.

Why June 16?—So that’s the reason Bloomsday celebrations occur on June 16. But why did Joyce set his story in June 16? The date, when Joyce chose it, did not coincide with the anniversary of a major world event. Nor does it appear to carry significance to Joyce in his personal life.

Could Joyce have chosen June 16 to commemorate the beginning of his romance with Nora Barnacle? Or perhaps he selected that date because it would not be in competition with that of a significant anniversary or holiday. Could Joyce have imagined that setting the actions for Ulysses on a neutral date would result in his novel receiving its own commemoration every June 16?

Answers could be found at the following Free, Local Event

Marylu HillThe Rosenbach Museum & Library, which has a manuscript of Ulysses— handwritten by Joyce—in its collection, hosts a Bloomsday celebration every June 16. This event includes a reading of Ulysses. Beginning at 9:30 a.m., Philadelphia area dignitaries, such as Edward G. Rendell—45th governor of Pennsylvania, will each read a passage of Joyce’s novel. This year’s roster features Marylu Hill, PhD, director, Villanova University Center for Liberal Education.


To Dig Deeper, explore the following links, prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader: Humanities II and also subject librarian for English, literature and theatre:

Free Downloadable audiobook of Ulysses
The Cambridge companion to James Joyce
Joyce Reading from Ulysses
Our Special Collections holdings for Joyce
The James Joyce Centre website


Sarah WingoSarah Wingo
Team Leader: Humanities II
Falvey Memorial Library
Villanova University
610-519-5183


Article by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team, also contributed to this article.


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Octocentenary! 800th Anniversary Celebration of the Magna Carta

Magna_Carta_(British_Library_Cotton_MS_Augustus_II.106)

The Magna Carta (originally known as the Charter of Liberties) of 1215, written in iron gall ink on parchment in medieval Latin, using standard abbreviations of the period, authenticated with the Great Seal of King John. The original wax seal was lost over the centuries.[1] This document is held at the British Library and is identified as “British Library Cotton MS Augustus II.106″ One of four known surviving 1215 exemplars of Magna Carta. Source Britishlibrary.png This file has been provided by the British Library from its digital collections.

John, by the grace of God King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine and Count of Anjou, to his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, foresters, sheriffs, stewards, servants and to all his officials and loyal subjects, greeting. 

Octocentenary! Truly, that’s a word you don’t hear everyday!

Though most of its clauses have been repealed, the Magna Carta – celebrating its 800th anniversary today – still stands as a framework and rallying cry against the arbitrary use of political power.

Signed June 15, 1215 by King John in Runnymede, (and not Runnemede, NJ, for those of us who have watched too much local news) this medieval document was composed as a peace treaty between the king and his subjects.

John, according to history (and to this entertaining British Library-produced video narrated by Monty Python’s Terry Jones,) was allowing power to go to his head – having allegedly imprisoned his wife, murdered his nephew, and raising taxes to pay for expensive foreign wars and wasteful expansionism. His barons had had enough and imprisoned John, forcing him to negotiate and follow the rule of law himself. Though most of of the document was rewritten within its first ten years, three of its original clauses still stand in English statute books: one granting liberties to the English Church, one granting certain privileges to the city of London, and third and most important, the right to a trial by jury. To writ:

“No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions,or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land.

See excerpts of the remaining clauses here.

Ideas in the Magna Carta are also reflected in theories of representative government and influential behind the cries of “no taxation without representation” which sparked the American Revolution and ultimately were incorporated into the US Bill of Rights. Worth viewing is the Library of Congress’ recent digital exhibit, Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor. Its overview material states that, “by examining the ways in which Magna Carta has been interpreted in English and American constitutional law and politics, this exhibition demonstrates how principles such as due process of law, the right to a jury trial, freedom from unlawful imprisonment, and the theory of representative government emerged from a tradition that began 800 years ago.”

Library curator Nathan Dorn and Princess Anne view the exhibit. Photo by John Harrington. Retrieved 6/8/15 http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2014/11/pic-of-the-week-princess-anne-opens-magna-carta-exhibition/

Library curator Nathan Dorn and Princess Anne view the exhibit. Photo by John Harrington. Retrieved 6/8/15 http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2014/11/pic-of-the-week-princess-anne-opens-magna-carta-exhibition/

 Can one still view the original Magna Carta?

Yes, If you happen to find yourself in Merrie Ol’ England, you can visit one of three original parchments of the document, or several other locations with amended or later versions. In fact, last week, Princess Anne officially reopened Lincoln Castle after a “multi-million pound refurbishment” that included a new vault for housing that city’s original copy of the document.

Closer to home…Dig Deeper

But if you’d rather save your pounds for a rainy day, you can still get up close and personal with the Magna Carta by viewing the extensive array of Falvey resources gathered by subject librarian for political science and geography, Merrill Stein.

On the famous bronze doors of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, there are eight images; three are dedicated to the Magna Carta (5,6 & 7).

On the famous bronze doors of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, there are eight images; three are dedicated to the Magna Carta (5,6 & 7).

 

Full text of the document and good explanation of the document’s relevance and history from Fordham University.

Full text with annotations; an ed doc.

British Library Digital Collection

National Archives translation

British Library Modern day English translation

EAWC Readings from Medieval Europe

Yale Law School Avalon Project

William Sharp McKechnie, Magna Carta: A Commentary on the Great Charter of King John, with an Historical Introduction, by William Sharp McKechnie (Glasgow: Maclehose, 1914)

Magna carta; the Lincoln cathedral copy

Magna Carta Libertatum (Latin)

University of Oxford Bodleian documents

1215 version

1225 version

Falvey Memorial Library subject search:


Dig Deeper links provided by Merrill Stein, subject librarian for political science and geography. Find Merrill’s contact info here.MerrillStein

 


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New Week: Summer Event listings, Hours & More!

NEW-WEEK2

If you’re coming to Falvey this summer, here’s all you need to know to get you through the week!


This week’s hours:
Monday – Thursday:  8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday:  8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday:  10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sunday:  Closed


BLOOM
New resource for Bloomsday
Burned, banned, impounded, and smuggled in 1922…yet now commemorated with its own ‘day’. Tuesday, June 16 is Bloomsday, a day marked by celebrations that reach far beyond Dublin, the setting of James Joyce’s complex and then scandalous book, Ulysses. Published last year and looking like an intriguing read is Kevin Birmingham’s story of the famous book’s publishing trevails, The most dangerous book : the battle for James Joyce’s Ulysses, available now. Find it: Call Number: PR6019.O9 U6257 2014 Located: Falvey Main – 4th Floor.


Annihilation_by_jeff_vandermeerThe year’s best Science Fiction announced

Last week, Sci-fi fans got some nice ideas for additions to their to-be-read lists with the announcement of the winners of the 2014 Nebula Awards (presented 2015), honoring the year’s best science fiction and fantasy novel, novella, novelette and short story.  Full lists of winners and nominees are listed here. And what better time than a firefly lit night in summer for checking out Falvey’s extensive collection of sci-fi? (Or let us beam down your next favorite futuristic post-apocalyptic tome through interlibrary loan.)


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All the latest from Cupertino

Though not as exciting as his appearance at Hoops Mania in 2011, Drake took the stage at Apple’s WWDC (World Wide Developers Conference) last week – one of the company’s major product/service tweak and demo showcases of the year. The rapper was on hand to promote Connect – a platform that allows musicians to upload material directly to consumers as part of the show which was mostly dominated by Apple’s new music service. Though similar in many respects, it looks like Apple is now poised to compete directly with Spotify. Other iOS enhancements and things only developers could love were also revealed. The Verge was kind enough to compile all Apple’s latest announcements into a 12 minute video.


Selection page [4]. “Type XIV. Roadster, 30 Horse Power, $2,750″: The Autocar

Selection page [4]. “Type XIV. Roadster, 30 Horse Power, $2,750″: The Autocar


Take a spin through this Week’s Digital Library Roundup!

This update brings a number of newly digitized materials to your attention. The final 28 parts of the Hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church finish off the digitization of that important resource. Two photograph albums – one covering the cross-country road trip of three Pennsylvania men during the summer of 1924 and another depicting the reunion trip of a group of World War I veterans back to the battlefields of Europe a year after the war concluded, were added this week. Of significance also is the creation of the Autocar collection of materials covering the Ardmore automotive company. In addition a few new story paper issues and two complete Philadelphia Ceili Group music workshops conclude this set of offerings! – See more, read more here! There’s always something new!


001qAre you familiar with Juneteenth?

Friday, June 19 is the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth, the annual celebration of the end of slavery. Watch our blog for a list of resources curated by History liaison Jutta Seibert. In this video from the Library of Congress, folk musician Mike Seeger performs “Stolen Souls From Africa” an abolitionist song.


Help for those in accelerated classes

Librarians are on hand all week to help you with summer session classes or getting a head start on your fall projects. Let us know how we can help! Check out this Curious Cat post for tips from Falvey’s librarians on how to handle the unique research challenges of accelerated summer classes!


A valuable reminder from Joyce Carol Oates…
…who celebrates her 77th birthday tomorrow.

“We inhabit ourselves without valuing ourselves,
unable to see that here, now,
this very moment is sacred;
but once it’s gone –
its value is incontestable.”

Also celebrating birthdays this week are country singer Blake Shelton (39), actor Neil Patrick Harris (42) and Beatle Paul McCartney, who once wrote, “o-bla-di, o-bla-da, life goes on.” Perhaps the first person to remind us to not the sweat the small stuff was French philosopher Blaine Pascal, born on June 19, 1623, who said, “little things console us because little things affect us.” Moral of the story? Enjoy your week, and don’t forget to stop and smell those roses in front of Mendel Hall.


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Foto Friday: Cool it!

Water

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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Philosophy Librarian Nik Fogle Wins Above and Beyond Award

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Nikolaus (Nik) Fogle, PhD, received the Above and Beyond Award, one of three awards given by the Villanova University Staff Council each year to members of the University staff. He received the award at the University Staff Council Awards Luncheon on May 1.

The criteria for the award are that the recipient “will have performed a significant action or service that: surpasses the requirements of their job description, is voluntary, is unexpectant of compensation in time off or payment, [and] is either within or outside of their scheduled work hours.”

Dr. Fogle joined Falvey in 2012 as the philosophy librarian and Philosophy, Theology and Humanities team coordinator. He works with several humanities departments and programs on campus, providing research assistance, information literacy instruction, and support for a range of collaborative projects.

For the last two years he has held a fellowship in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowships provide recent PhDs with “a unique opportunity to develop expertise in the new forms of scholarly research and the information resources that support them.”

Asked about receiving the award, Dr. Fogle said, “I’m really grateful and honored. I’m so lucky to get to work with so many brilliant, encouraging and thoughtful people.”


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.


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Last Modified: June 11, 2015