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General Sherman Goes To Philadelphia (Actually Only His Coat Makes the Trip)

SHERMAN-COAT

Walking by Special Collections recently, I noticed that something was missing – General William Tecumseh Sherman’s Civil War frock coat, which had been on exhibit, highly visible from outside Special Collections since 2009. I have a special interest in this garment since it once spent a night in Falvey’s art-history slide collection room, where I worked at the time; it had been returned one evening from the Civil War Museum in Philadelphia and needed to be housed in a secure, temperature-controlled location until Special Collections and Digital Library Coordinator Michael Foight could retrieve it the next morning.

James G. Mundy, Jr., Director of Library & Historical Collections, The Union League, and Sherman's frock coat

James G. Mundy, Jr., Director of Library & Historical Collections, The Union League, and Sherman’s frock coat

The coat is now on exhibit at The Union League in Philadelphia as part of its exhibit, “Philadelphia 1864: The Year of Decision.” The coat will return to Special Collections after the exhibit closes.

expert-judith-giesberg

Judith Giesberg, PhD

How did this coat, worn by General Sherman (1820-91) on his “March to the Sea,” make its way to the Union League’s Heritage Center exhibit, one might wonder? Judith Giesberg, PhD, professor and graduate program director, Department of History, was instrumental in reminding The Union League of Philadelphia’s Director of Library and Historical Collections, James G. Mundy, Jr., of the coat’s existence although he had known about it previously. Dr. Giesberg had been a member of a Civil War roundtable and also had spoken at The Union League several times, which is how she met Mundy. When she learned about the planned exhibit, she told Mundy about the coat.

“Philadelphia 1864…” is the fourth is a series of such Civil War exhibits: “Philadelphia 1861: A Coming Storm,” “Philadelphia 1862: A City at War,” and “Philadelphia 1863: Turning the Tide” preceded the current exhibit. “Philadelphia 1864: The Year of Decision” focuses on major events, such as – the appointment of Ulysses S. Grant as Lieutenant General of the Union Army, – Grant’s Overland Campaign, – General William Tecumseh Sherman’s march through Georgia, – the election of Abraham Lincoln, – the U.S. Sanitary Commission’s Great Central Fair in Philadelphia, and it “will also draw attention to the growing activities of The Union League.” The exhibit includes over fifty artifacts from The Union League’s collections, the Philadelphia History Museum and other institutions. The exhibit will remain open until February 2015. It is open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from three until six p.m. and on the second Saturday of each month from one to four p.m.

 

The Union League of Philadelphia was founded as a men’s club in 1862, the first of several Union Leagues created to support the Union and President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War (1861-65). RS7820_Union League sign(1)The Union League building, listed on the National Historic Register since 1979, was erected in 1865. John Fraser (1825-1906) was the architect of the original building. In 1909 Horace Trumbauer (1868-1938) designed an annex for the Union League at 15th and Samson Streets.


Article and Union League photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Continuum: Collections and Access Make Falvey Distinctive


Darren

In an era when the uniqueness of a library’s collections are distinguished by not only what books it has in the stacks but also what it has in terms of special and digital collections, it is interesting to note a few exceptional examples of rare and unique items that are of interest to scholars: in this case, Latin and Irish manuscripts.

Recently Kenneth B. Steinhauser, PhD, a professor in the Department of Theological Studies at Saint Louis University published a survey of Latin medieval and Renaissance manuscripts he studied at Villanova University. He catalogs the thirteen manuscripts in Falvey Memorial Library and the two in the Augustinian Historical Institute collection. Dr. Steinhauser states in his published article on the subject, “In summation, the manuscript collection at Villanova University emphasizes the Augustinian tradition, specifically works of Augustine himself, Augustinian liturgical material and writings of medieval Augustinian theologians.” See Manuscripta 57.2 (2013): 205-77 (DOI 10.1484/j.MSS.1.103704).

Irish history and heritage is another unique focus of our special collections. A Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in Villanova University, Pennsylvania by William J. Mahon was published by the School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2007.

Villanova University’s Special Collections and Digital Library assembles, presents and preserves physical and digital collections that support teaching and research of the campus community and the global network of scholarship; the Rare Book Room houses over 15,000 rare and unique physical documents and artifacts requiring special handling and preservation ranging from medieval manuscripts to early popular American newspapers, while online over 20,000 items are available. The historical record of Villanova University is available in the University Archives, which is also in Falvey.

The physical library collection has more than 500,000 printed volumes, including books and historical runs of major academic journals. Web-accessible resources include over two hundred general and discipline-specific research databases, approximately ten thousand full text electronic journals, and extensive microfilm and audiovisual collections. Online collections also include almost 650,000 digital volumes encompassing the corpus of English-language books from the earliest days of the movable type printing press through scholarly literature of the early twenty-first century. Beyond Villanova’s collection, the regional E-ZBorrow system in which Falvey participates provides one-stop searching and access to over 35 million books from 50 college and university libraries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and West Virginia. In addition, materials can be requested from libraries world-wide through Inter-Library Loan. See http://library.villanova.edu/about/services/illservices/.

DARREN SIG2

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Dig Deeper: Everything’s on the line – and online for US Soccer

Nigeria at United States, friendly

There’s no shortage of online reading material for FIFA soccer fans between matches! And despite Thursday’s Best. Loss. Ever, U.S. Men’s Soccer has moved into the Knockout bracket of 16 - sort of like the Sweet 16 for you college hoops fans. Anyway, soccer fever shouldn’t be dissipating anytime soon.

Fortunately, readers of the Library News blog have help to sort though it all – it’s good to know someone in the library business, isn’t it?  Librarian and Liaison Team Leader for Geography and Political Science Merrill Stein has curated a handful of interesting links for background info on the sport of soccer, World Cup 2014 host country Brazil, the best ways to stream the games and lots more to satisfy your inner soccer geek. Got to yellow card you, though: you’ll need a lot of time to get through it all!

Don’t forget: it’s one and done for the U.S. vs. Belgium on Tuesday in Salvador. The loser of that match goes home; the winner heads to the quarterfinals. Game starts at 4 p.m.


Dig Deeper:

Viewing options:

Links to news radio TV services –Full 2014 FIFA World Cup Schedule on ABC, ESPN, Univision, Canadian TV and radio:

http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/thegoalkeeper/Complete-2014-World-Cup-game-schedule-fixture-list.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/soccer-insider/wp/2014/06/09/streaming-the-world-cup/

On Soccer:

FIFA: http://www.fifa.com/

MLS soccer: http://www.mlssoccer.com/worldcup/2014

At-a-glance Groups & schedule:  http://www.bbc.com/sport/football/world-cup/2014/schedule/group-stage

Top 5 strikers you can’t miss:  http://www.mlssoccer.com/worldcup/2014/news/article/2014/06/08/world-cup-top-5-who-are-strikers-you-cant-miss-brazil

Of course – fantasy runs into reality…  http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/09/brazil-uneasy-start-world-cup-strikers-protests-sao-paulo

On Brazil:

Brazil in the World Cup spotlight: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-27635554

Brazilian Federal Government website on the 2014 FIFA World Cup (The latest news, links, photos): http://www.copa2014.gov.br/en

BBC Special reports: Brazil:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-radio-and-tv-19481328

BBC News: Latin America/Caribbean:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-27635554

BBC Travel visits Brazil:  http://www.bbc.com/travel/video/soccer-cities/20140609-where-football-meets-sun-and-samba

CNN coverage:  http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/11/world/americas/brazil-world-cup-tent-city/

South Africa’s World Cup advice to Brazil:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-27731564

Databases for searchable news/background:

Sports Business Research Network

Lexis Nexis Academic

ProQuest Central

Don’t hesitate to ask us for help with research navigation!

Trivia

The Physicist Who Can Tell You All About the New World Cup Ball:

Vanishing spray:  a World Cup first

See the 12 World Cup venues in Brazil on a Google Earth tour

Social Media

Stay in the game: Twitter guide for the 2014 World Cup

FIFA on Facebook (33M fans!!)

US Soccer on Facebook

Fun:

Choose your all-time World Cup XI - and share it with friends.

Movies you can borrow from the library: 

Invictus  Morgan Freeman, as Nelson Mandela, unites apartheid stricken South Africa through World Cup rugby.

Bend it like Beckham Follows two 18 year old girls as they pursue their dream of playing professional soccer.

30 for 30.  Inspirational documentaries from the world of sports produced by ESPN

O ano em que meus pais saíram de férias A boy is left alone in a Jewish neighborhood in the year of 1970, where both World Cup and dictatorship happen in Brazil.

Brazil world cup images via Google 

Classic World Cup moments, Lego Style!


SteinMerrill Stein is team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science. Joanne Quinn is the team leader for Communication and Service Promotion. 

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Home Before the Leaves Fall: World War I Online Exhibit Launch

WIONLINE COUNTDOWN

Home Before the Leaves Fall: A Great War Centennial Exposition,” an online exhibit, will be launched Thursday evening, June 26, at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Peter John Williams—an attorney, an amateur historian with a special interest in World War I, and a life-long Philadelphia resident—will speak on life in Philadelphia during World War I (1914-1919). Williams is the author of Philadelphia: The World War I Years. Both digital and physical materials will be on display at the launch and reception.

keep-him-freeVillanova University, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society, Chemical Heritage Foundation, College of Physicians, Library Company of Philadelphia and Swarthmore College are current participants in the exhibit, which commemorates the centennial of World War I. The exhibit highlights little-known primary and secondary sources held by various institutions in the Delaware Valley region.

 

Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator, says “[T]his sprang out of an initial collaboration with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, with Villanova’s Special Collections and Digital Library team as the coordinators and hosts of this project. A large and growing number of institutions in the Mid-Atlantic currently contribute content as well as a number of academically affiliated and independent scholars and researchers, including several Villanova University faculty and graduate students.”

kaisar77-191x300

Foight explains, “The goals over the next four years include to prioritize digitization of little-known primary and secondary sources on the Great War held by institutions in the mid-Atlantic and to share descriptions of held content for both the public and the scholarly community. The website itself will host a set of curated shorter articles authored with illustrations drawn largely from this newly available content. A number of Digital Humanities projects, including an independent crowd-sourced genealogical data collection and mapping of the Great War dead of Philadelphia, will be worked on with the scholars involved in the exhibition.”

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania explains that the website will contain images, memoirs, diaries, periodicals, “contextual essays, news of commemorative events, interactive data, and geographical information system (GIS) mapping. The project aims to promote the use of these materials to students, scholars and the public, and to commemorate the services and sacrifices of soldiers and civilians a hundred years ago.”


Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Poster image from National Archives. Photo Kaiser William II. Digital Library@Villanova University

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Frances (Mimi) DiLenge Retires

MIMI

Mimi DiLenge

Frances (Mimi) DiLenge, Academic Integration technical specialist, retires at the end of June after working for more than twenty years in Falvey Memorial Library. She was hired by Susan Markley in the Periodicals Department.

After the Library was reorganized by former Library Director Joe Lucia, DiLenge began working for Jutta Seibert, Academic Integration team leader. As part of her duties with Academic Integration, DiLenge works with the reference librarians. She is also among a group who trained to work at the Information Desk, working first for Theresa Bowden, then with Jackie Mirabile (both now retired). When the Information Desk was discontinued, DiLenge became a supervisor in Access Services as her secondary assignment. She also transcribes handwritten documents for the Digital Library, reporting to Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator.

Interim Library Director Darren Poley says, “Her work with Academic Integration and at the desk is appreciated. … [Her] smiles and good cheer have been a great encouragement to staff and patrons/guests alike.”

“Mimi,” says Jutta Seibert, “has been an Academic Integration team member since the very beginning in 2006. Her positive outlook and approachable nature will be much missed. Mimi never got tired of tracking down missing books and clearing up local holdings information so that catalog records could be updated. This is important behind-the-scenes work that is often neglected because it takes so much time and dedication and yet it is such critical information for librarians and patrons alike. Mimi made sure that documentaries and feature films which are actively used in the classroom were converted from VHS to DVD. She managed the annual review of lost and long overdue books and recently assisted librarians with a long overdue inventory of the print collection. Most patrons will know Mimi from her work at the information and circulation desk where she assisted patrons for many years,” Seibert adds.

DiLenge lived in Broomall as a child. She graduated from Immaculata College (now Immaculata University) with a bachelor’s degree in French. She received her master’s degree in Library Science from Villanova University and worked as an elementary school librarian before starting her family. DiLenge worked as a travel agent for a number of years before coming to Falvey and says “I continue to keep my hand in the travel business.”

“My retirement will allow me to spend more time with grandchildren, travel, garden, sew and do some volunteer work,” she says.


Article and photo by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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“One Book Villanova” Turns Ten

1398353001099The One Book Villanova Program is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year!  In honor of this landmark occasion, the One Book Villanova committee has proudly announced the 2014-2015 book selection early: The Other Wes Moore by author Wes Moore. WESMOREThe book follows the lives of two young men who are about the same age, live in the same city and who also share the same name. Despite their many striking similarities, the young men’s lives take very different paths: one Wes grows up to be a scholar, war veteran, White House aide and prominent business leader while the other Wes becomes a convicted criminal serving a life sentence for allegedly committing murder. The Other Wes Moore leads the reader to contemplate how these two people turned out so differently despite some of their remarkably similar circumstances growing up in poverty-stricken Baltimore.

Throughout the past ten years, the Villanova One Book selections have varied greatly in topic and theme and have led readers through many diverse cultural settings and landscapes.
Good Kings Bad Kings took us to Chicago and showed us the harsh realities of institutional life for adolescents with disabilities.
Little Princes
exposed the human trafficking issues that orphaned children face in Nepal.
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
described for us what the Japanese Internment camps were like for families during WWII.
The Unforgiving Minute placed us in the shoes of a West Point educated soldier as he led his platoon through the savagery and uncertainty of combat in Afghanistan.
Rooftops of Tehran described life in Iran under its oppressive regime.
- In The Glass Castle, we learned what it was like for the author to grow up homeless with highly dysfunctional parents.
Left to Tell poignantly described one woman’s experience surviving the Rwandan genocide.
- In Blood Done Sign My Name, we witnessed the civil rights struggle in the American south.
- In The Kite Runner, our very first One Book selection in 2004-2005, we traveled to both Afghanistan and America and experienced the harsh Taliban takeover of the country and felt the hardships of immigration.
Each of these book selections has helped to strengthen the ties of the Villanova Community and has also forced us to confront the sometimes harsh realities of human nature. The One Book Villanova Committee hopes to continue this tradition with the tenth anniversary One Book Villanova selection, The Other Wes Moore.

ONE-BOOKSAll rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors have received a copy of the 2014-2015 One Book Villanova selection in early May, and all incoming freshmen will be mailed a copy of the book over the summer. In addition, the One Book Villanova Committee has decided to change the format and timing of the program. The author’s visit will occur on Thursday, September 25, as part of the St. Thomas of Villanova weekend festivities. The entire Villanova Community is encouraged the read The Other Wes Moore over the summer in preparation for the author’s visit in early fall! Those students, staff and faculty who were not able to pick up a copy of the book in early May should visit the Office of Student Development (Room 214/217 Dougherty Hall), the Office for Multicultural Affairs (Room 102 Dougherty Hall), or Falvey Memorial Library anytime during normal business hours to receive a book. For students, the book is free of charge and for faculty and staff the cost is $6 per book.

Wes Moore, author of The Other Wes Moore

Wes Moore, author of The Other Wes Moore

The One Book Committee is also in the midst of planning a series of topical programs throughout the academic year in support of the 2014-2015 book selection and to promote the tenth anniversary of the program.

More information about the author’s visit and One Book Villanova tenth anniversary programming can be found on the One Book website.


News From Falvey Winter 2008 - Gina McFaddenArticle by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator for the Scholarly Outreach team.

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Dig Deeper: Remembering Maya Angelou

image

Whenever a public figure passes away, I can expect that for the next few days my social media will be abuzz with articles, remembrances and general mentions of said person. So it has come as no surprise that since Maya Angelou’s death on Thursday May 28 my Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr feeds, as well as many other websites and blogs that I frequent, have been brimming with content on the life, works and death of Angelou. However, as I have scrolled through the many posts and tweets in response to Angelou’s life and death over the past few days I have been struck by the genuine outpouring of emotions people are expressing. It felt somehow unique, somehow more personal than the usual “rest in peace” and “they will be missed” messages I usually see.

I was particularly moved by a Facebook post by a good friend of mine who teaches high school English who posted late in the day on the 28th long after all of the initial posts of surprise and sadness had flooded my news feed, she said:

“I spent some time today thinking about what I love so much about Maya Angelou, and I’ve decided it’s the fact that she made me feel powerful, in all the positive connotations of that word.”

Go to Angelou’s Wikipedia page or any site detailing her biography and you can learn that “she published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, and several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, movies and television shows spanning more than 50 years” (Wikipedia). And Angelou’s resume was as varied and interesting as her writing. In her lifetime she was a poet, civil rights activist, dancer, film producer, television producer, playwright, film director, author, actress and professor, just to name a few of the occupations she held in her 86 years of life.

But put all of that aside; remove the titles, labels, accomplishments and honors, and consider a simple sentence: “She made others feel powerful.”

It’s hard to think of a better epitaph for a woman who once said “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Dig Deeper: Maya Angelou

If you’re interested in learning more about Maya Angelou, we have some resources to recommend:

Books in our catalog written by Maya Angelou

Books about Maya Angelou and critical companions to her works:

 

Maya Angelou’s official website (pretty bogged down right now, may not open due to heavy traffic)

 

Dictionary of Literary Biography (Available through Databases A-Z) has the following entry on Maya Angelou:

Maya Angelou (4 April 1928-). Lynn Z. Bloom

Afro-American Writers After 1955: Dramatists and Prose Writers. Ed. Thadious M. Davis and Trudier Harris-Lopez. Dictionary of Literary Biography Vol. 38. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. p3-12.

 

JStor:

Remembering Maya Angelou: a 1977 interview in The Black Scholar.

 

YouTube:


SarahArticle by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Falvey Scholar program recognizes student accomplishments in research, innovation and creativity

DARREN-WITH-UPTON

Interim Library Director Darren G. Poley presents Jerisa Upton with her award.

The annual Falvey Scholars Award—established by Falvey Memorial Library in conjunction with the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships and the Honors Program—recognizes and celebrates the academic excellence of some of Villanova’s finest undergraduate scholars. This year’s event, held on Friday April 25, honored six Falvey Scholars under each of the following categories: business, engineering, liberal arts, science, nursing and our new category, social science, which was added given the overwhelming response and volume of excellent candidates in the liberal arts.

Each of the Falvey Scholars presented a 30-minute summary of their winning project and were each presented with the Falvey Scholars Award by our Interim Library Director, Darren Poley.

Falvey is delighted to announce the following undergraduates as the 2014 Falvey Scholars:

Aurora Vandewark (nursing); mentor: Michelle M. Kelly, PhD, CRNP; Project: “Evidence-Based Practices to Reduce Psychosocial Distress Among Parents of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Patients.”

Jerisa Upton (social science); mentor: Maghan Keita, PhD; Project: “Understanding Bureaucratic Politics and the Origins of the Great Leap Forward.”

Mark Bookman (liberal arts); mentors: Maghan Keita, PhD, and Edwin Goff, PhD; Project: “Re-imagining Discourse: Shingon Buddhism and Western Epistemologies.”

Clockwise, from top left: Vandewark, Upton, Bookman, McGrane, Ferguson and Shaik

Clockwise, from top left: Vandewark, Upton, Bookman, McGrane, Ferguson and Shaik

Noor F. Shaik (science); mentor: Dennis D. Wykoff, PhD; Project: “Using Fluorescent Markers in Cells and Flow Cytometry to Measure the Selective Pressures in Yeast.”

Olivia Ferguson (business); mentor: Peter Zaleski, PhD; Project: “Metropolitan Manufacturing Decline, 1980-2005, and Subsequent Effects on Residents.”

Robert McGrane (engineering); mentor: Noelle Comolli, PhD; Title: “Chitosan Thin-Films for Post-Surgical Drug Delivery.”

Falvey Scholars is just one of the many events that comprise the Undergraduate Research Exposition, or EXPO 14: a week-long series of programs that recognize the research undergraduates accomplish throughout the year. Villanova is proud to highlight the contributions of its undergraduate student community!


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator for the Scholarly Outreach team. Photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Fun, free wallpaper for your laptop or smartphone

TOUGHLIB phone-to

When the going gets tough, the tough get a librarian! As a reminder of all the work you did (or the help you got) this semester, we’ve designed a fun graphic you can use for the background of your computer or smartphone screen!

Access the graphic for computer screen dimensions at this link.

Access the graphic for your smartphone screen at this link.

To change computer wallpaper, open the link and drag the graphic to your desktop, then open your monitor settings to switch wallpapers. To change your smartphone or tablet background, drag graphic to the desktop. Email or transfer it to your Camera Roll via Dropbox or your preferred method, and then open Settings to change Wallpaper/Brightness on your mobile devices. If these directions confuse you, ask a librarian to help.  (See what we did there?) ;-)

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What Does Your Mother Read?

mother and child baby daughter reading magic book in dark
After reading Dr. Spock, Dr. Sears, Dr. Phil or Dr. Seuss, what does your mother read for herself? Does she peruse People, Woman’s World or Woman’s Health? Or does she prefer Erma Bombeck, Janet Evanovich or Anna Quindlen?

Falvey Memorial Library staff members offer their responses below. How about you? What does (or did) your mother read? Please contribute your mother’s favorite titles/authors in our comments section!

Rebecca Whidden, Reserve Technician:
My mother was a big Agatha Christie fan. She read most of her books multiple times.

Darren G. Poley, Interim Director: My mother was and is an avid perpetual reader. One of her favorite novels when I was a kid, Richard Adams’ Watership Down. Because of my interest in fantasy and sci fi, she encouraged me to read C. S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia and the Perelandra series.

Rob LeBlanc, First Year Experience & Humanities Librarian: My mom read Frank Herbert’s Dune series again and again, got me to read it, and doomed me to being a life-long sci-fi fan.

Sarah Wingo, Subject Librarian for English Literature and Theatre: My mom read so many books to my sister and me while we were growing up I couldn’t even begin to count them. We read every night before bed, and she absolutely instilled a love of reading in me. Something I always looked forward to was going to the library to pick out new books or, as a special treat, going to Borders where my sister and I each got to pick out two books to buy. I also have vivid memories of us lying in bed, my mom reading to us, and a huge dictionary on the bedside table. If we didn’t know a word, she had us look it up. Reading drastically impacted the size of my vocabulary.
I don’t know what I’d say my mother’s favorite book would be, but since I’ve been an adult I’ve recommended a lot of books to her that I’ve read and enjoyed, and she in turn seems to enjoy them. In the last few years she has read and really enjoyed The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood, The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, After You’d Gone by Maggie O’Farrell, and Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides just to name a few.

Regina Duffy, Events Coordinator: My mom loves Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women.

Laura L. Hutelmyer, Electronic Resource & Special Acquisitions Coordinator:
Towards the end of her life my mother attempted to read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. She got about ½ way through, but because her medication caused her to forget what she’d read, she had to start over. On her second attempt, she got about 2/3 of the way through before passing on. I have that paperback copy in a box, bloated and coffee stained, with the book mark still in place. One day I’ll read it for her.

Joanne Quinn, Team Leader, Communication & Service Promotion: There’s nothing my mom enjoys more than curling up with a cup of tea and a juicy Hollywood memoir. In fact, I just bought her a copy of Lady Blue Eyes: My Life With Frank by Barbara Sinatra to which she replied, “Oh, I already read it – but I’ll keep it anyway because I was sad when I had to return the copy I read to the library.”

Luisa Cywinski, Team Leader, Access Services: One of my mom’s favorites is Le Petit Prince. She also loves poetry (French and English).

TAMMIENicole Subik, Learning Support Services: I asked my mother about her favorite book, and in the spirit of a true book lover (which she truly is), she could not pick just one. Here are her two top choices in her own words:
2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
remains one of my favorite novels. I love how he interweaves science and the evolution of mankind into a series of possibilities. The line “But he would think of something” surfaces twice in the story and has stuck with me as a mantra regarding how to proceed in life. Boy’s Life by Robert R. McCammon is my other favorite. This was the most amazing blend of story lines. He captures that magical feeling of childhood and then transports you into an adult world full of all the not so magical things that can be encountered when you leave that childhood sanctuary.
My mom is awesome. Her name is Tammie Subik. Although you did not ask for it, I also included a very recent selfie of the two of us. She really did encourage my love of reading and books!

Robin Bowles, Subject Librarian for Biology: Among many other things, my mother was a private pilot for many years. Her favorite book in those years was West With The Night.

Alice Bampton, Visual Resources Librarian: My mother loved historical fiction. Because we lived outside the city limits we could not use the public library so my maternal grandfather often borrowed books for Mom. She loved “Gone with the Wind,” reading it several times. She and her mother also saw the movie when it was first released in 1939. My parents instilled a love of reading in my sister and me; books were always an important part of our Christmas gifts.

Bill Greene, Document Delivery & Distance Learning Delivery: Attention Earthlings: at age 5 or so I was very interested in reading about wild animals. At 7 or 8, I was infected by the dinosaur bug. At age 12 I became interested in science fiction through the master, Ray Bradbury. Whenever the occasion required a gift, my mother would get me a book on these subjects. At Christmas there were many books! She is the reason, in large part, for the way I turned out. What a great mother!


Thanks to all library staff who contributed to this article! We’ll be featuring Dads’ favorites next month, so if you’d like to participate, send your book title/memory by June 11 to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.

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Last Modified: May 9, 2014