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Digital Library houses unique Lincoln assassination manhunt materials

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Falvey Memorial Library’s Digital Library and Special Collections hold a special and fascinating repository of materials pertaining to Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, which commemorates its 150th anniversary today. The materials show a rare glimpse of the fervor and technology utilized in the manhunt to locate Lincoln’s assassin, John Wilkes Booth, in the days and weeks following the fatal shooting.

The following four features include links to digitized content about the assassination and hunt for the assassins, provided by Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator. Click on the blue hyperlinks to go directly to the materials’ digital holdings and data.

Visit the Digital Library anytime to view our comprehensive and diverse collection of rare books, manuscripts, realia and other digital content.

MEDIUM file for this DataModel

Special Order No. 61, April 16, 1865

Special Order No. 61, April 16, 1865

http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:95870


Special Order, No. 66, April 21, 1865

Special Order, No. 66, April 21, 1865

 

Special Order, No. 66, April 21, 1865

http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:95874


New York Tablet : A Family Journal, v. VIII, no. 47, April 22, 1865 (see pages 8+)

New York Tablet : A Family Journal, v. VIII, no. 47, April 22, 1865 (see pages 8+)

 

New York Tablet : A Family Journal, v. VIII, no. 47, April 22, 1865 (see pages 8+)
http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:292524


 

Letter, To: "My gentle unknown friend" From: Henry O. Nightingale, April 30, 1865

Letter, To: “My gentle unknown friend” From: Henry O. Nightingale, April 30, 1865

Letter, To: “My gentle unknown friend” From: Henry O. Nightingale, April 30, 1865
http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:23485


Resources and links provided by Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator.


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The Curious ‘Cat: What strategy would you recommend to prepare for finals?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “With about three weeks of classes left, what strategy would you recommend to prepare for finals?

Caitlin GammaCaitlin Gemma—“I would recommend going to the Library and setting aside time to study … I personally always go to the third-floor cubicles; that’s my space. I have one cubicle I really like. And I always study out and … really focus. That’s my strategy.”

 

 

 

 

ViscardiAnthony Viscardi—“Take advantage of all the resources available that the University has: the Writing Center, the math tutoring center, the VSB tutoring [on the Library’s second floor]. Those are all really helpful, and visiting your professors’ office hours for any additional help. … Drink a lot of coffee to stay up. … Those are really the difference makers.”

 

 

SpandanaSpandana Vanukuri—“Just go through the writing [class] notes, which I have written … when the professor says something, the important points. … And then go through the [PowerPoint] slides. That’s it. … That more than will do it for me.”

 

 

 

 

RS8780_DSC_3063-scrMichael Anderson—“I usually hold up in a room and don’t come out. … I usually get a room in Tolentine and spend long hours there until I’m ready. It’s not fun. … with whoever has the exams with me, we just  get a room and start a study group, basically, ten hours a day during finals week.”

 

 

 

Chang

Edward Chang—“With only three weeks left, students should be going over the textbooks—whatever texts they had before—having all that set before actually starting to study so they don’t have to cram. Basically, don’t procrastinate.”

 

 

 

 

Pieper

Jordan Pieper—“Try to get everything done the week before finals or done early. I’m an engineer so I write a lot of note sheets; that way I have all of my equations and all the information I need right on hand with me. That way I don’t need to worry about trying to search through it. Other than that there’s really not a lot I can do to prepare for engineering problems and so on. I also try to do a lot of practice problems.”


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“I Am the Resurrection and the Life” (John 11:25): An Easter Celebration from Special Collections

Laura Bang

Laura Bang

“I Am the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25): An Easter Celebration from Special Collections” is a broadly based exhibit that appeals to viewers on several levels, intellectual and visual. Designed by Laura Bang, Special and Digital Collections curatorial assistant, and mounted by Bang; Michael Foight, Special and Digital Collections coordinator; and Allison Dolbier, intern, the exhibit will remain on display until the end of April. Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer, created posters and other graphics for this exhibit.

In her introduction to the exhibit Bang says, “Easter is considered by many to be the most important observance of the Christian year. … This exhibit highlights some of the materials in Falvey Memorial Library’s Special Collections that pertain to Easter and spring celebrations.” In the same tall vertical case as Bang’s introduction are two books, Easter Garland by Priscilla Sawyer Lord and The Easter Book of Legends and Stories edited by Alice Isabel Hazeltine, Elva Sophronia Smith and Pamela Bianco.

Easter Garland is open to display two poems. The other book shows a photograph of a young boy dying Easter eggs, and on the opposite page is an article, “Foods of the Easter Season.” At the bottom of this case, a large book, Festivals & Rituals of Spain by Cristina Garcia Rodero and José Manuel Caballero Bonald, is open to a double-page spread, a colorful photograph of purple-robed men wearing tall pointed hats and playing very long horns, part of a Holy Week celebration.

In the adjacent case are four books: The Temple: Sacred Poems & Private Ejaculations, Little Pollys Pomes [sic], Christmas-eve and Easter-day and The Villanova Monthly (1893). The Temple … by George Herbert, a seventeenth century poet, is open to show “Easter Wings,” an example of concrete poetry in which the text forms a shape which is “as important an element as the verses themselves” (Bang). Little Pollys Pomes, written by T. A. Daly in a child’s voice, shows Polly’s poem, “Easter.” Christmas-eve and Easter-day by Robert Browning and The Villanova Monthly both display Easter poems; “He Is Risen” in The Villanova Monthly was written by R. A. G., a Villanova student.

RS8770_Girl's Own Paper

The Girl’s Own Paper

Popular culture is presented in the next case with issues of Golden Days (1880), The Girl’s Own Paper (March 26, 1898) and The Chicago Ledger (April 9, 1910) each displaying articles and/or poems relating to Easter.

Religious works are shown in the next three cases. In one case are a Biblia Sacra Polyglotta and a Missale Romanum. The large Biblia Sacra Polyglotta, published c.1800, is open to Luke 23-24, the verses telling of Jesus’ Crucifixion and Resurrection. Bang explains, “A polyglot book displays side-by-side blocks of the same text in several languages. This edition contains text in Greek, English, Hebrew, Latin Vulgate, German, French, Italian and Old Spanish.”

Missale Romanum (Roman Missal)

Missale Romanum (Roman Missal)

An equally large Missale Romanum (Roman Missal), printed in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1773 is in the same case. A Roman Missal is a liturgical book containing the texts used in the celebration of the Roman Catholic Mass. This Missale Romanum is open to pages showing on the left an illustration of the Resurrection and on the right the text for Easter Sunday (Resurrection Day) Mass.

Displayed alone in the next case is a large volume, an open Biblia Latina. The original Biblia Latina, more commonly called the Gutenberg Bible, was printed by Johannes Gutenberg in Mainz, Germany, in the 1450s using movable type, the first important book printed this way. It began the age of printed books; only 48 copies or partial copies of the Gutenberg Bible survive.

The Biblia Latina shown here is a facsimile, one of only 1,000 copies printed in the United States in 1961. This facsimile is open to the beginning of the book of Acts “which describes Jesus’ appearance to the Apostles after his Resurrection …” (Bang). Although the Bible is printed, its colorful decorations continue the tradition of hand-illuminated manuscripts and the colorful decorations on the right-hand page are truly spectacular.

RS6350_Kells-Christ-in-Majesty-copy

Book of Kells, Christ in Majesty

Three books occupy the final case in this Easter exhibit. Most impressive both in size and illustrations is the Evangelorum Quattuor Codex Cenannensis, the Book of Kells, a facsimile printed in 1950. The original Book of Kells was probably written and decorated c.800 at a monastery at Kells, Ireland. Today it is housed in the library of Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. The Book of Kells, a Hiberno-Saxon manuscript richly illuminated on vellum (calf skin), contains the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. It was likely intended to be used at the altar of the monastic church. Special Collections’ facsimile is opened to show two of the many illustrations, a Christ in Majesty framed in elaborate Celtic interlace and a cross carpet page. Cross carpet pages are full-page cross designs without text; this one incorporates eight circles and is filled with Celtic interlace. These two pages are part of the Gospel of St. Matthew.

A much smaller book, The Christian Year: Thoughts in Verse for the Sundays and Holydays Throughout the Year by John Keble, published in 1874, is open to display a sepia-colored Crucifixion on the left and “Good Friday,” a poem on the right. Kehle was a poet and churchman. The third book, by Pacificus Baker, The Lenten Monitor. Of Moral Reflections and Devout Aspirations On the Gospels: For Each Day From Ash-Wednesday to Easter Sunday, is open to “At Blessing of the Palms” and “Reflection.” Baker was an eighteenth century English Minorite friar; this volume was published in 1834.

After a long, bitter cold winter, this exhibit welcomes the Easter season, the beginning of spring. On display are works both sacred and secular. It is an exhibit worth viewing and contemplating.


imagesArticle and photographs by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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Women’s History Month: Power & Magic in the Kitchen

Historically speaking, the kitchen is a woman’s domain. Women were chained to their stoves for hours on end. Cooking skills were right up there with other desirable traits, such as purity, appearance, and obedience to men. As Laura Schenone puts it in her book, A thousand years over a hot stove, “cooking reveals itself as a source of power and magic, and, at the same time, a source of oppression in women’s lives.”

To paraphrase Schenone, what women learned and what they knew wouldn’t be found in a book. It was passed down in the oral tradition, shared with daughters and friends. Women shared information and found support for more than just cooking. They relied on each other to learn healing remedies, to craft utensils and containers, to secure moral support, and to learn survival skills.

When times made life difficult and challenged even the most experienced cook, women found ways to feed their families with what little food was available. They would pool their resources or come to the aid of a hungry family. Women created new recipes to stretch the limited types and quantities of food.

Not unlike other American households, during World War II, Eleanor Roosevelt’s housekeeper, Ms. Henrietta Nesbitt found ways to deal with meat rationing and developed “meat-stretcher” recipes. There is one such recipe in The Husbandman, an agricultural newspaper. This newspaper was published during America’s Gilded Age, a period when the women’s suffrage movement was strengthening in the United States.

The original recipe for scrap pie is below. My adaptation follows the image.

Scrap Pie – 1886

The husbandman, v. XIII, no. 640, Wednesday, November 24, 1886

Scrap Pie Women's History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scrap Pie – 2015

1 lb. ground beef

1 lb. white or red potatoes, peeled and chopped into large chunks

½ large onion, finely chopped

2 tbsp. chicken, beef, or vegetable broth

1 egg, beaten

4 tbsp. butter

¼ tsp. pepper

½ tsp. salt

Preheat oven to 375°. Prepare and assemble all ingredients.

Brown the ground beef in a skillet. Drain and set aside. Sauté onion and set aside. Use 1 tbsp. butter to coat the inside of a 9” pie plate. Cover the inside bottom of the pie plate with ground beef. Drizzle broth over beef. Layer the sautéed onion over the beef. Boil chopped potatoes in large pot of water until potatoes are tender. Turn off burner, drain and return potatoes to pot. Mash potatoes until smooth. Add the beaten egg, 1 tbsp. butter, salt, and pepper to the mashed potatoes. Whisk by hand or use an electric hand mixer until smooth. Cover the beef with the mashed potato mixture. Use a dinner fork to create a design on the potatoes. Use remaining 2 tbsp. of butter to dot the top of the potatoes.

beefbeef onionsbeef potato

 

 

 

 

 

Bake at 375° until top is browned, about 30 – 35 minutes.

Scrap Pie done

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makes 4-6 servings. Serve with salad or cooked vegetables.

Below are links to books, articles and blogs for your reading, watching and listening pleasure.

A thousand years over a hot stove can be requested through E-ZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan.

What we lose in losing Ladies’ Home Journal (Thanks to Laura Bang, Special Collections, for the link.)

The First Kitchen

Women’s History and Food History: New Ways of Seeing American Life

#FoodieFriday: 5 Kitchen Appliances and Food Creations that Transformed Women’s Lives in the 20th Century

Women’s History Month – Audio and Video

My thanks to Michael Foight, Special Collections, for sending me the link to our digitized copy of The Husbandman.


LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnailMonthly food blog feature by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion, and team leader, Access Services.


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‘Caturday Night News

Have you noticed that people don’t hold onto their old newspapers like they used to? We do. If you want to read more about Villanova Wildcats sports history, we’ve got digitized back issues of The Villanovan before they started publishing online editions.

NCAA 1985 Division I Mens Championship

NCAA 1985 Division 1 Men’s Championship Bracket, The Villanovan, March 22, 1985


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Traditional Irish Dance Music

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


abstract-retro-shamrock-design_mkwW9GSt. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner, and right now you can’t turn on the morning news without hearing that chipper jig jingle introducing the Irish segment between the politics and the weather—not that I’m complaining! I, like many people, am a fan of that traditional Irish dance music. And speaking of morning news features, the subtle jealously I experience while watching a crew of kids step-dancing away is pretty amusing (I so could’ve done that! How hard can it be?). I really don’t claim to know much about Irish culture, my Callaghan-Gallagher bloodline and having completed James Joyce’s Ulysses en totale notwithstanding, but luckily Falvey has enough information to keep me in the know. When thinking about that traditional music, I decided I wanted to know more about the actual instruments involved in making that Irish sound—you know that sound. The sound.

With the help of resources archived in the Philadelphia Ceili Group collection, hosted by Villanova’s Digital Library, I listened a little more closely to the individual instruments that make up that St. Patrick’s Day sound. A little light Google research has led me to believe (and experts, correct me if I’m wrong) that the traditional Irish sound is typically made up of Uilleann pipes, fiddles, tin whistles, and flutes. Click on the names of the instruments to listen to recordings from past Philadelphia Ceili Group events!

Uilleann Pipes
Uilleann pipes are nifty because if, like me, you don’t have a honed ear for those bag instruments, you might have expected something identical to the Scottish bagpipe. They sound similar, but they are indeed different. Check out this Youtube vid to see them battling it out! The bagpipes incorporate blown air; Uilleann pipes are pressed under the arm.

Fiddle
What’s the difference between a fiddle and a violin? Not much. Fiddling is a folk style of playing a violin. Nothing makes me want to get up and dance more than an enthusiastically played fiddle.

Tin Whistle and Flute
I have a cheap tin whistle I found somewhere in my grandfather’s junk cabinet as a kid, and the only thing I can play is Concerning Hobbits from The Lord of the Rings (this isn’t me, and I’m not this good). I know I’m not maximizing its potential or anything, but hey, it sounds pretty.

If you’re interested in learning more about Irish music beyond the instrumentation of traditional dance music, we also have a few text-based resources.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, everyone!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Art of Spring Break: Cabinets of Curiosities: Highlights from Special Collections

ARTOFSB
CABINETS

“Cabinets of Curiosity: Highlights from Special Collections,” a new exhibit on Falvey’s first floor, consists of six cabinets highlighting a variety of materials recently acquired by Falvey’s Special Collections. Photograph albums, a scrapbook, children’s books, adult novels, a tour book for California, a stereoscope and cards (double photographs that appear in three dimensions when viewed in a stereoscope), and a World War II Japanese portable volt-and-current meter are just some of the items in this exhibit.

METER.

Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant, curated the exhibit. Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator, helped Bang install the exhibit. Joanne Quinn, Communication and Service Promotion team leader and graphic designer, created the graphics for “Cabinets of Curiosities.”

Bang introduces the exhibit saying, “This ‘highlights’ exhibit features a selection of recently acquired materials. Over the past two years, we have focused out collection efforts primarily in the areas of popular culture and materials and upcoming historic anniversaries, particularly the current centennial of the First World War.”

CHILDRENS-BOOKS

“I love these ‘hodge-podge’ exhibits,” she adds, “because they give us a chance to show some of the great stuff that doesn’t fit in our regular-themed exhibits, like the stereoscope viewer.”

Two recent donations—Irish-themed books given by Patrick Moss, and a World War II collection from the family of James D. Reap, Jr.—are featured in the “Cabinets of Curiosities.”

The “Cabinets of Curiosities” will remain on display until mid to late March, followed by an Easter exhibit.


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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The 8:30 | Things to know before you go (2/25)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

EXTENDED HOURS FOR MIDTERMS!
The library will be open until 3:00AM. Study party!


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


Don’t miss the Villanova Digital Library content round-up!

content roundup dig lib small

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


GETTING READY FOR BRACKETOLOGY!
Bracket Kallie Smaller
Outreach intern Kallie is a profesh taper. You’ll never see cleaner blank spaces (sorry, T. Swift)! Hint: these March Madness Matchups might make your stomach growl. Look for the voting board by Falvey’s entrance right after Spring Break. Nom!


FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK
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If you give our page a like on Facebook, you’ll be so in the know. Not only do we share links to all the goings-on of our blog, but we also post announcements and share very cool content from all around the internet!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Every page of every book was a peep-hole into the realm of knowledge. His hunger fed upon what he read, and increased.” – Martin Eden by Jack London


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.

 


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Share the Love: Macaroons and Chocolate

SHARETHELOVE2

Like the title says, we’re here to talk about macaroons, referred to by the official website of France as “seductive little biscuits,” and chocolate, traditionally consumed on Valentine’s Day.

If you read the play “A Doll’s House”, then you probably remember Nora’s obsession with macaroons and the significance of this simple cookie in the play. A similar theme plays out in the movie “Chocolat” where chocolate is taboo during Lent but its overwhelming allure leads the residents of a quaint French village to hide their consumption of it from the mayor.

London Art of Cookery title pageI’m using a recipe from “The London Art of Cookery and Domestic Housekeepers’ Complete Assistant On a New Plan Made Plain and Easy to the Understanding of Every Housekeeper, Cook, and Servant in the Kingdom,” written in 1783. How’s that for a title? We have the print edition in Special Collections, but there are also other digitized editions available.

An important distinction needs to be made. Macaroons, as they are made in France, are almond biscuits sandwiched together with jam, chocolate, or other sweet fillings. The “other” type of macaroons contain shredded coconut. And although the recipe from The London Art of Cookery simply calls them Macaroons, it’s actually a recipe for French macaroons, not coconut macaroons. It’s confusing. I know.

Macaroons

 

 

 

 

One detour from the recipe will be the addition of chocolate ganache filling between two macarons, which is how they would be made in a French pattisserie. I will use the 1783 recipe for the cookies and a Food Network recipe for the ganache. And of course, I had French cafe music playing on Spotify, for inspiration.

Ingredients:

1 lb. sugar

1 lb. almonds, blanched and beaten (almond meal)

A few drops of rose water

7 egg whites, frothed

macaroon batterAfter combining the sugar, almond meal, and a few drops of rose water, I stirred in the frothed egg whites. The egg whites should form stiff peaks before being added to the sugar and almond meal. Using a small spoon, drop round dollops of batter about two inches apart on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Or you can use a pastry bag. The recipe ends with the instruction, “put them in the oven” without so much as an oven temperature or length of cooking time. I checked the Food Network for a suggested oven temperature (325) and time (13-15 minutes).

There was no measurement for the rose water so I used ½ tsp., but next time I would skip it altogether. It was a noticeable and not necessarily pleasant flavor, but that’s just my opinion. Luckily, the chocolate ganache soon remedied that. The cookies came out a little flat, not like the macarons I’ve come to expect. They tasted good so, who am I to complain? One last tip: make extra ganache. It’s great for dipping strawberries.

macaroons plated

To quote Nora, and although they didn’t turn out perfectly, “I shall have one, just a little one–or at most two. I am tremendously happy.”

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

 

 

 

I want to thank Michael Foight and Laura Bang in Special Collections at Falvey Memorial Library for locating suitable recipes from Falvey’s print and digital collections. Their help was invaluable.


‘Caturday feature written by Luisa Cywinski, writer, Communication & Service Promotion Team and team leader, Access Services.

 


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Falvey Memorial Library 2014 Year in Review

2014 was a busy year for Falvey Memorial Library. We acknowledged successes, welcomed new faculty and nationally acclaimed authors, waxed nostalgic over Choose Your Own Adventure books, said goodbye to old friends and even opened a 3D ‘automatic virtual environment’ – the first CAVE ever situated in a library setting with reserved time for public access.  The following is a sample of our year in pictures. Enjoy!

Falvey Memorial Library 2014

Falvey Memorial Library 2014

2014-02-14 16.06.01

Who can forget “Spring” Semester of 2014…

...a wintry winter...

…a wintry winter…

...that eventually thawed.

…that eventually thawed.

A very busy event season gave patrons lots of choices!

A very busy event season gave patrons lots of choices!

Poets, scholars, politicians...

Poets, scholars, politicians…

Shakespeare turned 400...

Shakespeare turned 450…

Wilbur the Pig took on Oedipus...

Wilbur the Pig took on Oedipus…

Peeps took over the study rooms...

…Peeps took over the study rooms…

...and we celebrated Smart Money Week.

…and we celebrated Smart Money Week.

We offered tips...

We offered tips…

Help and smiles...

Help and smiles from now retired Donna Chadderton

...and opportunities to "Choose Your Own Adventure" at VU Pop II, which celebrated Interactive Fiction.

…and opportunities to “Choose Your Own Adventure” at VU Pop II, which celebrated Interactive Fiction.

We said goodbye to some old friends...

We said goodbye to some retiring old friends…Mimi DeLenge, Sue Connor and Marie R.,

Librarian Kimberley Bugg (off to pursue a PhD!)

Librarian Kimberley Bugg, (off to pursue a PhD!)

Kelly Forst and Corey Arnold

Graduate Assistants Kelly Forst and Corey Arnold

Susan Markley

and Librarian Susan Markley, who retired after 35 years of service to the University.

...and miss dear ones, like Jim Fox.

And we miss dear ones, like former Access Service ace and proud Villanova alumni Jim Fox, who passed away this year.

And we celebrated our Falvey Scholars

And we celebrated our Falvey Scholars, including

Noor F. Shaik

Noor F. Shaik

Student and community poets at our annual Open Mic Poetry exhibition

…and student and community poets at our annual Open Mic Poetry exhibition.

The Class of 2014 moved on...

The Class of 2014 moved on…

..and the CAVE began to move in

..and the CAVE began to move in

Along with improvements to Falvey Hall side patio

Along with improvements to Falvey Hall side patio

Continued progress on the daCortona masterpiece

Continued progress on the daCortona masterpiece

..and kudos for Dave Uspal, here celebrating his FACULTAS award with fellow tech team members, Dave Lacy and Chris Hallberg.

..and kudos for Dave Uspal, here celebrating his FACULTAS award with fellow tech team members, Dave Lacy and Chris Hallberg.

Before we knew it, summer was over and we were welcoming the Class of 2018!

Before we knew it, summer was over and we were welcoming the Class of 2018…

New Faculty Reception

New Faculty Reception

Multicultural Student Reception

Teresa A. Nance, PhD, Assistant Vice President, Multicultural Affairs Associate Professor at the annual Multicultural Student Reception in the Holy Grounds lounge, and

New interim director, Robert DeVos, PhD

and the Library’s new interim director, Robert DeVos, PhD.

Fall brought a new ACS display, a collaboration between First Year Experience Librarian Robert LeBlanc and ACS program faculty mentor Gregory Hoskins, PhD

Fall brought a new ACS display, a collaboration between First Year Experience Librarian Robert LeBlanc and ACS program faculty mentor Gregory Hoskins, PhD,

multiple WWI centennial exhibits, including Home Before the Leaves - wwionline.org - a collaboration between our Digital Library and other Great War scholars

multiple WWI centennial exhibits, including Home Before the Leaves – wwionline.org – a collaboration between our Digital Library and other Great War scholars,

A visit from Wes Moore, author of the One Book Villanova 2014-15 selection, The Other Wes Moore

A visit from Wes Moore, author of the One Book Villanova 2014-15 selection, The Other Wes Moore,

...and the opening of the CAVE facility.

…and the opening of the CAVE facility.

As fall semester rolled on

As fall semester rolled on

We reminded students to text a librarian,

We reminded students to text a librarian,

...ask questions!...

…ask questions!…

..and NOT get their pretzels in a twist over finals!!

..and NOT get their pretzels in a twist over finals!!

We said congrats to Access Services' Bill Greene for his 40th Year Service Anniversary (here he's getting a congrats kiss from Ann Stango!)

We said congrats to Access Services’ Bill Greene for his 40th Year Service Anniversary (here he’s getting a congrats kiss from Ann Stango!)

Business librarian and USC rep Linda Hauck made a beautiful contribution to the Villanova Holiday Bazaar (thanks, Linda!),

Business librarian and USC rep Linda Hauck made a beautiful contribution to the Villanova Holiday Bazaar (thanks, Linda!),

...and we decorated a tree!

…and we decorated a tree!

As 2014 rocks on into 2015, we want to thank all of the Villanova Community for a wonderful year. As Edith Lovejoy Pierce once said, "the book is called Opportunity and its first chapter is New Year's Day."

As 2014 rocks on into 2015, we want to thank all of the Villanova Community for a wonderful year. As Edith Lovejoy Pierce once said, “the book is called Opportunity and its first chapter is New Year’s Day.” Let’s all embrace this new, blessed opportunity to get it right.


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Last Modified: December 28, 2014