FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

Dig Deeper: Jeffrey Johnson, PhD on “The Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe”

Jeffrey_JohnsonIn honor of the 100th anniversary of World War I, Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, professor of history, will be giving a lecture titled “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.” The talk will take place Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4:00 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

During the lecture, Dr. Johnson will discuss the background to the European diplomatic crisis of July 1914 that followed the assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and the various factors that led to war rather than a peaceful resolution of the crisis. He will then outline the initial phase of the fighting, as shaped by the Schlieffen-Moltke Plan that called for an all-out German attack on France through neutral Belgium while maintaining a defensive stance in the East. This plan and its subsequent failure transformed what might have been another localized Balkan war (like two previous ones in 1912 and 1913) into a long global war costing millions of lives and billions in property and resources. Finally, Dr. Johnson will briefly reflect on the broader historical significance of the First World War as the self-destruction of the ancient ideal of European empire, ultimately to be replaced by the modern ideal of international democracy.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public.

Below, Falvey’s team leader for academic integration, Jutta Seibert, has compiled a collection of resources should you wish to further study the topic of Dr. Johnson’s lecture.


Dig Deeper

Books by Dr. Jeffrey Johnson

Johnson, Jeffrey A. The Kaiser’s Chemists: Science and Modernization in Imperial Germany (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990).

Johnson, Jeffrey A. and Roy M. MacLeod, eds., Frontline and Factory: Comparative Perspectives On the Chemical Industry At War, 1914-1924 (Dordrecht: Springer, 2006).

New Books About World War I Available at Falvey

Selected Surveys of World War I History:
John Horne, A Companion to World War I (Chichester, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).

J.M. Winter, The Cambridge History of the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Selected Online Encyclopedias:
Tom Pendergast, Sara Pendergast and Christine Slovey, eds. World War I Reference Library (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002)

John M. Merriman, J. M. Winter, Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction (Detroit, Mich.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006).

Alexander DeConde, Richard D. Burns and Fredrik Logevall. Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy. 2nd ed. (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002).

Robert D. Johnston, ed., Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History. Vol. 4: From the Gilded Age through the Age of Reform, 1878 to 1920 (Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010).


JuttaSeibertDig Deeper links selected by Jutta Seibert, team leader for academic integration.

Like

Dig Deeper: Outstanding Faculty Research Award Recipient: Sally Scholz, PhD

Sally ScholzA Scholarship@Villanova/Outstanding Faculty Research Award lecture featuring Sally J. Scholz, PhD, professor of philosophy, will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 24 at 2:30 p.m., in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Scholz will be talking about the extensive research that led her to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award in 2014.

Dr. Scholz’s talk, titled “Seeking Solidarity,” will articulate her thoughts not only on how invocations of solidarity conventionally call forth community’s spirit, inclusiveness and cooperation, but also on how nothing, unfortunately, keeps solidarities from sometimes being dangerous or harmful. Dr. Scholz’s presentation will explore these pernicious types of solidarities, revealing the moral failings of solidaristic relations.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office for Research and Graduate Programs, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dr. Scholz’s research, dig into the resources provided by Nikolaus Fogle, subject librarian for Philosophy.


Dig Deeper

Books and Scholarship by Sally Scholz, PhD


Feminism GuideScholz, Sally J. Feminism: A Beginner’s Guide. Oxford ; New York: Oneworld, 2010.
Dr. Scholz’s most recent book, Feminism: A Beginnger’s Guide, is her authoritative introduction to feminism.

 

 

Political SolidarityScholz, Sally J. Political Solidarity. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008.

Political Solidarity is a major contribution to social and political philosophy, in which she advances her framework for understanding political solidarity.

 

 

Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance.” Journal of Social Philosophy 38, no. 1 (March 1, 2007): 38–52. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9833.2007.00365.x.
“Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance” is one of her most-cited articles, in which she develops her conception of political solidarity as a variety of solidarity which “unites individuals based on their shared commitment to a political cause,” but which “is incompatible with physically violent forms of activism and resistance.”

Scholz, Sally J. “Transnational Feminist Solidarity and Lessons from the 2011 Protests in Tahrir Square.” Global Discourse 4, no. 2–3 (May 9, 2014): 205–19. doi:10.1080/23269995.2014.914369.
In this very recent article, Dr. Scholz develops a conception of transnational feminist solidarity.

Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and the More-Than-Human World.” Ethics & the Environment18, no. 2 (2013): 81–99.
“Political Solidarity and the More-Than-Human World” is one of her more recent contributions, which brings her theory of political solidarity into dialogue with environmental philosophy.

 

Hypatia

 

Dr. Scholz is the editor of what is certainly the premier feminist philosophy journal, Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy.

 

Watch Dr. Scholz’s acceptance speech for the Outstanding Faculty Research Award, given at the Faculty Scholars Dinner.

 


Nik FogleDig Deeper links selected by Nikolaus Fogle, Subject Librarian for Philosophy.

 

 

Like

Dig Deeper: Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, researches a major US women’s prison

Breaking Women

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library, Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, associate professor, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, will deliver a Scholarship@Villanova lecture about her recently published book, Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment. Dr. McCorkel will discuss how her four years of research in a major U.S. women’s prison helped her to uncover the reasons tougher drug policies have so greatly affected those incarcerated there, and how the very nature of punishment in women’s detention centers has been deeply altered as a result. Lauded as “prison ethnography at its best” (Lorna Rhodes, author of Total Confinement: Madness and Reason in the Maximum Security Prison), her book is published by New York University Press and was a finalist for the 2013 C. Wright Mills Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

This event—co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Sociology & Criminology, the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, and the Center for Peace and Justice Education—is free and open to the public.


Dig Deeper:

jill_mccorkelvillanova_edu

Resources by and about Dr. Jill McCorkel

Attending the lecture? Now read Dr. McCorkel’s new book: Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment.

Find out more about the professor’s work and research interests by visiting her Villanova webpage

Keep up to date with the professor by following her on Twitter!

Check out Dr. McCorkel’s collaborative photo essay with prisoners from SCI Graterford @ Strongbox Magazine – Vol. 1 2009.

Becker, S. & McCorkel, J. (2011). The gender of criminal opportunity: The impact of male co-offenders on women’s crime.
Building on ethnographic research and feminist labor market analyses, this study explores how gender affects access to criminal opportunities. Using National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, the authors examine the effect a male co-offender has on women’s offending. They find that the presence of a male co-offender broadens women’s criminal involvement in distinctive ways.

McCorkel, J. (2003). Embodied surveillance and the gendering of punishment.
This ethnography explores the enactment of “get tough” politics in a state prison for women and considers whether the implementation of seemingly gender-neutral programs and policies implies that women’s prisons are no longer operating as “gendered organizations.”

McCorkel, J. (2004). Criminally dependent? Gender, punishment, and the rhetoric of welfare reform.
This study relies on ethnographic data collected from a state prison for women to examine whether and to what extent welfare and criminal justice policies were coordinated during the drug and poverty wars of the past decade. Findings reveal that drug war policies did indeed transform punishment practices on the feminine side of the penal system, but such transformations were ultimately premised on changes to institutional interpretive structures that altered the ways state actors conceptualized gender, crime and women’s needs.

More Resources on Women and Imprisonment

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU): Women in Prison
The ACLU “fights to ensure that the criminal justice system treats women and girls fairly, that it protects the health and safety of women in its custody, and that it facilitates their successful reentry into their communities.” Check out this web resource for general information, statistics, videos and its personal testimony series called “Words from Prison.”

Women’s Prisons in the United States
A list of United States federal and state prisons which either currently or once did contain female prisoners.

Female offenders: critical perspectives and effective interventions
This classic text explores a variety of topics on female offenders from the nature of female offending, its patterns and explanations, power-belief theory and relational theory to institutional assessment, classification and programs.

Interrupted life: experiences of incarcerated women in the United States
This is a “gripping collection of writings by and about imprisoned women in the United States, a country that jails a larger percentage of its population than any other nation in the world. This eye-opening work brings together scores of voices from both inside and outside the prison system including incarcerated and previously incarcerated women, their advocates and allies, abolitionists, academics and other analysts” (see the full description at the University of California Press).

Women’s mental health issues across the criminal justice system
An accessible guide to women’s mental health in criminal justice systems, this text touches on meeting the needs of juvenile and adult offenders, measuring traumatic events in the lives of incarcerated girls, crisis intervention teams training, policy implications, and the ethics of justice and mental health systems.

A list of all books with the subject “Female offenders Rehabilitation United States.”

A list of all books with the subject “Women prisoners Services for United States.”

Explore more about corrections in the United States with this comprehensive list of print and online titles.


Alex Williams

Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments. For questions or more information, feel free to contact him by email (alexander.williams@villanova.edu) or phone (ext.8845).

Like

Blog round-up: ten quick hits from across campus

TEN QUICK HITS2

The first article in this series concentrated on content update from Falvey’s reference blogs. From here on out, this blog content roundup will feature ten quick hits from across campus, including highlights from blogs of the library.

1. Find out if that “perfect idea” of yours has some merit.

2. This student played tic-tac-toe against a Supreme Court Justice over the summer break.

3. Wonder if there were any werewolf sightings?

4. Alert to all political science, French major, and study abroad aficionados.

5. The one interview question (directive?) you should be prepared to answer.

6. Pretty cool to be a part of this.

7. At least one new student is enjoying their time here.

8 The Department of Public Administration has two new professors, one who loves to cook beef wellington and the other can weld!

9. The English Department hosted a happy hour at the Library!

10. Speaking of happy hours, Villanova Theatre shows us how to make cocktails as classy as the cast from Fallen Angels.

 


Blog roundup by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

Like

Embracing a Fresh Beginning: Upcoming Events in Falvey this Fall

FALLEVENT-HEAD

The sun is setting on the summer season, and you know what that means—a new semester is upon us! With hesitation we traded in our strappy sandals and beach tags in exchange for new text books and 3-ring binders. And, while we could start to wallow in self-pity, we should remind ourselves that the new semester brings with it a chance for a fresh start and a new opportunity to be productive. For, as T.S. Eliot once said, “Every moment is a fresh beginning.” At Falvey Memorial Library, we are preparing to embrace the challenges that the fall semester will present us with a newfound energy and focus.

In fact, the Scholarly Outreach team has been working behind the scenes this summer to strategically plan a semester full of interesting, engaging events to keep Villanova students, staff, faculty and community members busy. There is a lot to look forward to! Falvey will offer a great range of events this semester, all of which will appeal to varied interests.

James Hedtke, PhD

James Hedtke, PhD

As always, we will continue to offer informative, insightful events. For instance, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will present an Alumni Author series talk on Sept. 29  titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk will be based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944 and will focus on the crash of an American military aircraft into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944.

Ellen Cassedy

Ellen Cassedy

Falvey is also fortunate to host Ellen Cassedy—speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator—at our annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture on Oct. 22. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with its “dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Joseph L. Tropea, PhD

Joseph L. Tropea, PhD

Falvey will also be welcoming Joseph L. Tropea, PhD, retired Professor and former chair, Department of Sociology, George Washington University on Nov. 5 for our annual event that focuses on scholarship about Italian-American history, culture and the immigrant experience: The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture. Dr. Tropea will discuss his recent work, which draws focus to social history, particularly on the 1907 Monongah, West Virginia mine disaster, which killed 361 persons, including 170 Italian migrants.

Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips

Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips

On the lighter side, Falvey is planning a graphic-novels event featuring Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of Dirty Diamonds (an all-female comic anthology) on Thursday, Oct. 30. Claire and Kelly will discuss their experiences in editing, in being involved in a Kickstarter project and in working with all female contributors.

Additionally, this fall we will continue to co-sponsor an wide array of regularly scheduled events like the VSB peer-tutor office hours and Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts club for those looking to get a bit of extra study help or those simply looking for a break from all of the studying!

And, as always, we will continue to serve as the host site for faculty, staff, and official student organizations to plan their campus events and meetings and need space. We are happy to be able to offer several event/meeting locations for all types of events, such as open houses, panel discussions, lectures, round table meetings, and so on. Requests should be submitted at least 10 days in advance via Falvey’s “Request a Venue” form.

Make sure to mark your calendars now and keep checking Falvey’s Events and Displays page for details about upcoming events!

Like

VITAL Resources for New & Continuing Faculty!

The Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning (VITAL) sponsored a new-faculty orientation program on August 18 and 19 in several locations across campus. As part of this program, new faculty were welcomed to Falvey Memorial Library on Tuesday, August 19, for a breakfast meet and greet. Interim Director Robert DeVos, PhD, welcomed librarians, and Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration as well as the coordinator of the liaison team to the departments of history, sociology and criminal justice, eagerly introduced librarians and staff to new faculty. New faculty members also had the opportunity to gather according to disciplines for informal discussions with liaison librarians in their subject areas. The event provided new faculty a strong sense of what services the Library has to offer the Villanova Community!

Gabriele BauerFollowing the event, I (Gina Duffy) interviewed Gabriele Bauer, PhD, director of the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning (VITAL), to discover more about the new faculty orientation program as well as VITAL’s activities and general campus mission.

RD: How many new faculty members did you welcome to Villanova this year during the new-faculty orientation program?

GB: VITAL, in co-sponsorship with the Office of Academic Affairs, welcomed 33 faculty colleagues at the new faculty program held August 18 and 19. While many colleagues are new to Villanova, some are (also) new to their full-time instructional roles. With over 40 presenters from across Villanova on hand, faculty were offered context for their central role in helping to support, inform, and advance Villanova’s mission, vision, and future direction. Among the program topics addressed were professional development support, students’ expectations, academic support services, instructional policies and resources, and teaching in the inspiration of St. Augustine. Attendees represented 22 departments across colleges: Accountancy, Augustine and Culture Seminar Program, Biology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computing Sciences, Economics, Ethics, Finance, Geography and the Environment, History, Human Resource Development, Marketing and Business Law, Mathematics and Statistics, Naval Science, Nursing, Political Science, Psychology, Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology, Theatre, and Theology and Religious Studies.

RD: What are the highlights of the new faculty program?

GB: Given the comprehensive program, it’s challenging to identify just a few highlights. Based on feedback, the sessions that provide faculty with personalized insights into their teaching and scholarly roles at Villanova seem to be most appreciated. Among these sessions were the sessions addressing our students, academic support services, and the roundtable discussions with Falvey Memorial Library’s departmental liaisons. A faculty panel discussion on the subject, “What I wished I had known in my first year at Villanova” elicited vital advice for our colleagues.  Key examples included creating a folder of all teaching records–such as unsolicited student emails, peer observations, CATS reports, syllabi, assignments, and advising activities—as a repository of material for the annual and three-year review; the importance of being patient when adjusting to a new professional environment, new courses, and new colleagues; setting realistic goals; accepting that things will not always go as planned; and viewing mistakes as opportunities for learning and growth.

new faculty orientation 3

New faculty orientation

RD: Do you have any insider tips or advice for “newbies” on campus?

GB: Being a “newbie” myself last year, I would suggest taking the time to listen, engage in conversation with colleagues, staff, and students in your department. Don’t be reluctant to ask questions or ask for clarification of procedures and conventions that might differ from those at your former institution (that may be more difficult to do for some of us introverts).

Yes, the Villanova website provides extensive, detailed information, yet how long will it take us to find the one kernel that we are looking for? I have discovered that reaching out to colleagues by phone not only expedites the process but helps me meet new colleagues, learn about their work and deepen my understanding and appreciation for the Villanova culture and context. Plus I have found it most enjoyable to talk with colleagues-such conversations add a human touch to our mainly digital work world.

Try and venture out of your department, participate in campus events that interest you or resonate with your values and passion. Take advantage of the many cultural offerings, such as superb theater performances that are offered free to faculty and staff on Tuesdays, or participate in an exercise class.

RD: Can you describe VITAL’s main role on campus?

GB: VITAL provides and coordinates services and resources for faculty members from all disciplines who are interested in helping their students become more effective learners. We collaborate with departments and University offices to identify and support student learning needs and help advance instructional goals. We offer opportunities to meet and learn from nationally known experts and serve as a clearinghouse for higher education materials.

RD: What services that VITAL offers do you believe are the most valuable to Villanova faculty (both new and continuing)?

GB: We provide a range of services that are designed to support faculty at various stages in their careers. Among the services we offer are confidential instructional consultations with individuals, departments or other groups; confidential classroom observations with constructive feedback; tailored sessions to meet departmental needs; mini-grants to support innovative teaching, learning, e-Learning and assessment of student learning; topical workshop sessions and campus-wide events that provide opportunities to engage with colleagues across the University.

RD: Anything else you would like to mention to new and continuing faculty?

GB: We are delighted to bring to faculty members’ attention three teaching resources: Teaching Professor, monthly online newsletter that offers evidence-based, nuts-and-bolts teaching practices for all disciplines; IF-AT, a multiple-choice tool for group feedback, testing of students’ comprehension and ability to apply, and differentiate concepts; and Faculty Online Café to keep your teaching fresh, discuss current topics, exchange teaching experiences and practices with colleagues. To access the Faculty Café, go to elearning.villanova.edu, select the university seal to sign in, and click “Faculty Online Café.”

We wish all of our faculty colleagues—both new and continuing—a fulfilling and productive new academic year and look forward to supporting them. You will always find a free cup of coffee or tea at the VITAL office, 106 Vasey Hall.

Like

What’s New with Pietro da Cortona’s “The Triumph of David”?

Intriguing developments about “The Triumph of David” have occurred since our previous blog post about this Cortona painting. The painting has been completely cleaned and, over the Memorial Day weekend, varnished. And, most impressive, Anthony Lagalante, PhD, associate professor, Dept. of Chemistry, received a grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for technical analysis of the artwork. Dr. Lagalante received the notification and a check for $24,000 at the end of May.

Although varnishing is normally the final step in the creation of an oil painting, the conservator, Kristin de Ghetaldi, explains, “We always put a thin ‘isolation’ coat of varnish on the surface of paintings after we have removed as much of the unoriginal restoration as we are able. This helps to bring back some of the saturation but also serves as a barrier layer between the original surface and any materials that we then add (fills, inpainting, etc.).”

Photo (32)

Areas with gouache viewable on painting’s bottom right.

Currently the interns, volunteers and de Ghetaldi are filling areas of paint loss and toning the fills with red gouache (gouache is opaque watercolor paint) to simulate the original ground of “The Triumph of David.” To observe the conservators in action, visit the Reading Room in Falvey Hall (aka Old Falvey) or watch the live feed. The conservators are happy to answer questions about their work.

For more information about the conservation project – “About the Restoration;” the Kress award; biographies of the conservation team; the chemistry of the painting; a biography of the donor, Princess Eugenia Ruspoli (1861-1951, born Jennie Berry in Alabama); and more – go to projects.library.villanova.edu/paintingrestoration/ or from Falvey’s homepage, click “Projects” and scroll to “Conserving a Giant …”

For more information about the artist, Pietro da Cortona, see “Dig Deeper: About the artist Pietro da Cortona.”


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 

Like

UPDATE: Villanova’s Automatic Virtual Environment

Last fall this blog post informed you of a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment, aka “CAVE,” coming to the Library. This summer construction accelerated, and the Villanova CAVE will open soon.

“It sounds similar to watching an IMAX film in 3D,” a colleague informed me. I explained that it’s much more than observing. It’s more like the holodeck from Star Trek, the television series. The Villanova CAVE allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about and even circle around the 3D image an object, such as a statue or tree, as though they were in the actual setting. The Villanova CAVE also includes sound.

Funding for the Villanova CAVE comes from a $1.67 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant: “the largest NSF research grant ever awarded to the University.”

 

UntitledThe CAVE—aka the Villanova CAVE—arrives … some assembly required.

 

 

RS7959_1725Formerly Viewing Room 4 in Falvey Hall, this space has been prepared to house the Villanova CAVE.

 

 

RS7973_DSC_2181 copyInstallation begins!

 

RS7981_DSC_0370An installer prepares one of the Villanova CAVE’s many projectors.

 

RS7980_DSC_0369The enclosure begins to take shape.

 

RS8005_DSC_2216Testing the Villanova CAVE

 


Photos by Luisa Cywinski and Alice Bampton.

Like

It’s Shark Week and we’ve got fintastic shark art from the Digital Library!

SHARK DIGITAL
http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Record/vudl:312089

Did we, ahem, whet your appetite for more Dime Novel adventure? If so, be sure to check out our fascinating full collection of Dime Novel and Popular Literature from 1860 to 1930.

Like

Special Collections project on WWI to be featured on PCN broadcast

Screen Shot 2014-07-24 at 2.02.00 PM
Verizon Channel 9 – which is PCN, Pennsylvania’s non-profit cable network, broadcast a show entitled Philadelphia in World War I. For those who missed it, this program will be re-broadcast Saturday, July 26th at 5:35 pm and again on Sunday, July 27th at 04:35 am.

This program includes an interview with Special Collections and Digital Library Coordinator Michael Foight and other speakers involved with the “Home Before the Leaves Fall: a Great War Centennial Exposition” which features World War I content from Villanova University as well as other heritage organizations throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Experience World War One as it happened day by day, 100 years ago at http://wwionline.org.

Like

« Previous PageNext Page »

 


Last Modified: July 24, 2014