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Foto Friday: Don’t leave home without one (or two)

 

Books-03

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Home Before the Leaves Fall: World War I Online Exhibit Launch

WIONLINE COUNTDOWN

Home Before the Leaves Fall: A Great War Centennial Exposition,” an online exhibit, will be launched Thursday evening, June 26, at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Peter John Williams—an attorney, an amateur historian with a special interest in World War I, and a life-long Philadelphia resident—will speak on life in Philadelphia during World War I (1914-1919). Williams is the author of Philadelphia: The World War I Years. Both digital and physical materials will be on display at the launch and reception.

keep-him-freeVillanova University, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society, Chemical Heritage Foundation, College of Physicians, Library Company of Philadelphia and Swarthmore College are current participants in the exhibit, which commemorates the centennial of World War I. The exhibit highlights little-known primary and secondary sources held by various institutions in the Delaware Valley region.

 

Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator, says “[T]his sprang out of an initial collaboration with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, with Villanova’s Special Collections and Digital Library team as the coordinators and hosts of this project. A large and growing number of institutions in the Mid-Atlantic currently contribute content as well as a number of academically affiliated and independent scholars and researchers, including several Villanova University faculty and graduate students.”

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Foight explains, “The goals over the next four years include to prioritize digitization of little-known primary and secondary sources on the Great War held by institutions in the mid-Atlantic and to share descriptions of held content for both the public and the scholarly community. The website itself will host a set of curated shorter articles authored with illustrations drawn largely from this newly available content. A number of Digital Humanities projects, including an independent crowd-sourced genealogical data collection and mapping of the Great War dead of Philadelphia, will be worked on with the scholars involved in the exhibition.”

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania explains that the website will contain images, memoirs, diaries, periodicals, “contextual essays, news of commemorative events, interactive data, and geographical information system (GIS) mapping. The project aims to promote the use of these materials to students, scholars and the public, and to commemorate the services and sacrifices of soldiers and civilians a hundred years ago.”


Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Poster image from National Archives. Photo Kaiser William II. Digital Library@Villanova University

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Demian Katz receives Lifetime Pop Culture Achievement Award

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Michael Foight (right) presenting the award to Demian Katz (left).

As part of the VuPop Popular Culture and Materials Conference each year, a worthy conference attendee is awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award for activities related to the preservation and scholarship of that specific material type. This year’s recipient is Demian Katz, library technology development specialist from Falvey Memorial Library. Demian is one of the world’s foremost acknowledged bibliographers and collectors of print interactive fiction and appreciated by gamebook fans all over the internet for Demian’s Gamebook Web Page, an international reference guide to interactive books, solitaire role-playing, and game-inspired fiction.

Katz recently donated more than 2,500 print game books and other related materials to the Department of Special Collections at the University of California Santa Barbara.  The Demian Katz Gamebook Collection (Mss 294) is now currently open for research using the Online Archive of California primary resource finding aid.

For more information on this year’s VuPop conference, visit here. For more on the interactive fiction genre, visit here.


 

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Let the light shine

Light

Happy Summer!

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Say Hello to Summer: What to Read on the Longest Day

2014-06-04 15.57.00After a long, blustery and snow-filled winter, many of us were more than eager to prematurely whip out the sunscreen and sandals and hit the beach this Memorial Day, which has been dubbed by most as the start of the summer season. However, what most people don’t realize is that summer doesn’t officially begin until the summer solstice, which takes place this year on June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere. This day is often referred to as “the longest day” because we experience the most hours of sunlight that we will all year long. The extra hours of light will be a welcomed gift for many, especially after the cold and dreary winter that we’ve had.

So, wondering how you can embrace impending summer and take advantage of the extra precious hours of light? Here at Falvey Memorial Library we can make one inspired suggestion: sit outside and catch some of those rays with a big fat book and an ice-cold drink! In fact, there are a number of books that you can check out directly from Falvey to help you properly celebrate the “the longest day.”

Several prominent authors have written stories that take place over the course of a single day. As you will discover after reading these books, a lot of action can transpire within a mere 24 hours!

Books that take place over the course of one day:

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Saturday by Ian McKellan

Seize the Day by Saul Bellow

Ulysses by James Joyce

Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry

Or why not slow down and take on an extra-long book to help kick-off summer? You will have enough reading light to last you all day!

Long books that we suggest reading:

A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

Make sure to check out a book from Falvey and, if you’re feeling especially ambitious, even snag two from our shelves. You might as well take full advantage of the longest day that we’ll see all year and give a proper welcome to the summer season!

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David Uspal Upholds Library Tradition – Receives the Latest Facultas Award

Uspal & Facultas AwardDavid Uspal, senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications, received the Spring 2014 Facultas Award on May 20 at the annual University Faculty Staff Picnic. Uspal is the seventh Falvey Memorial Library employee to receive the Facultas Award. The late Therese Dougherty received the Fall 1996 Facultas Award, followed by Bente Polites, Special Collections and reference librarian, fall 2004; Phylis Wright, Interlibrary Loan Office, spring 2006; Domenick Liberato, Access and User Assistance, fall 2007; Barbara Quintiliano, Instructional Design Librarian, fall 2008; and Susan Ottignon, research librarian, spring 2012.

The Facultas Award is presented each fall and spring semester by the Faculty Congress to “acknowledge and honor the contributions of staff members of the Villanova community,” “focus attention on the vital, yet often unnoticed, services essential to the smooth and efficient functioning of the Villanova community, especially the academic faculty,” “recognize persons who would not be otherwise recognized …” and “reinforce among our fellow faculty the importance and diversity of staff support work in all areas of the University.” The Facultas Award constitutes a plaque and a Wildcard gift certificate.

This is Uspal’s second University award. The University Staff Council presented a Work Process Improvement (WPI) award to him in spring 2013 for the interactive map of Falvey Memorial Library that he developed.

Uspal says, “I want to thank Villanova University and Falvey Memorial Library for bringing me on board three years ago and the Technology Development team and the Digital Library team for being supportive of our efforts in the realm of Digital Humanities. A big thank you to all the students and faculty for helping us pilot our way through our initial Digital Humanities projects. Finally, a special thanks to Laura Bang, the Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Aurelius Digital Scholarship initiative, who has masterminded Villanova’s push into the Digital Humanities universe and without whom this award would have been impossible.”

Interim Library Director Darren Poley comments, “David Uspal is a wonderful asset to Falvey. His blend of deep knowledge as an information technologist with an ever cheery disposition and excellent people skills is incredibly rare. We are indeed fortunate to have David in the Library where he works so well with both staff and the patrons we serve.”

Uspal relaxes by reading and playing board and video games/interactive fiction. His interest in interactive fiction is aptly shown by his involvement with VuPop 2, an annual conference which explores pop culture and mass media.

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Remembering Jim Fox

The Periodical Department in 1999. (L-R) Natalie Tomasco, Susan Markley, Bill Greene, Laura Hutelmyer, Jim Fox and Betty Lane.

The Periodical Department in 1999. (L-R) Natalie Tomasco, Susan Markley, Bill Greene, Laura Hutelmyer, Jim Fox and Betty Lane.

The Falvey Memorial Library staff was saddened to hear of the passing this month of one of our former colleagues, Jim Fox. When he retired in 2010, the Library paid tribute to him by acknowledging his service with a blog post. Now we wish to take a moment to reflect on Jim’s lasting impact upon Falvey’s staff and share what he truly meant to us.

As stacks coordinator, with Access Services, we relied on Jim to supervise the student workers in Bound Periodicals (the area now known as ‘Falvey West,”) and assist the students, faculty and staff in navigating the mysteries of the microfilm readers. No matter the complexity of the questions posed to him, whether it related to his immediate purview or to impact some general information, Jim’s hearty responses clearly demonstrated his warmth and desire to be of assistance.

Jim will always be part of Falvey. Here are some thoughts by people who knew him:

Laura Hutelmyer, Falvey’s Electronic Resource & Special Acquisitions Coordinator told us:

Jim and I were hired on the same day in August 1996. We split the job of Microforms Supervisor. I worked Monday-Wednesday-Friday and Jim did Tuesday-Thursday because he taught as an adjunct at Penn State and LaSalle Universities on the other days.

  •  He always shook “hands” with his elbow.
  •  He used to ‘verse’ the international students on the importance of St. Patrick’s Day.
  • A lifelong historian, he was trying to get an article published only a month or so ago.
  • His family told me (at his memorial service) that he loved his job here at Villanova.

On a personal note, Laura shared with us that since her father-in-law and Jim were both natives of Germantown, a correspondence began between them, each sharing memories of growing up in the area.  Laura considers herself very fortunate to have such “a priceless set of letters.”

Jeannine Ahern, a Business Processes & Administrative Services Specialist for Falvey’s Director’s office, shared her experiences:

Outside of work, Jim Fox and I shared a common bond.  We both coached girls basketball.  I learned so much about coaching basketball from Jim.  On break time at Falvey, I would often go to Jim for advice.  He taught me fantastic offensive drills and strategies for defense.  But, the most important lesson Jim taught me was to give every player a chance to shine.  Jim told me, “Each player has their own unique talent. It is the coach’s role to see that talent in the player and then give them the opportunity to display it.”  I had a very successful coaching experience as a result.  Our success was not measured in wins. It was measured in the confidence and pride that resounded within the players hearts.

I will remember Jim as being a very kind, thoughtful, funny person.  I’m so glad I had the opportunity to work with him and call him friend.

Jim Fox with Joanne Quinn and Luisa Cywinski in 2010

Jim Fox with Joanne Quinn and Luisa Cywinski in 2010

From Sue Ottignon, Research Support Librarian:

I never really paid attention to Villanova’s basketball schedule. With Jim’s arrival on campus, he introduced me to the strong basketball rivalry between Villanova’s Wildcats and St. Joseph’s Hawks.  It was from Jim I learned key phrases like, “Hawk Hill” and the “Holy War.”  Seeing Jim around brightened my day with just his simple ‘hello’ and ‘how are you’ phrases . . .  a humorous man who was conversant on many topics.

From Joanne Quinn, Team Leader for Communications and Service Promotion:

Jim never believed that I was truly a Villanova University graduate because I was unable to recite the lyrics to our Alma Mater. My response was that I spent my four years in the band playing the trombone, so I never had to actually sing the song. He would not hear of it. I guess when you’d taught high school as long as Jim did, you ate excuses like that for lunch!

Working alongside with him in Access Services, I could be up to my you-know-what in ILL requests and alligators, but hearing Jim gruffly respond “miserable as ever” each time someone asked “how ya doin’” – even from across the room – never, ever failed to make me laugh.  He also reproached me occasionally in my duties as the Falvey whiteboard artist, if I chose to honor a rock or pop star instead of the Saint of the Day – and he always knew which saint that was.  The day I drew the Phillies’ Darren Daulton instead of Thomas Paine, I received an “anonymous” Letter from the Management that “officially” demoted me. It came complete with letterhead and wax seal. True story.

On May 3, 2010, the day he retired from the library, I see that I could have drawn Bing Crosby or Golda Meir…or even the Flyers’ Ron Hextall, but I think I made a better choice…

Whiteboard art from May 3, 2010

Whiteboard art from May 3, 2010

We should all be as lucky to work with someone like this. This one’s for you, Jim:

 

Villanova, Villanova
When we leave your shelt’ring walls,
We shall leave an echo ringing
Through your treasured halls
We will leave an echo ringing
In the silent night
While our memories are singing
Of our Blue and White.
When the last big game is over
And the last roll call is heard
When the oldest pedagogue
Has had his final word
We shall come to ALMA MATER
In our dreams again
With a prayer for Villanova
And a sweet amen.
 From the Villanova Alma Mater, by Al Dubin and Joseph Burke

Article and coordination by Sue Ottignon, Research Support Librarian

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What Does Your Father Read? Roundup

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When your father used to come home from work, did he unwind with The Evening [Philadelphia] Bulletin, Sports Illustrated, or Popular Mechanics? Or did he kick back with a bestseller by David McCullough, David Bradley or Dave Barry?

Falvey Memorial Library staff members offer their responses below. How about you? What does (or did) your father read? Please contribute your father’s favorite titles/authors in our comments section.

From Darren Poley:

dune-book-coverMy Dad who was only an occasional reader liked Frank Herbert’s: Dune (1965). He encouraged me to read Ursula LeGuin‘s: The Word for World is Forest (1976).

 

 

From Sarah Wingo:

the-hobbitMy dad read J.R.R. Tolkien’s  The Hobbit and all three Lord of The Rings books to me when I was between the ages of 8-11 or 12ish. He did all of the voices and his Gollum in particular was perfect years before the movies ever came out. Having those books read to me at such a young age really influenced my imaginative aesthetic. One of my childhood friends, with whom I’m still close, called me when the movies came out to say “OH MY GOD, this is what we used to play when we were kids!! I had no idea!! And you weren’t kidding – those black rider things are terrifying!” She never read the books, but I used to always make her play Lord of The Rings with me when we were little. I’ve reread them many times since and they will always have a very special place in my heart because I shared them with my father.

Those terrifying ringwraiths

Terrifying ringwraiths

From Alice Bampton:

natgeovintagecoverMy father wasn’t much of a reader; he much preferred outdoor activities. But he had subscribed to National Geographic from early adulthood until he died. He kept every issue; they were stored in a  large bookcase and we – my sister and I – had free access to them. As a small child I enjoyed the photographs, originally in black and white and later in color  – perhaps this helped inspire my love of photography – and later I enjoyed reading the stories. My father also kept his set of the Book of Knowledge, a children’s encyclopaedia that contained all sorts of articles: biographies, science, literature, how to make things, etc. These were in the same bookcase as the National Geographics and also provided considerable entertainment on days when we couldn’t go outside to play and in the evenings. (Since we lived in the country,  television wasn’t available out there until I was in high school.)

From Susan Ottignon:

5386d250fca0708d3a6e9010.LDad served in the Army, during World War II, and I believe this major event led to him to be become a voracious reader on the subject of the Third Reich and its major players.  I especially remember him reading Albert Speer’s Spandau : the Secret Diaries and The House on Garibaldi Street : the First Full Account of the Capture of Adolf Eichmann as well as many of the works on Adolf Hitler.  Dad was an avid collector of all 39 volumes of the Time-Life’s series, World War II, and when each volume arrived, he read them cover to cover.

From Joanne Quinn:

mYn3WKOZOOIGVZ1zS0TDheQ-1My dad had the same pile of reading material sitting on the old metal tray table next to his La-Z-Boy for years…I always suspected it was mostly untouched. There was something there called The Golfer’s Trilogy, a slim three volume set that was written by some combination of Jack, Arnie or Sam, and fitted into a glossy cardboard sleeve. I think it came free with the subscription to Golf Digest or whatever other golf magazines were stacked there as well. He also hung onto the issue of Sports Illustrated with Steve Carlton on the cover long past its shelf life. That was 30 years ago, but he still has a recliner and a tray table and a pile of stuff that also doesn’t seem to change all that often: Remembering Harry Kalas. A pile of Ireland of the Welcomes, a subscription sent and renewed for him year each by a distant cousin. But it’s his love of the paper, the daily paper, that pushes his time spent reading into the stratosphere. Though he and my mom moved to Ocean CIty, N.J., almost 20 years ago, he still picks up the Delaware County Daily Times every single day. He also enjoys the Ocean City Sentinel & Inquirer as well. He’ll tell you it’s because he likes the puzzles – and, with an elbow, wants to double check that he’s not listed in the obits.

From Kimberley Bugg:

autobiography-malcolm-x-alex-haley-paperback-cover-artWhen I was around 11 or 12 years old, I either ran out of or lost interest in the Judy Blume and Baby-Sitters’ Club books that I loved to read so I began to search my house for other reading materials. In my father’s closet, I found a trunk of new and more exciting things to read including Donald Goines novels, Women, Culture, and Politics by Angela Davis, and this this gem of a book: The Autobiography of Malcolm X. To this day this it is one of the most profound literary works I think I have ever read. It was brazen, bold, and political. I loved it. I also enjoyed Angela Davis’s book too. The discovery of these works not only matured me as a person but evolved my scope of interest and reading selection.  Now that I am reflecting, sneaking in my father’s closet to read that biography has shaped some of the things I am most passionate about in my life.


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Hats off!

Hats

Happy Father’s Day!

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Susan Markley retires after 35 years service to the library

Susan-edited1Falvey Memorial Library lost one of its most valuable and devoted librarians with the retirement of Susan Markley on May 30th after 35 years of service to the university. Serving most recently as the head of the Resource Management Team, Susan also worked on the Nursing Liaison Team teaching library skills to returning graduate students.

Susan started at Villanova University in May 1979. She worked as the part-time Government Documents Librarian in the Technical Services Department until asked by the Library Director to assume the position of Head of Periodicals, a position she held for the next 27 years. Susan saw many changes during these years and recalled, “When I took over the management of the Periodical Department, the Library subscribed to approximately 3,000 print journals. Today we have subscriptions and access to well over 10,000 mostly electronic journal titles.” In 2007, when the Periodical Department and Technical Services merged, Susan became the team leader for the newly created Resource Management Team, currently located on the lower level of the Library.

At her retirement party, Susan reminisced about the library of the 1970s. She said, “In 1979, the Library had only one reference librarian and offered no instruction classes. The cataloging/acquisition department had eight librarians, with another one in Interlibrary Loan, one at Circulation and one in Instructional Media. There was only one male librarian on staff. The Library had only two computers, both in Tech Services, and those librarians had to sign up for one hour time slots in order to use them.  Patrons located materials by using the card catalog and blue binders listing the holdings of every journal in the collection. Both women and men dressed for the job and staff members in offices were permitted to smoke at their desks.”

Susan noted that her biggest challenge was converting the print journal collection to electronic format, tracking database payments, learning to deal with vendors, both domestic and foreign, and maintaining access to a growing print and electronic collection. However, her greatest pleasure was working closely with the various librarians and library staff.

As part of her professional development activities, she was active in numerous local, state and national library organizations, including serving as treasurer for the Tri-State College Library Cooperative, secretary for the Association of College & Research Libraries, Delaware Valley Chapter, and as a board member of the College & Research Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association.

Susan is a Philadelphia native and a graduate of the Philadelphia High School for Girls. She earned a B.A. in History from Boston University, a M.S. in Library Science from Drexel University and a M.S. in Liberal Studies from Villanova University. Before coming to Villanova, she was a librarian for the American Law Institute. She plans to continue spending time as a volunteer for the Women’s Resource Center in Wayne and to participate more in local politics. A long-time supporter of the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Susan also plans to attend more of their special concerts and lectures. A world traveler, she and her husband, Tom, will be returning to Russia and the Baltic countries this summer and either Japan or India in 2015.


Article by Laura Hutelmyer, photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Last Modified: June 11, 2014