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Dig Deeper: Money Smart Week @ Falvey Memorial Library

money smart week

Falvey Memorial Library is proud to announce its participation in this year’s Money Smart Week! Money Smart Week (April 5-12), created by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, is a public awareness campaign to promote financial literacy. In collaboration with the American Library Association, Money Smart Week @ your library brings financial programming to library communities. Read on for Money Smart Week @ Falvey Memorial Library event details and to find some great resources to help you be money smart!


KRISTYNA MSW

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Moving to the City

A VU Seniors Alumni 101 Event

Monday, April 7, 6:30 p.m.

Bartley 1011

Learn what it takes to move to, live and survive in cities like Manhattan, Washington and Philadelphia after graduation. After a brief presentation about the ins and outs of real estate, Alumni Chapter volunteers from these cities will share their personal advice and answer questions about life in the city.

Additional Resources:

Apartment Hunting Tips from the NYC Affordable Housing Resource Center

Eating Well on a Budget

Co-sponsored by Villanova Dining Services and VU Seniors

Tuesday, April 8, 1:00 p.m.

Falvey Memorial Library 205

Villanova Dining Services’ Alicia Farrow and Gail Mitchell will offer tips on food budgeting, shopping, preparation and eating well on campus. They will focus on getting the greatest nutrition for your dollar by suggesting healthy, palate-satisfying choices as alternatives to cheap, packaged food. A light lunch will be served on a first-come basis.

Additional Resources:
Villanova Dining Services Nutritional Information

Find nutrition resources, recipes, vegetarian options and other thought-provoking information.

Healthy Eating on a Budget

Useful tips from ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Managing/Repaying Student Loans

Tuesday, April 8, 4:00 p.m.

Falvey Memorial Library Room 205

In this session, Melissa Hannum and Heather Rosenstein, representatives from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA), will review various resources available to assist borrowers as they enter loan repayment.

Additional Resources:
YouCanDealWithIt.com

YouCanDealWithIt.com provides practical and easy-to-understand advice on how to deal with common financial situations facing today’s college students and recent graduates.

Money Matters When Looking for an Apartment and Signing a Lease Wednesday, April 9th, 4:30 p.m.
Falvey Memorial Library Room 204
Kathy Byrnes, Office of Student Life, will unpack the issues that come with off-campus living. She will discuss start-up expenses, financial elements of renting, household budgeting and protecting your security deposit.

Additional Resources:
Renting a Home or Apartment: Leases and Security Deposits from the Pennsylvania attorney general

Renting a Home or Apartment from USA.gov

Career Center Senior Hours: Market Yourself in the Career Center A VU Seniors Alumni 101 Week Event
Wednesday, April 9, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Career Center, Garey Hall
Visit the Career Center for the special senior hours to market yourself into that first job after graduation. Learn how to connect with key alumni, put the finishing touches on your resume and cover letter, and learn helpful tips on how to succeed in your upcoming job interviews. Don’t miss this opportunity to visit the Career Center for professional advice and some free refreshments and snacks provided by the VU Seniors Committee.

Additional Resources:

GoNova Jobs
Portal to job postings and on campus recruiting.

More resources for making money smart decisions:

Take your Wildcard and ask for a student discount at many cultural institutions.

Falvey Memorial Library’s books on personal finance.

MyMoney.gov
A product of the Congressionally chartered Federal Financial Literacy and Education Commission, which is working to strengthen financial capability and increase access to financial services for all Americans.

See the Money Smart Week Resources page for even more great resources!


kristyna-carroll_edArticle and resources by Kristyna Carroll, research support librarian for Business and Social Sciences. Photo by Alice Bampton.

 

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Jane Golden and the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program

Jane GoldenJane Golden, founder and executive director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, will present a talk on Monday, April 7, at 3:00 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner. She will discuss the Mural Arts Program and present a slideshow of some of the latest, most impressive Philadelphia murals.

Golden began Mural Arts thirty years ago as an anti-graffiti program. Mural Arts is now internationally recognized for its leadership in community-based public art, a program which has involved over 30,000 young men and women. The participants have created 3,600 public murals. Mural Arts’ goal is “to create art that transforms public spaces and individual lives and asserts our fundamental belief that art can ignite change.”

Mayor W.Wilson Goode (mayor 1984-1992) originally hired Golden to help combat Philadelphia’s graffiti problem. She reached out to the graffiti writers and, recognizing their artistic talents, began to provide opportunities for them to utilize their skills as mural painters in appropriate settings.

Golden was appointed director of the Mural Arts Program in 1996 when it was placed under Philadelphia’s Department of Recreation. She has supervised numerous complex public art projects which have helped transform Philadelphia neighborhoods and allowed thousands to experience art in every day settings.

She has undergraduate degrees in fine arts and political science from Stanford University and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Rutgers University. Golden received the Adela Dwyer – St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award from Villanova in 2008. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree at commencement in 2008. She also holds honorary PhDs from Swarthmore College, University of the Arts, Widener University and Haverford College.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of English and its concentration in writing and rhetoric, the Cultural Studies Program and Falvey Memorial Library. It is free and open to the public.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Literary Character March Madness Enters the Round of 16: Analyst Predictions

What a week it’s been for the library’s Literary Character March Madness! With votes rolling in both online and on our physical bracket by the circulation desk, we’ve finally entered the round of sweet 16. While each of these 8 battles will prove interesting in their own right, this week we’d like to offer four predictions in the signature match-ups of the round.

Curious George vs. Winnie the Pooh

imageI’m not sure anyone could have predicted that these two pants-less anthropomorphic goofballs would take down such heavy hitters as Anna Karenina and Alice in the round of 64, but here we are. In any case, despite the recent doping allegations and that very public falling out with the man in the Yellow Hat, the smart money is on Mr. George in this one. I mean, just look at his wittle face!

Hamlet v. Harry Potter

imageIn last year’s tournament Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling made it all the way to the championship match-up, taking down major contenders such as Herman Melville along the way. For that reason it seems like The Boy Who Lived … has the odds in this one. Sorry, Hamlet my man, but it looks like this one’s “not to be.”

James Bond vs. Tom Sawyer

imageIt’s high-tech gadgetry versus home-spun foolery in this Midwest match-up, but Mr. Bond-James-Bond won’t seem so suave after Tommy-Boy tricks him into whitewashing a fence, now will he? Then again I heard Bond’s been moving in on Becky Thatcher, so he may already be in Sawyer’s head. Seems like a coin-toss, but I’m going to take Sawyer in this one.

Gandalf vs. Dante

imageWow. These storylines just write themselves: the 5-3 battle in the East is between two Catholic wizards. Wait, I’m being told Gandalf isn’t Catholic. And Dante wasn’t a wizard?! What’s with the hat and spell book, then? Somebody else should really be writing this.

 

That’s all for now, book fans! Be sure to vote for your favorite characters here, and stick to the Library News blog for more analysis next week. Remember, you can follow Falvey Memorial Library (FalveyLibrary) on twitter (#novabookbracket) and Facebook for more action.

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Dig Deeper: Vera Figner, Icon of the Revolution in Soviet Russia

Lynne Ann Hartnett, PhD

Lynne Ann Hartnett, PhD

Falvey Memorial Library is pleased to host its latest Scholarship@Villanova lecture on Tuesday, April 1, at 2:30 p.m., featuring Lynne Hartnett, PhD, assistant professor, Department of History, director of Russian Area Studies, director of the Center for the Study of Violence and Conflict. Dr. Hartnett’s talk is entitled “On the Edge of Revolution: Activism, Terrorism, and Political Resurrection in the Life of One Russian Revolutionary Legend.”

This talk will use the life of Vera Figner, a Russian noblewoman who became a revolutionary terrorist, as a historical lens through which to explore political activism and radicalism in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Russia. As a leading member of a radical group widely considered to be the world’s first modern terrorist organization, Vera Figner’s biography provides great insight into the circumstances and choices that impel otherwise peaceful individuals to embrace violence as a method of protest. The lecture will follow Figner through the revolutionary underground, prison, exile and the Russian Revolutions of 1917 in order to analyze and assess the role that gender, class, personality and historical timing played in Figner’s decision to become a radical activist, her experiences within the revolutionary movement and her subsequent status as an icon of the revolution in Soviet Russia.

We invite you to enhance your enjoyment and understanding of Dr. Hartnett’s scholarship by exploring library resources listed below, selected and annotated by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.


9780253012845_med

 


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While many of you are eagerly anticipating the publication of Dr. Hartnett’s monograph The Defiant Life of Vera Figner: Surviving the Russian Revolution, which will be available in early June, here are some related sources which are currently available in print or online:

Figner, Vera. Memoirs of a Revolutionist. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1991.This is Figner’s autobiography written during her twenty-two years of incarceration and published soon after her release.

Hartnett, Lynne A. “Perpetual Exile: The Dynamics of Gender, Protest, and Violence in the Revolutionary Life of Vera Figner (1852-1917).” PhD diss., Boston College, 2000. ProQuest (AAT9961602). Dr. Hartnett’s dissertation is available online for Villanova students, faculty and staff.

We recommend the following encyclopedias and survey histories as background reading:

Burwood, Linnea G. “Figner, Vera (1852–1942).” In Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia edited by Anne Commire. Vol. 5. Detroit: Yorkin Publications, 2002.

Marik, Soma. “Women in the Russian Revolution.” In The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest edited by Immanuel Ness. Blackwell Publishing, 2009.

Millar, James R. Ed. The Encyclopedia of Russian History. New York: Macmillan, 2004.

Perrie, Maureen, D. C. B Lieven, and Ronald Grigor Suny. The Cambridge History of Russia. Vol. 3. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Monographs about women in the Russian Revolution in the Falvey collection:

McDermid, Jane., and Anna Hillyar. Midwives of the Revolution: Female Bolsheviks and Women Workers in 1917. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1999.

Hillyar, Anna, and Jane McDermid. Revolutionary Women in Russia, 1870-1917: A Study in Collective Biography. Manchester : New York: Manchester University Press, 2000.
[https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/542390]

Engel, Barbara A. and Clifford N. Rosenthal. Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar: The Memoirs of Five Young Anarchist Women of the 1870′s. Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1987.

Maxwell, Margaret. Narodniki Women: Russian Women Who Sacrificed Themselves for the Dream of Freedom. New York: Pergamon Press, 1990.

For an up-close look at Vera Figner and the Russian revolution in contemporary newspapers and magazines we recommend:

American Periodicals Series

Read George Kennan’s reply to a letter about Russian revolutionaries in Outlook:

Kennan, George. “Who are Russia’s Real Revolutionists? A Reply to a Letter from a Friend of the Bolsheviki.” Outlook,  December 19, 1917, 638-39.

Historical New York Times

Read the 1927 book review of Figner’s autobiography in the New York Times.

Memoirs of a Revolutionist.” New York Times, June 19, 1927, BR2.

British Periodicals

Read Ralston’s review and learn how baffled he was by the revolutionary commitment of Russian women. Here is a short excerpt:

“The most interesting by far of the conspirators are the women. The type of character which they represent is one which is very unfamiliar to us. We find it difficult to believe that young girls, belonging to what we should call the upper middle classes, well educated, and by no means destitute of culture, can leave their homes and go away, of their own free will, to lead a hard life among strange people of a lower class – and all for an idea. We can understand such a sacrifice being made in the cause, let us say, of religion or loyalty, but for the sake of irreligion and disloyalty it appears unaccountable.” [p. 400]

Ralston, W. R. S. “Russian Revolutionary Literature.” The Nineteenth Century: A Monthly Review 1, no. 3 (1877), 397-416.


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History.

Introductory article by Regina Duffy, Scholarly Outreach event coordinator.

 

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Window Shopping: Careers in International Development Day

internatl dev exhibitThis colorful blue and green window display with its large centrally located sign and eye-catching world map made of four layers of stacked cubes promotes Careers in International Development Day on Wednesday, March 26, 1:30 – 5:00 p.m. in the Connelly Center.

Flanking the dominant central elements are two side panels: “World Options” and “Find Out How to Get There.” “World Options,” to the left, lists career choices, such as humanitarian engineering, advocacy, the United Nations and more. “Find Out How to Get There,” the right panel, provides information needed for attending the Careers in International Development Day event.

internatl dev exh pptPowerPoint presentations, prepared by Trudy Pacella, staff member of the Office for Mission and Ministry and administrative assistant of the Catholic Relief Services (CRS) advisory board, show photographs from trips taken by nursing students and also from participants in the Careers in International Development Day programs.

A panel to the right of the map lists numerous sponsors, among them Catholic Relief Services Partnership with Villanova University and Falvey Memorial Library.

Publications related to international development and written by Villanova faculty, selected by Linda Hauck, business librarian, complete the bottom of the display.

Joanne Quinn, design specialist, created and mounted the exhibit. Suzanne Toton, EdD, associate professor, Dept. of Theology and Religious Studies, and coordinator of the CRS Partnership, and Trudy Pacella, senior administrative assistant, provided information and inspiration for the exhibit.

This Careers in International Development Day window will be on display until early April.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

Photos by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication and Service Promotion team and Access Services team leader.

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Symposium: Careers in International Development Day

international development logoA recently installed library display highlights the March 26 Careers in International Development Day. This is not your usual job fair but a symposium designed for career exploration. Catholic Relief Services organized and hosted the event in partnership with Villanova University, the College of Nursing Center for Global and Public Health, the Villanova School of Business, the VSB Center for Global Leadership, the Career Center, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, the Office of Mission and Ministry and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Consortium for Higher Education.

The blue and green display consists of wayposts to the plenary talk by Lindsay Coates, executive director of InterAction, titled, “The Scope and Changes in the Field of Humanitarian Relief” and the breakout roundtables on advocacy impacting policy, global health, government foreign service, humanitarian engineering, non-governmental organizations, social entrepreneurship, social impact investing, think tanks and the United Nations. Recent additions to the library collection touching on international development topics are also included as are works authored by Villanovans.


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The library’s collection includes many books, article databases and statistical sources about international development. For the policy wonk, Columbia International Affairs Online includes full-text  case studies, policy briefs, scholarly articles and books. Public Affairs International  Service (PAIS) is an article database covering similar territory. Because international development is truly interdisciplinary, academic research on international development can be found in many specialized databases, such as  PubMed for health, EconLit for economics, and  Compendex or Inspec for engineering.

Since 1990 the United Nations has published the Human Development Report, which identifies trends in development, and the Index, which is a tool used to assess country level development in terms of life expectancy, education and income. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development publishes numerous books and statistical series on development in many dimensions all available in the OECDiLibrary. AidData.org takes a data driven approach to improving outcomes by publishing datasets, visualizations and reports.

Villanovans across the disciplines are engaged in research on various aspects of development aid. Suzanne Toton, EdD, writes about Catholic relief, world hunger and social justice. The writing of Kishor Thanawala, PhD, explores economic development and justice. Latin American Development is the area of expertise of Satya Pattnayak, PhD. Jonathan Doh, PhD, is a prolific researcher on nongovernmental organizations and global corporate responsibility. Christopher Kilby, PhD, is a thought leader on the economics of foreign aid. Ruth McDermott-Levy, PhD, is a practicing nurse, educator and researcher on international community health.

Careers in International Development Day speakers represent a variety of organizations, all with interesting web sites well worth exploring with links below:

Acumen http://acumen.org/

Bread for the World:  Have Faith, End Hunger http://www.bread.org/

Catholic Relief Services http://crs.org/

Center for Global and Public Health https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/nursing/centers/globalhealth.html

Global Policy Solutions http://globalpolicysolutions.com

InterAction:  A United Voice for Global Change  http://www.interaction.org/

United Nations Refugee Agency  http://www.unhcr.org

U.S. Agency for International Development  http://www.usaid.gov/


imagesArticle by Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, (pictured) business librarian and team coordinator for the Business Research team.

 

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops!

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Aurelius Digital Humanities Launch Ardmore Project Website

Icon-edThe Ardmore Project, an Aurelius Digital Humanities initiative, launched its website on March 11. Craig Bailey, PhD, associate professor of history, conceived of the Ardmore Project for his Social History and Community Research class, a junior-year research seminar.

Dr. Bailey’s students collected and analyzed data from primary and secondary sources to create a profile of a local community in the early 20th century: Villanova’s neighboring town of Ardmore, in this case. One goal of their research was to produce a website featuring profiles of some notable community members and an interactive map of Ardmore.

To accomplish this goal, Dr. Bailey collaborated with Falvey staff members Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant, and David Uspal, senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications, to create the site.

Bang describes the project as the first completed project for Aurelius. She notes that this is only the first phase and that subsequent classes will be able to add layers to the preexisting data and interactive map.

Uspal explains the technology behind the project as follows: Using image mapping, Uspal’s goal was to teach the students HTML, digital scanning and how to build a website. Of the 11 students who participated in the project, none had HTML experience or appreciable experience with scanning items and website creation. However, as the students became comfortable with the technology, they became more innovative.

A map of Ardmore, Pa. from the mid - 1920's.

A map of Ardmore, Pa. from the mid-1920s.

Dr. Bailey received his inspiration for the course in 2012 when he recognized his students’ need for greater experience using primary sources. At the time, Dr. Bailey’s research for the Friends of Linwood Park had impressed him with the rich source of material available. He decided to shift his focus to mid-1920s Ardmore, Pennsylvania, and engage his students in this real-world research opportunity.

Craig

Dr. Bailey demonstrates the interactive map.

Each student was responsible for charting 200 individuals and writing a biography for one resident. The students also researched one organization, in this case the Ardmore YMCA. To do their research, the class used the Main Line Atlas from 1860-1926, census returns, the Ardmore Chronicle from 1904, the Philadelphia Inquirer and probate records. Dr. Bailey noted that a lot of advance preparation went into making the project a success. For instance, he visited Norristown ahead of time to confirm that wills could be found before sending students to do their research.

Ardmore Chronicle

Masthead from the Ardmore Chronicle. Click to link to copies in Falvey’s Digital Library.

The Ardmore project proved to be a valuable experience for the students. Besides being introduced to multiple ways of finding primary sources, the students learned practical things, such as how to talk in a professional manner; how to manage their time; how to do research when book bags, pens, etc. are banned from the archives; and how to solve problems as a group. Dr. Bailey noted that instead of the project being a “cloistered” one, it brought students out into the surrounding communities and allowed them to make valuable connections.

Article by Laura Hutelmyer, photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management.

Photographs by Alice Bampton

Images courtesy of the Digital Library

 

 

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Foto Friday: Hype

Check out the Falvey Library brackets! Vote online or in person at the front desk. May the best woman (or man) win!

Check out the Falvey Library brackets!
Vote online or in person at the circulation desk.

 

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management.

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Great Literary Characters Throw Down in Library March Madness

BRACKETOLOGY-LOGOHarry Potter cramming on Gandalf the Grey. James Bond posting up Lady Macbeth. It’s March already, and that means Falvey Memorial Library’s bracketed literary smack-down is underway.

Following 2013’s highly competitive tournament in which #1 seed William Shakespeare obliterated a fierce field of authors, past and present, we at the Library have decided to shake things up and make this year’s battle about the creations rather than the creators. That’s right: 2014 is all about character. With that in mind we’ve compiled a list of 64 of the greatest literary characters and pitted them against each other in our seeded bracket with the goal of finding Villanova’s favorite. Not since the confusing and angst-ridden world of fan fiction have literary universes collided with such force, with such enthusiasm, and with so few spelling errors. What a time to be alive.

Will Wilbur get ahead of Oedipus?

Will Wilbur get ahead of Oedipus?

Like last year, the winners of each matchup will be chosen purely by the fans. That means if you want to see Wilbur the Pig take down Oedipus, then you’ll have to vote. There are two ways to vote this year: on our giant print bracket at the library’s front desk or online via our submission form. As an added bonus, each submitter is eligible to win a prize at the end of the tournament, so vote early and often. Check this site for future analysis and predictions, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook (#novabookbracket) for up to the minute updates and results. Best of luck to your favorite, and may the best character win.

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POSTPONED: Open Workshop & Discussion with Villanova Irish Dance Team

Today’s Open Workshop & Discussion with the Villanova Irish Dance Team has been postponed until a later date. Please watch our event listings for the rescheduled time and place.

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Last Modified: March 20, 2014