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Extra! Extra! Newspapers in Special Collections

Extra“Extra! Extra! Newspapers in Special Collections” features various newspapers housed in Falvey’s Special Collections. The exhibit was curated by Laura Bang, digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant; Laura Hutelmyer, electronic resources and special acquisitions coordinator; and Jean Lutes, PhD, associate professor, Department of English, and director of academics, gender and women’s studies. Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer, created the graphics for the exhibit.

“Extra! Extra! …” begins in the vertical case which houses a placard with information about newspapers, concluding with “This exhibit provides a glimpse of some of the varied types of newspapers that can be found in Falvey’s Special Collections.” Also on display in this case are 12 mastheads reproduced from newspapers; “The Lepracaun,” “Public Ledger,” “Chicago Ledger,” “The New World” and “New York Ledger” are among those shown. On the bottom shelf are a large scrapbook from c.1880s containing clippings related to the Catholic Church and a bound volume of the “Boston Cultivator” from March 1848 from which articles have been cut, probably for inclusion in someone’s scrapbook. The curator’s placard says, “Scrapbooks provided a format for readers to collect and organize a rapidly growing selection of reading materials.”

Five additional cases feature newspapers grouped by categories: “Early Papers,” “Illustrations,” “Social Justice,” “Family Papers” and “Publications for Young Readers,” all accompanied by informative placards.

“Early Papers” features works published in Philadelphia: “The Saturday Evening Post,” May 30, 1829 (here aDolls newspaper, but later a magazine); “Public Ledger,” March 25, 1836; “Saturday Night,” Nov. 16, 1889; and a bound volume of “Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine” opened to the July 1856 issue. The curator’s placard tells us that between 1836 and 1880 Philadelphia had 12 daily papers, many more than we have today.

“Illustrations” exhibits a “Public Ledger Color Supplement” cover from June 8, 1919; a “Dear Little French Orphan …” paper doll with several outfits; an image of “Picturesque Philadelphia: Old South Street Market;” an open volume of a New York “Illustrated News” from 1853 and placards explaining how illustrations were created in a time before it was possible to insert photographs in newspapers and magazines.

The “Social Justice” case offers four issues of this newspaper published from 1936 until 1942 by Father Charles Edward Coughlin, a member of the Basilian Fathers. Father Coughlin used “Social Justice” to promote his ideology and as a supplement to his radio broadcasts. Articles such as “Ladies and Gentlemen Meet Satan,” “The Roosevelt Cleaner,” “The Smut Vendor” and “Who Is Next on Relief?” give the reader a sense of Father Coughlin’s interests.

RS7611_Harper's“Harper’s Bazar: A Repository of Fashion, Pleasure, and Instruction,” “People’s Home Journal,” “Collier’s Weekly: An Illustrated Journal of Art, Literature and Current Events” and “Comfort” are displayed as “Family Papers.” These newspapers reflect the interests of American families in the years 1870 through 1919 (the years on display). Look carefully at them; the illustrations provide information about fashion and farm life, one shows a mounted policeman coming to the aid of a woman on a runaway horse, and, particularly appropriate for our winter weather, another displays couple riding a toboggan.

The final group of newspapers on display is “Publications for Young Readers:” “Golden Days for Boys and Girls,” Feb. 4, 1882, and “Happy Days: A Paper for Young and Old,” Feb. 2, 1907, and Nov. 6, 1915, issues. The front pages of these papers show large illustrations related to the stories included.

The exhibit will remain on display through May.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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The Violent and the Fallen: a Reading from James Matthew Wilson

WILSON-BOOKThis Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 2:30 p.m. Falvey Memorial Library will be hosting a poetry reading and Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring James Matthew Wilson, PhD, an assistant professor of literature in the Department of Humanities and Augustinian Traditions. Dr. Wilson will be reading poems from The Violent and the Fallen, his forthcoming chapbook soon to be published through Finishing Line Press. The Violent and the Fallen delves deep into the lives of poetic speakers across the open expanses of Midwestern America and features an array of characters as seemingly disparate as bankers, lifeguards and alcoholic balloon vendors, each in search of redemption in the face of violence and desire. The reading will be held in room 205 and begins at 2:30 pm.


Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre, has compiled the following Dig Deeper links for this exciting event, including several poems written by Dr. Wilson:

Dig Deeper:

Dr. Wilson has made available several of his papers and articles through academia.com

He is a regular contributor to Front Porch Republic

His poem Living Together, from the journal Per Contra

Another poem, entitled A Note for Ecclesiastes

Many of Dr. Wilson’s articles are available through Falvey Memorial Library databases


Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

Sarah WingoLinks prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Falvey Celebrates Black History Month 2014

BLACKORAL-TO

Please join us in Falvey Memorial Library this week as we observe Black History Month. On Tuesday, Feb. 18, at 2:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner, Thomas Mogan, PhD, director, Office of Student Development and adjunct professor in the Department of History will present a talk titled “The Black Oral History Project: Confronting Our Past to Inform Our Future.”

Dr. Mogan will discuss the research efforts that led to the creation of Black Villanova: An Oral History, one of Falvey Memorial Library’s online exhibits, which examines the history of the African American student experience at Villanova University throughout the years spanning from approximately 1950-1985.

Alice Bampton, senior writer and visuals specialist, Communication and Service Promotion team, recently interviewed Dr. Mogan about the project:

AB: How did you get interested in the Black Villanova Oral History Project?

TM: I have always had a keen interest in the history of the civil rights movement, and this led me to pursue graduate work in history. I was conducting research for a seminar paper on the integration of African American athletes at Villanova, and I met with Dr. Ed Collymore, former executive director of Multicultural Affairs at Villanova and a former student-athlete. He shared with me some fascinating stories about what it was like to be an African American student-athlete at Villanova during the 1950s, and that set me on my journey to learn more. I knew that he was part of a much larger story that needed to be told.

Tom Mogan, PhD

Tom Mogan, PhD

AB: Who decided to involve the Falvey Digital Library?

TM: As part of my training to be a historian, I knew that it was good practice to make your research accessible to the public. So, as I began to conduct the interviews, I knew immediately that I wanted to share these interviews with the Villanova community. I approached Joe Lucia, former director of Falvey Memorial Library, with the idea, and he was very eager to support me in this endeavor. David Uspal [senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications] has also provided invaluable assistance in developing the oral history project’s website.

AB: What are your plans for the future of this project?

TM: I hope to continue to add to the collection by conducting more interviews. I have added a news feature to the site so I hope to keep it updated and fresh so that people have a reason to return to the site.

AB: Are there plans to publish your research (beyond the dissertation)?

TM: I have spoken with several journals about publishing an article based on this research, and I will be working on submitting those by the early summer. I hope to one day publish this work as a book.

AB: How did you select the subjects for the interviews?

TM: As a starting point, I sent an invitation letter to several African American alumni whom I knew were leaders within the Black Student League in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Two alums in particular, Ted Freeman and Napoleon Andrews, responded quickly and enthusiastically agreed to help me find African American alumni who might be willing to share their stories. This project would not have happened without the support of these two gentlemen. I have only interviewed one woman to date so I would like to include more about the African American woman’s experience at Villanova.

AB: Any additional information/comments that you would like to share?

TM: This project has been one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had in my life. In support of this project, I worked with the Alumni Association to sponsor a reunion for African American alumni during Homecoming 2012. We were able to welcome back over 40 African American alumni, some of whom had not been back to campus in over 40 years. This project has helped to begin the healing process for many black alums, and for that I am very pleased. I also hope that this project will allow Villanova to learn from our past as we continue to address issues of diversity and inclusion on our campus today.

David Uspal, Falvey’s senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications, was the library’s main point person for the project as he helped with the very difficult technical aspects of mounting the exhibit. On behalf of Uspal, his colleague Laura Bang, digital and special collections curatorial assistant and digital humanities coordinator at Falvey, says, “The Black Villanova project is a great addition to the library’s digital projects. Dr. Mogan’s interviews bring to life important perspectives on the Villanova experience for African Americans.” Work on this project will continue as it is an evolving historical record. Dr. Mogan, the project coordinator, invites additional participants in this project as he wants to include their stories in the rich heritage of African American history at Villanova University.


Farah Jasmine Griffin, PhD

Farah Jasmine Griffin, PhD

In addition to Dr. Mogan’s Black Oral History talk on Feb. 18, Falvey will also co-sponsor the Annual Black History Month talk along with the Africana Studies Program. On Thursday, Feb. 20, at 4:00 p.m. in room 204, join us as Farah Jasmine Griffin, PhD, William B. Ransford professor of English and comparative literature and African-American studies, Columbia University presents the Annual Black History Month talk as part of Africana Studies’ Spring Lecture series. Make sure to check out these great events!


Regina-edIntroduction written by Regina Duffy, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and library events and program coordinator.

imagesInterview by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. Black Oral History Project graphics by Joanne Quinn.

 

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Meet the Conservator: Kristin deGhetaldi

DeGhetaldi profileKristin deGhetaldi, a native of Santa Cruz, Calif., is leading the group working to conserve the huge painting attributed to Pietro da Cortona, “The Triumph of David,” which hung in the Reading Room of Falvey Hall from 1956 until 2013. The painting was taken down and removed from its frame in 2013 and currently rests against the end wall of the Reading Room where it is being conserved in public view.

DeGhetaldi has an undergraduate degree from Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa, where she majored in chemistry. How did a chemistry major make such a huge step, from science to the visual arts, this writer wondered. So I asked deGhetaldi, “What inspired you to become a conservator?”

Her answer: “Going abroad. I … was encouraged by my mentor to NOT focus on the sciences during my semester abroad. When I returned to the States I realized that I had a passion for the arts as well as science and then tried to figure out how I could use both skill sets. Obviously seeing conservators at work in Italy and England also contributed to my decision to pursue a career in conservation.”

My next question: “What training is required? Do you need to have artistic talent?” DeGhetaldi’s answer, “You really need to have a ‘three-legged stool’ approach to academics: studio art, science and art history. … Color matching is perhaps one of the more important skills that a painting conservator needs to have in order to address issues associated with loss compensation. You don’t need to paint like Leonardo da Vinci, but you do need to have an optimal level of hand skills. … Today … most students pursue a master’s degree in art conservation after obtaining a bachelor’s degree in art history, studio art, the sciences or other related fields. In order to be accepted into a graduate degree program in the United States students must satisfy extensive course requirements (e.g. organic chemistry, art history/anthropology courses, a studio art portfolio, etc.) and complete a certain number of hours serving as a volunteer/intern in a cultural institution or private studio. This pre-program experience often takes additional time beyond completion of an undergraduate degree.” For more information about art conservation see art conservation. To learn more about graduate programs in the discipline visit graduate programs.

Both terms, conservation and restoration, have been used in reference to the current treatment of “The Triumph of David.” I asked deGhetaldi to explain which term is correct and why. She says, “… In the United States we now use the terms ‘conservation’ and ‘preservation’ when describing up-to-date, ethical methods of treatment … Although you will still hear a conservator use the term ‘restoration,’ it is mostly due to the fact that the general public is more familiar with this phrase … The term ‘restoration’ is now typically associated with antiquated practices or even unethical treatment approaches. Restorers do not document what they use or do to an artwork; conservators on the other hand fully document everything and use only stable, reversible materials that are appropriate for the artwork.”

When asked if she had any surprises in the conservation of the Cortona painting so far, deGhetaldi says, “I think the most gratifying ‘surprise’ has been the recovery of the original brilliant colors that have been obscured and hidden beneath layers of varnish and overpaint for so many years.” (The painting was restored in 1956, and since then the varnish has darkened so much that very little of the original colors were visible; figures were barely visible.) Given the size of this painting (approximately twelve by nineteen feet), a logical inquiry was “Is this the largest painting on which you have worked?” And her reply is, “Yes, I believe it is … although a couple of paintings that I helped treat during an internship at the J. Paul Getty Museum come very close. …”

DeGhetaldi earned a post-baccalaureate certificate in conservation from the Studio Arts Center International, Florence, Italy. She has a Master of Science degree from the Winterthur/University of Delaware program in Conservation and she completed a three year Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Painting Conservation at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., where she worked on Old Master paintings. DeGhetaldi has also worked at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Calif.; and Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence, R.I.

She is currently enrolled in the doctoral program at Winterthur/University of Delaware. Her dissertation topic is “Novel Analytical Methods Used to Explore the Evolution from Egg to Oil Paints in Quattrocento Italy.”

Vistors are welcome to watch the conservator and interns at work. If you cannot visit campus see the live video. For more information about the project go to painting restoration.


Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.

 

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Evangelii Gaudium Readings: A Conversation Series on the Catholic Church and the World

DIANE-POPE2TEFalvey Memorial Library and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will be presenting a three part series of conversations inspired by Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel). In this 47,560 word document, which is written in a highly accessible style, Pope Francis encourages the Christian faithful to embark upon a new chapter of evangelization and also points out new paths for the Church’s journey in the years to come.

But what exactly is an “apostolic exhortation?” According to the New Catholic Encyclopedia, it is a morally persuasive and significant expression of the magisterium, or teaching authority of the Church. Exhortations are quite influential because they are frequently the product of consensus. An exhortation can also be the base for further study and for special norms putting its teaching into effect, but it is neither legislative nor does it define church doctrine (MORRISEY, F. G. “Apostolic Exhortation.” New Catholic Encyclopedia. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 2003. 585-586. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.).

On Wednesday, Feb. 5, at 6:00 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner, Bernie Prusak, PhD, Sue Toton, PhD, and Jim Wetzel, PhD, will facilitate the first discussion of the Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel) will explore the theme, “I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting and dirty” (Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel), which entails a discussion of the role of the Church in the world today, where it is headed, and what it means to be poor and evangelical.

The second discussion, hosted by Mary Hirschfeld, PhD, Robert DeFina, PhD, and Gerald Beyer, PhD, takes place on Tuesday, Feb. 25, at 6:00 p.m. in Room 205 of Falvey and will explore the theme, “The worship of the golden calf has returned” (Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel). This discussion will address whether the socioeconomic system is unjust and promotes a “throw-away culture” and will also consider the idea that capitalism can be consistent with social justice.

The final discussion, led by Rebecca Winer, PhD, Hibba Abugideiri, PhD, Crystal Lucky, PhD, and Charlie Cherry, PhD, occurs on Tuesday, March 25, at 6:00 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner and will explore how “We can learn so much from one another” (Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel). This final installment will focus on world peace through interfaith understanding and our duties towards other in promoting this understanding.


Dig Deeper: Want to Learn More about Pope Francis I?

o-POPE-ROLLING-STONE-570Pope Francis (born: Jorge Mario Bergoglio), who named himself in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, has taken the world by storm. Friendlier in demeanor and less conservative than his predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI, who was the first pope to resign in almost 600 years, Pope Francis’ humility, compassion, and peaceful smile have charmed Catholics and non-Catholics alike. It’s not surprising he was named TIME’s “Person of the Year” for 2013 or that he’s been depicted in graffiti as the SuperPope on a street in Rome. As of this week, he’ll also be the first Pope to grace the cover of Rolling Stone. You can connect with him on Facebook and even follow him on Twitter! Clearly, Pope Francis is inspiring us on all fronts with messages that are truly universal. Some of his past tweets have included: “Let us pray for peace, and let us bring it about, starting in our own homes!” and “To be saints is not a privilege for the few, but a vocation for everyone.”

Here are a few resources that will help you learn more about the man:

·     Francis: Man of Prayer

This book describes the life of the new pope, from his beginnings as the child of Italian immigrants to becoming the first Jesuit pope and first pope from the Americas.

·     Francis: Pope of a New World

Written by a major Vatican reporter, this easy-to-read book contains all the essential information on Pope Francis as well as new impressions and insights on his character as well as his early days in office.

·     Francis, A New World Pope

A survey of Pope Francis’s journey to the papacy, his beliefs and writings, his character, and the new challenges he will face as Pope, which include church governance, consumerism, evangelization, tending to the poor, and much more.

·     Pope Francis on the Open Directory Project

The Open Directory Project is the largest directory of the web. Check out this page for a list of links about Pope Francis such as news and opinion, stories, commentaries, photographs, and more.

·     Pope Francis, Jorge Mario Bergoglio – Holy Father

The Vatican’s official website devoted to all things Pope Francis.

·     Pope Francis’ Channel on YouTube

This series is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and is free and open to the public.


Alex Williams theology liaisonAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, MS is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams.

Photo of Pope Francis by Diane Brocchi, Special Events Coordinator, College of Arts & Sciences

Our Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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One Book Villanova Author Susan Nussbaum to Visit Campus on January 28

If you haven’t already done so, make sure to finish reading Villanova University’s 2013-2014 One Book Villanova selection, Good Kings Bad Kings. The author, Susan Nussbaum, will be visiting campus tomorrow, January 28, to take part in many exciting activities on campus throughout the day along with the Villanova Community.

Susan Nussbaum

Susan Nussbaum

Good Kings Bad Kings is a novel told from the perspectives of several characters who either work or live in an institution for young adults with disabilities in Chicago. Readers follow the characters as they deal with the hardships of institutional life and experience personal triumphs and tribulations.

By weaving her intricate web of characters, Nussbaum helps to raise awareness about the hardships facing those who live in institutions; she doesn’t necessarily focus her whole story on the characters’ disabilities, but rather draws attention to the other obstacles that they face as young adults in their sometimes hostile environment.

Living with disability herself, Nussbaum is sensitive to the way in which disabled characters are often portrayed in books and movies. When she became tired of having disabled characters included in stories in stereotypical ways, she made it a goal in writing Good Kings Bad Kings to focus on the character’s lives and the way in which the “system” was tough on them. In a recent Huffington Post article, “Disabled Characters in Fiction,” Nussbaum said “Disabled people barely ever think about our disabilities. When we do think about them, it is usually because we are dealing with an oppressive, systematic problem…All sorts of interesting stories can be written about a disabled character, without the disability ever being mentioned.” In Good Kings Bad Kings, readers see that the problem is the corruption of the ILLC, the institution in which they live.

During Nussbaum’s visit to campus, Falvey will proudly host her for a book signing at 1:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Make sure to grab your book and stop by to meet the author in person! While here, take a look at the One Book Villanova display on the first floor of the Library. It includes a retrospective of previous years’ OBV selections and examples of famous novels that Nussbaum feels fall short of the sensitivity needed for depicting disabled populations.  The window was designed by Joanne Quinn, Team Leader for the Communication and Service Promotion, with help of Sarah Wingo, Literature and Theatre liaison librarian, and constructed by Outreach student employees Kelly Forst, Kyle Bowles and Molly Quinn. Special thanks as well to Ann Stango of Access Services and her son, Michael, for lending various mobility aids for the display.

Some other highlights of the author’s visit are to include a student talk, community dinner and a book discussion. Make sure to join us in welcoming Susan Nussbaum to Villanova’s campus!

In celebration of the One Book Villanova selection for 2013-2014, there have also been several other events planned across campus this semester. Make sure to check them out!

 

 

 

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Springing Forward Towards a Semester Full of Exciting Events!

SPRINGCALENDAR3As Leo Tolstoy wrote in his classic novel Anna Karenina, “Spring is the time of plans and projects.” This spring semester, Falvey Memorial Library’s Scholarly Outreach Team is bringing Tolstoy’s words to life by feverishly planning a bolstering schedule of events.

Students, faculty and staff can expect a plethora of workshops, lectures, open houses, meetings and even leisurely events to take place in Falvey almost every day of the school week! Some highlights include a book signing by Susan Nussbaum, author of this year’s One Book Villanova selection, Good Kings, Bad Kings; two Literary Festival talks, featuring authors David Gilbert and Adelle Waldman; our annual Black History talk; our three Scholarship@Villanova talks featuring Villanova faculty members James W. Wilson, PhD, C. Nataraj, PhD, and Lynne Hartnett, PhD; the annual Pope John Paul II Legacy Lecture featuring former Villanova professor D.C. Schindler, PhD; an Open Mic Poetry Reading; a celebration in honor of Earth Day;  and our 2014 Falvey Scholars Awards presentation and reception. Also, some of our regularly scheduled events include VSB peer-tutoring sessions in the Learning Commons every Tuesday and Wednesday night at 6:00 p.m. and the Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) meetings on many Friday afternoons throughout the semester. Make sure to stop by the Library to participate in these events!

In addition to the events that the Library plans, Falvey also serves as a host site for events that are organized by other departments and groups from all across campus. Villanova faculty, staff and representatives from official student groups are able to request a space for their event or meeting by filling out the Events Request Form or by directly contacting Regina Duffy, library events and program coordinator. Event locations include the Speakers’ Corner, Learning Commons Rooms on the second floor (204 and 205) and the first-floor lounge.


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication & Service Promotion team and Library Events and Program coordinator.

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Falvey Memorial Library 2013 Year in Review

2013 was a busy year for Falvey Memorial Library. We acknowledged successes, celebrated achievements, welcomed new faculty, discussed technology, marveled over dime novels, opened new rooms and even played a little music.  The following is a sample of our year in pictures. Enjoy!

One-book-2013

One Book Villanova with Conor Grennan

Diaries-Display

Emilie Davis Diaries

Student-Workers

Celebrating Student Employees

ACRL-Award

ACRL Award: Joe Lucia accepting the award from Stephen Bell

ACRL-Bash

ACRL Gala Event

Scholars-Window

Celebrating our Falvey Scholars

VuPop

VUPop I Organizers and Presenters

Falvey-Picnic

Falvey Summer Picnic

Farewell-2

Joe Lucia’s Farewell Party

Interim

Darren Poley assuming the position of Interim Director

Staff-Retreat

Staff Retreat

New-Faculty

Welcoming new faculty

Superfecta-Winners

Superfecta: Vuie Award Winners Doreva Belfiore and Katherine Lynch

Superfecta-Class

VUClass with Joanne Quinn

Faculty-Forum

Faculty Forum with Darren Poley and Linda Hauck

Removing-Painting

Pietro Da Cortona painting restoration

Painting-Group

Restoration Crew

Reading-Room

Falvey Hall Reading Room reopens

Christmas-Party-2013

Celebrating Christmas at the Villanova Conference Center with Taras Ortynsky and Barbara Haas

Photographs by Alice Bampton, Luisa Cywinski and Laura Hutelmyer.

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Library displays rare Mendeliana at University Mendel Medal Awards

mendelAnyone associated with Villanova University knows the special status that 19th century Augustinian friar and scientist Gregor Mendel holds on our campus. Most of us have either walked the shiny corridors of Mendel Science Center, relaxed or eaten a hoagie on Mendel Field during first-year orientation or admired the seven foot bronze statue of the “father of modern genetics” that stands behind the Library. Most notably, the University awards the Mendel Medal each year to outstanding contemporary scientists in recognition of their scientific accomplishments and religious convictions.

This year, Villanova’s Mendel Medal recognizes Sylvester “Jim” Gates, PhD, for his groundbreaking work in supersymmetry, supergravity and string theory, as well as for his advocacy for science and science education. Dr. Gates visited Villanova on Nov. 15 as part of a two-day event culminating in a dinner and lecture by Gates in the Connelly Center. As in years past, the Library played a special role in welcoming the esteemed guest to the event by providing display support and rare Mendeliana for all attendees to view during the celebration.

According to Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator, the items chosen for display were two volumes that represented two of Mendel’s first attempts to explain plant hybridization, which are the basis of modern genetics.

The first of the items is

Mendel, Gregor Johann.  Versuche über Pflanzen-Hybriden. Vorgelegt in den Sitzungen vom 8. Februar und 8. März 1865.  Verhandlungen des naturforschenden Vereines in Brünn, Band IV, Heft 1 (1865): 3-47.  Brünn: Verlag des Vereines, 1866.

Foight explains the volume’s historical significance. Gregor Mendel’s experiments with hybridization of pea plants were conducted in the garden at the Augustinian Monastery in Brünn, Austria. Mendel reported these experiments in two lectures, which he read before the Natural Sciences Society of Brünn on Feb. 8 and March 8, 1865. The manuscript was published in the Society’s Proceedings in 1866. An English translation, “Experiments in Plant Hybridisation”, was first published in the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, London, 26, 1901, p.1-32.

The second volume,

Mendel, Gregor Johann.  Über einige aus künstlicher Befruchtung gewonnenen Hieracium-Bastarde. Mitgeteilt in der Sitzung vom 9. Juni 1869. Verhandlungen des naturforschenden Vereines in Brünn, Band VIII, Heft 1 (1869): 26-31.  Brünn: Burkart, 1870.,

is Mendel’s paper on the results of his experiments with hawkweed hybrids as read to the members of the Natural Sciences Society in Brünn on June 9, 1869, and published in the Society’s 1869 Proceedings. An English translation, “On Hieracium-Hybrids Obtained by Artificial Fertilisation,” was first published in William Bateson’s Mendel’s Principles of Heredity,” Cambridge, 1902.

Both volumes were presented to Villanova University by the Augustinians of the Province of Saint Thomas of Villanova on January 23, 1999, and have since been displayed regularly at the Mendel Medal event. Lorraine McCorkle, graphic designer for University Communications, prepares the Mendeliana for display each year.


Dig Deeper: If you knew SUSY …

While a primer or even a rudimentary understanding of supersymmetry—aka “SUSY,” the field in which Dr. Gates excels—may be beyond the scope of this article, our Science Librarian Alfred Fry was able to locate a fascinating lineup of videos featuring Dr. Gates, as well as several other links discussing quantum field theory.

Like all our librarians, Fry is available to patrons as a gateway to further resources and help is as close as a click away.

A 10-minute lesson in supersymmetryIn two new videos, Fermilab physicist Don Lincoln explains the what and the why of supersymmetry.

Supersymmetry  From CERN: Supersymmetry predicts a partner particle for each particle in the Standard Model, to help explain why particles have mass.

What is supersymmetry? In less than 100 seconds, Helen Heath explains why SUSY is so beautiful.

Series of lectures on supersymmetry given by Jim Gates at the African Summer Theory Institute in 2004  and other videos featuring the Mendel Medal recipient’s work available on YouTube.


Article by Joanne Quinn, team leader for Communication and Service Promotion.

UnknownLinks prepared by Alfred Fry, Science & Engineering Librarian

Our new Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Mannella Distinguished Speaker Leonard Guercio to Screen Two Films on the Italian-American Experience

MANNELLA13-EVITEOn Wednesday, Dec. 4 at 7:00 p.m. filmmaker Leonard Guercio will deliver this year’s Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series lecture. Guercio has worked as a writer, producer, director and editor in various media—including film, experimental video, television, print, web and music. He currently serves as program and project specialist in the Film and Media Arts department of Temple University’s Center for the Arts.

In addition to the lecture, Guercio will be screening two of his short films. The first is a brief documentary about St. Nicholas of Tolentine Parish in South Philadelphia, and the second is an original dramatic short film entitled “Tiramisù” If time permits, a Q&A session with Guercio will follow the talk.

The Mannella Lecture Series began in 1996 and is made possible by the generosity of Villanova University alumnus Alfred S. Mannella, who named the series after his parents. The events in the annual series focus on scholarship and artistic achievement surrounding Italian American history, culture and the immigrant experience.

GUERCIOGuercio shot “Tiramisù” in South Philadelphia almost ten years ago. Privately funded and independently produced, the film has since maintained a long and illustrious screen life that exceeds its humble beginnings. In 2007, Guercio presented the film at the Pesaro International Film Festival in Pesaro, Italy. “Tiramisù” opened a retrospective of New Italian-American Cinema, which included feature films by prominent actors and filmmakers, such as John Turturro, Steve Buscemi and Nancy Savoca. Since then the film has screened in classrooms all over the world, including Beijing and New York.

Shot in an intimate black and white, “Tiramisu” tells a story of love and responsibility through the lives of an Italian-American family and their friends in the community. Remarking on the film’s title, Guercio explains that the Italian word “Tiramisù” translates to English as “lift me up,” a reference to the restorative power of the classic dessert, which is traditionally made with espresso. Guercio’s film, too, enacts a kind of restoration and reframes the Italian-American experience by challenging viewer expectations that may have been shaped by stereotype.

This year’s Mannella Lecture will be held in the Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library. The event is free and open to the public and available for ACS credit. Light refreshments will be served.

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Last Modified: December 3, 2013