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Octocentenary! 800th Anniversary Celebration of the Magna Carta

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The Magna Carta (originally known as the Charter of Liberties) of 1215, written in iron gall ink on parchment in medieval Latin, using standard abbreviations of the period, authenticated with the Great Seal of King John. The original wax seal was lost over the centuries.[1] This document is held at the British Library and is identified as “British Library Cotton MS Augustus II.106″ One of four known surviving 1215 exemplars of Magna Carta. Source Britishlibrary.png This file has been provided by the British Library from its digital collections.

John, by the grace of God King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine and Count of Anjou, to his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, foresters, sheriffs, stewards, servants and to all his officials and loyal subjects, greeting. 

Octocentenary! Truly, that’s a word you don’t hear everyday!

Though most of its clauses have been repealed, the Magna Carta – celebrating its 800th anniversary today – still stands as a framework and rallying cry against the arbitrary use of political power.

Signed June 15, 1215 by King John in Runnymede, (and not Runnemede, NJ, for those of us who have watched too much local news) this medieval document was composed as a peace treaty between the king and his subjects.

John, according to history (and to this entertaining British Library-produced video narrated by Monty Python’s Terry Jones,) was allowing power to go to his head – having allegedly imprisoned his wife, murdered his nephew, and raising taxes to pay for expensive foreign wars and wasteful expansionism. His barons had had enough and imprisoned John, forcing him to negotiate and follow the rule of law himself. Though most of of the document was rewritten within its first ten years, three of its original clauses still stand in English statute books: one granting liberties to the English Church, one granting certain privileges to the city of London, and third and most important, the right to a trial by jury. To writ:

“No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions,or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land.

See excerpts of the remaining clauses here.

Ideas in the Magna Carta are also reflected in theories of representative government and influential behind the cries of “no taxation without representation” which sparked the American Revolution and ultimately were incorporated into the US Bill of Rights. Worth viewing is the Library of Congress’ recent digital exhibit, Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor. Its overview material states that, “by examining the ways in which Magna Carta has been interpreted in English and American constitutional law and politics, this exhibition demonstrates how principles such as due process of law, the right to a jury trial, freedom from unlawful imprisonment, and the theory of representative government emerged from a tradition that began 800 years ago.”

Library curator Nathan Dorn and Princess Anne view the exhibit. Photo by John Harrington. Retrieved 6/8/15 http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2014/11/pic-of-the-week-princess-anne-opens-magna-carta-exhibition/

Library curator Nathan Dorn and Princess Anne view the exhibit. Photo by John Harrington. Retrieved 6/8/15 http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2014/11/pic-of-the-week-princess-anne-opens-magna-carta-exhibition/

 Can one still view the original Magna Carta?

Yes, If you happen to find yourself in Merrie Ol’ England, you can visit one of three original parchments of the document, or several other locations with amended or later versions. In fact, last week, Princess Anne officially reopened Lincoln Castle after a “multi-million pound refurbishment” that included a new vault for housing that city’s original copy of the document.

Closer to home…Dig Deeper

But if you’d rather save your pounds for a rainy day, you can still get up close and personal with the Magna Carta by viewing the extensive array of Falvey resources gathered by subject librarian for political science and geography, Merrill Stein.

On the famous bronze doors of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, there are eight images; three are dedicated to the Magna Carta (5,6 & 7).

On the famous bronze doors of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, there are eight images; three are dedicated to the Magna Carta (5,6 & 7).

 

Full text of the document and good explanation of the document’s relevance and history from Fordham University.

Full text with annotations; an ed doc.

British Library Digital Collection

National Archives translation

British Library Modern day English translation

EAWC Readings from Medieval Europe

Yale Law School Avalon Project

William Sharp McKechnie, Magna Carta: A Commentary on the Great Charter of King John, with an Historical Introduction, by William Sharp McKechnie (Glasgow: Maclehose, 1914)

Magna carta; the Lincoln cathedral copy

Magna Carta Libertatum (Latin)

University of Oxford Bodleian documents

1215 version

1225 version

Falvey Memorial Library subject search:


Dig Deeper links provided by Merrill Stein, subject librarian for political science and geography. Find Merrill’s contact info here.MerrillStein

 


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New Week: Summer Event listings, Hours & More!

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OK, Monday – Let’s Do This!
If you’re coming to Falvey this summer, here’s all you need to know to get you through the week!

This week’s hours:

Monday-Thursday, June 8 – 11: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Friday, June 12: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, June 13: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.


This week’s events:

Monday, June, 8:

Grant Application Discussion. Room 204. 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. (private event)

Tuesday, June, 9:

University Advancement Department Retreat. First Floor Lounge. 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Joint CFDV and DVMSDG Meeting. Reading Room. 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Wednesday, June, 10: 

Think Tank. Room 204. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.


Did you catch the ‘Caturday photos of Alumni Wildcats at Reunion University? Click on the photo below to go there now!

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Alumni Author Panel Discussion kicked off Reunion Weekend activities at the library with presentations from (clockwise,) playwright Michael Hollinger and authors Sean Harvey and Judy Lee Burke. Photos by Alice Bampton.


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It’s Monday and you’re knackered, but look. how. cute.
Though it’s inconceivable that this could be your first viewing of this photo, what better way to start your week than with a kingly dose of royal cuties, Prince George and Princess Charlotte. Also inconceivable to have first official royal portraits snapped and then tweeted by their mom, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. Bit quicker than waiting for Hans Holbein’s paint to dry! I do think I see a little of Alfred the Great in her, don’t you? Around the eyes, maybe?


Digital Library Content Roundup – First Week – June 2015

Front cover, Chicago Ledger, v. XXXVII, no. 16, Saturday, April 17, 1909

Front cover, Chicago Ledger, v. XXXVII, no. 16, Saturday, April 17, 1909

This week finds a number of resources newly available including more of the Falvey Daily Doodles (for more on Joanne Quinn’s work, see:The Falvey Whiteboard Artist), more Story Paper issues, and more Great War content! And of special note in the World Collection is the additional of an early Photograph Album depicting daily life in the Philippine countryside. There’s something new every week! See all this week’s items by clicking here.


TONY-BOOKS

Draggin’ your wagon this morning? Oh, don’t be so dramatic

Maybe you shouldn’t have stayed up so last night to watch the Tony Awards, AKA the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre!

This year’s Broadway productions may have piqued the interest of bibliophiles more than usual, as several Best Play and Best Musical nominations were based on popular books. Fun Home, subtitled A Family Tragicomic, is a graphic memoir written by Alison Bechdel in 2006 and is a riveting examination of a father-daughter relationship. Fun Home was adapted into a Broadway musical and was nominated for 12 Tony Awards. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Tony-nominated for Best Play, is a 2003 novel by Mark Haddon which tells the story of Christopher, a 15 year old boy with an autistic spectrum condition who decides to investigate death of his neighbor’s dog for which he’s been accused. And nominated for eight Tonys, including Best Play, is Wolf Hall, Parts One and Two, which is based on Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize winning historical novels, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, and center on Thomas Cromwell and political intrigue in Henry VIII’s court and the king’s desperation for a male heir.

P.S., we hear through the grapevine that at least one Falvey librarian has already put in the 6 hours needed to view Parts 1 and 2. Can you guess who?


icloudIn The Cloud:

It was another busy year. Who had time to figure out the iCloud? Now that summer is here, this book, How to Do Everything iCloud, could be the answer to your cloud questions. Since it’s an eBook, you can easily dig into it while your toes dig into the sand. See you in the Cloud!



WB_Yeats_ndBirthdays abound

Birthdays this week include acknowledgments of architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) former First Lady (and First Mother?) Barbara Bush who turns 90 today and Maurice Sendak, who passed away in 2012. English Stuart lyricist and poet Ben Jonson and Game of Thrones actor Peter Dinklage share a birthday on Wednesday, and on Thursday, another Bush family member, former President (and First Father?) – George Herbert Walker Bush (41) turns 91. Wednesday is also the birthday of diarist and Holocaust victim Anne Frank. Sadly, Saturday would have been Nobel-prize winning mathematician John Nash‘s 87th birthday. And, believe it or not, Mary Kate & Ashley will turn 29. You wanted birthdays? You got it, dude! :-)


We’ll end with a quote from another June 13 birthday celebrant, Irish poet William Butler Yeats (1865-1939): an invocation to end writer’s block for all beginning to form their midterm papers. It comes up quick in summer semester!

writerblockHANDS, do what you’re bid:


Bring the balloon of the mind

That bellies and drags in the wind


Into its narrow shed.

Have a great week! Let us know how we can help!



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Alumni Authors to Discuss Writing, Answer Questions

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Harvey, Hollinger and Burke

Alumni authors will discuss their published and/or performed intellectual pieces of work on Friday, June 5, in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner at 10:00 a.m. This panel discussion features Judy Lee Burke ’75 CLAS, Michael Hollinger ’89 MA, and Sean P. Harvey ’00 CLAS. Attendees will gain insights into the writing process from inspiration to final edited draft to publication, as well as have opportunities to ask questions of the three alumni authors.

Judy Leeblackrock Burke ’75 CLAS will discuss her new suspense thriller, Blackrock. Burke’s novel takes readers on an exhilarating multi-country journey as undercover operative Laine Sullivan encounters jolting mysteries in her personal life as she performs her espionage work. Burke, who cites painting among her avocations, even painted the novel’s cover image.

Burke is also an Alumni Medal recipient. The Villanova University Alumni Association presents this award (now called “the St. Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medal”) to alumni who have achieved a level of distinction within their chosen fields or professions and who have provided outstanding service to Villanova.

After receiving her undergraduate degree from Villanova University, Burke earned her master’s degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. She subsequently entered the Curriculum Teaching Psychological Studies and Literacy doctoral program at the University of Michigan. She also attended Lee Strasberg Theater and Film Institute in New York.

Learn more about Burke, her publications and the career she launched at Villanova by visiting her website.

 

under-the-skin-1Michael Hollinger ’89 MA earned his master’s degree in theater from Villanova and is now an associate professor in the University’s Department of Theatre. Professor Hollinger has authored several award-winning plays, many of which have been performed at Philadelphia’s Arden Theater Company, as well as by other professional theater companies across the country.

Professor Hollinger has an uncommon approach to writing plays: “Plays are music to me … characters are instruments, scenes are movements; tempo, rhythm and dynamics are critical; and melody and counterpoint are always set in relief by rests—beats, pauses, the spaces in between.” Baker, John M. (2007). “Intrigue and Delight: The Comedy of Michael Hollinger. In Comédie du Jour: A Festival of Plays by Michael Hollinger. Theatrical program published by Iowa Summer Rep, University of Iowa.

Learn more about Michael Hollinger, the plays he has authored, and his career in theater by visiting his website.

 

nativeSean P. Harvey ’00 CLAS graduated Summa Cum Laude with a B.A. in History from Villanova University in 2000; he earned his PhD in History from the College of William and Mary in 2009.

He has won awards for his teaching and his research, including yearlong fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His articles and reviews have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly, Reviews in American History, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Humanities and Social Sciences Online (H-Net), and Journal of the Early Republic, where he is Co-Editor of Book Reviews.   Currently an assistant professor in the Department of History at Seton Hall University, he lives in New York City with his wife, Sarah Grunder, and his newborn son, James.

Harvard University Press published his first book, Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation, in 2015.


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Alumni Authors’ Panel: Highlighting Literary Achievement

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Villanova University is pleased to welcome back alumni this weekend for the 2015 reunion! The reunion, which is celebrated on campus from Thursday, June 4th, through Sunday, June 7th, will feature a wide array of lively events, activities and workshops in honor of the return of our former wildcats to campus. Falvey Memorial Library will be the site of many of these events, including a panel discussion featuring three alumni authors who will discuss their personal experiences in the creation of one of their published and/or performed intellectual pieces of work. The panel discussion, which is free and open to the public, will take place Friday, June 5, at 10:00 a.m. in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner.

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Harvey, Hollinger and Burke

Alumni panelists will include Sean P. Harvey ’00 CLAS on his book The Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation; Judy Lee Burke ’75 CLAS on her book Blackrock; and playwright Michael Hollinger ’89 CLAS on Under the Skin. Each panelist will have the opportunity to talk about their individual creative process and the critical reception of their work. The panel will be moderated by Darren G. Poley, Scholarly Outreach team leader and theology librarian. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions at the event as well.

Sean P. Harvey will talk about his book, The Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation, which discusses the complex history of the communication (or miscommunication) between white Europeans and Native American people in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Judy Lee Burke will discuss the creation of her book, Blackrock, which is a suspense thriller that follows a female protagonist as she re-embarks on her former career as an architectural designer and gets much more than she bargained for. Playwright Michael Hollinger will discuss Under the Skin, which takes us into the life of a dying man and details the difficult relationship that he with his daughter. Both Harvey and Burke’s books have been published; however, a printed version of Hollinger’s play is still in the process of being created. The play premiered at the Arden Theatre in Philadelphia in January, 2015. Join us as we delve deeper into learning about the writing and publishing process with our authors!

In addition to the panel, Falvey has also mounted a window display on the first floor to further highlight the accomplishments of our alumni authors. In the display, all three of the panelists have been featured along with approximately thirty other alumni authors whom Falvey would like to recognize for their literary achievements. It is our hope to include these and all of Villanova’s alumni authors into our Community Bibliography, which is an open citation repository that houses a list of the published works of the members of the Villanova University community. Any individual associated with Villanova who would like to be featured in our Community Bibliography project should contact communitybibliography@villanova.edu for more details.


Article by Regina Duffy, writer for the Communication & Service Promotion team and Library Events and Program manager. News From Falvey Winter 2008 - Gina McFadden

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‘Caturday: Welcoming Alumni Wildcats!

Looking back at the year 1951, the Alumni Reunion was filled with seriousness, decorum, and…pretzels? Do you know these gentlemen? Are they officers of the Villanova Alumni Association or the Editors of the Villanova Alumnus? Is that man peeking through from the back an early example of photobombing? They’re having fun, that’s for sure!

We look forward to seeing our Alumni Wildcats next week, from June 4 – 7 for Alumni Reunion Weekend!

Villanova Alumnus 1951 Villanova Alumnus Officers 1951
Villanova Alumnus editorial staff


Images courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.

‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services team.


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Memorial Day – Then and Now

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A brief history of the Memorial Day holiday

Memorial Day or, more accurately, Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial beginning of summer. Memorial Day itself is now celebrated on the last Monday of May. However, this was not always true, so below is a bit of the history of this holiday.

A number of locations claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day, Boalsburg, Pa., among them. Often called Decoration Day, it was established as a day to decorate with flowers the graves of those who lost their lives in the Civil War. Approximately 620,000 men lost their lives in the war so most families, North and South, had some personal relationship with the dead or injured.

alice-tombstoneOn May 5, 1868, Major General John Alexander Logan (1826-1886)  , an organization of Union veterans, declared that May 30 should be the day on which the graves of the war dead should be decorated with flowers. That year a large ceremony, presided over by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and various Washington, D.C., officials, was held at Arlington National Cemetery. Congressman James Garfield of Ohio was one of the speakers. At the conclusion of the speeches, members of the GAR and children from a nearby orphanage for children of Union veterans placed flowers on the graves of more than 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers while singing hymns and reciting prayers.

The back story for this: an anonymous writer had sent a letter to the GAR adjutant general, a letter in which the author told the adjutant general that in his native Germany it was a custom to place flowers on graves in the spring. alice-flagThe adjutant general, Norton P. Chipman, sent this information to Logan. Logan then expanded upon the idea, and sent an order to all GAR posts to observe May 30 as a day to honor the Civil War dead. This date, May 30, became the first nationally observed commemoration held in more than 200 locations, mostly in the North.

There are other claimants for the establishment of Memorial Day. In Richmond, Virginia, women formed the Hollywood Memorial Association of the Ladies of Richmond and they helped to establish the Oakwood Memorial Association; the purpose of these two groups was to decorate the graves, both those of Union and Confederate soldiers, in the Hollywood and Oakwood Cemeteries. The same year, 1865, Confederate veterans organized, but the decoration of graves remained women’s work.

From the 1870s on some observed the holiday as commemoration and others chose to enjoy themselves. By the 1890s May 30 had become more a popular holiday, less a memorial to the Civil War dead who had been forgotten by many. Congress declared Memorial Day a federal holiday in 1889.

Recent history

0142184e39c4a65c074e0437142edc22President Lyndon Johnson and Congress declared in 1966 that Waterloo, N.Y., was the birthplace of Memorial Day, based upon a ceremony held there on May 5, 1866, honoring area veterans of the Civil War. Other claimants are Boalsburg, Pa.; Macon and Columbus, Ga.; Carbondale, Ill; Columbus, Miss.; and others.In 1968 Congress changed the date of Memorial Day from May 30 to the last Monday of May. This change was strongly encouraged by the travel and resort industries; a three day weekend was an invitation to travel for many.

Since the late 1960s Memorial Day has become a major commercial activity. Originally many businesses closed, but this is no longer true. Now there are numerous Memorial Day sales – my email is filled with advertisements for these as are newspapers.

Congress passed a law, signed by the president, in December 2000, to honor the fallen of all wars, “The National Moment of Remembrance Act.” There are also Confederate Memorial Days still observed in many Southern States: Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. Each of these states set its own date to honor their Confederate dead.

POPPIES

Picnics and memories

On a personal level, I grew up hearing Memorial Day referred to as Decoration Day, perhaps a regional or generational custom. I lived in western Maryland, south of the Mason Dixon Line, but an area more Northern than Southern in its history. I remember going with my family – grandparents, parents and younger sister – to visit a small, very rural hilltop cemetery where the adults spent the day clearing weeds and other debris from the graves and, when lunch time came, we had a picnic right there (Mom’s homemade meatloaf, kept warm by wrapping it in multiple layers of newspaper, and potato salad). Flowers, cut from my grandmother’s flowerbed, were placed in front of the tombstones. I knew an older widow who cut peonies from her garden to take to the cemetery to place on her husband’s grave. None of the graves in that old family cemetery belonged to Civil War soldiers nor was the widow’s husband a Civil War veteran. Even today I know family members who visit cemeteries to leave flowers on Memorial Day. Is this a local custom?

Many communities do have Memorial Day events with speeches honoring those who fell serving the United States, parades, picnics and other activities. How will you spend your Memorial Day?

Dig Deeper: Falvey resources

The National Memorial Day: A Record of Ceremonies Over the Graves of the Union Soldiers, May 29 and 30, 1869. 1870. E. F. M. Faehtz.
Memorial Lessons: A Sermon Preached at King’s Chapel, Boston, on Sunday, May 29, 1870, with a List of the Sons of the Church Who Entered the Service of the Country. 1870. Henry Wilder Foote.
Memorial Day, May 30, 1870, Oration by Gen. I. F. Shepard (Adjutant General of Missouri) at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. 1870. I. F. Shepard.
 A History of Memorial Day: Unity, Discord and the Pursuit of Happiness. 2002. Richard P. Harmond.
Honoring the Civil War Dead: Commemoration and the Problem of Reconciliation. 2005. John R. Neff.
Celebrating America’s Freedoms. (Online) 2009. United States Dept of Veterans Affairs.


Cemetery photos and story by Alice Bampton. Waterloo, NY photo credit: Joseph Sohm/Visions of America/Corbis.


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A Misconception about “Cinco de Mayo”

Happy Cinco de Mayo! In case you missed it the first time around, we are reposting a popular blog post from 2013 written by Sue Ottignon, Research Support Librarian for Languages & Literatures that answers the question, once and for all, what Cinco de Mayo commemorates. Always ask a librarian! 

Battle of Puebla, 5 May 1862

Battle of Puebla, 5 May 1862

Wait!!  Before you make the mad dash to enjoy all those delicious salsa combos you made to kick off your annual “Cinco de Mayo” celebration, I have some little-known facts to share with you about this day.

If you thought Cinco de Mayo was Mexico’s Independence Day, you would be mistaken! Mexico’s Independence Day is September 16th. Yup, you heard me. It was on that September day, in 1810, Mexicans declared their independence from Spain, which had controlled the territory referred to as “New Spain,” since 1521 when Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztec Empire. If you plan to add Independence Day, aka “Grito de Dolores,” to your celebration list, be sure to check out the article in the Encyclopaedia Britannica[1]on Mexico’s struggles!

So what’s so great about the 5th of May? Although it is not an official holiday in Mexico, it does commemorate the Mexicans’ victory over the French on May 5, 1862, in the town of Puebla; thus, the holiday is called “El Día de la Batalla de Puebla,” and there are celebrations. The Mexican-American community, from the western states, began the observance shortly after the event. Ultimately, the day’s events evolved within the US as recognition of the Mexican culture and heritage.  Moreover, the U.S. Congress recently issued  resolutions[2] recognizing the historical significance of Cinco de Mayo. The Congressional Record, for the House of Representatives, recorded on June 7, 2005, a concurrent, non-binding resolution recognizing the historical significance of the day,[3]

Selected resources about “Cinco de Mayo”:

Arellano, Gustavo.  Interview by Michel Martin. Arts & Life.  Natl. Public Radio, 5 May 2011. NPR.org. Web. 29 Apr. 2013.

“Cinco de Mayo.” Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online Academic Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2013. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

Ganster, Paul. “Cinco de Mayo.” Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture.

Ed. Jay Kinsbruner and Erick D. Langer. 2nd ed. Vol. 2. Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2008. 413. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

Hamnett, Brian. “Puebla, Battle and Siege of.” Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture. Ed. Jay Kinsbruner and Erick D. Langer. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2008. 401-402. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

“Monthly Record of Current Events: Mexico.” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. 25.146 (1862): 261. Making of America, 1815-1901. Web. 29 April 2013.

“News from San Francisco.” New York Times (1857-1922): 1. Jun 01 1862. ProQuest. Web. 27 Apr. 2013.

Pérez, Daniel Enrique. “Cinco de Mayo.” Confluencia: Revista Hispánica de Cultura y Literatura 27.1 (2011): 210+. Academic OneFile. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

Recognizing Historical Significance Of The Mexican Holiday Of  Cinco De Mayo of2007.  H.R. Con. Res. 44. 7 June 2005. Web.


Sue Ottignon is the subject librarian for romance languages and literatures. RS4540_FML164_SusanOttignon_018_EDIT---ed


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Mood Board: Falvey Scholar Joseph Schaadt

This week, we are featuring the 2015 Falvey Scholars and giving you the chance to get to know these bright young adults up close and personal. Not only are they very smart – they’re very interesting! Just last week, Falvey Memorial Library, the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships, and the Honors Program announced the 2015 Falvey Scholars Award winners: Katie Kline, Elizabeth Long, Jessica Swoboda, Nicholas Ader, Joseph Schaadt and John Szot. These six remarkable senior students have been selected from a pool of candidates from various disciplines for their outstanding undergraduate student research projects at Villanova University. Click here for a listing of their projects as presented at the 2015 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony.
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Featuring Joseph Schaadt
rsz_joseph_rh_schaadt

“I’m a mechanical engineering major from the Bay Area in California and I work in Dr. Aaron Wemhoff’s Multiscale System Analysis Laboratory (MSAL) here at Villanova as part of the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) for Energy Smart Electronic Systems (ES2). When I’m not conducting research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of data centers, I can be spotted playing on the Villanova men’s water polo team or using my free time to play recreational basketball with my friends. While at Villanova, I have enjoyed taking advantage of the numerous opportunities to do service in the community, being involved with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers as the Vice President of our student chapter, and being a cohost on The Zone, a sports talk program on WXVU 89.1 Villanova Radio.”

Project Title: “Load Capacity and Thermal Efficiency Optimization of a Research Data Center Using Computational Modeling”


I am inspired by my father Russell. His diligence, hard work, confidence, and pursuit of excellence are something I try to copy daily.

If I could be any person for a day, I’d be Brandon Stanton, the creator of Humans of New York. He has a great passion for his job and is able to reach and inspire millions of people through his art.

My favorite Villanova memory is being at the Syracuse basketball game my sophomore year when we upset them in overtime at the Wells Fargo Center. I was with some of my best friends Ricky, George, Adam, Brandon, and Chris that day and had a great opportunity to go to a car show, see Reading Terminal market, and explore the city of Philadelphia after. Juice the Cuse!
Reading_Terminal_Market_Sign

While working on my research project, I was challenged by having to explore a topic so foreign to anything I had ever known. It forced me to step outside of my comfort zone, learn quickly, and seek out experts in my field of research who could offer advice when I needed help.

Today I’m feeling the color Yellow. I can’t wait for summer!

I’m listening to the Grateful Dead. Their music is relaxing and has a special peace about it and always reminds me of my Dad and my home.

One Summer Adventure I’m daydreaming about is adventuring around my birthplace and home of San Francisco with my Dad. I can’t wait to get back to the city by the bay.

Happiness is the feeling of what it’s like to have a wonderful family, close friends, and good health.

Everyone should know that everything you want in life is just outside your comfort zone or else you would already have it.

I am amazed by the inherent beauty and complexity of life on Earth. It’s easy to forget just how many great things there are to see in this world and how little time we have to do it!

Thanks, Joseph!


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Foto Friday: “Bring out … The Comfy Chair!!!!”

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If ever a photo needed a caption, this is it!

Rev Peter Donohue VU PresidentEveryone’s favorite good sport, The Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, ’75 LAS presided at the Annual Staff Recognition Dinner this week, and applauded Falvey’s own Bill Greene, Access Services specialist with a rather special tongue-in-cheek tribute! Staff members with 40 years of service were each presented with a commemorative captain’s chair, emblazoned with the University seal. Bill immediately gave his a whirl, and settled in comfortably. So comfortably, in fact, that Father Donohue immediately and theatrically went into ottoman-mode and offered Bill a place to rest his weary feet as well! (As photographer, I apologize for the somewhat blurry image, as I was giggling so hard, the camera couldn’t focus!)


Blurry photo by Joanne Quinn, Communication and Service Promotion team leader


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Mood Board: Falvey Scholar Elizabeth Long

This week, we are featuring the 2015 Falvey Scholars and giving you the chance to get to know these bright young adults up close and personal. Not only are they very smart – they’re very interesting! Just last week, Falvey Memorial Library, the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships, and the Honors Program announced the 2015 Falvey Scholars Award winners: Katie Kline, Elizabeth Long, Jessica Swoboda, Nicholas Ader, Joseph Schaadt and John Szot. These six remarkable senior students have been selected from a pool of candidates from various disciplines for their outstanding undergraduate student research projects at Villanova University. Click here for a listing of their projects as presented at the 2015 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony.
falvey-scholar-2015-small2

 

Featuring Elizabeth Long
Elizabeth Long

“I am a senior nursing major from Kensington, CT. I have been fortunate to participate in multiple activities on campus including the Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania (SNAP). It has been a wonderful experience participating in undergraduate research as a Davis Grant recipient and also as serving as the Vice President of the National Student Nurses Association this past year. I have Villanova to thank for all of these enriching opportunities!”

Project Title: “Nurses’ Perceptions of Human Trafficking in an Urban Emergency Department: A Qualitative Study”


I am inspired by the strength of my patients.

If I could be any person for a day, I’d be Joe Biden.

My favorite Villanova memory is going on a nursing service experience to the Dominican Republic.

While working on my research project, I was challenged by recruiting subjects.

Today I’m feeling the color purple.

I’m listening to The Wolf, Mumford and Sons

Boston

Boston, MA

One Summer Adventure I’m daydreaming about is exploring New England.

Happiness is laughing with my friends.

Everyone should know I love barbecue.

I am amazed by my fellow Villanovans.

Thanks, Elizabeth!


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Last Modified: May 1, 2015