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Throwback Thursday: 1914 Corr Hall Housed Theology and Philosophy Library

 

Corr Hall

Corr Hall 1914

Philadelphia Inquirer, page 7, vol. 170, iss. 53, February 22, 1914

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Shark Week poem: Your Program Tanked? Don’t Blame the Shark

Flight of sharks

When a leather-jacket clad
Water skiing lad
Wants to prove his manhood,
Obviously he should
show, making his mark
by jumping the shark.

And now those joyful Days have passed,
But I’m still here. I will outlast
these weaker species. That’s the score.
My kind outlasted dinosaurs.

I am
blue shark,
bull shark,
night shark,
nurse shark,
dusky shark,
goblin shark,
zebra shark
and reef shark.

I’m whale shark
lantern shark,
lemon shark,
leopard shark
sandbar shark,
sharpnose shark,
silky shark and
great white shark,

bignose,
blacknose,
bluntnose and
broadnose

gulper,
spinner,
thresher,
tiger,
copper,
sleeper and
cookiecutter

blacktip
whitetip
silvertip
(Take your pick.)

bonnethead,
hammerhead,
also crested bullhead

(Give my memory a shake) Oh,
Right—I almost forgot mako.

Now, before you disembark
‘cause your species’ fate looks dark,
think how long there have been sharks
—makes your time look like a quark!

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O Captain, My Captain

Whitman_Poem_O_Captain_My_Captain_09MAR1887_handwritten

O Captain! My Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! My Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my captain lies
Fallen cold and dead.

“O Captain! My Captain!” is a poem written by Walt Whitman in 1865. It is an elegy or mourning poem, written to honor Abraham Lincoln. The poem is an extended metaphor with Lincoln serving as the captain of a ship, symbolizing the United States.

The poem was featured prominently in Dead Poets Society, the film that featured Robin Williams‘ Oscar-winning portrayal of John Keating, a teacher at a stuffy boys-prep school. The students show their support for Keating at the end of the film by standing on their desks and reciting the poem, in defiance of the school’s headmaster’s decision to fire their beloved teacher. The poem has been featured in several anthologies, including Whitman’s Sequel to Drum-Taps and later editions of Leaves of Grass. Comedic legend Williams passed away yesterday at the age of 63.

These volumes and the film are available for borrowing at the Library. Falvey also has other films featuring Williams.

 

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Sea Yarns, Shark Yarns, No Yawns!

Moby_Dick_final_chaseLife on the sea promises adventure, excitement and life-changing experiences. Ever since Homer’s Odyssey, people have enjoyed sea yarns, and some of the most memorable feature sharks. The following seafaring tales—many available at Falvey—will satiate your craving for a satisfying sea yarn.

Odyssey by Homer

Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner by Daniel Defoe

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff

The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Kon-Tiki by Thor Heyerdahl

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy

Film—The Caine Mutiny

Film—Mr. Roberts

Film—Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World

Film—Voyage of the Yes 

What’s your favorite sea story? Please use the Comment section to tell us.

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It’s Shark Week and we’ve got fintastic shark art from the Digital Library!

SHARK DIGITAL
http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Record/vudl:312089

Did we, ahem, whet your appetite for more Dime Novel adventure? If so, be sure to check out our fascinating full collection of Dime Novel and Popular Literature from 1860 to 1930.

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Throwback Thursday: Headlines

These articles were on the second page of The Villanovan in November 1968. The article on the right announces the official dedication of Falvey Memorial Library. The University’s President, Rev. Robert J. Walsh, presided over the ceremonies. #tbt

If you want to dig deeper into The Villanova Monthly, as it was called from 1893-1897, or The Villanovan, from 1917 -2006, visit the Digital Library.

Falvey addition article Villanovan 1968

 

 

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Dog Days Special: Can you name these famous dogs?

australian shepherd and books

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Dog Days Special: Do Dogs Make Literature Memorable?

White dog on books

Whether they are the focus of a narrative or one of its characters, dogs have played memorable roles in literature. Falvey Memorial Library has several stories about dogs in its collection.

Many University students probably read Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, Sounder by William H. Armstrong and James Barkley or Red Dog by Bill Wallace for elementary school. And as adults, they may have read Marley & Me by John Grogan.

Readers who enjoyed Jack London’s The Call of the Wild would probably like White Fang and the suspenseful short story “To Build a Fire” by that same author.

Dogs also inspire writers of non-fiction: Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust by Michael Hingson; Rescuing Sprite: A Dog Lover’s Story of Joy and Anguish by Mark R. Levin; and Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him by Luis Carlos Montalvan (Author), Bret Witter (Contributor).

Sometimes a poem is the best choice for remembering a dog that has become a part of one’s life. Jimmy Stewart’s poem “Beau” provides an ideal example.

Do you have a favorite literary work that features a dog (or dogs)? Please use the Comment section to tell us.

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Throwback Thursday: Where is the Sister Bell?

sister_bell

The “sister” of the Liberty Bell, formerly housed in the library.

According to a July 1988 article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, the bell was “shielded by a shelf of reference books from visitors and standing against the rear wall of the Falvey Memorial Library at Villanova University [and] is a little sister of the nation’s most conspicuous patriotic symbol of freedom. It’s known as the Other One, the Sister Bell and the Villanova Bell. ”

Where is the bell now? The Sister Bell was moved to the Augustinian Heritage Room. She may be seen by appointment by calling Father Marty Smith: 610-864-1590. Father Smith notes that people come from all over the country to view the bell. Maybe you will too!

More information can be found on the Blue Electrode blog.

 

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Dig Deeper: The Ramones

Guest blogger,  Rohanah Spatz-Mallory

Rohanah

 

On July 11, the last original member of the Ramones, Tommy Ramone, passed away of bile duct cancer. Born Thomas Erdelyi in Budapest, Hungary, in 1949, he moved to Forest Hills, Queens, at the age of four and went on to found one of the most popular and enduring rock bands of all time. The death of Tommy Ramone, the last surviving original member of the Ramones, marks the end of an era. The other three died recently: Joey in 2001 of lymphoma, Dee Dee in 2002 of a drug overdose and Johnny in 2004 of prostate cancer. The sad occasion of Tommy Ramone’s death is extremely significant to a certain large group of people, young and old: Punks.

Some have recently said that the Ramones are now finally dead—gone but not forgotten. Others, such as Legs McNeil, a close friend of the Ramones as well as other punk artists and bands of the original punk era, such as Iggy Pop and the UK group The Sex Pistols, think that the Ramones have been gone for a long time, citing their supposed artistic demise in the late 1980s. Even still, the Ramones were arguably the most influential punk band ever. They pioneered the simple, fast punk sound that many know and love.

image

The Ramones are still a fairly popular group with lots of people today, including the original punk rockers of the Ramones’ generation as well as a new generation of kids and young adults that like the punk style and music of the Ramones. As the past few weeks have gone by, many people have talked to me about Tommy Ramone’s death both on social media and in person. The day after he passed away I wore a Ramones shirt, and people of a wide range of ages complimented the shirt, asked if it was to remember Tommy, or said they loved the Ramones and were very surprised when they heard the news.

As a huge fan of the Ramones’ style, attitudes and music, I felt slightly upset about this death although I can’t really say why. There will always be easy access to Ramones music, and there are pictures, videos and interviews of them. I can say, as a young fan of the Ramones, I am disappointed that there is no way to ever see them. Of course there wasn’t any way to see them before Tommy’s death, but this just seals in the thought that the band all together is completely gone. Something about it just doesn’t feel the same, knowing that you’re listening to music where all four founding members of the band are not alive.

Dig Deeper:

People all over the world will always recognize the influence that The Ramones had on music and society. You can dig deeper into punk music and its cultural impact with these great resources from the Falvey collection:

For popular histories of punk rock that cover the Ramones, try these:

England’s dreaming : anarchy, Sex Pistols, punk rock, and beyond, by Jon Savage

Break all rules! : punk rock and the making of a style, by Tricia Henry

 

punk coverHere are a couple of region-specific histories:

Grinding California : culture and corporeality in American skate punk, by Konstantin Butz

It makes you want to spit! : the definitive guide to punk in Northern Ireland, 1977-1982, by Sean O’Neill and Guy Trelford

 

And finally, two more scholarly treatments of punk rock culture:

Punk rockers’ revolution : a pedagogy of race, class, and gender, by Curry Malott and Milagros Peña

Lipstick traces : a secret history of the twentieth century, by Griel Marcus

 

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Last Modified: July 30, 2014