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Event Spaces at Falvey

Due to the growth in the number of event venues at Falvey and the capacity to have multiple programs going on simultaneously, the number of events in the Library has skyrocketed into hundreds each academic year.

We are often still asked, “Why does the Library have events at all?” The answer is quite simple: If a library has value, it is more than a learning resource center or a conduit for data. The university library retains much of its value as a place where things happen, especially the organized and the unexpected acquisition of knowledge outside the classroom.

It is not just a place where study and research occurs, but also a place where ideas become connected and many discoveries are made by scholars who are living, learning and thriving in the community the library serves. It is an anchor institution for a university education. It is also a place where the many members of the university are enriched by experiences that can help them interpret the world they are trying to explain by means of the academic enterprise.


Room 204

Room 204

One of the seminar rooms in Falvey’s Learning Commons, which is often filled with studying students when not in use for an event, is Falvey room 204. This is an exceptional space for presenting to a group in a setting that can accommodate either rows of chairs or an arrangement of tables and chairs. Its default layout is classroom style.

Room 204 2

Room 204, which is part of the Learning Commons, is a visible seminar room across from the elevator on Falvey’s second floor. The space, with its large screen and projector, is ideal for the many types of lectures and symposia co-sponsored by the Library.


  Room 205

Room 205 3

An ideal forum for lectures, panels, workshops and group meetings is Falvey room 205. A much-sought-after space on the Library’s second floor, this multi-faceted room also functions as a social space for receptions and informal gatherings. Although room 205 is quiet and enclosed, it offers a view into the lively activity of the Learning Commons on the second floor. When not in use by the Library as a meeting, reception or program space, Falvey 205 is an open student study area.

Room 205 2


  Learning Commons Lounge

Learning Commons Lounge 2 by John Welsh
A secluded forum in the Library is the lounge located on the second floor in the Learning Commons in Falvey, near Learning Support Services, across from Room 202. When this public area opened in 2012, it was described as “the new lounge space with funky furniture and cafe lighting.”

Given its out-of-the-way location on Falvey’s second floor, even though it is a public event space as a part of the Learning Commons, it is “a neat little comfortable back corner where thoughts can brew and be blended.” It is occasionally used as a venue for casual events hosted by the Library.


 Speakers’ Corner

Speakers Corner 1

The Library sponsors events, but it also hosts many campus events, and its major forum is affectionately called Speakers’ Corner. Inaugurated as a new space for intellectual, cultural, and social programming in February 2012, Speakers’ Corner is a public area on the first floor of Falvey.

This highly visible event space is a popular venue in Falvey, and events in this venue are always open to the public.
Programming in Speakers’ Corner has included poetry readings, book signings, musical and orientation events.

If you are interested in booking an event, or just more information about any of our spaces, please contact a member of Falvey’s Scholarly Outreach team, which manages this event space for the Library.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (8/25)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

SAVE THE DATE!

On Thursday, Sept. 10, Reyna Grande, the author of The Distance Between Us: A Memoir  will visit Villanova University.  Her book was chosen as the new OneBook Villanova, the campus wide reading program that is now in its eleventh year. First year students were mailed the book during the summer and all others can purchase the book from the Center for Multicultural Affairs or the Office of Student Involvement or by ordering online by cash, check or budget transfer.

Ms. Grande will appear in the library’s Speakers Corner between 4:40 and 5:30 on September 10 to provide readers with an opportunity to meet the author and get their book signed.


CAN YOU IDENTIFY A SCHOLARLY JOURNAL?

MAGSDifferent types of publications have different purposes and different audiences. When we talk about journals/magazines, we can usually divide these publications into three broad categories: scholarly journals, popular magazines, and trade publications. For more information, see this handy checklist on the Falvey website: https://library.villanova.edu/help/faqs/typesofperiodicals/


ADD YOUR FAMILY PHOTO TO OUR WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES DISPLAY!

POPEDISPLAY SMIn celebration of World Meeting of Families 2015 and Pope Francis’ visit to Philadelphia, Falvey Memorial Library invites you to celebrate your family by sharing a family photo.

There are two ways to participate. 1.) Bring in a copy of your favorite family photo and hang it on the library display window. 2.) Post your family photo on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram with the hashtag #falveyfamily and we’ll hang it for you. Please note, submission of a photo implies your permission to use images on library social media accounts, displays, and publications. Provide copies and not originals as photos displayed will not be returned.

Follow #VillanovaUatWMF for official Villanova papal visit information.


NEW ON OUR SHELVES….
9600ac4544e0459e8d432eb953017ad4-0.500The Complete Poetry of Maya Angelou

From the catalog: Throughout her illustrious career in letters, Maya Angelou gifted, healed, and inspired the world with her words. Now the beauty and spirit of those words live on in this new and complete collection of poetry that reflects and honors the writer’s remarkable life. New York : Random House, [2015]


QUOTE OF THE DAY
mockup

Is that your final answer? – Regis Philbin

Incidentally, Regis Philbin celebrates his 84th birthday today so, Happy Birthday, Reege! Who remembers Who Wants to Be a Millionaire’s classic primetime run when Reege used to make sure we were absolutely, positively sure that our answer was correct? One way to do that these days, ‘Cats, is to consult your subject librarian! Falvey has, well, about about a Million resources to help you on your way!


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Librarians Welcome New Faculty at Annual Breakfast

FACREC MONT2

 

Falvey Memorial Library was again proud to host the traditional continental breakfast for Villanova University’s New Faculty Program, which took place Monday, Aug. 17. The program is hosted by VITAL, the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning, and tailored to support the needs of new faculty members by easing them into their new teaching positions, answering questions and introducing them to campus resources. The library’s Learning Commons meeting rooms provided a bright, spacious environment for the new professors to network with subject librarians and begin their Villanova experience.

Gabriele Bauer, PhD, and Director of VITAL also introduced the new faculty members to Falvey’s newest entrant, Millicent Gaskell, University librarian and library director, who began here in May.


Photos by Alice Bampton.

 


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Foto Friday: Find Yourself in the Stacks

stax sm

 


Welcoming the Class of 2019! #Nova19

 


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Villanova community invited to submit family photos for Welcome Pope Francis Display

POPE DISPLAYSIZED

To celebrate the visit of Pope Francis to Philadelphia and the World Meeting of Families – Philadelphia 2015, Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer, created the “Welcome Pope Francis” window exhibit. The World Meeting of Families, an international conference on the family, meets September 22-25. Pope Francis will visit Philadelphia September 26-27.

In the spirit of the World Meeting of Families congress that precedes the Pope’s visit, Villanova students, faculty and staff are invited to share their family photographs with the University community by including them in the window display. You have two ways to participate: bring in a copy of the photograph and hang it on the window or post the photograph on social media with the hashtag #FalveyFamily (Falvey Memorial Library is on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).

Quinn asks participants to submit copies, not original photographs; the photographs will not be returned. She adds, “Submission of a photo implies your permission to use images on library social media accounts, displays and publications.” You may submit photos now; this is your chance to be part of a world-wide celebration of families.

A large banner welcoming Pope Francis flanked by a “big head” portrait of the pope leads the viewer into the display. Two posters inviting people to “Celebrate your family,” a large poster displaying “The World Meeting of Families Philadelphia 2015 Official Prayer” and accompanying official image, two papal flags and assorted books about Pope Francis and other popes complete the exhibit. A large open space is for the family photos. Kallie Stahl, Outreach student employee, assisted with the design and mounting of the display.

This eye-catching exhibit is in the large window to the left of the entrance to Falvey’s Holy Grounds, visible to anyone entering the Library. The exhibit will be up until the end of October.


 

Article by Alice Bampton.


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Foto Friday: In Corso

Sneak peek CORTONA

We’re taking a sneak peek as conservation work continues on the Falvey Hall Reading Room’s hidden treasure, the baroque masterpiece by Pietro da Cortona. Follow along on the Conserving a Giant: Resurrecting Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David” blog.


Photo by Alice Bampton.


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Dig Deeper: The Revolutionary War and American Independence

DECLARATION
 
“… these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.

 Not just a list of grievances, the Declaration of Independence is also a checklist for good government. Its approval and adoption by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776 in Philadelphia (woot woot!) marks the beginning of a new nation, the United States of America.

Bell_Tower_of_Independence_HallIt’s easy to take the ideological stories of the birth of our nation and its heroes for granted as they have been taught to us since elementary school and romanticized in movies and television. But have you, as an adult, visited the Liberty Bell or Independence Hall (where the Declaration and its forebear, the Articles of Confederation,) were debated? Or walked the streets near Declaration House at 7th and Market where Thomas Jefferson wrote the document? Have you ever read or researched with a critical eye, materials that dig deeper into the symbolic, mythical and political realities of the document’s history?

The following links, curated by history liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert, are great scholarly resources for getting beyond the myths and into the historical context of the American Revolution. Why not take some time this July 4th weekend to explore some of Falvey’s many resources written about that time? She’s also included authentic primary materials from the Digital Library, to truly complete your step back into history.


 New Books

Books about the Declaration of Independence

Books about the American Revolution

Books about the history of the U.S. Constitution


 Primary Sources in Digital Collections

Falvey Memorial Library has a strong collection of primary sources about this monumental period in American history. Here are some suggestions from the library’s digital collections. Additional primary sources, available in print or microform only, can be discovered with the help of the library’s online catalog.

American Founding Era
This collection brings together scholarly digital editions of the papers of major figures of the early republic: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Dolley Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Harriott Pinckney Horry.

America’s Historical Newspapers, 1690-1922
Follow the War of Independence and the birth of a new nation in contemporary newspapers.

Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1800
Follow the events of the American Revolution from a local perspective.

American Periodicals Series
Read the first magazines published in the American colonies and in the early republic.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800
Digital copies of over 37,000 books and pamphlets published and sold in the American colonies and the early republic.

Early American Imprints, Series II: Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801-1819
Digital copies of over 36,000 books and pamphlets published and sold in the early republic.

Sabin Americana, 1500-1926
Digital copies of works about the Americas published throughout the world from 1500 to the early 1900’s.

American State Papers, 1789-1838
Legislative and executive documents of the first 14 U.S. Congresses.

Interested in the other side of the story? Discover British opinions on events in the American colonies through contemporary newspapers and magazines:

Online References

Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History

Encyclopedia of the American Constitution

Dictionary of American History

American National Biography Online

Encyclopedia of the American Revolution

A Companion to the American Revolution

Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


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Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History. Introduction by Joanne Quinn.


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Stonewall Book Awards honor works of GLBT merit

stonewall_logoThe 2015 Stonewall Book Awards given by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT) of the American Library Association were presented this weekend in San Francisco at the organization’s annual conference.

The awards are given annually to English-language works of merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience. Several major categories are awarded: the Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award, the Barbara Gittings Literature award and the Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award. The awards are given to works published the prior year.

This year’s winners include—

 Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award

51lOr0fYHkLPresented to This Day in June, written by Gayle E. Pitman and published by Magination Press, an imprint of the American Psychological Association.

Other Children’s and Young Adult Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender teens speak out, written and photographed by Susan Kuklin, published by Candlewick Press.
  • I’ll Give You the Sun, written by Jandy Nelson, published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.
  • Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress, written by Christine Baldacchino, with pictures by Isabelle Malenfant, published by Groundwood Books

Barbara Gittings Literature Award

Prelude-to-Bruise-683x1024Presented to  Prelude To Bruise, written by Saeed Jones, published by Coffee House Press.

Other Barbara Gittings Literature Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Bitter Eden, written by Tatamkhulu Afrika, published by Picador USA.
  • Frog Music, written by Emma Donoghue, published by Little, Brown and Company.
  • The Two Hotel Francforts, written by David Leavitt, published by Bloomsbury.
  • My Real Children, written by Jo Walton, published by Tor Books.

Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award

51NViGPmlUL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Presented  to Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims, written by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, published by New York University Press.

Other Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Gay Berlin, written by Robert Beachy, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
  • Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More, written by Janet Mock, published by Atria Books.
  • Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, and the Battlefield of AIDS, written by Martin Duberman, published by The New Press.
  • Charity & Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America, written by Rachel Hope Cleves, published by Oxford University Press.

Dig Deeper: The Stonewall Riots

stonewallii

Resistance to a police raid inside a small, Greenwich Village jukebox bar (one of the few in New York City where  the LGBT community were welcomed) marked the start of the gay rights movement. As hundreds upon hundreds of protesters poured out onto the streets over six days of rioting, the gay community, previously forced into secrecy, finally saw the strength of its own numbers. The event proved to be a turning point. The following year saw the start of annual gay pride parades and other outward demands for recognition, respect and equal rights—events often held on the Stonewall anniversary and eventually in hundreds of cities. The Stonewall Book Awards is just one of the many ways the event is commemorated.

Last week was a landmark week for the gay rights movement for two reasons: first, the Supreme Court decision affirming the right to same sex marriage in all fifty states, and, though less publicized, the naming of the Stonewall Inn as an official New York City landmark. Learn more about this incredible chapter in human rights history through the following library resources (or hundreds more – just ask!) curated by History liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert.

Dig Deeper: Stonewall Riots

1. Books about the Stonewall Riots in the Falvey collection

2. Gale Virtual Reference Library (Databases A-Z): Introductions to the subject matter from a selection of the Library’s subject encyclopedias.
Tina Gianoulis. “Gay Liberation Movement.” In St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, edited by Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast, 211-15. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000.

3. Sage Knowledge platform (Databases A-Z): More introductions and overviews from social sciences encyclopedias.
Lucian Truscott and Priscilla Glanville. “Stonewall Rebellion.” In Encyclopedia of Leadership, edited by George R. Goethals, Georgia J. Sorenson and James MacGregor Burns, 1492-98. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2004. doi:10.4135/9781412952392.n340.

4. CQ Global Researcher: An excellent overview over the evolution of gay rights in the U.S.
Reed Karaim. “Gay Rights.” CQ Global Researcher 5, no. 5 (March 1, 2011): 107-32.

5. New York Times: Read the original news coverage of the 1969 riots.
“4 Policemen Hurt in ‘Village Raid.’” New York Times, June 29, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118526412?accountid=14853.
“Police Again Rout ‘Village’ Youths.” New York Times, June 30, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118687806?accountid=14853.

6. Washington Post: Read about the movement as it was described in the year the riots occurred.
Nancy L. Ross “Homosexual Revolution.” The Washington Post, October 25, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/143552646?accountid=14853.

7. OpinionArchives: Browse the archives of the country’s leading opinion magazines and follow the changing public opinion. OpinionArchives includes the complete archives of The Nation, The New Republic, The National Review, The New Yorker, and Commonweal among other titles.


Dig Deeper links provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader – Academic Integration. Article by Joanne Quinn, team leader for Communication and Service Promotion.


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“The audience is half of the poem”: the First Latino Poet Laureate

Library of Congress appoints the 1st Latino Poet Laureate

Connecting to people through performance is crucial for Herrera. “I used to stand on the corner in San Diego with poems sticking out of my hip pocket, asking people if there was a place where I could read poems,” he recalls. “The audience is half of the poem.”

(Retrieved from LA Times, 6/22/15)
Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Congratulations to Juan Felipe Herrera, who was appointed the 21st poet laureate on June 10 by the Library of Congress. Herrera will be the first Hispanic-American person to be chosen as poet laureate in the United States in the 79 years since the program’s inception. His tenure will begin in September—national Hispanic heritage month.

Herrera, the son of migrant farmers, spent much of his youth travelling and living in tents in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Though terribly underprivileged, he was presented with the remarkable opportunity to attend UCLA as a young adult. From there, he went on to attend Stanford University and the University of Iowa’s Writing Workshop, where he earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

Through his education and experiences as a young Hispanic-American, Herrera developed a deep passion for writing and performing in both English and Spanish. He penned several pieces, including collections of poetry and children’s books in honor of his heritage and worldview. In addition to his writing and performing, Herrera has been an avid teacher and has also served as the poet laureate of California from 2012-2014.

Villanova University was lucky enough to welcome Juan Felipe Herrera as one of the featured speakers during the 14th annual Villanova Literary Festival, organized by Alan Drew, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing. The talk took place on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner. A jam-packed audience had the opportunity to listen to Herrera as he read and performed selected poems in both Spanish and English. With great enthusiasm and detail, Herrera shared his past experiences and showed poignant images to illustrate his work.

It’s been reported that Herrera’s main focus during his tenure as poet laureate will likely be to connect people of all different cultural backgrounds through poetry and to help highlight the stories of those people who are typically overlooked.

Interested in learning more about Juan Felipe Herrera? Check out Falvey Memorial Library’s holdings by this author.

Also, visit the following sites for additional information on Herrera and the position of Poet Laureate, provided by librarian Susan Ottignon.

Juan Felipe Herrera, Current Poet Laureate

List of works by Juan Felipe Herrera

Past Poets Laureate: 2011-present

About the Position of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry


Dig Deeper links provided by Sue Ottignon, subject librarian for romance languages and literatures.


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Spotlight on Falvey Forums: Engaging the Villanova Community

falvey-spaces-logo

Final

the Reading Room

Due to the growth in the number of event venues at Falvey and the capacity to have multiple programs going on simultaneously, the number of events in the Library has skyrocketed into hundreds each academic year.

We are often still asked, “Why does the Library have events at all?” The answer is quite simple: If a library has value, it is more than a learning resource center or a conduit for data. The university library retains much of its value as a place where things happen, especially the organized and the unexpected acquisition of knowledge outside the classroom.

It is not just a place where study and research occurs, but also a place where ideas become connected and many discoveries are made by scholars who are living, learning and thriving in the community the library serves. It is an anchor institution for a university education. It is also a place where the many members of the university are enriched by experiences that can help them interpret the world they are trying to explain by means of the academic enterprise.

Final 2

Why so many events?

Because the number of connections and discoveries to be made are innumerable, the ways in which our world can be interpreted and explained are unbounded. And although there are limits to what a library can do, Falvey wants to flourish as a place encouraging  inspiration, consciousness raising and community engagement. 

Final 3
If you are interested in booking an event, or just more information about the intellectual, cultural, and social programming in Falvey, please contact a member of the Scholarly Outreach team, which manages the events for the Library.



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Last Modified: June 26, 2015