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The Curious ‘Cat: What do you look forward to?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you look forward to this semester?

RS9838_DSC_3721-scrCaitlin St. Amour—“I’m starting law school, so it’s going to be a whole different way to go to school, different kind of classes. So I’m looking forward to really starting learning about what I want to do—if that makes sense—as opposed to undergrad classes, which were so broad. So that’s what I’m excited for: to actually start what I’m going to be doing [as a career].”





Danielle Morro—“I’m going to start grad school here in a week, for school counseling. So I’m looking forward to that. And probably most specifically, I have an internship placement within a classroom setting, so I’m excited to get some experience within the classroom and learn through some hands-on experience.”





Mary Connors—“It’s my first semester of law school, so I look forward to meeting everyone and making new friends. And that’s probably what I most look forward to. … I have a great story now on my first day!”








Mary McLaughlin—“Well, it’s my senior year, so that’s kind of nerve-wracking but also very exciting. I guess I’m looking forward to—I’m working this summer and also taking classes—so having that balance and putting [into] practical use what I’m learning. I’m getting deeper into classes that are more specific to my major and more specific to what I want to do within my major. I’m marketing and international business, so a lot of my classes are going to have overlap between the two, which is exciting. And also just doing all the things I can do one last time.”


Sydney Riley—“I’m excited to meet a bunch of new people, especially—I haven’t met my roommates yet, so I’m excited to meet them. I come all the way from Seattle, so it’s going to be very interesting to get used to the east coast culture. I’m a freshman, so I’m excited to be away from home and be independent. I think that’s what I’m looking forward to the most.”





Zachary Schlake— “I guess I’m looking forward to meeting my friends again and seeing them and just kind of getting back to hanging out with my friends that are here. … I’m going to be a junior.”


Falvey Memorial Library welcomes new faculty members to Villanova

Falvey Memorial Library welcomed all new faculty members to Villanova to a breakfast reception this morning. If you are a faculty member who was unable to attend, we’re reprinting the general handout that was provided here, which gives a brief rundown of key contact information and services (double click graphic for expanded view). Contact us anytime if you have any further questions or suggestions for library staff.




The Curious ‘Cat: What Podcasts do you listen to?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students and staff,
Do you listen to podcasts? What podcasts do you listen to?

RS9513_DSC_3693-scrHaley Miller—“I’ve listened to [only] one podcast ever and it was [from] Serial; it was a murder mystery. And I really did enjoy it; it was 12 episodes long and about 45 minutes an episode. They re-opened a man’s case who was being accused of murdering his ex-girlfriend. It had my attention the whole time. I did it on a car ride … to somewhere and [then back] home. … That’s been my only experience [with podcasts]. It’s a true story. The case is currently being appealed in the Maryland circuit court system, so it’s still ongoing.”

RS9517_DSC_3697-scrDarrell Robinson—“I do listen to podcasts, but I don’t have a favorite one. I pretty much listen to anything that will catch my interest, but usually it’s language, stuff about languages, modern languages … There’s one I have on my computer to help me learn Chinese, for instance. … It’s on iTunes; it’s completely free … It’s great ‘cause you can listen and just go about your business, go about your day.”



RS9540_DSC_3701-scrDaniel Ehinger—“I only listen to one podcast. I listen to something called the Rooster Teeth Podcast. It’s an Internet company; they make Internet shows and they sell paraphernalia … it’s all video-game-based. I’m really into video games and Internet stuff, so that’s why I listen to them.”


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Philosophy


Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”RS9332_2014-01-29 14.34.20-5-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Philosophy Librarian Nikolaus Fogle

What’s new this year?

NF—Well, the Philosophy program is about to welcome six new graduate students, who I’ll get to meet in August. And of course the philosophy collection is constantly growing. We’ve recently acquired the online version of the Loeb Classical Library, which is great for people doing ancient philosophy. We’re getting more resources online generally, including Oxford Handbooks and a Bloomsbury e-book collection in political thought.

What are the challenges for philosophy students who want to use the Library? 

NF—People often just don’t know where to start. Depending on the project, they might need to use any number of different research tools. And once they figure out where to go, students don’t always know the right sorts of questions to ask themselves in order to use them effectively. A related problem, too, is waiting too long to ask for help.

What resources does the Library offer to help philosophy students overcome those challenges? 

NF—We try to make navigation as easy as possible. The subject and topic guides on the website are pretty helpful, but librarians are also here in person to provide guidance whenever it’s needed. In addition to individual research consultations, we also do in-class orientations and workshops on research skills, tools and techniques throughout the year.

What do you wish philosophy students knew about you, about the Library? 

NF—I guess I just want them to know that the Library is here to provide them with help, and with resources. There’s practically nothing you might need that we won’t be able to get a hold of for you. And it’s not just materials—we’re here to provide you with the knowledge and know-how to enable you to move through the research process as effectively as possible.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

NF—I love getting to help people, and finding out what they’re working on. I really enjoy collaborating with my colleagues in the Library and elsewhere on campus. And I love that I get to be a philosophy nerd in a really big way.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

NF—Villanova students have such a wide range of interests, and so much enthusiasm. The humanities curriculum here is really great. I like that I never know what the next question is going to be. I also like seeing people’s interests coalesce as they decide on a paper topic, or a major, or a dissertation.


The Curious ‘Cat: What’s the first thing you want to do for fun?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “After your final exam or project, what’s the first thing you want to do for fun?





Chantelle Casillas—“… go on vacation. I’m going to Barcelona.”











Robert Carey—“Beach—go right to the beach, Rehoboth Beach, that’s where I’ll go.”











Atena Hashemoghli—“I’m moving to New York. So the first thing is visiting Times Square or somewhere else to have fun, and enjoy the rest of the summer there.”









Jeffrey Hupf—“going to visit my friends and family back home in New Jersey … Hammonton, New Jersey.”










Ciara Sprance—“For fun? probably read a book that wasn’t assigned, read a book that I’m going to enjoy and not cry about or sweat about … I’m going to read a book by John Banville; he’s a good Irish writer. … I’m going to read The Sea, after I read this.”







Daniel Shea—“That is a hard question. Usually I go home for break … I usually go immediately, so I don’t really do anything [for fun. My home is in] San Francisco.”



The Curious ‘Cat: Which of the following statements is true?

Curious CatThis week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “Which of the following statements is true?” *

1. The Library houses a rare painting, the massive 12-by-19-feet “The Triumph of David” by Pietro da Cortona, a major artist of the Baroque period.

2. The Library houses a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment that allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about as though they were in the actual setting.

3. The Library is soon to house a Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship that will nurture students as creative and innovative thinkers.

4. The Library houses a Research Support Center, which provides eleven research librarians—each an expert both in scholarly research and in one or more academic disciplines—who look forward to helping you with your assignments.

RS9291_DSC_3610-scrKyle Johnson—“I think multiple parts of these are true. I know for sure that there is a CAVE, and I’m pretty sure that there are eleven research librarians. I’m not sure about the new Center, and I haven’t seen the painting myself. But I know those two are true.”







Jaclyn Lanciano—“I think it’s number three. … I just heard them talking about how they’re going to renovate.”










Martha Wolnicki—“Number one, I would say, is false. Number two, I would say, is false. Three and four are true.”









Francesca Cocchi—“I’ve seen the painting; I don’t know if all the stats are correct, but I assume. And I wrote an article about the CAVE facility, so I know that’s here … when we first got the grant for it … for the school newspaper (The Villanovan) … Yeah, I want to be a journalist. The Center for Innovation sounds familiar. I actually would think we already have one. I guess that’s true. … And I would say the last one is—eleven sounds like a lot, but—I think I’ll just say “true” for all of them.”



John Suggs—“They all kind of sound true. … Is that a bad thing? They’re all true statements. I like the one about nurturing students as creative and innovative thinkers.”








Brooke Erdman—“More than one sound true to me. … I kind of like the CAVE. … I’m going to go with the second one.”








* All four of the statements are true.


The Curious ‘Cat: When you need a break from studying, what is a good way to refresh your mind?

Curious Cat


This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “When you need a break from studying, what is a good way to refresh your mind or to relieve stress?”

RS9263_DSC_3570-scrYeji Seak—“I usually catch up on all the delayed text messages that I need to send back to people. Or I try to stretch a little bit and get some food to refresh my memory and just take a 10-to-15 minute break each time—use the bathroom if I need to … When I’m taking a break I don’t really think about what I just learned; I try to calm myself down and relax a little bit and then go back to studying and focus.”




Wilson Capellan, OSA—“I go to the coffee shop. Just being alone makes my mind refreshed. And then surf the Internet and visit social media—while sipping a cup of coffee.”








Aliyia N Patterson—“I cook—and run, either or—cooking or running. Sometimes when I’m running and we have a paper due next week I’ll be running and thinking about what I’m doing in the paper. Unless a car jumps out in front of me, then my mind is back on running. It’s happened a couple of times. So I like to cook and run.”






Anna Fickenscher—“Sometimes I just take a break and watch stupid reality TV … or mindless Internet entertainment … reading different blogs or reading different articles—just kind of get my mind off of school work with something that requires less thought process.”






Divya Bonagiri—“I’ll watch some comedy movie or comedy film, and I’ll have some refreshment for some time. And then I’ll go back to studies. Or I enjoy doing my hobby. … I get refreshed doing my hobby for some time and then get back to my studies.”






Mervin Woodlin—“I have a family, so I spend time with them. I usually do most of my studying at home; the only reason I’m here is because I just started a summer program. Most of the time when I’m studying and I want to take a break, I spend time with them.”



The Curious ‘Cat: What would you change? What would you keep?

Curious Cat
This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could change one thing about the Library, what would it be? What about the Library do you hope never changes?

RS9223_Christian LolkChristian Lolk—“I have a background in the humanities, so as many books and sections devoted to the humanities as possible … I’m a new student, but I checked around the Library this past semester, and I noticed there’s not much past the late ‘80s purchased or put on the shelves … I would prefer some newer books and more in the humanities.”

Editor’s Note—Browsing the collection often leads to discoveries of new books, connections among various subjects, or in-depth knowledge of a specific topic. Another strategy for finding new books, though, is to use Falvey’s powerful catalog either to sort your search results by date—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data descending 





—or to use the “Year of Publication” filter to set a date range—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data range

RS9226_John Costello
















John Costello—“[change—] more electrical outlets … not change—the calming environment”

MJ from Curious 'Cat - 2015-07-01









MJ—“I don’t know what I want to change about the printers, but something. I’m always so relieved when a printing problem is solved … I’m just grateful … I wish there was more lounge lighting for those late-night studies. And something I hope that never changes is the warmth of the café addition. I’m a returning student from 20 years ago, and my jaw dropped when I saw food in the Library. I thought there had been some kind of coup. But it’s made it so nice … it just makes me feel good. It makes me feel relaxed at times when things can be quite stressful.”

RS9231_Simhachalam PanduriSimhachalam Panduri—“I would like to increase the number of study rooms because every time I think of getting a study room it’s always busy. I can’t get any; I need to wait for one or two hours to get a study room.”

RS9235_Blessing Mbamalu







Blessing Mbamalu—“I’m a fourth-floor kind of person, and I realize it’s not going to be that quiet, so I wish it was a little bit more [quiet]. I don’t know how you would be able to enforce it to make it stricter.”

RS9239_Anusha Mathur






Anusha Mathur
—“One thing I would like to change about the Library is more seating space. In the fall or spring [semesters] whenever I enter at 4:00 p.m. and the Library is extremely busy, I don’t find space to sit. Maybe that is one thing which can be done.”


The Curious ‘Cat: Would you rather … ?

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could choose between having the current library and current earning potential when you graduate OR having a library without online electronic databases, an online catalog, or online research help but also having double the earning potential when you graduate, which would you prefer?


1. Danielle FarerDanielle Farer—“The first one … It’s really hard to find what you need in a library without the assistance of people to help you and without the computers to help you and having to do all that work by yourself … I remember when I was younger and you actually had to flip through the card catalog; that’s really time-consuming … I’d much rather make less and have the process be a lot easier.”

2. Sushmita Arjyal



Sushmita Arjyal—“I would definitely go with the second choice: electronic suppliances have helped in past and also will help in future … If we can have more, then it would be nice … it has helped the online catalog and the online sources that we can find books online; we can find the [building] map and find where the books are.”

3. Craig Gilbert




Craig Gilbert—“I’d prefer the first. … The more information you have, the better off you’re going to be. The money comes by itself later; the money doesn’t have to be connected to the information. We’re not in school to make money; we’re in here to learn.”

4. Susheel Bajaj





Susheel Bajaj—“I would prefer the “all” one. It has all the online stuff—online books, online materials—because you don’t need to carry a hardcopy of the book. That would be very easy, and you can read the stuff anywhere you want … on the go, on the mobile device, on the tablet, anywhere on the go. So that would be good if we had more of the online materials instead of hardcopy of the books.”

5. Matthew Zarenkiewicz



Matthew Zarenkiewicz—“[I prefer] the current library. My earning potential … I’m worried about, obviously, but not so much that I would sacrifice the amount of time that I save using the online database and things like that to do research, especially this summer when I’m doing research. So I’m very happy for all of that.”

6. Indu Priya Eedara




Indu Priya Eedara—“The first one: It’s always better to have online catalogs or online stuff, which would be easier to access.”


The Curious ‘Cat: What Do Villanova Students Really Think about the Library?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you wish the Library knew about your needs as a student?

CC 2015-06-17 - #1 Black Shirt - Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku-scr

Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku—“In computer science every semester they would introduce some new courses … and some [new] textbooks … But when we go to the Library website, we never find those books. It would be helpful if you would coordinate with the other departments and … get the information, like what the new courses they are offering, and get in contact with the faculty who are offering those courses and order the books, not to issue them to the students but at least two or three different copies in the Library. That would be great because one of the courses we have … I did not get … even a PDF version, anything like that in the Library. So it would be great if you would coordinate with the different departments and get at least the online versions rather than the printed versions of the books.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #2 Purple Shirt - Thomas Modayil Jacob 1-scr

Thomas Modayil Jacob—“And the need [for computer science textbooks] is urgent in the computer science and the computer engineering departments ‘cause there a lot of fields we have courses on, like semantic web and big data, which don’t have textbooks as yet. So I think that the Library needs to coordinate with the professor to at least have those relevant papers or, if there is a textbook, then the textbook, at least in the PDF form.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #3 Army Shirt - G. Ramesh Krishna-scr

Ramesh Krishna—“Since we don’t have the books, we need to take a loan from other libraries … we need to get the books that are not available here we need to get the loan from others libraries. So that would be helpful if … instead of loaning from other libraries it would be better if have those books in our Library.”

Editor’s note—The Library does not purchase textbooks for current courses unless the titles are specifically ordered by faculty.
One reason – Expense: New editions are often published in a year or so, rendering the textbook we would have purchased obsolete.
Another reason – Competition: The Library doesn’t want to be in competition with the University Shop.
Library staff, however, have begun to explore ways that Falvey can better meet our students’ need for textbooks. Keep checking this blog for updates.

CC 2015-06-17 - #4 Rebecca Snow-scr


Rebecca Snow—“I think it’s important to have quiet places. We have one upstairs, but maybe another room would be good. [Otherwise,] I like the way it’s set up; I think it’s good.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #5 - Shaina Smolowe-scr






Shaina Smolowe—“More printing for free would be incredibly helpful.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #6 - Stephanie Mader-scr








Stephanie Mader—“I like the quiet study room upstairs. I like the access to the computers. I like the coffee room; it might be nice if that were open during the summer.”


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Last Modified: June 18, 2015