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Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Throwback Thursday: Homecoming 1962

The crowning of a Homecoming Queen is no longer part of the Homecoming tradition at Villanova University, but new events have been added. This year’s festivities include the football game (v. Morgan State), an outdoor festival, evening receptions, Hoops Mania, and the Dream for Eileen 5K. (If your interests this weekend are more scholarly, the library will maintain regular hours.)

Check out the October 31, 1962 issue of the The Villanovan in the Digital Library to read more about Homecoming in 1962.

Homecoming queen

Alumni Association President, Edward Donahue, crowns the Homecoming Queen, Pat Farren, on November 2, 1962. (Photo courtesy of University Archives)

 

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‘Cat in the Stacks: Homecoming

CAT-STAX

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Get hyped: this weekend is Homecoming! To be honest, until a few days ago and some Wikipedia reading, I always thought Homecoming meant the first football game at home after a string of away games. As it turns out, while football is of course a super exciting part of homecoming, the people “coming home” are the alumni.

Warning: there are some feelings incoming. Prepare yourself.

 

Feelings

Obligatory Mean Girls gif.

To Wildcats from years gone by, Villanova is home and always will be. College is a second home to its students for hundreds of reasons, most obviously because a majority of students physically move into campus residences halls and apartments. College is their first home away home. But even for commuters and part-timers, colleges become emotionally significant dwellings. They become so much more than sterile buildings with desk-filled classrooms.

I am only two months into the Villanova experience as a grad student, so I feel like I have a connection with the first-year experience of campus, but I do vividly remember the first few months of my undergrad experience: the excitement, the fun, the new friends and new responsibilities. But I also remember anxiety, fear, and homesickness. I remember challenges and I remember mistakes.

The reason college becomes home for thousands upon thousands of people is not just because college is an exciting and fun place to live for a few semesters—it is home because it is a community of human beings learning how to think and learning how to live. It is home because it is, for so many students, the mostly-forgiving net where they take the first daring (or tentative) leaps into adulthood.

From the outside, college can look idyllic: beautifully manicured campuses filled with young thinkers thinking their ways to academic success. But from the inside, it is home: raw, feeling, and sometimes fraught, but a loving light. It’ll push you forward, but it will always welcome you back.

Now go check out the Homecoming event schedule!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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Dig Deeper: Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania

We Are HereThis year’s annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture, which will be held in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 12:30 p.m., will feature Ellen Cassedy, speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with “the dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, award-winning author Ellen Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Ellen Cassedy’s We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust (University of Nebraska Press, 2012), begins with a personal journey into the old Jewish heartland (land of her Jewish forebears), and then expands into a larger exploration.  The book won four national awards and was short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Jewish Book World calls it “brilliantly balanced, totally engaging, and constantly penetrating.”

For more information on Ellen Cassedy, the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania, and other resources both online and here in Falvey, see the following links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


Dig Deeper 

Ellen-head-shot-croppedSelected Internet resources

Ellen Cassedy site

Yad Vashem - The Beginning of the Final Solution, Murder of the Jews in the Baltic States

Holocaust Atlas of Lithuania

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

USC Shoah Foundation

Voices of the Holocaust

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

 

Selected Falvey Databases

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

ATLA Religion Database (EBSCO)

Historical Abstracts (EBSCO)

Opposing Viewpoints Resources in Context (Gale)

Oxford Bibliographies – Political Science, International Relations

Philosophy Documentation Center Collection (POIESIS)

Political Handbook of the World (Sage/CQ Press)

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (ProQuest)

 

Selected Guides

The Oxford handbook of genocide studies

Holocaust related encyclopedias

Course guide – Genocide and mass killing

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

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A Golden Anniversary for Wonka’s Golden Tickets, and a Previously Unpublished Chapter to Read

A first edition of signed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently available from the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America for $25,000.

A first edition of signed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently available from the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America for $25,000.

As Charlie and the Chocolate Factory celebrates its golden anniversary this fall, news of an unpublished chapter from an early draft of Roald Dahl’s masterpiece emerges: “Roald Dahl draft spills Charlie and the Chocolate Factory secrets.”

It’s fun to imagine what could have been, but I doubt that the book would have been better even with the “vanilla fudge mountain” or additional golden tickets and ticket winners. What do you think?

Read the previously unpublished chapter in its entirety here.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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All about VUFind Infographic

VUFIND TIMELINE4


Infographic designed by Joanne Quinn with copy and invaluable assistance provided by Demian Katz and Darren Poley.

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‘Cat in the Stacks: Break

CAT-STAX

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Break week is finally here! You’ve survived midterms, made it to mid-October! What hasn’t killed you has made you stronger. You’ve earned a break, so take it by the—oh. Wait. What’s that over there? It’s a huge “To Do” list of reading, writing, and studying looming for break week.

All This Work

For most of us, break week is not quite a vacation. But after a few collegiate semesters in my pocket, I’ve come to embrace it as a pretty special time—a stretch of days that can save or destroy my sanity for the second half of the semester. Really, getting a head start on final projects and research without having to worry about classes for a few days is pretty fantastic. And it’s not as if you have to spend every waking hour doing work (unless you’re in a really bad spot, in which case, grind away and Godspeed).

This year, my personal goal for break is to have a nice division of labor and chilling by following some personal guidelines.

How to Catch a Break During Break Week

Getting Up At Seven In The MorningAvoid sleeping in. I know you want to play video games until 3AM and sleep until mid-morning and then stare at your stack of articles with the intention of reading them but figure, hey, well I already wasted half the day, so why not just waste more? (Sorry, I’m projecting.) Getting up and getting work done early will free more of your afternoons and evenings for fun, and bonus: when break week is over, you won’t have to readjust to your class sleep schedule.

Work comfortably. You have to do classwork, sure, but there is one major difference… you get to do it in pajamas. Improve the atmosphere with a strong cup of hot coffee and a cat on your lap.

Create a schedule. I don’t know about you, but a huge portion of my homework time is usually spent trying to figure out exactly what I have to do—which pages to read, how long a paper has to be, when things are due. Lately, I’ve been marking everything well ahead of time, so that when it comes time to work, I can just get to work. Mark pages with Post-its or bookmarks. Lay out everything you need to work the night before you plan to do it (this also works for morning workouts!).

993dff014f860eReward yourself. I academically function on a positive reinforcement system. If I accomplish a set number of tasks on my to-do list during the day, I’ll indulge video games or Netflix at night. If you’re more extroverted than me (what do you expect? I’m a cat), plan some social outings.

When everything is said and done, and break week has ended, just remember… it’s only eight weeks until the end of the semester!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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VuFind Summit 2014 Welcomes Software Developers to Library, Oct. 13 & 14

VUFIND  LOGO

VuFind, an open source library search engine, is more powerful and user-friendly than the traditional online public access catalog (OPAC). Using VuFind, for example, Falvey’s catalog now enables users to perform just a single search to see not only books, media and articles but also Falvey-website items and books from other libraries—all on one page.

DAVELACY

David Lacy presents at VuFind ’13

The first VuFind 2.0 Summit occurred in Sept. 2010. It expanded to a VuStuff Conference in Oct. 2011. By Oct. 2012, VuFind had gained international recognition; this annual conference attracted librarians and technologists from Nepal, Portugal, Germany and Norway. The following year, this annual gathering of software developers featured several components, in addition to VuFind, and lasted a week. VuFind Summit 2014, the fifth annual VuFind conference, will take place for two days and focus exclusively on VuFind.

Presenters for this year’s conference come from the Murray Library at Messiah College, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, OCLC Developer Network and Falvey Memorial Library, to name a few. Falvey will host this event, and registration is required. Click here for registration information.

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Foto Friday: End of Summer

Grill

End of Summer

An agitation of the air,

A perturbation of the light

Admonished me the unloved year

Would turn on its hinge that night.

______

I stood in the disenchanted field

Amid the stubble and the stones,

Amazed, while a small worm lisped to me

The song of my marrow-bones.

_______

Blue poured into summer blue,

A hawk broke from his cloudless tower,

The roof of the silo blazed, and I knew

That part of my life was over.

________

Already the iron door of the north

Clangs open: birds, leaves, snows

Order their populations forth,

And a cruel wind blows.

 Stanley Kunitz

Stanley Kunitz, “End of Summer” from The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz. Copyright © 1953 by Stanley Kunitz.  Reprinted by permission of W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

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Dig Deeper: Journalism and the Great War

NYTimes-WWI headline 1918

When the Great War changed the course of the 20th century, it also greatly impacted the world of communication. Until this time, muckraking was the dominant journalistic movement, which was an incarnation of investigative writing that sought to unveil corruption and scandal (to “rake” up “muck”), especially regarding politics and social issues.

Some of the most influential journalists in the Progressive Era included Lincoln Steffens, Ida Tarbell, and Ray Stannard Baker, all three of whom wrote for McClure’s Magazine, which played a significant role in establishing the muckraking movement. While Steffens (1866-1936) focused on exposing government and political corruption, Tarbell (1857-1944) is perhaps best known for her work exposing John D. Rockefeller and the ills of his oil monopoly. Stannard (1870-1946) was an advocate of Woodrow Wilson during his presidential candidacy and was later asked by him to investigate the war in Europe. The muckraking movement, however, was to meet its end during World War I, during which government in general became adversarial toward journalism.

George Creel journalist

George Creel

Seven days after the United States entered the global conflict, President Woodrow Wilson created the Committee on Public Information (CPI), which strove to publicize the war through print and visual media in only constructive ways. Although the CPI did not have the ability to censor, its head, George Creel, a muckraking journalist himself, did advocate for voluntary self-monitoring and even issued a Preliminary Statement to the Press in May 1917 that urged editors to prevent publication of any news that could compromise military operations. As Creel was also a member of the government Censorship Board, which monitored communication over telegraph, telephone and cable, he was able to scrutinize periodicals as well as magazines, which were required to present their articles for the board’s review before publication.

The Espionage Act of 1917 and a 1918 sedition amendment frustrated attempts to publish an objective view of the war even further. The former barred any materials that ostensibly advocated disloyalty, insubordination, treason or obstruction of military recruitment, while the latter deemed criminal any published content disloyal to the government or military. In the hands of a manipulating Wilson administration, the freedom of domestic reporting was severely restricted.

Although operating under difficult conditions, there were numerous journalists who were able to distinguish themselves for their courage, intelligence and integrity.

Nellie_Bly_2

Nellie Bly

During what she thought only to be a vacation in Europe, Nellie Bly (1864-1922) witnessed the outbreak of the Great War. Previously, Bly had written for the New York World about government corruption, poor working conditions, and the Pullman labor strike, and even had the opportunity to interview American social reformer Susan B. Anthony. After taking a hiatus from investigative journalism, she was asked by a former World editor to write for the New York Evening Journal about her experiences in war-torn Europe. She ultimately accepted and is now known as America’s first female war correspondent reporting from the front lines.

John Reed (1887-1920) was another war correspondent who sailed to Europe soon after Germany declared war on France. He viewed the war largely as a product of commercialism and was frequently thwarted by censorship in the press. Reed is famously known to have shouted, “This is not my war, and I will not support it. This is not my war, and I will have nothing to do with it” (Homberger, John Reed, 1990, p.122). After President Wilson announced the involvement of the United States, Reed went on to publish vitriolic anti-war articles in the Socialist magazine The Masses, whose editors were eventually charged with conspiring to obstruct conscription.

After the war, author and journalist Georges Seldes (1890-1995) conducted an exclusive interview with the supreme commander of the German army, Paul von Hindenburg, who actually broke down in tears during the interview and discussed how pivotal America was strategically in winning the war.

With the efforts of these journalists and many others, it seems only appropriate that the Pulitzer Prizes, established by one of the most famous journalists and publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World, Joseph Pulitzer, were first awarded for achievement in journalism in 1917.


Dig Deeper: Resources about Journalism through the Great War

For a topic overview, check out the entry “Journalism, World War I” from our online reference Americans at War: Society, Culture and the Homefront. This entry concludes with a bibliography with sources that further investigate the history of journalism.

For primary sources, try browsing through a list of periodicals published during WWI.

Resources on Muckrakers past and present

A list of books about Ida Tarbell

Read more about Lincoln Steffens.

Discover the World War I diary of Ray Stannard Baker and more.

How well do you know Nellie Bly, the woman who travelled around the world in 72 days?

Find out more about the radical politics of John Reed.

Learn about the extraordinary career of Georges Seldes.

Resources about Joseph Pulitzer, the history of the prizes, and the works of individual prize-winning authors are all right here.

For more information about journalism throughout World War I, please email me, Alexander Williams, or call 610-519-8845.


Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments.

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Last Modified: October 8, 2014