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Share the Love: Macaroons and Chocolate

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Like the title says, we’re here to talk about macaroons, referred to by the official website of France as “seductive little biscuits,” and chocolate, traditionally consumed on Valentine’s Day.

If you read the play “A Doll’s House”, then you probably remember Nora’s obsession with macaroons and the significance of this simple cookie in the play. A similar theme plays out in the movie “Chocolat” where chocolate is taboo during Lent but its overwhelming allure leads the residents of a quaint French village to hide their consumption of it from the mayor.

London Art of Cookery title pageI’m using a recipe from “The London Art of Cookery and Domestic Housekeepers’ Complete Assistant On a New Plan Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of Every Housekeeper, Cook, and Servant in the Kingdom,” written in 1783. How’s that for a title? We have the print edition in Special Collections, but there are also other digitized editions available.

An important distinction needs to be made. Macaroons, as they are made in France, are almond biscuits sandwiched together with jam, chocolate, or other sweet fillings. The “other” type of macaroons contain shredded coconut. And although the recipe from The London Art of Cookery simply calls them Macaroons, it’s actually a recipe for French macaroons, not coconut macaroons. It’s confusing. I know.

Macaroons

 

 

 

 

One detour from the recipe will be the addition of chocolate ganache filling between two macarons, which is how they would be made in a French pattisserie. I will use the 1783 recipe for the cookies and a Food Network recipe for the ganache. And of course, I had French cafe music playing on Spotify, for inspiration.

Ingredients:

1 lb. sugar

1 lb. almonds, blanched and beaten (almond meal)

A few drops of rose water

7 egg whites, frothed

macaroon batterAfter combining the sugar, almond meal, and a few drops of rose water, I stirred in the frothed egg whites. The egg whites should form stiff peaks before being added to the sugar and almond meal. Using a small spoon, drop round dollops of batter about two inches apart on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Or you can use a pastry bag. The recipe ends with the instruction, “put them in the oven” without so much as an oven temperature or length of cooking time. I checked the Food Network for a suggested oven temperature (325) and time (13-15 minutes).

There was no measurement for the rose water so I used ½ tsp., but next time I would skip it altogether. It was a noticeable and not necessarily pleasant flavor, but that’s just my opinion. Luckily, the chocolate ganache soon remedied that. The cookies came out a little flat, not like the macarons I’ve come to expect. They tasted good so, who am I to complain? One last tip: make extra ganache. It’s great for dipping strawberries.

macaroons plated

To quote Nora, and although they didn’t turn out perfectly, “I shall have one, just a little one–or at most two. I am tremendously happy.”

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

 

 

 

I want to thank Michael Foight and Laura Bang in Special Collections at Falvey Memorial Library for locating suitable recipes from Falvey’s print and digital collections. Their help was invaluable.


‘Caturday feature written by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion Team and team leader, Access Services.

 


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‘Caturday: Black Wildcat

Shown below is the cover of Black Wildcat, an image borrowed from Black Villanova: An Oral History. Take a scroll through this amazing resource, especially this month as we celebrate Black History Month.

“On April 23, 1969, the Black Student League (BSL) published the first edition of the Black Wildcat. The unmistakable clenched fist on the front cover sent a clear signal to the Villanova community that the BSL was clearly influenced by the larger Black Power movement. With its controversial articles and opinion pieces, the Black Wildcat served to educate the Villanova community about the experiences of black students on a predominately white campus.”

caturday black wildcat debuts

 

 

 

 

 

caturday black history

 

 

 

 

 

 


‘Caturday feature written by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion Team and team leader, Access Services.


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Foto Friday: What do you see?

Looking-Glass

Not sure? Take a closer look at the tall display case on Falvey Library’s first floor. It will satisfy your curiosity.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/6)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) Regular Group Meeting. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week on (most) Fridays to play video games in a safe and fun environment. 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge (Holy Grounds). Always accepting new members. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE!

Don’t miss the Annual Black History Month lecture co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Africana Studies Program. This Monday, February 9, at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Saladin Ambar, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Political Science at Lehigh University, where he teaches courses on the American presidency and governorship, race and American political development, and political parties and elections. He is a graduate of Rutgers University’s PhD program in political science and a former fellow of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. Professor Ambar is the author of How Governors Built the Modern American Presidency and Malcolm X at Oxford Union. 


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RANSOMWARE: WHAT IT IS AND HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF.

Padlock Icon Computer Key Showing Safety Security And ProtectionThanks to Sarah Wingo for this heads-up! “The best way to keep ransomware off your computer, experts say, is to follow best practices by keeping software updated, using antivirus and other security software, and being careful about where you click and what you install. Backing up data on a separate hard drive or using a cloud service could save you from being held for ransom if an infection does occur.” More info here.


PRESIDENT OBAMA’S BUDGET INCREASES LIBRARY FUNDING

FROM THE ALA: President Barack Obama today (2/5/15) transmitted to Congress the Obama Administration’s nearly $4 trillion budget request to fund the federal government for fiscal year 2016, which starts October 1, 2015. The President’s budget reflected many of the ideas and proposals outlined in his January 20th State of the Union speech.

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Highlights for the library community include $186.5 million in assistance to libraries through the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA). This important program provides funding to states through the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

“The biggest news for the library community is the announcement of $8.8 million funding for a national digital platform for library and museum services, which will give more Americans free and electronic access to the resources of libraries, archives, and museums by promoting the use of technology to expand access to the holdings of museums, libraries, and archives. Funding for this new program will be funded through the IMLS National Leadership Grant programs for Libraries ($5.3 million) and Museums ($3.5 million),” said American Library Association (ALA) President Courtney Young


QUOTE OF THE DAY

“I’m not afraid of storms, for I’m learning how to sail my ship.” – Little Women by Louisa May Alcott 


SAIL STRONG, FRIENDS!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Four [Games] in February

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


PS3 controller

via Wikimedia Commons

Four in February is a challenge for video gamers established by Mike Suszek of Joystiq. The goal is to complete four games that have been gathering dust on our virtual shelves (particularly those of us stockerpilers whose wallets are weak to Steam sales. Eeep!). While I’ll admit February is a bit of a busy month for me (and for all students, I’m sure), I am going to valiantly attempt the Four in February challenge—even if it means using Spring Break, which is technically March. Gotta hit them books first.

So why am I talking about video games on a library blog? One, because I love them. Two, because I think video games are under-recognized at the scholarly level and offer excellent, new perspectives not only on storytelling techniques, but also data and information dissemination—which is becoming so important in this digital humanities library culture. Trust me, once you master the UIs of a couple of video games, no application will ever stump you again, and you’ll probably begin to broaden your ideas of how information can be interactively organized.

A whole host of misunderstandings and underexposure cloak the artistic and scholarly potential of video games. For one thing, video game technology moves so quickly that for the uninitiated, the word “video game” might be associated with, say, Pac-Man or Pong—which are fantastic achievements, don’t get me wrong, but don’t quite scream “narrative” or “roleplaying” (which, by all means, are not required qualities for all video games any more than romance is required for all novels – but as an English major, narrative and roleplaying tend to be my favored genres). Today, games can look a little more like this:

Many have modular stories which branch seemingly endlessly and produce tens of thousands of lines of dialogue.

They prompt scholarship like this.

Needless to say, games can be quite serious business with intense depth and incredible cultural import.

Never Alone

via Steam

For example, number one on my Four in February list is Never Alone, or Kisima Ingitchuna, released in November of 2014. The game was created in collaboration with the Alaska Native community. It explores “the traditional lore of the Iñupiat people of the Arctic.”  It is what its developers call a “world game” and is “a game that is a thousand years in the telling.” I’ve played through a fair bit of the game so far and it gives me chills— interactivity is such an effective way of keeping the spirit of traditional lore alive, and the kinetic input is far more effective for me (and probably countless others) than textbooks and documentaries. I can’t wait to finish the game and think more about the implications of the world game genre.

LIMBO is another game on my list. A panelist at an Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) conference I attended a few years ago described this title as poetry in video game form. I haven’t played it yet, but given it is frequently referenced in the argument for games-as-art, I’m sure I’ll find much to chew on. Likewise, Dear Esther, which for whatever reason was lost in my library and tragically uninstalled, is also on my list. Like LIMBO, this game has garnered buzz for being highly poetic and experiential.

While debates are ever ongoing regarding the scholastic value of gaming, Falvey Memorial Library needs no convincing – as I love taking every opportunity to remind you, there is indeed a shelf of video game scholarship in our library. Head to the third floor! Click the map below!

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Also, check out the Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) most Fridays during the semester from 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge for some gaming! The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week to play video games in a safe and fun environment.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/5)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


Irish Studies Conversation Circle. 6:30-8:30 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact Jerry Sweeney: tighdon@gmail.com


SAVE THE DATE…


Annual Black History Month lecture. Monday, February 9, at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Saladin Ambar, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Political Science at Lehigh University, where he teaches courses on the American presidency and governorship, race and American political development, and political parties and elections. He is a graduate of Rutgers University’s PhD program in political science and a former fellow of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. Professor Ambar is the author of How Governors Built the Modern American Presidency and Malcolm X at Oxford Union.

Academic Libraries in the Digital Age by William Y. Arms, PhD.  Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks, and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library.


YOUR SOURCE FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH RESOURCES
Are you a teacher? Know a teacher? Love free access to quality education materials? Check out Smithsonian’s Heritage Teaching Resources for a thorough collection of Black History teaching materials.


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RebelMouseDo you want easy access to a lot of our social media and blog content in one spot? Check out our Rebel Mouse site.

 

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY

“Ride on! Rough-shod if need be, smooth-shod if that will do, but ride on! Ride on over all obstacles, and win the race!” – David Copperfield by Charles Dickens


NOW GO RIDE ON! WIN THE RACE!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What Do Villanova Students Really Think about the Library?

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In this new feature, the Curious ‘Cat will ask a question of several students in the Library and show their responses here, on Falvey’s blog.


CUR CAT 2-4This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you wish the Library knew about your needs as a student?

Sarah Welch: “[I wish there were] more hours that it’s available; it closes [too] early on weekends”

Antonio Triggiano: “Right now, the Library fills all of my needs.”

Nusrat Akanda: “I would like to suggest having more desks, more spaces to study during finals.”

Andrew Houser: “VU Mobile is the most pressing issue … at the school. I really like the setup, though, as it is … I’m pretty content with the library setup.”

Emily Folse: “[I wish there were] a way we could print from our laptops instead of having to log on to [library] computers to send things to the printer … The Library does a really good job [with] the Writing Center and the Math Center of understanding the needs of the student and providing those resources.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: It is possible to send print jobs to the library’s printers from a personal laptop. Staff at Falvey’s main service counter has instructions for current Villanova students to add the library’s printers to the list of available printers on their personal laptop computer. Evidently, we need to do a better job of communicating that fact!

 Jane Cho: “[I wish there were] more availability from the librarians with hours … to communicate [with students] in person. Their hours are pretty limited and they don’t work weekends. It’s just not as convenient to send them an email as it is to talk to them.

“[I also wish that] the staff [were] a little more knowledgeable about how to help students with their research, like what direction they could go in … when the research librarians aren’t available.”

RESEARCH HELP ON WEEKENDS, A LIBRARIAN RESPONDS: Library help is available on weekends! We have a librarian on-call at Falvey most Sundays from 2pm-8pm for all your weekend research needs. We have experimented with Saturday librarians in the past, but there was never quite enough work for them to keep it up. During the week, librarians are on-call for instant help Mondays-Thursdays 8am-6pm and Fridays 10am-5pm.

While we are on-call, you can ask to see us in person at the front desk, come up to the 2nd floor directly and look for the “Ask it here!” sign with the blue lights outside a librarian’s office, send us an email at ref@villanova.edu, or contact us by chat with the Ask a Librarian button in the bottom right-hand corner of the library website. For quick questions you can call 610-519-4200 or even text us at (610) 816-6222.

Want to make absolutely sure that you’ll be able to get the exact help you need when you come in? You can make an appointment with a specific librarian anytime by simply emailing them from the Subject Guide(link) of the topic closest to your area of interest.


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Black History Month 2015: Saladin Ambar, PhD

CLAS.2.2.15Black History Month is observed every February in the United States and acknowledges the central role and achievements of black Americans in our nation’s history. Significantly, this Black History Month marks fifty years since the assassination of Malcolm X. On February 9th at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, Saladin Ambar, PhD, associate professor of political science, Lehigh University, will be presenting a talk titled “Malcolm X’s Legacy at 50: Lessons for Today.”

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Africana Studies Program, is free and open to the public.

How Governors Built the Modern American Presidency by Saladin Ambar, while currently checked out, is available at Falvey. Dr. Ambar also authored Malcolm X at Oxford Union: Racial Politics in a Global Era.

To learn more about Malcolm X before Dr. Ambar’s lecture, check out his biography on bio.com

For a list of places and events in Philadelphia to celebrate Black History Month, check out Visit Philadelphia.

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Malcolm X, 12 March 1964, via Wikimedia Commons


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/4)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


THERE’S BEEN A SIGHTING!!

COOKIE

Rumor has it, the red velvet Oreos have arrived on supermarket shelves! Let us save you a trip to the store! Stop by the big red box at the big front desk between now and next Thursday, 2/12 to let us know a book that you love. All ballots will be entered into a random drawing for one of five packages of red velvet Oreos! Lucky ducks will be notified Friday, 2/13!


BIG BOOK NEWS!

Did you hear the announcement yesterday? Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, had written a second novel in the 1950s entitled Go Set a Watchman and at long last, the novel will be published this July. Two million copies will be available at first release.


LIGHTS, CAMERA, TWEET
Twitter Video is now a thing. If you find Vine too short and Instagram video not quite your style, Twitter Video might be the answer to your needs! The app update is rolling out to your devices.


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Did you know that Falvey Memorial Library is on tumblr? Yes, we too indulge in the infinite scroll! Follow us, click those hearts, and reblog away.

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“After all, tomorrow is another day.” – Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell


HAPPY WEDNESDAY! BE KIND TO YOUR SWEET SELVES

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Now through March 27, Peruse the Bloomsbury Collection

evUntil March 27 the library has a trial subscription to Bloomsbury Collections. This is a collection of e-books from Bloomsbury Publishing, which incorporates the previous Continuum, Methuen, and Berg imprints, among others. The collection is strong across a wide range of humanities and social science disciplines, including classical studies, history, literary studies, philosophy, political science and religious studies.

Click here to access the collections.

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Some highlights: The Philosophy collection contains titles of particular interest in critical theory, postmodernism, political philosophy and aesthetics, as well as a number of excellent series, including Bloomsbury Studies in Continental Philosophy, Key Thinkers, and Ancient Commentators on Aristotle. The Literature collection contains the Arden Shakespeare, and the History collection has a large number of titles on ancient, medieval and early modern topics.

The collection is easily searchable and can be browsed by subject, so it’s simple to find book chapters on your topic of research. It also features a particularly clear interface. Most titles include a book summary/abstract, and individual chapters can be read as HTML, or downloaded and printed as PDF files.

Please contact Nikolaus Fogle (nikolaus.fogle@villanova.edu) with any questions or comments.


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Last Modified: February 3, 2015