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Stonewall Book Awards honor works of GLBT merit

stonewall_logoThe 2015 Stonewall Book Awards given by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT) of the American Library Association were presented this weekend in San Francisco at the organization’s annual conference.

The awards are given annually to English-language works of merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience. Several major categories are awarded: the Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award, the Barbara Gittings Literature award and the Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award. The awards are given to works published the prior year.

This year’s winners include—

 Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award

51lOr0fYHkLPresented to This Day in June, written by Gayle E. Pitman and published by Magination Press, an imprint of the American Psychological Association.

Other Children’s and Young Adult Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender teens speak out, written and photographed by Susan Kuklin, published by Candlewick Press.
  • I’ll Give You the Sun, written by Jandy Nelson, published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.
  • Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress, written by Christine Baldacchino, with pictures by Isabelle Malenfant, published by Groundwood Books

Barbara Gittings Literature Award

Prelude-to-Bruise-683x1024Presented to  Prelude To Bruise, written by Saeed Jones, published by Coffee House Press.

Other Barbara Gittings Literature Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Bitter Eden, written by Tatamkhulu Afrika, published by Picador USA.
  • Frog Music, written by Emma Donoghue, published by Little, Brown and Company.
  • The Two Hotel Francforts, written by David Leavitt, published by Bloomsbury.
  • My Real Children, written by Jo Walton, published by Tor Books.

Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award

51NViGPmlUL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Presented  to Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims, written by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, published by New York University Press.

Other Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Gay Berlin, written by Robert Beachy, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
  • Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More, written by Janet Mock, published by Atria Books.
  • Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, and the Battlefield of AIDS, written by Martin Duberman, published by The New Press.
  • Charity & Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America, written by Rachel Hope Cleves, published by Oxford University Press.

Dig Deeper: The Stonewall Riots

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Resistance to a police raid inside a small, Greenwich Village jukebox bar (one of the few in New York City where  the LGBT community were welcomed) marked the start of the gay rights movement. As hundreds upon hundreds of protesters poured out onto the streets over six days of rioting, the gay community, previously forced into secrecy, finally saw the strength of its own numbers. The event proved to be a turning point. The following year saw the start of annual gay pride parades and other outward demands for recognition, respect and equal rights—events often held on the Stonewall anniversary and eventually in hundreds of cities. The Stonewall Book Awards is just one of the many ways the event is commemorated.

Last week was a landmark week for the gay rights movement for two reasons: first, the Supreme Court decision affirming the right to same sex marriage in all fifty states, and, though less publicized, the naming of the Stonewall Inn as an official New York City landmark. Learn more about this incredible chapter in human rights history through the following library resources (or hundreds more – just ask!) curated by History liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert.

Dig Deeper: Stonewall Riots

1. Books about the Stonewall Riots in the Falvey collection

2. Gale Virtual Reference Library (Databases A-Z): Introductions to the subject matter from a selection of the Library’s subject encyclopedias.
Tina Gianoulis. “Gay Liberation Movement.” In St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, edited by Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast, 211-15. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000.

3. Sage Knowledge platform (Databases A-Z): More introductions and overviews from social sciences encyclopedias.
Lucian Truscott and Priscilla Glanville. “Stonewall Rebellion.” In Encyclopedia of Leadership, edited by George R. Goethals, Georgia J. Sorenson and James MacGregor Burns, 1492-98. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2004. doi:10.4135/9781412952392.n340.

4. CQ Global Researcher: An excellent overview over the evolution of gay rights in the U.S.
Reed Karaim. “Gay Rights.” CQ Global Researcher 5, no. 5 (March 1, 2011): 107-32.

5. New York Times: Read the original news coverage of the 1969 riots.
“4 Policemen Hurt in ‘Village Raid.’” New York Times, June 29, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118526412?accountid=14853.
“Police Again Rout ‘Village’ Youths.” New York Times, June 30, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118687806?accountid=14853.

6. Washington Post: Read about the movement as it was described in the year the riots occurred.
Nancy L. Ross “Homosexual Revolution.” The Washington Post, October 25, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/143552646?accountid=14853.

7. OpinionArchives: Browse the archives of the country’s leading opinion magazines and follow the changing public opinion. OpinionArchives includes the complete archives of The Nation, The New Republic, The National Review, The New Yorker, and Commonweal among other titles.


Dig Deeper links provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader – Academic Integration. Article by Joanne Quinn, team leader for Communication and Service Promotion.


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“The audience is half of the poem”: the First Latino Poet Laureate

Library of Congress appoints the 1st Latino Poet Laureate

Connecting to people through performance is crucial for Herrera. “I used to stand on the corner in San Diego with poems sticking out of my hip pocket, asking people if there was a place where I could read poems,” he recalls. “The audience is half of the poem.”

(Retrieved from LA Times, 6/22/15)
Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Congratulations to Juan Felipe Herrera, who was appointed the 21st poet laureate on June 10 by the Library of Congress. Herrera will be the first Hispanic-American person to be chosen as poet laureate in the United States in the 79 years since the program’s inception. His tenure will begin in September—national Hispanic heritage month.

Herrera, the son of migrant farmers, spent much of his youth travelling and living in tents in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Though terribly underprivileged, he was presented with the remarkable opportunity to attend UCLA as a young adult. From there, he went on to attend Stanford University and the University of Iowa’s Writing Workshop, where he earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

Through his education and experiences as a young Hispanic-American, Herrera developed a deep passion for writing and performing in both English and Spanish. He penned several pieces, including collections of poetry and children’s books in honor of his heritage and worldview. In addition to his writing and performing, Herrera has been an avid teacher and has also served as the poet laureate of California from 2012-2014.

Villanova University was lucky enough to welcome Juan Felipe Herrera as one of the featured speakers during the 14th annual Villanova Literary Festival, organized by Alan Drew, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing. The talk took place on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner. A jam-packed audience had the opportunity to listen to Herrera as he read and performed selected poems in both Spanish and English. With great enthusiasm and detail, Herrera shared his past experiences and showed poignant images to illustrate his work.

It’s been reported that Herrera’s main focus during his tenure as poet laureate will likely be to connect people of all different cultural backgrounds through poetry and to help highlight the stories of those people who are typically overlooked.

Interested in learning more about Juan Felipe Herrera? Check out Falvey Memorial Library’s holdings by this author.

Also, visit the following sites for additional information on Herrera and the position of Poet Laureate, provided by librarian Susan Ottignon.

Juan Felipe Herrera, Current Poet Laureate

List of works by Juan Felipe Herrera

Past Poets Laureate: 2011-present

About the Position of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry


Dig Deeper links provided by Sue Ottignon, subject librarian for romance languages and literatures.


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Foto Friday: How to Pierce the Clouds

SKIESOVER-CHAP

Stormy skies over the Church on Tuesday night.

Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending.
You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds?
Lay first the foundation of humility.
–  Saint Augustine


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The Curious ‘Cat: Would you rather … ?

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could choose between having the current library and current earning potential when you graduate OR having a library without online electronic databases, an online catalog, or online research help but also having double the earning potential when you graduate, which would you prefer?

 

1. Danielle FarerDanielle Farer—“The first one … It’s really hard to find what you need in a library without the assistance of people to help you and without the computers to help you and having to do all that work by yourself … I remember when I was younger and you actually had to flip through the card catalog; that’s really time-consuming … I’d much rather make less and have the process be a lot easier.”

2. Sushmita Arjyal

 

 

Sushmita Arjyal—“I would definitely go with the second choice: electronic suppliances have helped in past and also will help in future … If we can have more, then it would be nice … it has helped the online catalog and the online sources that we can find books online; we can find the [building] map and find where the books are.”

3. Craig Gilbert

 

 

 

Craig Gilbert—“I’d prefer the first. … The more information you have, the better off you’re going to be. The money comes by itself later; the money doesn’t have to be connected to the information. We’re not in school to make money; we’re in here to learn.”

4. Susheel Bajaj

 

 

 

 

Susheel Bajaj—“I would prefer the “all” one. It has all the online stuff—online books, online materials—because you don’t need to carry a hardcopy of the book. That would be very easy, and you can read the stuff anywhere you want … on the go, on the mobile device, on the tablet, anywhere on the go. So that would be good if we had more of the online materials instead of hardcopy of the books.”

5. Matthew Zarenkiewicz

 

 

Matthew Zarenkiewicz—“[I prefer] the current library. My earning potential … I’m worried about, obviously, but not so much that I would sacrifice the amount of time that I save using the online database and things like that to do research, especially this summer when I’m doing research. So I’m very happy for all of that.”

6. Indu Priya Eedara

 

 

 

Indu Priya Eedara—“The first one: It’s always better to have online catalogs or online stuff, which would be easier to access.”


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Celebrate Freedom by Exploring Juneteenth and Harriet Tubman resources

 

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Today is the sesquicentennial of Juneteenth, the nineteenth of June, and the day that marks the end of slavery in the United States. Though the Emancipation Proclamation was signed two and a half years earlier in 1863, at that time without mass media, it actually took the physical arrival of Major General Gordon Granger and his Union soldiers in Galveston, Texas to announce to the last of the held slaves there that the Civil War had ended and that they were free. Hence, birthing a new Independence Day.

Juneteenth not only commemorates the abolition of slavery but also is growing to be a multicultural and global celebration of  freedom in general. Specifically, it is an opportunity to build cultural awareness, and in many communities, to educate young African-American generations about the struggles of their past and how their ancestors prevailed. Gratitude and pride, story and song make up many Juneteenth celebrations.

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Also in recent news is one of the country’s most legendary abolitionists, Harriet Tubman. Ms. Tubman recently emerged the winner of a public survey (Womenon20s.org) to nominate the first woman to appear on U.S. paper currency. Though the selection, and even the process, was subject to debate (e.g., some see it as hush money, some see it as ‘money’,) the accomplishments of this brave abolitionist in her very dangerous times cannot be minimized. News broke Wednesday, June 18, that the $10 bill, which now depicts Alexander Hamilton, will definitely feature the portrait of a woman, though her identity is yet to be determined. The Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew will determine the person by the end of 2015, with the new currency appearing in 2020 — the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment.

Dig Deeper

Explore further the intriguing times after the Emancipation through the following Falvey resources about Juneteenth and Harriet Tubman, curated by history liaison, Jutta Seibert. She’s also included some links on what actually goes into making the U.S. dollar bill. Contact Jutta here for her guidance through your research needs and also for her help navigating the wealth of books and online library materials.

1. African American Studies Center Online (AASCO)
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.oxfordaasc.com/
AASCO is a great source about African American history in general and Harriet Tubman’s life in particular. It includes the Encyclopedia of African American History: 1619-1895, Black Women in America, and the African American National Biography project. AASCO also includes primary sources and images.

2. Books about Harriet Tubman in the Falvey collection:

3. Black Abolitionist Papers, 1830-1865
Find numerous digitized primary sources written by and about Harriet Tubman.

4. African American Newspapers: The Nineteenth Century
Follow the life of Harriet Tubman as chronicled in the African American Press.

5. Historical New York Times, 1851-2009

Tubman’s obituary from March 14, 1913:

http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/97412990?accountid=14853

A report about the white resistance to emancipation in Texas from July 1865:
“The Negro Question in Texas.” New York Times (1857-1922), Jul 09, 1865.

http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/91903644?accountid=14853.

6. Secondary sources about the tradition of Juneteenth celebrations in the Falvey collection:
Kachun Mitch. “Celebrating Freedom: Juneteenth and the Emancipation Festival Tradition.” In Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial, edited by Thomas J. Brown, 73-91. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. [E641 .R45 2011]

7. A Brief History of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS66871

8. All you ever wanted to know about the dollar:
Currency Notes. [Washington, D.C.]: Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 2004.

http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS66873


Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What Do Villanova Students Really Think about the Library?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you wish the Library knew about your needs as a student?

CC 2015-06-17 - #1 Black Shirt - Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku-scr

Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku—“In computer science every semester they would introduce some new courses … and some [new] textbooks … But when we go to the Library website, we never find those books. It would be helpful if you would coordinate with the other departments and … get the information, like what the new courses they are offering, and get in contact with the faculty who are offering those courses and order the books, not to issue them to the students but at least two or three different copies in the Library. That would be great because one of the courses we have … I did not get … even a PDF version, anything like that in the Library. So it would be great if you would coordinate with the different departments and get at least the online versions rather than the printed versions of the books.”

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Thomas Modayil Jacob—“And the need [for computer science textbooks] is urgent in the computer science and the computer engineering departments ‘cause there a lot of fields we have courses on, like semantic web and big data, which don’t have textbooks as yet. So I think that the Library needs to coordinate with the professor to at least have those relevant papers or, if there is a textbook, then the textbook, at least in the PDF form.”

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Ramesh Krishna—“Since we don’t have the books, we need to take a loan from other libraries … we need to get the books that are not available here we need to get the loan from others libraries. So that would be helpful if … instead of loaning from other libraries it would be better if have those books in our Library.”

Editor’s note—The Library does not purchase textbooks for current courses unless the titles are specifically ordered by faculty.
One reason – Expense: New editions are often published in a year or so, rendering the textbook we would have purchased obsolete.
Another reason – Competition: The Library doesn’t want to be in competition with the University Shop.
Library staff, however, have begun to explore ways that Falvey can better meet our students’ need for textbooks. Keep checking this blog for updates.

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Rebecca Snow—“I think it’s important to have quiet places. We have one upstairs, but maybe another room would be good. [Otherwise,] I like the way it’s set up; I think it’s good.”

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Shaina Smolowe—“More printing for free would be incredibly helpful.”

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Stephanie Mader—“I like the quiet study room upstairs. I like the access to the computers. I like the coffee room; it might be nice if that were open during the summer.”


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The Highlighter: Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases Like a Pro

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


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Octocentenary! 800th Anniversary Celebration of the Magna Carta

Magna_Carta_(British_Library_Cotton_MS_Augustus_II.106)

The Magna Carta (originally known as the Charter of Liberties) of 1215, written in iron gall ink on parchment in medieval Latin, using standard abbreviations of the period, authenticated with the Great Seal of King John. The original wax seal was lost over the centuries.[1] This document is held at the British Library and is identified as “British Library Cotton MS Augustus II.106″ One of four known surviving 1215 exemplars of Magna Carta. Source Britishlibrary.png This file has been provided by the British Library from its digital collections.

John, by the grace of God King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine and Count of Anjou, to his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, foresters, sheriffs, stewards, servants and to all his officials and loyal subjects, greeting. 

Octocentenary! Truly, that’s a word you don’t hear everyday!

Though most of its clauses have been repealed, the Magna Carta – celebrating its 800th anniversary today – still stands as a framework and rallying cry against the arbitrary use of political power.

Signed June 15, 1215 by King John in Runnymede, (and not Runnemede, NJ, for those of us who have watched too much local news) this medieval document was composed as a peace treaty between the king and his subjects.

John, according to history (and to this entertaining British Library-produced video narrated by Monty Python’s Terry Jones,) was allowing power to go to his head – having allegedly imprisoned his wife, murdered his nephew, and raising taxes to pay for expensive foreign wars and wasteful expansionism. His barons had had enough and imprisoned John, forcing him to negotiate and follow the rule of law himself. Though most of of the document was rewritten within its first ten years, three of its original clauses still stand in English statute books: one granting liberties to the English Church, one granting certain privileges to the city of London, and third and most important, the right to a trial by jury. To writ:

“No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions,or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land.

See excerpts of the remaining clauses here.

Ideas in the Magna Carta are also reflected in theories of representative government and influential behind the cries of “no taxation without representation” which sparked the American Revolution and ultimately were incorporated into the US Bill of Rights. Worth viewing is the Library of Congress’ recent digital exhibit, Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor. Its overview material states that, “by examining the ways in which Magna Carta has been interpreted in English and American constitutional law and politics, this exhibition demonstrates how principles such as due process of law, the right to a jury trial, freedom from unlawful imprisonment, and the theory of representative government emerged from a tradition that began 800 years ago.”

Library curator Nathan Dorn and Princess Anne view the exhibit. Photo by John Harrington. Retrieved 6/8/15 http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2014/11/pic-of-the-week-princess-anne-opens-magna-carta-exhibition/

Library curator Nathan Dorn and Princess Anne view the exhibit. Photo by John Harrington. Retrieved 6/8/15 http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2014/11/pic-of-the-week-princess-anne-opens-magna-carta-exhibition/

 Can one still view the original Magna Carta?

Yes, If you happen to find yourself in Merrie Ol’ England, you can visit one of three original parchments of the document, or several other locations with amended or later versions. In fact, last week, Princess Anne officially reopened Lincoln Castle after a “multi-million pound refurbishment” that included a new vault for housing that city’s original copy of the document.

Closer to home…Dig Deeper

But if you’d rather save your pounds for a rainy day, you can still get up close and personal with the Magna Carta by viewing the extensive array of Falvey resources gathered by subject librarian for political science and geography, Merrill Stein.

On the famous bronze doors of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, there are eight images; three are dedicated to the Magna Carta (5,6 & 7).

On the famous bronze doors of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, there are eight images; three are dedicated to the Magna Carta (5,6 & 7).

 

Full text of the document and good explanation of the document’s relevance and history from Fordham University.

Full text with annotations; an ed doc.

British Library Digital Collection

National Archives translation

British Library Modern day English translation

EAWC Readings from Medieval Europe

Yale Law School Avalon Project

William Sharp McKechnie, Magna Carta: A Commentary on the Great Charter of King John, with an Historical Introduction, by William Sharp McKechnie (Glasgow: Maclehose, 1914)

Magna carta; the Lincoln cathedral copy

Magna Carta Libertatum (Latin)

University of Oxford Bodleian documents

1215 version

1225 version

Falvey Memorial Library subject search:


Dig Deeper links provided by Merrill Stein, subject librarian for political science and geography. Find Merrill’s contact info here.MerrillStein

 


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Foto Friday: Cool it!

Water

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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Philosophy Librarian Nik Fogle Wins Above and Beyond Award

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Nikolaus (Nik) Fogle, PhD, received the Above and Beyond Award, one of three awards given by the Villanova University Staff Council each year to members of the University staff. He received the award at the University Staff Council Awards Luncheon on May 1.

The criteria for the award are that the recipient “will have performed a significant action or service that: surpasses the requirements of their job description, is voluntary, is unexpectant of compensation in time off or payment, [and] is either within or outside of their scheduled work hours.”

Dr. Fogle joined Falvey in 2012 as the philosophy librarian and Philosophy, Theology and Humanities team coordinator. He works with several humanities departments and programs on campus, providing research assistance, information literacy instruction, and support for a range of collaborative projects.

For the last two years he has held a fellowship in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowships provide recent PhDs with “a unique opportunity to develop expertise in the new forms of scholarly research and the information resources that support them.”

Asked about receiving the award, Dr. Fogle said, “I’m really grateful and honored. I’m so lucky to get to work with so many brilliant, encouraging and thoughtful people.”


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.


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Last Modified: June 11, 2015