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‘Caturday: Poets, Then and Now

Five years ago Christine Simmons, ’10, then editor-in-chief of Arthology, presented the newest issue of Villanova’s student literary-art magazine at Falvey’s Open Mic Poetry Reading. This link will take you to the full blog article that mentions other poets and artists, including the Senior Class Poet of 2010, Emily Southerton, whose work was published in Arthology.

I wonder who will be featured this year at the Open Mic event on April 22.

Christine Simmons

Christine Simmons, ’10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnail‘Caturday feature by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services.


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Foto Friday: Librarian Retrievers!

2015-04-02 16.43.03

Nellie, The Seeing Eye puppy currently being fostered by Library Events & Outreach Specialist Laura Matthews, has been a frequent visitor to the Villanova campus. As you can see, Nellie has taken a special liking to Life and Health Sciences Librarian, Robin Bowles. We think it’s because she has mad respect for how well Robin can retrieve the latest research data and info for patrons.


Photo by Joanne Quinn.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/10)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Theology Department Meeting. 12:30 – 2:30 p.m in room 205. Questions? Contact: karen.cunningham@villanova.edu

Competitive Effectiveness Citation Review Session. 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: Linda.hauck@villanova.edu

Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) Regular Group Meeting. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week on (most) Fridays to play video games in a safe and fun environment. 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge (Holy Grounds). Always accepting new members. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell, PhD,associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Tuesday, April 14 at 4:30 p.m. in room 205. Dr. Sewell will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.


NOM NOM NOM!
The first of two lightning rounds of #NomNomNomatology has begun! The final four are duking it out. Be sure to vote for the winningest foods in some intensely delicious match-ups right here, or vote in person at the front desk in Falvey!
NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY

 


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THAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

unlikely entrepreneursThe excerpt below best represents the “major issues in the history of medicine, women’s history, and immigration history” addressed in Unlikely Entrepreneurs by Barbra Mann Wall.

“In 1877, Sister Lidwina Butler sat in the dimly lit steerage compartment of a trans-Atlantic sailing vessel, her thoughts no doubt shifting between the Ireland she left behind and the New World she would soon embrace. Few in this last great wave of Irish immigrants could have foreseen that this youthful nun would one day become the administrator of a major Catholic hospital.”


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“It is an old maxim of mine that when you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” – The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Write a Poem Today!

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


While planning what to write about today
I looked upon the calendar and thought,
It being April, I should write a poem
For Poetry Month; Thursday’s blog should rhyme!

Turns out rhyming is pretty hard to do,
Instead you’ll have to humor this blank verse.
And catch the times my lines are not ten beats
Since I am not so hot at matching feet.

You should try to do this, too; not easy,
But who cares? A challenge is good for you.
It’s poetry month—there’s no better time!
Maybe you can make yours a little rhyme.

The coolest thing about poetry is
How forms and patterns make it so much fun
To be creative with a direction—
And have a roadmap to beat writer’s block!

If you want to learn more about writing
Poetry, or anything, check the stacks.
This book looks pretty good; I’d read it.
Here’s a collection of poetic forms!

Then there’s spoken word and songs and rap—
All ready for your thoughts and words to join
The party. So give it a shot today!
Be a poet, write a poem, sing a song!

Old letter


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/9)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Search, Capture, Done!  Bibliographies Made Easy with Zotero! 4:00- 4:45 p.m. in room 207. Here’s your chance to learn how to use the powerful citation management tool Zotero. With just a couple of clicks, capture references from databases and search engines and then generate a bibliography in the style of your choice. Get subject search help too! Bring your laptop or Mac. Open to students, faculty, and staff. Questions? Contact: barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu

Irish Studies Conversation Circle. 6:30-8:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact Jerry Sweeney: tighdon@gmail.com


SAVE THE DATE…

Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture featuring Giorgi Japaridze, PhD. Tuesday, April 21 at 2:00 p.m. in the Reading Room. Dr. Japaridze will discuss the extensive research that led him to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award in 2015. Tailored for a general audience, Dr. Japaridze’s talk “Computability, Logic, and Computability Logic” will give an overview of the new line of research introduced by the speaker several years ago, named “Computability Logic.” In the same sense that traditional logic is about providing a systematic answer to the question “What is (always) true?” Computability Logic is about providing a systematic answer to the more general question “What can (always) be computed and how?” This is a long-term program for rebuilding logic into a comprehensive formal theory of computability. Light refreshments will be served.

Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell: Tuesday, April 14 at 4:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Lisa Sewell, PhD, associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.


APPLE WATCH GETS A RELEASE DATE
The Apple Watch will be released on April 24. The cheapest model will run you $350. Are you going to be part of the wearable tech revolution? Maybe interest will explode when they finally look like the concept art (I repeat: concept art! Not real!) below.

Concept art via Jivaldi

Concept art via Jivaldi


NOM NOM NOM!
The first of two lightning rounds of #NomNomNomatology has begun! The final four are duking it out. Be sure to vote for the winningest foods in some intensely delicious match-ups right here, or vote in person at the front desk in Falvey!
NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY

 


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RebelMouseDo you want easy access to a lot of our social media and blog content in one spot? Check out our Rebel Mouse site.

 

 

 


THAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

photograph as contemporary artThe new edition (2014) of The Photograph as Contemporary Art has a revised “introduction outlining the evolution of photography from documentary tool to art form” and an updated chapter that focuses on younger artists who  “employ [contemporary art photography] as part of a wider pan-media practice.”

 

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“But the cloud never comes in that quarter of the horizon from which we watch for it.” – North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Nomnomnomatology: Final Four Food Fight

This week, our battles shift into high gear with our first lightning round. Final Four voting will close Thursday afternoon, so get your votes in quick! And don’t forget that over the weekend, you’ll be determining our ultimate Chompion.

It’s anyone’s game, really, now that we’re down to the cream of the crop, and we have two matches to call.

450px-Stephen_Colbert_presents_Stephen_Colbert's_Americone_DreamBrownies vs. Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream
It’s so close to summer that Ben and Jerry’s is certainly coming in with, well, frozenness in its favor. Even if it’s not hot, the air is starting to smell like summer vacation, and where’s there’s summer, there’s ice cream. While I’d love to say “scoop some ice cream onto the brownie” and call it a win for both, the world just doesn’t work that way. Sorry, brownies—ice cream is going to win this one.

512px-BK-French-FriesFrench Fries vs. Reese’s Cups
Fries have been showing up consistently, week after week, as one of the highest-tallying foods. Are Reese’s Cups amazing? Yes. But this just isn’t their week. I hold fast to the prediction that Fries are going to take all this year.

Frankly, let’s dip the fries in the ice cream, put the ice cream on the brownies, and crumble the Reese’s on top. Now that’s a Super Bowl Sundae!

…Oops. Wrong sport.

Is your stomach rumbling yet? Be sure to vote for our championship game teams online or at the circulation desk in Falvey. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more #nomnomnomatology action.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/8)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Think Tank Meeting. 12:00 – 1:00 p.m in room 204. Falvey Think Tank is an informal group to facilitate discussion, idea-sharing, and play. This group normally meets from 12:30-1:30pm on the second Wednesday of each month. Please feel free to bring along your lunch and we’ll provide snacks! You do not need to attend the whole hour or come every month — feel free to drop in and out as your schedule permits. Questions? Contact: laura.bang@villanova.edu

From EndNote to Zotero Workshops. 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. in room 204. This workshop will show you how to move your citation library from EndNote to Zotero painlessly and how to find all your old favorite features including merging duplicate records, creating a citation from just a PDF, and inserting citations into a Word document or other work. Bring your own laptop to work along or take home instructions for later. Open to faculty, staff, and students of any level. Questions? Contact:  Robin.Bowles@Villanova.edu

APA Demystified. 4:00 – 4:45 p.m. in room 207. Come learn the basics of citing all types of documents: books, journal articles, and websites. Bring your laptop or Mac and get ready to show APA who’s boss! Open to students, faculty, and staff. Questions? Contact: barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

Earth Day 2015: Panel Discussion on Sustainable Solutions. Thursday, April 23 at 10:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Panelists who have devoted their careers to some aspect of sustainability will discuss their work. The challenges and opportunities of working daily to address environmental issues will be discussed. Questions and discussion between panelists and the audience are encouraged. A light continental breakfast will be provided.

Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell: Tuesday, April 14 at 4:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Lisa Sewell, PhD, associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.


ACADEMIC NOTE…

Giorgi Japaridze is Recipient of 2015 Outstanding Faculty Research Award

Giorgi Japaridze, PhD, a professor of Computing Sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has been selected as the recipient of its 2015 Outstanding Faculty Research Award for his scholarship in logic and computer science. The award recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates the highest standards of excellence in research, scholarship and contributions to their field. The Outstanding Faculty Research Award will be formally conferred at the University’s May 15 Commencement ceremony. In addition, Dr. Japaridze will speak about his research in a public talk at 2 p.m., April 21 in the Falvey Memorial Library Reading Room on campus. The talk is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs.

http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2015/0330.html


USE DO NOT DISTURB ON YOUR iPHONE WHEN STUDYING
do-not-disturb-signiOS 6’s new Do Not Disturb feature can be a great help when you’re trying to hunker down and get some work done. You can set it up manually, and all calls and messages are suppressed until you turn it off. But if there’s certain people that you want to be able to get through to you no matter what, you can set up a VIP list (bae, Grandma, your subject librarian, Justin Timberlake, etc.) Simply tap the “Allow Calls From” to allow incoming calls from those you choose. There’s also a “Repeated Calls” setting that allows through anyone who calls you twice within a three minute span – this can cover emergencies situations. For more info, click here. Have you tried it yet? What uses can you think of?


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TumblrWe’re on tumblr. Add us to your infinite scroll! Reblog and like us, too.

 


 

THAT NEW BOOK SMELL: NEW HOLDINGS AT FALVEY

classical science fictionWhat do Frankenstein and Oedipus Rex have in common with Battlestar Gallactica and The Hunger Games? Read one or more of the fourteen essays in Classical Traditions in Science Fiction to find out how “science fiction, the genre that is perhaps the most characteristic of the modern world, draws deeply on ancient Greek and Roman mythology, literature, history, and art.”

 


POEM OF THE DAY
If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking – Emily Dickinson

If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Darren Poley Appointed New Curator for the Augustinian Historical Institute

DARREN-&-FATHER

Father Allan Fitzgerald, OSA, STD, and Darren Poley

Darren Poley, Scholarly Outreach librarian and a liaison librarian for the Philosophy, Theology and Humanities team, recently became curator for the Augustinian Historical Institute. The Institute’s previous the director and curator, the Rev. Karl A. Gersbach, OSA, has moved to Chicago. Poley will continue to serve as Scholarly Outreach librarian and liaison team librarian.

Poley originally came to Falvey as a reference librarian and cataloger in 1999. He became an adjunct faculty member in the University’s Dept. of Theology and Religious Studies the following year, where he continues to teach.

He earned his undergraduate degree from Gettysburg College, a master’s degree in religion from the Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary and a master’s degree in library and information science from Drexel University.

falvey-hallThe Augustinian Historical Institute (AHI) is located in Falvey Hall, room 301. It “serves as a resource center for the study of the history of the Augustinian Order.” AHI holds “an extensive collection of materials on the history of the Order” and publishes scholarly works, including studies of St. Augustine. The Institute also collaborates with the International Institutum Historicum of the Order of St. Augustine and other Augustinian institutes.

Villanova University sponsors the Augustinian Historical Institute as a division of The Augustinian Institute. Father Allan Fitzgerald, OSA, STD, is the director of The Augustinian Institute. In his role as AHI curator, Poley reports to Father Fitzgerald. As curator, Poley keeps the collections current and makes materials available to visiting scholars.

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The Augustinian Historical Institute was founded at Villanova in 1971 through the labors of the Rev. Arthur J. Ennis, OSA, who served as its first director (1971-1977). The Institute’s collection contained a large part of the collection of the earlier Augustinian Historical Institute founded by the Rev. Francis Roth, OSA, at Riverdale, NY. Villanova’s Augustinian Historical Institute officially opened April 6, 1973. Following Father Ennis’ term as director, the Rev. Joseph C. Schnaubelt, OSA, was director 1977-1995. Rev. Karl A. Gersbach, OSA, served as the third director from 1995 until 2014.

In addition to serving as a repository for Augustinian history and publishing scholarly works on the same, the Institute has sponsored (with Falvey’s Special Collections) three exhibits: “Thomas of Villanova – 450 Years – and Nicholas of Tolentine – 700 Years: An Exhibit Commemorating Two Augustinian Saints” (2005), “Commemorating 500 Years of the Complete Works of Saint Augustine” (2006) and an exhibit commemorating the 750th anniversary of the Grand Union of the Augustinian Order (2006).

augustinScholars who wish to visit the Augustinian Historical Institute should contact Darren Poley at darren.poley@villanova.edu or call 610-519-6371. Poley’s library office is Falvey, room 234, and he is only in the Augustinian Historical Institute (Falvey Hall, room 301) a few hours a week. One may also call the Augustinian Historical Institute (610-519-7686) and leave a message for an appointment or concerning extended access to the collection.

The Augustinian Historical Institute is dedicated to fostering research: however, materials in the collection do not circulate. Records of AHI’s holdings appear in the library’s catalog.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/7)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Competitive Effectiveness Citation Review Session. Room 204. 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Questions? Contact: Linda.hauck@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

2015 Open Mic Poetry Reading & Arthology Celebration. Wednesday, April 22. 12:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Class of 2015 Creative Writing Contestants, other students and members of the University community will share original work and favorite poems, ranging from the humorous to the thought-provoking to the sublime. This event will also feature the release party of Arthology, one of Villanova University’s student art-literary magazines, which will be available to students for free.


ACADEMIC NOTE…

Giorgi Japaridze is Recipient of 2015 Outstanding Faculty Research Award

Giorgi Japaridze, PhD, a professor of Computing Sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has been selected as the recipient of its 2015 Outstanding Faculty Research Award for his scholarship in logic and computer science. The award recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates the highest standards of excellence in research, scholarship and contributions to their field. The Outstanding Faculty Research Award will be formally conferred at the University’s May 15 Commencement ceremony. In addition, Dr. Japaridze will speak about his research in a public talk at 2 p.m., April 21 in the Falvey Memorial Library Reading Room on campus. The talk is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs.

http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2015/0330.html

 


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What are you reading? If you use Goodreads (by the way, they have an app!), join our Falvey Memorial Library group!

 


NOM NOM NOM!
The Elite Eight of #NomNomNomatology have been chosen! Be sure to vote for the winningest foods in some intensely delicious match-ups right here, or vote in person at the front desk in Falvey!
NOMNOMNOMATOLOGY


POEM OF THE DAY
April is Poetry Month. Check in daily for new verse!

“Hope” is the thing with feathers – (314) by Emily Dickinson

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –

I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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A Movable Feast: Why Easter Does Not Occur on a Fixed Date Each Year

easter-plate

Christmas is always December 25 according to the Gregorian calendar (the calendar used by the Western Church), but the date of Easter varies year to year. One holiday celebrates the birth of Christ, the other His Resurrection. If Christmas is a fixed date, wouldn’t it be logical for Easter also to be celebrated on the same date each year?

Easter is considered “a movable feast” (New Catholic Encyclopedia) and Easter’s date also affects other holy days: Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent; Palm Sunday; the days of Holy Week – Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday – and Pentecost. The earliest date for Easter, March 22, occurred in 1761 and 1818 (I didn’t search further back); it will fall on March 22 again in 2285 and 2353. Easter can be as late as April 25 as happened in 1886 and 1943 and this will occur again in 2038. This year, 2015, Easter is celebrated on April 5.

rabbit

If you are a techie, you can calculate Easter dates for yourself using Easter Algorithm for a Computer Program . The rest of us can use our calendars.

From the earliest years of Christianity, Easter has been its most important feast, and the date of the observance varied. No one day of the week was associated with Christmas, Christ’s birth day, and by about A.D. 400 the western Church had assigned December 25 as the date for the observation of Christmas. The Easter season, however, did have specific days of the week associated with its events and this contributed to the variety of dates on which Easter was celebrated. Historically, it is believed that Jesus held the Last Supper on the 14th day of Nisan (a Jewish month), the date of Passover. The date of Passover was based upon a lunar calendar and Passover did not always fall on the same day of the week. But for Christians, Christ’s Resurrection occurred on a Sunday and therefore Easter should be celebrated on a Sunday. And this led to conflicts which were resolved by the Council of Nicaea (Council of Nice).

250px-Nicaea_icon
In A.D. 325 the Council of Nicaea (Council of Nice) decreed that Easter should be celebrated by everyone, everywhere, on the same day, Sunday, and “that this Sunday must follow the fourteenth day of the paschal moon; that the moon was to be accounted the paschal moon whose fourteenth day followed the spring equinox; that some provision should be made … for determining the proper date of Easter and communicating it to the rest of the world …”  Further refinements were made in 525 and with the adoption of the Gregorian calendar in 1582.

What are a paschal full moon and a spring equinox?

pascal-moon

A paschal full moon is the first full moon after the spring equinox. The spring/March/vernal equinox marks the beginning of spring in our hemisphere and the beginning of fall south of the equator. This year it took place on March 20 at 6:45 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). At the equinox the earth is tilted so that the sun’s light lands equally on the northern and southern hemispheres and night and day are approximately the same length. The date of the spring or vernal equinox can be March 19, 20 or 21. On the day of the equinox, the sun rises due east and sets due west; for the rest of the year until the fall equinox sunrise and sunset points remain northward.

The date of Easter, therefore, derives from a lunar calendar, and its date can vary annually. For the mathematical formula, see Smith, pp. 24-26. Once the date of Easter is determined, the other dates are calculated: Ash Wednesday, the first Wednesday before the first Sunday of Lent (count back six weeks from Easter to the first Sunday of Lent, then go back to the Wednesday before the Sunday); Palm Sunday is the Sunday before Easter; Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday are observed in the week immediately before Easter Sunday. Pentecost (also known as Whitsunday) is the 50th day after Easter; it marks the day when the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles and others while they were praying. After receiving the Holy Spirit, the Apostles went forth to preach.

The calculation of the date of Easter and the other holy days associated with it involves a combination of faith and mathematics, but one hopes that the above information helps explain why Easter does not occur on a fixed date each year.

Dig Deeper:

Holy Holidays! The Catholic Origins of Celebration (2011). Greg Tobin.
Passover and Easter: Origin and History to Modern Times (1999). Paul F. Bradshaw and Lawrence A. Hoffman, editors.
“The Date of Easter: A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Department of Mathematics, Villanova University” (1954). Sister Mary Bernita Smith, RSM.
The Regulation of Easter, or the Cause of the Errors and Dfferences [sic] Contracted in the Calculation of It Discover’d and Duly Consider’d. (1735). Henry Wilson.
The Great Cicle [sic] of Easter Containing a Short Rule, to Knowe Yppon [sic] What Day of the Month Easter Day will Fall … (1584). John Pett.

 

 


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Stock images from INGimage. 


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Last Modified: April 4, 2015