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The World According to the Class of 2018

ELMO2tr

Today is Move-In Day for the Class of 2018! Our incoming first-year students have never lived in a world without wearable cellular telephones, AMBER Alerts, computers that can defeat the world chess champion, or cloned sheep.

Television shows, from their point of view, have always displayed a score from the TV ratings system.

These millennials may have played with a Furby or with Teenie Beanies—miniature Beanie Babies included in fast-food children’s meals. At Christmastime, many of them received a “Tickle Me Elmo” doll.

They may not realize that the “save” icon for Microsoft and other products is an image of a floppy disk. Even if they do, they probably have never used a floppy disk.

Adobe Flash, MP3 (audio format), wikis and JAVA have always existed in their lifetimes, as has Amazon.com.

And the dictionary has always included the terms “alcopop,” “always-on,” “censorware,” “fist bump,” “microbrowser,” and “phishing,” as far as they’re concerned.

Certainly you could add examples not included on this list. Please share your own ideas/observations about the class of 2018 in our Comment section.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. Graphic by Joanne Quinn.

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What’s New with Pietro da Cortona’s “The Triumph of David”?

Intriguing developments about “The Triumph of David” have occurred since our previous blog post about this Cortona painting. The painting has been completely cleaned and, over the Memorial Day weekend, varnished. And, most impressive, Anthony Lagalante, PhD, associate professor, Dept. of Chemistry, received a grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for technical analysis of the artwork. Dr. Lagalante received the notification and a check for $24,000 at the end of May.

Although varnishing is normally the final step in the creation of an oil painting, the conservator, Kristin de Ghetaldi, explains, “We always put a thin ‘isolation’ coat of varnish on the surface of paintings after we have removed as much of the unoriginal restoration as we are able. This helps to bring back some of the saturation but also serves as a barrier layer between the original surface and any materials that we then add (fills, inpainting, etc.).”

Photo (32)

Areas with gouache viewable on painting’s bottom right.

Currently the interns, volunteers and de Ghetaldi are filling areas of paint loss and toning the fills with red gouache (gouache is opaque watercolor paint) to simulate the original ground of “The Triumph of David.” To observe the conservators in action, visit the Reading Room in Falvey Hall (aka Old Falvey) or watch the live feed. The conservators are happy to answer questions about their work.

For more information about the conservation project – “About the Restoration;” the Kress award; biographies of the conservation team; the chemistry of the painting; a biography of the donor, Princess Eugenia Ruspoli (1861-1951, born Jennie Berry in Alabama); and more – go to projects.library.villanova.edu/paintingrestoration/ or from Falvey’s homepage, click “Projects” and scroll to “Conserving a Giant …”

For more information about the artist, Pietro da Cortona, see “Dig Deeper: About the artist Pietro da Cortona.”


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

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UPDATE: Villanova’s Automatic Virtual Environment

Last fall this blog post informed you of a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment, aka “CAVE,” coming to the Library. This summer construction accelerated, and the Villanova Immersive Studies System (VISS) will open soon.

“It sounds similar to watching an IMAX film in 3D,” a colleague informed me. I explained that it’s much more than observing. It’s more like the holodeck from Star Trek, the television series. The VISS allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even circle around the 3D image an object, such as a statue or tree, as though they were in the actual setting. The VISS also includes sound.

Funding for the VISS comes from a $1.67 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant: “the largest NSF research grant ever awarded to the University.”

 

UntitledThe CAVE—aka the Villanova Immersive Studies System (VISS)—arrives … some assembly required.

 

 

RS7959_1725Formerly Viewing Room 4 in Falvey Hall, this space has been prepared to house the VISS.

 

 

RS7973_DSC_2181 copyInstallation begins!

 

RS7981_DSC_0370An installer prepares one of the VISS’s many projectors.

 

RS7980_DSC_0369The enclosure begins to take shape.

 

RS8005_DSC_2216Testing the Villanova Immersive Studies System (VISS)

 


Photos by Luisa Cywinski and Alice Bampton.

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Shark Week wallpaper for people who like to sink their teeth into a good book

MOBILE-SHARK

It’s been one fin-tastic Shark Week, hasn’t it! And since we know Falvey Memorial Library patrons love sinking their teeth into a good book, we’ve custom-designed a special Shark Week souvenir wallpaper for your laptop or mobile phone! Now, you won’t forget to head for the library every time you think you need a bigger book!

Download the laptop version here.
Download the mobile version here.

To change computer wallpaper, open the link and drag the graphic to your desktop, then open your monitor settings to switch wallpapers. To change your smartphone or tablet background, drag graphic to the desktop. Email or transfer it to your Camera Roll via Dropbox or your preferred method, and then open Settings to change Wallpaper/Brightness on your mobile devices.

Now excuse us while we tuck back into one of our favorite summertime reads, Finn-egans Wake.


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Throwback Thursday: 1914 Corr Hall Housed Theology and Philosophy Library

 

Corr Hall

Corr Hall 1914

Philadelphia Inquirer, page 7, vol. 170, iss. 53, February 22, 1914

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Shark Week poem: Your Program Tanked? Don’t Blame the Shark

Flight of sharks

When a leather-jacket clad
Water skiing lad
Wants to prove his manhood,
Obviously he should
show, making his mark
by jumping the shark.

And now those joyful Days have passed,
But I’m still here. I will outlast
these weaker species. That’s the score.
My kind outlasted dinosaurs.

I am
blue shark,
bull shark,
night shark,
nurse shark,
dusky shark,
goblin shark,
zebra shark
and reef shark.

I’m whale shark
lantern shark,
lemon shark,
leopard shark
sandbar shark,
sharpnose shark,
silky shark and
great white shark,

bignose,
blacknose,
bluntnose and
broadnose

gulper,
spinner,
thresher,
tiger,
copper,
sleeper and
cookiecutter

blacktip
whitetip
silvertip
(Take your pick.)

bonnethead,
hammerhead,
also crested bullhead

(Give my memory a shake) Oh,
Right—I almost forgot mako.

Now, before you disembark
‘cause your species’ fate looks dark,
think how long there have been sharks
—makes your time look like a quark!

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O Captain, My Captain

Whitman_Poem_O_Captain_My_Captain_09MAR1887_handwritten

O Captain! My Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! My Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my captain lies
Fallen cold and dead.

“O Captain! My Captain!” is a poem written by Walt Whitman in 1865. It is an elegy or mourning poem, written to honor Abraham Lincoln. The poem is an extended metaphor with Lincoln serving as the captain of a ship, symbolizing the United States.

The poem was featured prominently in Dead Poets Society, the film that featured Robin Williams‘ Oscar-winning portrayal of John Keating, a teacher at a stuffy boys-prep school. The students show their support for Keating at the end of the film by standing on their desks and reciting the poem, in defiance of the school’s headmaster’s decision to fire their beloved teacher. The poem has been featured in several anthologies, including Whitman’s Sequel to Drum-Taps and later editions of Leaves of Grass. Comedic legend Williams passed away yesterday at the age of 63.

These volumes and the film are available for borrowing at the Library. Falvey also has other films featuring Williams.

 

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Sea Yarns, Shark Yarns, No Yawns!

Moby_Dick_final_chaseLife on the sea promises adventure, excitement and life-changing experiences. Ever since Homer’s Odyssey, people have enjoyed sea yarns, and some of the most memorable feature sharks. The following seafaring tales—many available at Falvey—will satiate your craving for a satisfying sea yarn.

Odyssey by Homer

Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner by Daniel Defoe

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff

The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Kon-Tiki by Thor Heyerdahl

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy

Film—The Caine Mutiny

Film—Mr. Roberts

Film—Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World

Film—Voyage of the Yes 

What’s your favorite sea story? Please use the Comment section to tell us.

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It’s Shark Week and we’ve got fintastic shark art from the Digital Library!

SHARK DIGITAL
http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Record/vudl:312089

Did we, ahem, whet your appetite for more Dime Novel adventure? If so, be sure to check out our fascinating full collection of Dime Novel and Popular Literature from 1860 to 1930.

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Throwback Thursday: Headlines

These articles were on the second page of The Villanovan in November 1968. The article on the right announces the official dedication of Falvey Memorial Library. The University’s President, Rev. Robert J. Walsh, presided over the ceremonies. #tbt

If you want to dig deeper into The Villanova Monthly, as it was called from 1893-1897, or The Villanovan, from 1917 -2006, visit the Digital Library.

Falvey addition article Villanovan 1968

 

 

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Last Modified: August 7, 2014