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Harper Lee’s Second Book and its Publication Bring Controversy

Go Set a Watchman - cover

Imagine having a book you’ve written published for the first time. How surprised would you be if your book became a bestseller, won a Pulitzer Prize, and was even made into a motion picture starring a major actor? Would you publish another book and risk disappointing your audience? Or would you choose to leave your readers wanting more?

That book, of course, is Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. When it was released 55 years ago, one critic compared Lee’s skill to that of Mark Twain, and described her as “an artist of rare talent and control. This first novel is an achievement of unusual magnitude” (Canfield).

The recent announcement that Harper Lee’s second book to be published, Go Set a Watchman, would be released today captured the imaginations of Mockingbird’s fans and of the literary world. Watchman, however, is not a new book. In fact, Lee wrote it decades ago, before writing Mockingbird. That Lee waited so many years before publishing Watchman has raised questions about her decision, including controversy about whether she herself made this decision.

The first controversy

Harper Lee, now 88, suffered a stroke in 2007 and lives in an assisted-living facility (Trachtenberg). Her sister, Alice Lee (now deceased), in a 2011 interview, described Harper as “mostly blind and deaf” following her stroke (Berman). Alice Lee, an attorney, who had “long represented her sister and whom friends describe as Ms. Lee’s ‘protector,’ died Nov. 17 [2014].” Less than three months after Alice Lee’s death comes the announcement from HarperCollins Publishers that Go Set a Watchman would be published on July 14, 2015.

Lee has not spoken to anyone except her agent and her attorney about Watchman, its discovery or its publication. Harper publisher Jonathan Burnham insists that Lee is “very much engaged in the process,” although he bases his assessment on reports from Lee’s agent. Lee, Burnham adds, will not give interviews or other publicity when Watchman is released (Berman).

That Lee’s agent and her attorney, who appear to have everything to gain financially from this situation, have been the only ones communicating with the author Harper Leehas prompted an investigation. The Alabama Securities Commission investigated and “concluded that Ms. Lee appeared to understand what was occurring while approving the publication of ‘Go Set a Watchman’” (Stevens).

Despite the Commission’s findings, Lee’s fans have remained skeptical over the circumstances of Watchman’s discovery. These lingering doubts may have motivated Lee’s attorney, Tonja Carter, to publish an explanation in Monday’s Wall Street Journal (Carter).

The second controversy

Although Watchmen includes characters from Mockingbird, such as Scout and Atticus, the novel is set twenty years into the future, into the civil-rights movement. Fans of Mockingbird may be shocked to discover changes in Atticus. He served as Mockingbird’s “moral conscience: kind, wise, honorable, an avatar of integrity” (Kakutani).

In Watchmen, Scout, 26 and known as Jean Louise, has been living in New York City. She visits her hometown, Maycomb, Ala., to discover that Atticus now holds “abhorrent views on race and segregation” (Kakutani). Readers may wonder why Lee wrote this book as “a distressing narrative filled with characters spouting hate speech.” Ultimately, as Mockingbird “suggested that we should have compassion for outsiders like Boo and Tom Robinson,” Watchman “asks us to have understanding for a bigot named Atticus” (Kakutani).

Works Cited

Berman, Russell. “How Harper Lee’s Long-Lost Sequel Was
……..Found.” theatlantic.com. Feb 4, 2015.

Canfield, Francis X., “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Critic, 1960

Carter, Tonja B. “How I found the Harper Lee Manuscript.” Wall
……..Street Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Jul 13 2015. ProQuest.
……..Web. 13 July 2015.

Kakutani, Michiko. “Review: Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’
……..Gives Atticus Finch a Dark Side.” http://nyti.ms/1ULlBZv

Stevens, Laura, and Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. “Business News: No
……..Fraud found Is Discovered in Harper Lee Case.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed.Mar 13 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.

Trachtenberg, Jeffrey A., and Laura Stevens. “Harper Lee
……..Bombshell: How News of Book Unfolded.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Feb 07 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.


To Dig Deeper, explore the following links, prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader: Humanities II and also subject librarian for English, literature and theatre:

One of the big issues that has sprung up around GSAW beyond the controversy over its publication is the difference in the character of Atticus Finch and concerns that it may “tarnish” his legacy.

Here is another point from yesterday

You can read the first chapter or listen to Reese Witherspoon read it

NPR piece from yesterday

NPR piece from Feb

NPR piece from 2014 indicating that if Lee is being taken advantage of with this publication it may not be the first time


SarahDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. 


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The Highlighter: How to find articles from a well-established newspaper

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

You need articles from a newspaper that’s existed for over a century. Are they available in print, in a database or somewhere else? This video shows how to access articles from a well-established newspaper.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

 


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Foto Friday: A Summer Beauty

Lily Pad

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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The Highlighter: Browse a Magazine or Journal in “Lexis Nexis Academic”

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Sometimes you do not need to find a specific article, but you want to browse the magazine or journal that publishes articles on your topic. This video shows how to peruse a publication in the Lexis Nexis Academic database.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage. Or you can find them on YouTube.


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New Week: Save the Dates, Sharks, Soccer balls & More!

NEW-WEEK2

OK, Monday – Let’s Do This!
If you’re coming to Falvey this summer, here’s all you need to know to get you through the week!


Hours:  June 27 – July 27

Monday – Thursday: 8:00 am – 8:00 pm

Friday: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Saturday: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Sunday: Noon – 6:00 pm


Save the Date!

Summer IGR Workshops. Brighid Dwyer, Assistant Director, Diversity Research & Training, Center for Multicultural Affairs, Program on Intergroup Relations, has invited the Villanova University Community to participate in a IGR summer workshop series. There will be 5 weeks (10 sessions) of dialogue about current events, personal identities, and how who we are influences how we see the world and interact within it. The summer workshop series is an educational experience about issues of social justice, preparing faculty and staff to engage dialogues in situations where understandings and listening are needed. The dates of the workshop will be held from June 30–July 30 on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 12:00—1:00 p.m. in Falvey Memorial Library room 205. Because each session will build on the previous one, we ask that you commIt to attend 8 of the 10 sessions. Questions? Contact: Brighid Dwyer.


A star in a prison : a tale of Canada / by Anna May Wilson - See more at: http://blog.library.villanova.edu/digitallibrary/2015/07/02/content-roundup-first-week-july-2015/#sthash.9U4PB1zv.dpuf

A star in a prison : a tale of Canada / by Anna May Wilson – See more at: http://blog.library.villanova.edu/digitallibrary/2015/07/02/content-roundup-first-week-july-2015/#sthash.9U4PB1zv.dpuf

New Digital Library Content

This week we bring a few new issues of the story-paper Comfort and a new religious dime novel to your attention. As well, a rare report on the reorganization of the Indian army from 1920 and a host of newly digitized newspapers from the Joseph McGarrity Collection are available. McGarrity, a noted collector of Irish books and periodicals, had an exceptionally strong set of rare newspaper titles – many of which deal with Ireland and the Irish-American experience, but his collection was not limited to just this focus. This week two non-Irish titles from the collection can be accessed: the rare Philadelphia newspaper the Constitutional diary and Philadelphia evening advertiser and the Newark, New Jersey title the Centinel of freedom spanning 1799-1800. – See more here!

shark

It’s that time of year again – Shark Week!
Dubbed the “Super Bowl of the Ocean.” the ratings bonanza for the Discovery Channel is back! Shark Week reaps over 40 million viewers each year with countless hours of shark-centric programming. If this kind of thing, ahem, floats your boat, then why not peruse Falvey’s own shark programming through this list of great sea yarns in our collection or download  fin-tastic wallpaper for your phone or laptop. Or, if adventure is what you crave, visit the Digital Library’s Dime Novel collection!

FBL-WC-2015-WOMEN-MATCH52-USA-JPN

“Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly?”

― Frida Kahlo, born on this day in 1907

Congratulations to the United States Women’s National Team for winning the World Cup title!



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Foto Friday: A little Star Spangled History

The 26 star flag was the official flag of the United States of America for eight yearsbeginning with the Statehood of Michigan in 1837 and up until 1845 with the admission of Florida into the union as our 27th state.

The 26 star flag was the official flag of the United States of America for eight years beginning with the Statehood of Michigan in 1837 and up until 1845 with the admission of Florida into the union as our 27th state. The flag hangs on a wall in Connelly Center. The full story appears on an adjacent plaque.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management


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Dig Deeper: The Revolutionary War and American Independence

DECLARATION
 
“… these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.

 Not just a list of grievances, the Declaration of Independence is also a checklist for good government. Its approval and adoption by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776 in Philadelphia (woot woot!) marks the beginning of a new nation, the United States of America.

Bell_Tower_of_Independence_HallIt’s easy to take the ideological stories of the birth of our nation and its heroes for granted as they have been taught to us since elementary school and romanticized in movies and television. But have you, as an adult, visited the Liberty Bell or Independence Hall (where the Declaration and its forebear, the Articles of Confederation,) were debated? Or walked the streets near Declaration House at 7th and Market where Thomas Jefferson wrote the document? Have you ever read or researched with a critical eye, materials that dig deeper into the symbolic, mythical and political realities of the document’s history?

The following links, curated by history liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert, are great scholarly resources for getting beyond the myths and into the historical context of the American Revolution. Why not take some time this July 4th weekend to explore some of Falvey’s many resources written about that time? She’s also included authentic primary materials from the Digital Library, to truly complete your step back into history.


 New Books

Books about the Declaration of Independence

Books about the American Revolution

Books about the history of the U.S. Constitution


 Primary Sources in Digital Collections

Falvey Memorial Library has a strong collection of primary sources about this monumental period in American history. Here are some suggestions from the library’s digital collections. Additional primary sources, available in print or microform only, can be discovered with the help of the library’s online catalog.

American Founding Era
This collection brings together scholarly digital editions of the papers of major figures of the early republic: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Dolley Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Harriott Pinckney Horry.

America’s Historical Newspapers, 1690-1922
Follow the War of Independence and the birth of a new nation in contemporary newspapers.

Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1800
Follow the events of the American Revolution from a local perspective.

American Periodicals Series
Read the first magazines published in the American colonies and in the early republic.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800
Digital copies of over 37,000 books and pamphlets published and sold in the American colonies and the early republic.

Early American Imprints, Series II: Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801-1819
Digital copies of over 36,000 books and pamphlets published and sold in the early republic.

Sabin Americana, 1500-1926
Digital copies of works about the Americas published throughout the world from 1500 to the early 1900’s.

American State Papers, 1789-1838
Legislative and executive documents of the first 14 U.S. Congresses.

Interested in the other side of the story? Discover British opinions on events in the American colonies through contemporary newspapers and magazines:

Online References

Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History

Encyclopedia of the American Constitution

Dictionary of American History

American National Biography Online

Encyclopedia of the American Revolution

A Companion to the American Revolution

Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


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Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History. Introduction by Joanne Quinn.


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Stonewall Book Awards honor works of GLBT merit

stonewall_logoThe 2015 Stonewall Book Awards given by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT) of the American Library Association were presented this weekend in San Francisco at the organization’s annual conference.

The awards are given annually to English-language works of merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience. Several major categories are awarded: the Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award, the Barbara Gittings Literature award and the Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award. The awards are given to works published the prior year.

This year’s winners include—

 Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award

51lOr0fYHkLPresented to This Day in June, written by Gayle E. Pitman and published by Magination Press, an imprint of the American Psychological Association.

Other Children’s and Young Adult Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender teens speak out, written and photographed by Susan Kuklin, published by Candlewick Press.
  • I’ll Give You the Sun, written by Jandy Nelson, published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.
  • Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress, written by Christine Baldacchino, with pictures by Isabelle Malenfant, published by Groundwood Books

Barbara Gittings Literature Award

Prelude-to-Bruise-683x1024Presented to  Prelude To Bruise, written by Saeed Jones, published by Coffee House Press.

Other Barbara Gittings Literature Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Bitter Eden, written by Tatamkhulu Afrika, published by Picador USA.
  • Frog Music, written by Emma Donoghue, published by Little, Brown and Company.
  • The Two Hotel Francforts, written by David Leavitt, published by Bloomsbury.
  • My Real Children, written by Jo Walton, published by Tor Books.

Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award

51NViGPmlUL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Presented  to Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims, written by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, published by New York University Press.

Other Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Gay Berlin, written by Robert Beachy, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
  • Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More, written by Janet Mock, published by Atria Books.
  • Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, and the Battlefield of AIDS, written by Martin Duberman, published by The New Press.
  • Charity & Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America, written by Rachel Hope Cleves, published by Oxford University Press.

Dig Deeper: The Stonewall Riots

stonewallii

Resistance to a police raid inside a small, Greenwich Village jukebox bar (one of the few in New York City where  the LGBT community were welcomed) marked the start of the gay rights movement. As hundreds upon hundreds of protesters poured out onto the streets over six days of rioting, the gay community, previously forced into secrecy, finally saw the strength of its own numbers. The event proved to be a turning point. The following year saw the start of annual gay pride parades and other outward demands for recognition, respect and equal rights—events often held on the Stonewall anniversary and eventually in hundreds of cities. The Stonewall Book Awards is just one of the many ways the event is commemorated.

Last week was a landmark week for the gay rights movement for two reasons: first, the Supreme Court decision affirming the right to same sex marriage in all fifty states, and, though less publicized, the naming of the Stonewall Inn as an official New York City landmark. Learn more about this incredible chapter in human rights history through the following library resources (or hundreds more – just ask!) curated by History liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert.

Dig Deeper: Stonewall Riots

1. Books about the Stonewall Riots in the Falvey collection

2. Gale Virtual Reference Library (Databases A-Z): Introductions to the subject matter from a selection of the Library’s subject encyclopedias.
Tina Gianoulis. “Gay Liberation Movement.” In St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, edited by Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast, 211-15. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000.

3. Sage Knowledge platform (Databases A-Z): More introductions and overviews from social sciences encyclopedias.
Lucian Truscott and Priscilla Glanville. “Stonewall Rebellion.” In Encyclopedia of Leadership, edited by George R. Goethals, Georgia J. Sorenson and James MacGregor Burns, 1492-98. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2004. doi:10.4135/9781412952392.n340.

4. CQ Global Researcher: An excellent overview over the evolution of gay rights in the U.S.
Reed Karaim. “Gay Rights.” CQ Global Researcher 5, no. 5 (March 1, 2011): 107-32.

5. New York Times: Read the original news coverage of the 1969 riots.
“4 Policemen Hurt in ‘Village Raid.’” New York Times, June 29, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118526412?accountid=14853.
“Police Again Rout ‘Village’ Youths.” New York Times, June 30, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118687806?accountid=14853.

6. Washington Post: Read about the movement as it was described in the year the riots occurred.
Nancy L. Ross “Homosexual Revolution.” The Washington Post, October 25, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/143552646?accountid=14853.

7. OpinionArchives: Browse the archives of the country’s leading opinion magazines and follow the changing public opinion. OpinionArchives includes the complete archives of The Nation, The New Republic, The National Review, The New Yorker, and Commonweal among other titles.


Dig Deeper links provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader – Academic Integration. Article by Joanne Quinn, team leader for Communication and Service Promotion.


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“The audience is half of the poem”: the First Latino Poet Laureate

Library of Congress appoints the 1st Latino Poet Laureate

Connecting to people through performance is crucial for Herrera. “I used to stand on the corner in San Diego with poems sticking out of my hip pocket, asking people if there was a place where I could read poems,” he recalls. “The audience is half of the poem.”

(Retrieved from LA Times, 6/22/15)
Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Congratulations to Juan Felipe Herrera, who was appointed the 21st poet laureate on June 10 by the Library of Congress. Herrera will be the first Hispanic-American person to be chosen as poet laureate in the United States in the 79 years since the program’s inception. His tenure will begin in September—national Hispanic heritage month.

Herrera, the son of migrant farmers, spent much of his youth travelling and living in tents in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Though terribly underprivileged, he was presented with the remarkable opportunity to attend UCLA as a young adult. From there, he went on to attend Stanford University and the University of Iowa’s Writing Workshop, where he earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

Through his education and experiences as a young Hispanic-American, Herrera developed a deep passion for writing and performing in both English and Spanish. He penned several pieces, including collections of poetry and children’s books in honor of his heritage and worldview. In addition to his writing and performing, Herrera has been an avid teacher and has also served as the poet laureate of California from 2012-2014.

Villanova University was lucky enough to welcome Juan Felipe Herrera as one of the featured speakers during the 14th annual Villanova Literary Festival, organized by Alan Drew, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing. The talk took place on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner. A jam-packed audience had the opportunity to listen to Herrera as he read and performed selected poems in both Spanish and English. With great enthusiasm and detail, Herrera shared his past experiences and showed poignant images to illustrate his work.

It’s been reported that Herrera’s main focus during his tenure as poet laureate will likely be to connect people of all different cultural backgrounds through poetry and to help highlight the stories of those people who are typically overlooked.

Interested in learning more about Juan Felipe Herrera? Check out Falvey Memorial Library’s holdings by this author.

Also, visit the following sites for additional information on Herrera and the position of Poet Laureate, provided by librarian Susan Ottignon.

Juan Felipe Herrera, Current Poet Laureate

List of works by Juan Felipe Herrera

Past Poets Laureate: 2011-present

About the Position of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry


Dig Deeper links provided by Sue Ottignon, subject librarian for romance languages and literatures.


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New Week: Summer Save the Dates, Tech Bits, New Digital Library Content & More!

NEW-WEEK2

If you’re coming to Falvey this summer, here’s all you need to know to get you through the week!


Library Hours:
June 27 – July 27

Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Noon – 6:00 p.m.


SAVE THE DATES!

Summer IGR Workshops. Brighid Dwyer, Assistant Director, Diversity Research & Training, Center for Multicultural Affairs, Program on Intergroup Relations, has invited the Villanova University Community to participate in a IGR summer workshop series. There will be 5 weeks (10 sessions) of dialogue about current events, personal identities, and how who we are influences how we see the world and interact within it. The summer workshop series is an educational experience about issues of social justice, preparing faculty and staff to engage dialogues in situations where understandings and listening are needed. The dates of the workshop will be held from June 30–July 30 on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 12:00—1:00 p.m. in Falvey Memorial Library room 205. Because each session will build on the previous one, we ask that you commit to attend 8 of the 10 sessions.  Questions? Contact: Brighid Dwyer.

One Book Villanova Author’s Visit. On Thursday, September 10, Reyna Grande, author of Villanova’s 2015-2016 One Book Villanova selection, The Distance Between Us: A Memoir, will visit campus. The Distance Between Us: A Memoir tells the story of a young girl’s life before and after illegally immigrating from Mexico to the United States. Reyna Grande shares the story of her childhood that is sometimes funny, sometimes heartbreaking but all the time compelling. Beyond the politics of immigration debates, The Distance Between Us gives us insight into the story of a single family: the decisions made, the risks taken and the personal costs paid. Copies of the book may be purchased from the Center for Multicultural Affairs or the Office of Student Development. Be sure to check back for the schedule of events planned for Reyna’s visit. Questions? Contact the One Book Villanova Committee Co-Chairs: Terry Nance and JJ Brown.


acrlatala

ALA Annual Conference in session!
Billed as the ‘world’s largest library event,’ the American Library Association conference takes place through tomorrow in San Francisco. With attendance of over 25,000 librarians, library staff, educators, authors, publishers and suppliers expected to attend the 500+ programs and discussions and visit the 900+ exhibitors and poster sessions, the event provides a wealth of information and inspiration for those interested in issues concerning libraries. But no need to go to San Fran to keep up on the Conference news and highlights – just follow or search the hashtag #alaac15 on your favorite social media network.


Download your Google search history
Did you know that you could download your entire history of past searches on Google? It is so, according to this. It doesn’t explain why you’d want to do it, just how.


Reddit turns ten

0sdpjdwj63wnkjgleug7Guiltiest pleasure on the internet? For me, it’s Reddit, the social news website. Co-founders Alexis Ohanian (who now manages the travel site Hipmunk) & Steve Huffman describe the site they launched on June 23, 2005, as a lovechild between Slashdot and Delicious – link aggregate sites you may remember from the mid-naughts.  Actually, both still exist, but Reddit clobbers them in popularity. The innovative newsfeed uses a crowdsource-y upvote and downvote system to elevate the most newsworthy or popular comments and posts to the front page. The founders lament that most folks never make it past the front page. Albeit, it is the “front page of the internet,” so if you only have a few minutes, perusing the front page is an efficient way to keep up with the web’s latest memes, trends, gifs, and ofttimes more creepier or scatological offerings. It’s also the home of AMA (Ask Me Anything), TL,DR (Too Long Didn’t Read,) and my favorites, Oddly Satisfying and Mildly Interesting. Most important, be sure to seek out your favorite “subreddit” – feeds that exist for virtually every humanly possible interest. For example r/books, r/bookwriting, or r/collegebasketball. (‘Cause, like, what else is there? :-) ) Caveat, though: learn the lingo as soon as you can – Reddit can often be rated PG-13 or worse – so believe it when they say NSFW!


Always feeling like the oldest person in the room? It’s not your imagination – Millennials have overtaken Baby Boomers

Millennials, or those born from 1982 through 2000, now make up more than one quarter of the U.S. population (83.1 million), exceeding the 75.4 million Baby Boomers who were born from 1946 through 1964, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released Thursday. Additionally, “millennials are more diverse than the generations that preceded them, with 44.2 percent being part of a minority race or ethnic group,” according to the report.


New Main Line history resources and more from the Digital Library
This week we finish the digitization of the last of the available content from the Ardmore Chronicle newspaper including the remainder of 1910 and all of 1911. Also of note: a very early atlas of the Bryn Mawr region circa 1881 including an early view of campus, eleven new sets of Irish Traditional music from the Philadelphia Ceili Group, and several new story paper issues! – See it all at this link!


Don’t surround yourself with yourself…

Some good take away for your week, from the lyrics of prog rock band Yes and their original founding bassist Chris Squire, who passed away this weekend at age 67.



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Last Modified: June 29, 2015