FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



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Foto Friday: Chinese New Year – celebrating the year of the horse

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Happy Chinese New Year!

People born during the years 1906, 1918, 1930, 1942, 1954, 1966, 1978, 1990, 2002 or 2014 are born during the year of the horse. These people are known to be active, energetic and quick-witted. They are also most comfortable in a crowd.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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New Digital Library Front End

Digital Library HomeThe Falvey Memorial Library is pleased to announce the launch of our new Digital Library interface.

The new interface features a JavaScript-only page zoom, faster hierarchical browsing, and enhanced searching that includes both item and collection descriptions in the results.

The public front end is built on VuFind 2.0, which has not yet been officially released, but is available for testing here. The backend is running the latest beta version of VuDL (release spring 2013), which has been re-architected to use a Fedora-Commons repository.

A more detailed article describing the new Fedora-Commons data model and Solr integration is forthcoming.

For now, we encourage you to explore this new site, and to provide any feedback to us directly.

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Help Us Test a New Scanner

A new high-end scanner on the first floor has been installed on a trial basis.  We invite students, staff, faculty and visitors to help us test it out. The large flatbed (book edge) scanner and accompanying PC with touch screen interface are easy to use.  The software can even convert text to audio. You’ll find the trial scanner near the public print station on the first floor of the Library. Feedback forms are available. Give it a try and tell us what you think!

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Elsevier Journal Boycott Takes Center Stage with Scholars

According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, “A protest against Elsevier, the world’s largest scientific journal publisher, is rapidly gaining momentum since it began as an irate blog post at the end of January. By Tuesday evening, about 2,400 scholars had put their names to an online pledge not to publish or do any editorial work for the company’s journals, including refereeing papers.” Scientists too are putting their name to the protest. One blogger on MetaFilter informed readers that “The Cost of Knowledge lets scientists register their support for a boycott of all Elsevier journals for their support of SOPA, PIPA and the Research Works Act. It appears the boycott was inspired by Field’s medalist Tim Gowers’ recent comments describing his personal boycott of Elsevier journals.” What are your opinions about the journal boycott? How about the recent efforts to impose restrictions on internet sites by way of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)? Tell us what you think.

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New Scanners On Trial – Feedback Needed

Two high-end scanners have been installed on a trial basis and we invite students, staff, faculty, and visitors to help us test them. We have a large flatbed scanner and an overhead scanner. They are both located between the Circulation desk & the public printer on the first floor of the library. Feedback forms are available at the scanning stations. Give them a try and tell us what you think!

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David Uspal is New Web Specialist for Library and Scholarly Applications

David Uspal recently joined Falvey as Web Specialist for Library and Scholarly Applications. Joe Lucia, University Librarian, commented,dave-uspal “Dave brings many exciting skills to the library, and he will be working to advance our open source applications on all fronts in the months ahead.”

Dave works with the Technology Development team to update library web sites and to add new resources.

A native of Reading (Pa.), Dave has a bachelor’s degree in computer science with a minor in management information systems from The Pennsylvania State University and two master’s degrees from Penn State, Great Valley in software engineering and systems engineering.

His hobbies are board gaming and his two house rabbits. Dave noted that he tried doing home repairs over the summer but decided this wasn’t a hobby he is likely to pursue.

Article and photograph by Alice Bampton

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Feedback Friday: The Last Page

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“You know you’ve read a good book when you turn the last page

and feel as if you’ve lost a friend.”

-Paul Sweeney

Is this how you feel when you finish reading a great novel?  A popular trilogy? Your calculus textbook? Tell us about your recent encounter with a good book!


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Feedback Friday: Mac or PC?

imac_transparencycomputer_monitorIt’s a commonly held image that “cool” people prefer Macs while “conservative” types prefer PCs. Do you agree with this assumption? Which would you rather use at school? If you could buy any computer for personal, academic, and business use, which one would you buy and why?

Tell us in the comments!

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Feedback Friday: What does “Home! Sweet Home!” mean to you?

home_sweet_home_-_project_gutenberg_etext_215661According to L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, “No matter how dreary and gray our homes are, we people of flesh and blood would rather live there than in any other country, be it ever so beautiful. There is no place like home.” The holidays are right around the corner and almost everyone is thinking about going home. Whether you’re taking a plane, train or automobile, it won’t be long before you’re walking through that familiar front door. What do you look forward to most when you think of home?

Share your “going home” story. Tell us in the Comments!

Image of sheet music for “Home! Sweet Home!” words by H.R. Bishop, courtesy of Project Gutenberg

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Feedback Friday: Are games needed at the library?

chess_piece_-_white_queen1A professor recently asked the library to place her chess set on reserve so that she and her students could use it while in the library. After processing her request, we pondered the need for more board games at the library. We’ve decided to ask you, our patrons. Taking a break from studying or computing to play a board game may help the brain function better and can relieve stress. Studies have been conducted. Articles have been written.

What do you think? Tell us in the Comments!

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Last Modified: November 20, 2009