FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Science

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

RS9333_2014-01-29 11.43.48-7-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Science Librarian Alfred Fry

What’s new this year?

AF—We don’t have any new science resources this year, but the Library just hired a new director. I expect there will be a lot of changes.

What are the challenges for science students who want to use the Library? 

AF—Our databases, particularly in chemistry, are very powerful. Although it is very easy to do simple searches, it can be challenging to discover all the advanced features without instruction. Also, many students are familiar with just one database and are unaware of others that would be more appropriate in some situations.

What resources does the Library offer to help science students overcome those challenges? 

AF—Me. I’m happy to teach classes or provide individual or small group instruction.

What do you wish science students knew about you, about the Library? 

AF—I majored in chemistry. Many students know about the subject guides, but I wish more did.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

AF—Helping students and faculty in all areas, but particularly in science and engineering.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

AF—Villanova students tend to be more patient than students at other places I’ve worked. So, I can take the time to demonstrate the most effective techniques for getting the best results. There are also a few people from the wider Villanova community who have asked very interesting questions.


Like

Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Business

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

RS9325_2014-01-14 09.17.40-4-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Business Librarian Linda Hauck

What are the challenges for business students who want to use the Library?

LH—Many of the key business sources are not designed with libraries in mind.  Their primary customers are business professionals; consequently, they don’t integrate well with library discovery systems making it challenging for students to find the specialized resources they need for course work.

What resources does the Library offer to help business students overcome those challenges?

LH—I design subject guides and course guides that highlight relevant databases. Because many of these databases look and feel very different from typical scholarly article databases, I make tutorials and videos to demonstrate how to use them. Of course, I encourage students to drop into my office at Falvey 222 or make an appointment (https://vubusinesslibrarian.youcanbook.me/ )  with me to learn about how to gather credible competitive intelligence on people, companies and industries.

What do you wish business students knew about you, about the Library?

LH— I recognize that students are juggling coursework, community commitments, athletics and jobs, leaving little room for wasted energy.  For most students research is not the ends, but the means to solving problems, understanding and assessing others work product or creating something new of value. At the library, we’re all about facilitating students goals by sharing efficient research tools and techniques.

What do you like best about being a librarian?

LH—Being a research support librarian allows me to wear different hats.  I select materials, teach, do consulting, assess services and negotiate with vendors.  Best of all there is always something new to learn!

What do you like best about working with Villanova students?

LH—Villanova students are bright and driven but still consistently courteous.


Like

Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Nursing

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

………………resource locators,

…………idea developers,

……database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”

RS9338_2014-01-15 11.09.11-1-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Nursing/Life Sciences & Instructional Services Librarian Barbara Quintiliano 

What’s new this year?

BQ—By now, many students and faculty are familiar with our mobile research assistance cart, staffed either by my colleague Robin Bowles (pictured below) or me.

…..—We set up our cart on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the café area on the 2nd floor of Driscoll Hall. Our hours nursing librarians
for staffing the cart vary due to our other duties. This year, however, we are going to try to have regular hours and publicize them, so students will know when we will be there.

What are the challenges for nursing students who want to use the Library?

BQ—First of all, students must be aware that Google is not a gateway to all resources that they will need for nursing research. Nursing students need access to quite a few specialized resources—such as CINAHL (nursing database), PubMed, Cochrane Reviews, and the Community Health Data Base—and these can be found on the library’s website. Links for accessing these resources can be found on the nursing subject page (http://library.villanova.edu/research/subject-guides/nursing/).

…..—Second, these resources do not have Google-like search screens. They require just a little bit of technique to get the best results. However, if you are seeking specialized nursing or health data, these are the resources you need to use.

…..—Everything said in the previous paragraph goes double for students enrolled in distance courses, such as the University Alliance RN to BSN program. The library website is another interface that they need to discover because without those resources they will not be able to complete research assignments successfully.

What resources does the Library offer to help nursing students overcome those challenges?

BQ—All students in NUR1102 come to the Library during a regular class period for an introduction to the most important specialized nursing resources and for a primer in APA documentation style.

…..—Short instructional videos, linked on the nursing subject guide pages, illustrate how to search the specialized resources.

…..—My colleague Robin Bowles and I are available to assist students with any topic. I can be contacted by email at barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu and by phone at 610-519-5207. Robin can be contacted at robin.bowles@villanova.edu or 610-519-8129. We are also happy to make telephone appointments to work with distance learners.

What do you wish nursing students knew about you, about the Library?

BQ—Robin and I are as close as your email/phone. You can contact us anytime. We do our best to respond within 24 hours, if not sooner.

…..—No inquiry is too big or too small. We can assist you in doing literature searches, finding full text of articles when you have references, creating APA-Style bibliographies.

…..—I am available on Thursdays at Driscoll Hall 343 (when not staffing the research cart) and the other days of the week in Falvey Memorial Library, 2nd floor, Rm 225. Robin is available on Tuesdays at Driscoll Hall 343 and the other days of the week in Falvey, 2nd floor, Rm 230.

What do you like best about being a librarian?

BQ—I enjoy pursuing so many different topics and assisting with research of various levels of simplicity or complexity.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students?

BQ—I enjoy meeting and chatting with them (in person or by phone), as well as helping them with their assignments. They are remarkably cheerful under academic, clinical and work pressures. They brighten my day.


Like

‘Caturday: Impatient Pets

We’ve crossed over the midsummer mark, and most school-aged children have been off from school for a few weeks. What are your little Wildcats doing this summer? YMCA camp? Traveling with the family? Having fun with friends at the community pool? Do they have chores to do?

I hope they aren’t tempted to follow this young lady’s example.

Girl feeding cat and dog salami

“Don’t be impatient, children!”

Trade card featuring a girl feeding salami to a dog and cat, given with Frank Leslie’s “Chimney Corner”, from the Villanova Digital Library Dime Novel and Popular Literature collection.


Like

Foto Friday: In Corso

Sneak peek CORTONA

We’re taking a sneak peek as conservation work continues on the Falvey Hall Reading Room’s hidden treasure, the baroque masterpiece by Pietro da Cortona. Follow along on the Conserving a Giant: Resurrecting Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David” blog.


Photo by Alice Bampton.


Like
1 People Like This Post

The Curious ‘Cat: Which of the following statements is true?

Curious CatThis week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “Which of the following statements is true?” *

1. The Library houses a rare painting, the massive 12-by-19-feet “The Triumph of David” by Pietro da Cortona, a major artist of the Baroque period.

2. The Library houses a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment that allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about as though they were in the actual setting.

3. The Library is soon to house a Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship that will nurture students as creative and innovative thinkers.

4. The Library houses a Research Support Center, which provides eleven research librarians—each an expert both in scholarly research and in one or more academic disciplines—who look forward to helping you with your assignments.

RS9291_DSC_3610-scrKyle Johnson—“I think multiple parts of these are true. I know for sure that there is a CAVE, and I’m pretty sure that there are eleven research librarians. I’m not sure about the new Center, and I haven’t seen the painting myself. But I know those two are true.”

RS9292_DSC_3611-scr

 

 

 

 

 

Jaclyn Lanciano—“I think it’s number three. … I just heard them talking about how they’re going to renovate.”

RS9294_DSC_3613-scr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martha Wolnicki—“Number one, I would say, is false. Number two, I would say, is false. Three and four are true.”

RS9297_DSC_3616-scr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Francesca Cocchi—“I’ve seen the painting; I don’t know if all the stats are correct, but I assume. And I wrote an article about the CAVE facility, so I know that’s here … when we first got the grant for it … for the school newspaper (The Villanovan) … Yeah, I want to be a journalist. The Center for Innovation sounds familiar. I actually would think we already have one. I guess that’s true. … And I would say the last one is—eleven sounds like a lot, but—I think I’ll just say “true” for all of them.”

RS9301_DSC_3620-scr

 

John Suggs—“They all kind of sound true. … Is that a bad thing? They’re all true statements. I like the one about nurturing students as creative and innovative thinkers.”

RS9305_DSC_3624-scr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brooke Erdman—“More than one sound true to me. … I kind of like the CAVE. … I’m going to go with the second one.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* All four of the statements are true.


Like

Alice’s Adventures and Mock Turtle Soup

Alice's Adventures in WonderlandSince this is a library food blog, I like to find recipes that will connect to a book or to reading in general. So this month, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, I decided to read this childhood favorite again in the hopes of finding culinary inspiration.

The story begins with Alice half-dozing outside on a hot summer day as her older sister reads a book with “no pictures or conversations in it.” As her mind wanders, she enters another world where animals talk, playing card soldiers double as croquet arches, and a Queen randomly orders executions for trivial infractions. But it’s the Mock Turtle who gets my attention. He goes to school, sings, dances and plays games. We learn of the sad Mock Turtle’s schooling in chapter 9 and he performs the Lobster Quadrille in chapter 10. Both chapters are filled with songs, puns and word play.

I’m not sure if it was the Queen’s mention of Mock Turtle Soup or if it was the Turtle Soup song that inspired me to make soup. And there was no doubt in my mind that it would be the mock version of turtle soup. The ingredients would be easier to find and cheaper than using real turtle. That, combined with the happy childhood memories of finding cute little turtles near Fern Hill Lake, prevented me from considering turtle meat.

mock turtleIn the earliest publication of Alice’s Adventures, the Mock Turtle was beautifully illustrated by Sir John Tenniel, who showed the character with a calf’s head and hoofs instead of flippers on his hind legs. He may have been inspired to draw the Mock Turtle this way because of the transition to “dull reality” as Alice’s sister thought of how “the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle’s heavy sobs.”

Instead of making the traditional Victorian mock turtle soup, which calls for calf’s head and heels, I adapted a Louisianan recipe from the In a While, Crocodile cook book that had a little more kick to it. In addition to ground beef, I added ground veal, as a nod to the traditional calf ingredient.

¾ lb. ground sirloin

¾ lb. ground veal

6 stalks celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup chopped onion

3/4 cup butter

15 oz. tomato puree

30 oz. chicken broth

30 oz. beef broth

1/2 cup flour mixed with 1 cup water

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce

1 cup ketchup

1 teaspoon hot sauce (more if you like it hotter)

2 bay leaves

1-1/2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup lemon juice

1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

6 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

6 slices lemon, for garnish

1 cup sherry (or to taste)

Mock turtle saute stepSaute the meat, celery, garlic, and onion in butter until meat is brown and veggies are translucent. Add to the slow cooker (6 quart or larger).

Add tomato puree, chicken broth, beef broth, flour mixture, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, hot sauce, bay leaves, thyme, salt, and pepper to the slow cooker. Stir.

Cook on low heat for 3 ½ hours.

Add lemon juice, parsley, and eggs. Stir well and cook for another 30 minutes. If desired, skim and discard fat from top of soup.

IMG_8535Immediately before serving, remove bay leaves, add sherry to taste, and garnish individual bowls with lemon slices. Enjoy with buttered bread.

 

 

 

If you’re looking for a historically accurate mock turtle soup recipe, try the one copied below, from Martha Lloyd’s Household Book. (Martha was a close friend of Jane Austen.)

Mrs. Fowle’s Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf’s head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop’t very small. A ¼ of a pint of oysters chop’t very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop’t. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.

“The Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and began, in a voice sometimes choked with sobs, to sing this:—

‘Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,

Waiting in a hot tureen!

Who for such dainties would not stoop?

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beautiful Soup!

 

‘Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,

Game, or any other dish?

Who would not give all else for two

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beauti—FUL SOUP!’”


Food blog by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services team.

Mock Turtle Soup recipe adapted from In a While, Crocodile: New Orleans Slow Cooker Recipes by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, © 2014 by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.


Like

Harper Lee’s Second Book and its Publication Bring Controversy

Go Set a Watchman - cover

Imagine having a book you’ve written published for the first time. How surprised would you be if your book became a bestseller, won a Pulitzer Prize, and was even made into a motion picture starring a major actor? Would you publish another book and risk disappointing your audience? Or would you choose to leave your readers wanting more?

That book, of course, is Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. When it was released 55 years ago, one critic compared Lee’s skill to that of Mark Twain, and described her as “an artist of rare talent and control. This first novel is an achievement of unusual magnitude” (Canfield).

The recent announcement that Harper Lee’s second book to be published, Go Set a Watchman, would be released today captured the imaginations of Mockingbird’s fans and of the literary world. Watchman, however, is not a new book. In fact, Lee wrote it decades ago, before writing Mockingbird. That Lee waited so many years before publishing Watchman has raised questions about her decision, including controversy about whether she herself made this decision.

The first controversy

Harper Lee, now 88, suffered a stroke in 2007 and lives in an assisted-living facility (Trachtenberg). Her sister, Alice Lee (now deceased), in a 2011 interview, described Harper as “mostly blind and deaf” following her stroke (Berman). Alice Lee, an attorney, who had “long represented her sister and whom friends describe as Ms. Lee’s ‘protector,’ died Nov. 17 [2014].” Less than three months after Alice Lee’s death comes the announcement from HarperCollins Publishers that Go Set a Watchman would be published on July 14, 2015.

Lee has not spoken to anyone except her agent and her attorney about Watchman, its discovery or its publication. Harper publisher Jonathan Burnham insists that Lee is “very much engaged in the process,” although he bases his assessment on reports from Lee’s agent. Lee, Burnham adds, will not give interviews or other publicity when Watchman is released (Berman).

That Lee’s agent and her attorney, who appear to have everything to gain financially from this situation, have been the only ones communicating with the author Harper Leehas prompted an investigation. The Alabama Securities Commission investigated and “concluded that Ms. Lee appeared to understand what was occurring while approving the publication of ‘Go Set a Watchman’” (Stevens).

Despite the Commission’s findings, Lee’s fans have remained skeptical over the circumstances of Watchman’s discovery. These lingering doubts may have motivated Lee’s attorney, Tonja Carter, to publish an explanation in Monday’s Wall Street Journal (Carter).

The second controversy

Although Watchmen includes characters from Mockingbird, such as Scout and Atticus, the novel is set twenty years into the future, into the civil-rights movement. Fans of Mockingbird may be shocked to discover changes in Atticus. He served as Mockingbird’s “moral conscience: kind, wise, honorable, an avatar of integrity” (Kakutani).

In Watchmen, Scout, 26 and known as Jean Louise, has been living in New York City. She visits her hometown, Maycomb, Ala., to discover that Atticus now holds “abhorrent views on race and segregation” (Kakutani). Readers may wonder why Lee wrote this book as “a distressing narrative filled with characters spouting hate speech.” Ultimately, as Mockingbird “suggested that we should have compassion for outsiders like Boo and Tom Robinson,” Watchman “asks us to have understanding for a bigot named Atticus” (Kakutani).

Works Cited

Berman, Russell. “How Harper Lee’s Long-Lost Sequel Was
……..Found.” theatlantic.com. Feb 4, 2015.

Canfield, Francis X., “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Critic, 1960

Carter, Tonja B. “How I found the Harper Lee Manuscript.” Wall
……..Street Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Jul 13 2015. ProQuest.
……..Web. 13 July 2015.

Kakutani, Michiko. “Review: Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’
……..Gives Atticus Finch a Dark Side.” http://nyti.ms/1ULlBZv

Stevens, Laura, and Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. “Business News: No
……..Fraud found Is Discovered in Harper Lee Case.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed.Mar 13 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.

Trachtenberg, Jeffrey A., and Laura Stevens. “Harper Lee
……..Bombshell: How News of Book Unfolded.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Feb 07 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.


To Dig Deeper, explore the following links, prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader: Humanities II and also subject librarian for English, literature and theatre:

One of the big issues that has sprung up around GSAW beyond the controversy over its publication is the difference in the character of Atticus Finch and concerns that it may “tarnish” his legacy.

Here is another point from yesterday

You can read the first chapter or listen to Reese Witherspoon read it

NPR piece from yesterday

NPR piece from Feb

NPR piece from 2014 indicating that if Lee is being taken advantage of with this publication it may not be the first time


SarahDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. 


Like
1 People Like This Post

The Highlighter: How to find articles from a well-established newspaper

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

You need articles from a newspaper that’s existed for over a century. Are they available in print, in a database or somewhere else? This video shows how to access articles from a well-established newspaper.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Foto Friday: A Summer Beauty

Lily Pad

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


Like
1 People Like This Post

« Previous PageNext Page »

 


Last Modified: July 10, 2015