FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

Kallie & Michelle’s Infinite Playlist: Thanksgiving

Cat Music

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


 

Kallie and Michelle are back with tunes for your Thanksgiving cooking! Follow the link below or click the turkey for a YouTube playlist of fifteen songs that remind us of home, warmth, and gratefulness.

Tunes for Thankgiving

 

happy-thanksgiving-beautiful-turkey-card_zJ7jH9Od

I think it’s so groovy now
That people are finally getting together
I thinks it’s wonderful and how
That people are finally getting together

 

Like

Foto Wednesday: From a Railway Carriage

30th-Street

From a Railway Carriage

 Faster than fairies, faster than witches,

Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;

And charging along like troops in a battle

All through the meadows the horses and cattle:

All of the sights of the hill and the plain

Fly as thick as driving rain;

And ever again, in the wink of an eye,

Painted stations whistle by.

Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,

All by himself and gathering brambles;

Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;

And here is the green for stringing the daisies!

Here is a cart runaway in the road

Lumping along with man and load;

And here is a mill, and there is a river:

Each a glimpse and gone forever!

 Robert Louis Stevenson

1913

Safe Travels and Happy Thanksgiving!

Photograph: Bob Bardsley

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management

Like

The Highlighter: For Faculty—Designate a Grad Student as a Proxy Borrower

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Dear Villanova faculty member,

To choose a student who could come to Falvey to check out library materials on your library record, please do the following:

1. From Falvey Memorial Library’s homepage, click “Services.”

proxy borrower 1

 

2. From the “Services” page, click “Request Forms.”

proxy borrower 2

 

3. From the “Request Forms” page, click “Designate a Proxy Borrower.” 

proxy borrower 3

4. Complete and submit the “Designate a Proxy Borrower” request form.

Proxy-borrower links are established usually in one to two business days.

Like

Taking Pumpkins From Farm to Table

How many Halloween pumpkins have I thrown over the fence through the years? Sure, the raccoons and squirrels loved them, but at some point, I decided it was a waste. I bought pumpkins for Halloween and then bought canned pumpkin for Thanksgiving pies. It was like paying for the pumpkins twice.

Once I arrived at this realization, I started shopping for Halloween pumpkins with an eye toward pie. The owner of a small local farm suggested small sugar pumpkins, goose neck pumpkins, or small white pumpkins.  As long as they are in good shape and not carved as jack-o’-lanterns, they can be used for pie.

I don’t know about you, but I like to multi-task. Combining cooking projects with reports and statistics seems to improve my results on both. It could be an example of brain lateralization, if you believe in that sort of thing. Hey, what if baking pumpkin is good for your brain?

pumpkin selection

Avoid using carved pumpkins, like the one pictured here in the middle.

Okay, let’s cook pumpkins. Preheat the oven to 350°.

Cut off the top of the pumpkin (as you would for Halloween carving) and scoop out the seeds and mush.

pumpkin seedsSave the seeds! They’re brain food!

Cut pumpkin into manageable sections.

Cover a baking sheet with foil and spray the foil with cooking spray.

Place the pieces of pumpkin, cut side down, on the sheet.

pumpkin pieces

You can fill the pan without leaving too much space between pieces. It doesn’t affect the baking time.

Bake for 45-50 minutes or until fork-tender.

When the pumpkin is ready, take the tray out and let the pieces cool while you prep another tray (for those of you making big batches for freezing).

The skin can be peeled away or the pumpkin can be scooped out of the skin and placed in a food processor. Puree the pumpkin and use right away in your favorite recipe or store in plastic freezer bags. I measure 2 cups per plastic bag, which is enough for most recipes. Two sugar pumpkins and one goose neck pumpkin results in 4 freezer bags (8 cups) and one extra cup that comes in handy for a quick bread recipe.

Here’s a little trick I learned from The Pioneer Woman, Ree Drummond. After filling a freezer bag, lay the bag on its side, making sure the pumpkin puree sits firmly in the bottom of the bag, smooth the pumpkin out toward the seal, pushing air out as you go. When it gets near the top, seal the bag. The bags will lay flat in the freezer and the pumpkin will thaw faster when you need it.

pumpkin freezer bag pumpkin in freezer

 

 

Instead of making a traditional pumpkin pie, I made Pumpkin Swirl Cheesecake Squares using a recipe from the Canadian Food Network.

I won’t repeat the steps here, but I will share a photo of the results.

pumpkin squares plated

“The Cookery now goes on, the baking’s laid,

And many a mammoth pie and pudding’s made,

Roast meat and gingerbread and custards rare,

Are seen and smelt and tasted every where…”

(Verse excerpted from Thanksgiving: a poem in two parts by Henry Bliss, 1815.)

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Article & photos by Luisa Cywinski, writer for the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of Access Services.

Jack-o’-lantern carved by Michael Miller-Cywinski.

Like

‘Cat in the Stacks: (Un)helpful Tips for Thanksgiving Break

CAT-STAX

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


1280px-MashedPotatoes

All of the mashed potatoes.

Thanksgiving is in exactly one week. I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty excited. I, like you, have a ton to be thankful for this year, and as much as I’m tempted to make this a gooberfest of a grateful post, I’ll keep that to the Tweeter Tweety Twitter bird world (where you can hashtag #NovaSaysThanks and keep that feel-good thankfulness flowing throughout the week)!

So instead of sap, I give you:

Five Very Unhelpful* Strategies for Being Productive on Thanksgiving!

Look, everyone knows we have three weeks until finals. We’re trying to pretend it’s not true, but it is, and every cell of our sleep-deprived bodies are cringing with dread because projects and deadlines and exams are suddenly so scary and so giant and looming, and perhaps we can’t spare every hour of Thanksgiving for holiday activites. And maybe that’s okay, because you can…

thanksgiving-texting-toon-900-598x374

read article PDFs on your phone! You’ll fit right in at the dinner table, because your Aunt Betty just got a new iPhone and has discovered how to send cat gifs in texts, and your cousin Brad is checking his Fantasy scores, and really, every one of your family members’ faces are glowing blue this year, so what’s the harm? It’s not like anyone is talking!

But if that doesn’t cut it, you can study by osmosis during your turkey coma!

Step 1: Face-plant on the nice, cool pages of your biology textbook.

Step 2: Line up your frontal lobe on top of the juicier paragraphs.

Step 3: ???

Step 4: Profit!

No naps allowed? Use family debates to test your theses. People love arguing about things they don’t know much about, right? Free consultations!

And, worst-case scenario: you’ve been tasked with cooking. Buy 25 sides of green beans from KFC, write papers instead. Flawless plan.

*Don’t take any of this advice. It is terrible advice.


Some actually helpful tips for Thanksgiving break:

How to access databases through Villanova at home:
http://library.villanova.edu/help/faqs/offcampusaccess/

Subject Guides:
http://library.villanova.edu/research/subject-guides

Feel inefficient when using library resources? Check out our Highlighter blog posts:
http://blog.library.villanova.edu/news/category/highlighter/

Have fun, relax, and be grateful. Happy Thanksgiving, Wildcats!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
1 People Like This Post

The Economics of the Great War

The economic challenges wrought by the First World War were many and wide ranging, if not structurally lasting, spanning agriculture, employment and labor, manufacturing, transportation, trade and public finance. Scholarship on these topics is robust, presented in several formats, and written from various national viewpoints and scholarly approaches.

Christy, Howard Chandler, 1873-1952. Fight or buy bonds : Third Liberty Loan.. Boston, Mass.. UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc325/. Accessed November 18, 2014.

For interesting artifacts highlighting the role the liberty and victory bonds played in financing the war in the United States, see the University of Texas Digital Collection of posters or the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs. If you prefer an auditory approach, you can check out the sheet music for jingles written to encourage sales for the Library of Congress.

An example of a primary source in our collection is a book by John Maynard Keynes. Keyes is an important macroeconomic theorist who was in attendance at the Paris Peace conference, and argued against harsh reparations in the Economic Consequences of Peace, which is available as an open source ebook on Project Gutenberg or – for those who long for the tactile pleasures of the printed page – in our Special Collections.

Remember the glad of libertyLeading economic scholars are in the process of compiling a collection of essays on the economics of the Great War for its centennial. To date, the VOX:  WWI site has articles on how economic factors influenced the outcome of the war, opining that the economic policies that worked  during the war lead to later policy missteps, exploring the fallout the economic crisis of 1907 had on the initiation of hostilities in 1914 and measuring the economic cost of the war for Great  Britain. A nice succinct summary of the economic history of WWI is posted by Hugh Rockoff al leading economic historian on the Economic History Associations’s website.

Airplane, Possibly World War I Fighter Plane, 1916. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Reproduction Number LC-D418-407 DLC.

For an understanding of how industry ramped up during the First World War to manufacture needed munitions, trucks, and tanks and planes for the Allied forces, turn to the War Industries Board publication, American Industry in War. Another insider perspective is provided by Grosvenor B. Clarkson, a civilian member of the Council of National Defense, in the book Industrial  America in the World War:  The Strategy Behind the Line, 1917-1918. If you prefer historical perspective, pick up Conner’s  The National War Labor Board: Stability, Social Justice and the Voluntary State in WWI or  Cuff’s The War Industries Board:  Business Government Relations During WWI.

Any examination of the role of labor in the United States has to include readings from Marxist historian Philip Foner. Volume 7 of his History of the Labor Movement in the United States covers Labor and World War I, 1914-1918. For a counterpoint read Larson’s Labor and Foreign Policy:  Gompers, the AFL and the First World War, 1914-1918  Army, Industry and Labor in Germany: 1914-1918 by Feldman provides insight into the labor and industrial policies of the enemy. For an interesting thematic discussion of the labor and home fronts around the globe see Civilians in a World at War by Proctor.

To find additional resource on economic aspects of WWI, search our catalog, Historical Abstracts, American History & Life and EconLit.


Images used in order of display:

Christy, Howard Chandler, 1873-1952. Fight or buy bonds : Third Liberty Loan.. Boston, Mass.. UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc325/. Accessed November 18, 2014.

United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Publicity Bureau. Remember! the flag of liberty, support it! : buy U.S. government bonds, 3rd. Liberty Loan.. New York. UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29409/. Accessed November 18, 2014.

Airplane, Possibly World War I Fighter Plane, 1916. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Reproduction Number LC-D418-407 DLC.


RS4522_FML164_LindaHauck_003_EDITResources selected by Linda Hauck, subject librarian for business.

Like

The Highlighter: Use the Catalog’s Filters to Quickly Find Journals

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Use the catalog’s filters to quickly find every journal of a particular topic, genre or language in Falvey’s collection. This video shows how to perform this advanced searching technique.

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

Like

Upcoming Chicago-Style Workshops

chicago-manual-of-stylesmallAre you confused by the different formats required by Chicago-style for footnotes and bibliographies? Are you unsure about how and when to use “ibid.”? – Answers to your questions are just around the corner.

Come to Falvey Memorial Library for a quick introduction to Chicago-style rules for footnotes and bibliography. Sessions will be held in Falvey 204 in the second-floor Learning Commons. For more information, contact history liaison librarian Jutta Seibert (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu).

Wednesday, Nov. 19—4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Thursday, Dec. 4—4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Like

Fall Workshop Series: Digital Humanities (Resources Galore!)

This semester, Falvey Memorial Library presented a fall workshop series on Digital Humanities, organized by Laura Bang.  Laura works in Special and Digital Collections and she is actively involved in the Philadelphia Digital Humanities community.

The fantastically informative workshops provided an introduction to DH techniques and applications and took place in Falvey on various Saturdays from 9AM to noon. Since we were provided with tons and tons of resources, I’d be glad to share some with you! For an overview of the individual workshops and the projects/softwares explored, keep scrolling.

September 6: Intro to Digital Humanities 

dirtOur five-session workshop began with an introductory lecture by Mitch Fraas, the Schoenberg Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. As you might guess, we talked about the most popular question on the block: what are digital humanities? As this intro lecture proved, the best way to figure it out is to jump into one of the many projects you can find online. Definition by application! Fraas provided tons of resources; here are some excellent places to start.

Voyant-tools.org
viraltexts.org
historyharvest.unl.edu
earlynovels.org
mappingbooks.blogspot.com
http://vpcp.chass.ncsu.edu/
http://dirtdirectory.org *Reading about these tools will really give you a good sense of the applications of DH.

 

September 20: Coding Basics

The second workshop was a fun and approachable introduction to coding by Kate Lynch. We used Processing, which is not only a programming language, but also a development environment with an enormous online community. The software is free to download and open source. The Processing site is loaded with beginner tutorials.

I pointillized ‘Lil Bub! On the left behind the kitty, you can see the Processing window and code.

DH Bub 2

October 4: Audio Editing

audacity-windowsWorkshop number three covered basic audio editing. We played around with Audacity, a free, open source audio recording and editing software. You can download it right from the Audacity page. You can find plenty of royalty free sounds and tracks on the web for your projects on websites like freesound.org. The Audacity page also has plenty of tutorials, but I find YouTube tutorials are the most helpful for software training. Search “Audacity” and you are sure to find hundreds!

 

October 25: WordPress as a Content Management System

wordpress-logo-stacked-rgb
The fourth workshop explored WordPress as a content management system. WordPress.com, as you might already know, allows you to create a free blog, but it is not highly customizable. Based on your wants and needs, it might be perfect for you. However, if you’re looking for a software script to create a website, check out WordPress.org. According to the About page,

WordPress started as just a blogging system, but has evolved to be used as full content management system and so much more through the thousands of plugins and widgets and themes, WordPress is limited only by your imagination. (And tech chops.)

To get started with the WordPress software you’ll need a web host, but the software itself is free and open source.

 

November 8: Mapping/GIS

DH MappingThe fifth and final workshop introduced basic data mapping and visualization. Using CartoDB and openly available data sets from OpenDataPhilly, we learned how to import and create tables and how to customize maps based on those tables.

Sarah Cordivano, the workshop instructor, enthusiastically expressed the importance of projects such as OpenDataPhilly, a resource that

“…is based on the idea that providing free and easy access to data information encourages better and more transparent government and a more engaged and knowledgeable citizenry… By connecting people with data, we’re hoping to encourage users to take the data and transform it into creative applications, projects, and visualizations that demonstrate the power that data can have in understanding and shaping our communities.”

For more information on OpenDataPhilly, visit the About Us page.

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
1 People Like This Post

‘Cat in the Stacks: Kallie and Michelle’s Infinite Playlist

Cat Music

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Perhaps you’ll remember a ‘Cat in the Stacks post from way, way back in September about instrumental music suitable for research. Well, my exquisitely broad music library has been raided yet again for a ‘Cat-approved playlist and for double the music fun, I’ve teamed up with Outreach intern Kallie Stahl. This time around, we’re going full vocals with some of the most life-affirming, upbeat songs you can think of!

Since Kallie and I are graduate students and this is bonafide crunch time, we know exactly what it’s like to lose your mind and lose your hope. Both of us agree: music is the answer. Jam with us and breathe! Click the link below the jamming kitty to listen to the playlist for free on 8tracks.

Cat Music

Kallie and Michelle’s Infinite Playlist (Volume 1)

1)   Afterlife –Ingrid Michaelson
“We all, we all, we’re gonna be alright. We got, we got, we always got the fight in us.”

2)   Chasing the Sun – Sara Bareilles
“You said, ‘Remember that life is not meant to be wasted. We can always be chasing the sun. So fill up your lungs and just run – but always be chasing the sun.’”

3)   Just Breathe – Pearl Jam
“Oh I’m a lucky man, to count on both hands the ones I love.”

4)   You’ll Be Okay – A Great Big World
“You’ll be okay. You’ll be okay. The sun will rise to better days.”

5)   Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag – Minnutes
“What’s the use of worrying? It never was worth while.”

6)   Welcome Home – Radical Face
“Was never much, but we’ve made the most. Welcome home.”

7)   Banana Pancakes – Jack Johnson
“Maybe we can sleep in. Make you banana pancakes. Pretend like it’s the weekend now.”

8)   Let It Go – Dragonette
“We don’t need a cure for the weight of the world, ’cause its floating round in the universe, just swinging like it’s tied by a string that you hold - and let it go!”

9) Tupthumping (Manic Focus Remix) – Chumbawamba
“I get knocked down, but I get up again. You’re never gonna keep me down.”

10) Baba Yetu (Feat. Soweto Gospel Choir)– Christopher Tin
“Baba yetu, yetu uliye, mbinguni yetu, yetu, amina. Baba yetu, yetu, uliye jina lako litukuzwe.”

Bonus! You’ll Be Okay (Live), because it never fails to make me love the world, especially at 1:43:


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
1 People Like This Post

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: November 13, 2014