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‘Caturday: Thankful ‘Cats

The ‘Cats who worked on The Villanovan newspaper filled the November 1916 issue primarily with their Thanksgiving-themed original stories and poetry, including the hymn below by Gerard F. Hart, class of 1919. Their works were especially poignant as one of the worst moments of World War I, the Battle of the Somme, took place that year.

May all Villanovans enjoy Thanksgiving with their family and friends. Amen.

Villanovan Nov 1916 Villanovan 1916 Nov poem

Images from the Villanova University Digital Library.

‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, writer for the Communication and Service Promotion team and team leader of Access Services.


‘Caturday: Take Comfort

cat waiting

Thanksgiving hasn’t changed much in the last hundred years. As shown on the cover of Comfort magazine, a journal “devoted to art, literature, science and the home circle,” the turkey takes center stage as families gather together. (‘Cats have to wait for scraps.) Go a little further in and you’ll find recipes on page 5 that will have your mouth watering, especially the cinnamon rolls. Thinking of raising turkeys? Check out the fact-filled article, Poultry Farming for Women (p. 14). In the mood to make Christmas gifts? Go directly to page 40! This journal isn’t just tips and tricks, there are stories too. Find out the truth of the Van Alvords’ Thanksgiving!

This issue is just packed with old-timey holiday goodness! Read it today and you’ll be ready for Thanksgiving and beyond!

Comfort Thanksgiving 1913


Images of Comfort magazine and Cat and Mouse from the Villanova University Digital Library.

‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, writer for Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of Access Services.


The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (11/9)


Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!


Reception for James & Kathryn Murphy. Thursday, November 12 at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Please join us as we celebrate James and Kathryn Murphy’s planned donation of 300 signed, first-edition Irish poetry books to the Library.

The event marks the unique contributions the Murphys have made to Irish studies and also Villanova’s long standing connection with leading Irish writers, such as Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. Award-winning poet and former Heimbold Chair, Moya Cannon, will present readings.

Did you know—elipses

All University publications, both print and online, adhere to AP style. To be consistent with University publications, Falvey’s online and print publications also adhere to AP style (see FML Style Guidelines).

AP Style evolved so as to fit the maximum amount of words in a space. That goal is the reason for the following:

Ellipses—“In general, treat an ellipsis as a three-letter word, con- structed with three periods and two spaces, as shown here” ( … ).


how to be detectiveNEW MEDIA NEWS

Looking for a job that doesn’t pay, but that rewards you in other ways? Consider proofreading this vintage book as part of the Distributed Proofreaders project.  You could learn How to Be a Detective while you’re on the job! Find out more on the Blue Electrode blog today!






Did you hear the news before the weekend? Philadelphia has been designated a “World Heritage City,” the first in the United States, and will now be a city categorized with the likes of Paris, Jerusalem, and Prague. What an honor! As reported on Philly.com, the title is more than just a gold star, as it offers the potential of increased reputation and tourism.



Today in 1934, astronomer Carl Sagan was born. Last month we ran a quote celebrating Neil deGrasse Tyson’s birthday (October 5) and mentioned his praised airtime as the host of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. But did you know Carl Sagan was his predecessor as host of Cosmos: A Personal Voyage – a majorly influential piece of scientific documentary? Both deGrasse Tyson and Sagan share similar vocations as science popularizers and while Sagan has since passed, his contributions toward bringing space to the public eye live on.

carl sagan

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.” – Carl Sagan


If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


‘Caturday: Wildcats at War

Vietnam Rev Robert J Walsh VU Pres 1969 photo

Rev. Robert J. Welsh, OSA, STD

The Vietnam War started in 1955 and ended 20 years later in 1975. In the midst of the War, Villanova students and faculty here in the States were not idle. Many issues of The Villanovan contained reports of their activity and responses to the War. Below are two images from the Oct. 8 and Oct. 15, 1969 issues of The Villanovan that highlight the campus response to the moratorium to end the war.

Rev. Robert J. Welsh, OSA, STD, was University president from 1967-1971 and wrote “We must work and pray that the way to a just and lasting peace may soon be found.”

As noted on the Villanova Digital Library search page, issues of The Villanovan “are fully searchable from the Library Catalog and are in PDF format for easy reading, printing and downloading. Search the fulltext in the … Digital Library search box or in the library Search tab.”

Vietnam Rev Robert J Walsh VU Pres 1969

vietnam moratorium events Oct 15 1969


LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnail‘Caturday blog by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of the Access Services team.


The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (10/7)


Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!


Cultural Studies Food Week–The Taste of Justice: Rhetoric and Reality. Monday-Friday, Oct. 26-30. In our annual speaker series, students will learn about the politics of food production and consumption as they relate to nutrition and other issues. Each evening’s event will include Q and A for students as well as tasty culinary treats.

Did you know—

Need a Quiet Place to Study? This short video provides a lighthearted look at a resource the Library takes seriously:
quiet study spaces.


how to do chemical tricksHey, gang! Since you’ll have all kinds of time on your hands next week, why not try out some nifty chemistry projects? The Blue Electrode blog has just what you need! A book that Falvey recently contributed to Project Gutenberg, How To Do Chemical Tricks, is now available for your reading pleasure. It contains “some highly amusing and instructive tricks!” As noted in the review by resident blogger Demian Katz, “some of the experiments might still be fun to perform today (if you can figure out how to modernize the archaic terminology).”



Ginger reading book

You’ve heard of eating local – how about reading local?  A handful of libraries are establishing programs of one kind or another to promote local authors to their local patrons. This is, of course, a really great help to burgeoning authors–but it also highlights the ways a public library can be part of a “literary ecosystem” for a particular community.

If you’re interested in the works and writings of people in our Villanova community, check out the Community Bibliography.



It is Hispanic Heritage Month – a celebration that recognizes the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States. Technically a month that straddles two, HHM is celebrated each year between September 15 and October 15,and includes the anniversaries of the independence of five Latin American countries.

The term Hispanic or Latino refers to Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish cultures or origins regardless of race. According to the 2010 Census, 50.5 million Americans identify themselves as Latino or Hispanic, representing a 3% increase since 2000.

Each day this month we will reproduce one of twenty countries represented on a joint poster project sponsored by the library and the Office of Mission and Ministry. Each poster features QR codes linking to premier resources that the library has for researching Hispanic history, culture or language and more importantly, the names of the specialized subject librarians devoted to aspects of these studies. Contact Susan Ottignon (Romance Languages and Literature,) Jutta Seibert (History and Art History) or Merrill Stein (Geography and Political Science) for further research needs or assistance. Posters designed by library Communication team leader, Joanne Quinn, with the assistance of Ottignon and Stein. The library wishes to thank Christopher Janosik, PhD and the Office of Mission & Ministry for their support of this project.

BOOKTOBER – Meet the millennial Forsythe Pendleton Jones III!

1460728658481483042First of all, who’s willing to admit that they knew that was Jughead Jones’ real name? And sure, Archie may be listed first on the comic book marquee, but we all know Juggie is the real star of the show. Perennially cool under pressure – until something comes between him and a stack of cheeseburgers – Jug is always the aloof onlooker, the chill bystander as Arch makes a fool of himself fawning over Betty and/or Veronica. Well, now it’s official – Jughead’s causing a big wave in the comic book world by getting a modern makeover by Chip Zdarsky (Howard the Duck) and artist Erica Henderson (The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl). It comes out today, Riverdale!

On this day in 2003, Arnold Schwarzenegger was elected governor of California. As most know, Schwarzenegger is a body builder gone action movie star, most well-known for his roles in The Terminator, Predator, and Conan the Barbarian. As most people may not know, Schwarzenegger lurks Reddit fitness threads and has a very cool habit of being a fitspiration for unsuspecting Redditors. Cool dude.

arnold s

“The mind is the limit. As long as the mind can envision the fact that you can do something, you can do it, as long as you really believe 100 percent.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger


If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Commemorating 150 years of the study of genetics: “Gregor Mendel, OSA, and the Origin of Genetics”


“Gregor Mendel, OSA, and the Origin of Genetics,” an exhibit on Falvey’s first floor, introduces Mendel; commemorates the 150th anniversary of Mendel’s paper, “Experiments in Plant Hybridization” (Versuche űber Pflanzenhybriden); looks at Mendel on campus; and offers a small display related to the Mendel Medal.

The name Mendel is familiar to the Villanova community as the name of a campus building, the Mendel Science Center, usually called Mendel Hall. But how many are aware of the man for whom the building is named? Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) is the acknowledged father of genetics based upon a paper he presented in 1865 and published the following year.

RS9958_DSC_0290-scrHe was born in the German-speaking Austrian Empire (now the Czech Republic) to a farming family. At age twenty one he joined the Augustinian Abbey of St. Thomas in Brűnn to further his education. The abbot, who was interested in heredity of plants and animals, encouraged Mendel to experiment with plant genetics in the abbey’s five-acre garden. As noted he presented his research, but it was virtually ignored until 1900.

Falvey’s exhibit begins in the vertical case with an introduction to the exhibit and Mendel’s experimentation with plant hybridization using peas. A large eye-catching banner (from University Archives) with a life-like portrait of Gregor Mendel, OSA, commemorates the 80th anniversary of the Mendel Medal. Also in this case are a few books about Mendel and a small framed portrait.

Five more themed cases continue the exhibit, beginning with “Early Life” and ending with “The Mendel Medal.” Illustrating Mendel’s “Early Life” are a children’s book from Special Collections, Gregor Mendel: The Friar Who Grew Peas by Cheryl Bardol; Life of Mendel by Hugo Iltis (Augustinian Historical Institute); views of Brno (location of the Abbey of St. Thomas where Mendel lived and worked); views of the Mendel Museum and the foundations of his greenhouse at the Abbey; and select pages from a manuscript photograph album, The Mendel Tradition in Brno, Czechoslovakia by Herbert Christian Hanson.

The next case, “Versuche űber Pflanzenhybriden (Experiments on Plant Hybridization),” shows a facsimile reprint of Mendel’s paper as it appeared in print in 1866, a program from the presentation of a copy of “Verhandlungen des naturforschenden Vereines in Brűnn” by the Augustinians of the Province of St. Thomas of Villanova to the University and other related publications. To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Mendel’s paper, “Experiments in Plant Hybridization,” the University will hold a symposium on Monday, Dec. 7.

“After the Pea Paper” case displays assorted publications from the Augustinian Historical Institute and Special Collections, including Mendel’s Dwarf (1998), fiction by Simon Mawer. A placard tells the viewer that Mendel’s paper was almost unknown until the early 1900s.

“Mendel at Villanova” displays copies of the Villanovan with articles about the dedication of the first Mendel Hall in 1929 and the current Mendel Science Center in 1961. This display features photographs of the 1910 statue of Mendel in Brno and of the one on campus beside the Mendel Science Center.


“The Mendel Medal: Honoring Pioneers in the Sciences” case presents photographs of some of the recipients, programs from the award ceremonies, a 1929 Villanovan article about the presentation of the first Mendel Medal to John A. Kolmer, MD, and an obverse image of the medal as designed and sculpted by John R. Sinnock.

The Mendel Medal, named in honor of Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), OSA, “the father of modern genetics,” is now awarded annually to an outstanding scientist. The award was established in 1928 and given each year until 1943. From 1946 until 1968, the Mendel Medal was awarded only eight times and from 1968 until 1992 there were no awards. In 1992 the Mendel Medal award was reestablished and has been given each year to an outstanding scientist.

This year’s Mendel Medal recipient is the Nobel Prize-winning biochemist, Brian Kobilka, MD, of Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kobilka will give the 2015 Mendel Medal Lecture at 2:00 p.m., October 2, in the Villanova Room, Connelly Center.

This very educational exhibit about Gregor Mendel, OSA, his important scientific discovery and his relationship with Villanova is well worth visiting several times; there is far more here than can be readily absorbed in just one visit. This exhibit is a collaborative effort, drawing from materials owned by University Archives, Falvey’s Special Collections and the Augustinian Historical Institute. It was planned and materials were curated by Special Collections and Digital Library Coordinator, Michael Foight and Digital & Special Collections Curatorial Assistant Laura Bang. Graphics were designed by Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer. The exhibit will be open throughout this semester.


Alice Bampton is a visual specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.


Project Website Launched: Mill Creek Valley


Craig Bailey, PhD, associate professor of history, reads his edifying and entertaining introduction to the Mill Creek Valley project website.

The Aurelius Digital Scholarship Initiative at Falvey Memorial Library supports digital humanities projects and digital scholarship here at Villanova. Our digital humanities superheroes are Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant, and David Uspal, senior web specialist for Library Services and Scholarly Applications, and together they work with classes to produce fascinating and forward-thinking digital scholarship. Past classroom projects include the Ardmore Project, a digital edition of El Perú en sus tradiciones, an su historia, en su arte, Travels Through Greco – Roman Antiquity, and a series of DH workshops for graduate students covering topics such as coding basics, audio editing, and mapmaking. This past Monday, Bang and Uspal joined Craig Bailey, PhD, associate professor of history as he and his undergraduate class launched an interactive website tracing the transformation of the Mill Creek Valley.


Dave Uspal explains the website building process and introduces the audience to the wonders of responsive resizing.

The launch took place at 3:00 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, and Dr. Bailey presented a talk entitled “Changing Landscapes: People and Place in the Mill Creek Valley, Lower Merion c.1870-c.1920.” In spring 2015, ten junior-year students participating in a research seminar with the Department of History undertook a group project to examine how the farms and mills of the Mill Creek Valley transformed into the familiar residential properties of today. Each student chose a property from an atlas published in 1877, traced that property’s development over time, and reconstructed the lives of the inhabitants. Working alongside Digital Humanities staff in Falvey Memorial Library, students constructed an interactive website to communicate their research.


The satisfying reveal of a finished product.


Changing Landscapes: People and Places in the Mill Creek Valley, Lower Merion c.1870-c.1920

Check it out!



Now on Display: Sinking of the Lusitania Special Collections Exhibit

The RMS Lusitania, designed to be the fastest ocean liner in service, was launched in Sept. 1907. Owned by the Cunard Line, Ltd., her maiden voyage was from Liverpool, England, to New York. Her 68,000 horse-power engines allowed the Lusitania to travel at an average speed of over 25 knots per hour (28.8 miles per hour). That same year the top speed for a Model T Ford was about 45 miles per hour; a Stutz Bearcat had a top speed of 85 miles per hour. For comparison, by 1969 the Queen Elizabeth, another large Cunard luxury liner, had a maximum sustained speed of 28.5 knots (32.8 miles per hour).

In 1913, with war clouds looming, the Lusitania was sent to dry dock to be fitted for government service: ammunition magazines and hidden gun mounts were installed on her decks.
On May 1, 1915, the Lusitania, captained by William Turner, left New York bound for Liverpool on what became her last voyage. Although the German embassy had placed advertisements in New York newspapers warning that any ship sailing into the “European War Zone” might be attacked by German submarines, the Lusitania nevertheless sailed, carrying 1,264 passengers, including 124 children and infants, and 693 crew members.

At 2:10 p.m. on May 7 a German submarine, U-20 captained by Walter Schwieger, torpedoed the Lusitania as she cruised eight miles off the coast of Ireland. After the torpedo hit, a second, larger explosion quickly followed, and within eighteen minutes the Lusitania sank. Schweiger said in his log, “… great confusion on board … they must have lost their heads.” (“The Lusitania.” HistoryLearningSite.co.uk. 2014. Web) One thousand one hundred ninety five of the 1,959 people aboard the Luisitania died, 123 Americans among them. Captain Turner survived although he had been washed overboard and spent over three hours in the sea.

Installing the Lusitania exhibit are  (l-r): Laura Bang, Alison Dolbier and Marjory Haines.

Installing the Lusitania exhibit are (l-r): Laura Bang, Alison Dolbier and Marjory Haines.

This event sets the stage for the current Special Collections exhibit, “‘Too Fast for Any Submarine’: The Last Voyage of the Lusitania,” curated by Allison Dolbier, a Digital Library intern. Laura Bang, Digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant; Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator; and Marjory Haines, intern, helped Dobier install the exhibit, which fills seven display cases. Joanne Quinn, graphic designer and Communication and Service Promotion team leader, created the graphics. The exhibit is multi-faceted, incorporating a wide variety of materials: newspapers, children’s books, two medals, photographs and more.

2015-05-05 17.11.22A large poster, “Dastardly Deed!” captures the eye and leads one to the beginning of the exhibit in the upright case; the dastardly deed is, of course, the German U-boat’s attack. On the top shelf is the curator’s introduction, “A Fateful Voyage.” And on the same shelf is a color postcard of the Lusitania, mailed in 1909. On the next shelf are a 1913 two-page advertisement for the Cunard Steamship Co. in The Fra: A Journal of Affirmation, “Are You a Citizen of the World? An Advertisement by Elbert Hubbard.” There is a newspaper from Panama City, May 9, 1915, with a prominent headline, “Death’s Toll of the Lusitania, 1346.” There are also a menu and tickets in a frame as well as a copy of an advertisement for the Lusitania with a “Notice” below warning travelers. The “Notice” is signed by the Imperial German Embassy.

On the bottom of this case is a bright red flag with a golden yellow lion, a Cunard Steamship Company flag on loan from Eugene L. DiOrio, a small bottle containing rust from the Lusitania and its certificate of authenticity, and Exploring the “Lusitania”: Probing the Mysteries of the Sinking That Changed History, 1995, by Robert D. Ballard and Spencer Dunmore. This book is open to show the Lusitania as it appears underwater today.

IMG_2146Flanking this cabinet is a large framed print, “The Cunard Line Steamships: Lusitania and Mauretania.”
There are six more cases, each labeled “Too fast for any submarine,” the claim made for the Lusitania. These cases contain a variety of materials such as books, a newspaper scrapbook open to a clipping with the headline. “U. S. Ship Torpedoed; American Lives Lost,” pamphlets from 1915 and ’17, two medals, and much more.

One case is dedicated to “The Irish advocate for Germany … and Independence,” and another case focuses on “German-Americans and the case for American neutrality.” These two cases remind viewers that the United States is and was a nation of immigrants and there were often conflicting opinions about the Great War, World War I.


Highly informative and often visually appealing, this is an exhibit worth multiple visits to fully absorb its offerings. The exhibit will continue until mid-September.

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Digital Library houses unique Lincoln assassination manhunt materials

Falvey Memorial Library’s Digital Library and Special Collections hold a special and fascinating repository of materials pertaining to Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, which commemorates its 150th anniversary today. The materials show a rare glimpse of the fervor and technology utilized in the manhunt to locate Lincoln’s assassin, John Wilkes Booth, in the days and weeks following the fatal shooting.

The following four features include links to digitized content about the assassination and hunt for the assassins, provided by Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator. Click on the blue hyperlinks to go directly to the materials’ digital holdings and data.

Visit the Digital Library anytime to view our comprehensive and diverse collection of rare books, manuscripts, realia and other digital content.

MEDIUM file for this DataModel

Special Order No. 61, April 16, 1865

Special Order No. 61, April 16, 1865

Special Order, No. 66, April 21, 1865

Special Order, No. 66, April 21, 1865


Special Order, No. 66, April 21, 1865

New York Tablet : A Family Journal, v. VIII, no. 47, April 22, 1865 (see pages 8+)

New York Tablet : A Family Journal, v. VIII, no. 47, April 22, 1865 (see pages 8+)


New York Tablet : A Family Journal, v. VIII, no. 47, April 22, 1865 (see pages 8+)


Letter, To: "My gentle unknown friend" From: Henry O. Nightingale, April 30, 1865

Letter, To: “My gentle unknown friend” From: Henry O. Nightingale, April 30, 1865

Letter, To: “My gentle unknown friend” From: Henry O. Nightingale, April 30, 1865

Resources and links provided by Michael Foight, Special Collections and Digital Library coordinator.


The Curious ‘Cat: What strategy would you recommend to prepare for finals?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “With about three weeks of classes left, what strategy would you recommend to prepare for finals?

Caitlin GammaCaitlin Gemma—“I would recommend going to the Library and setting aside time to study … I personally always go to the third-floor cubicles; that’s my space. I have one cubicle I really like. And I always study out and … really focus. That’s my strategy.”





ViscardiAnthony Viscardi—“Take advantage of all the resources available that the University has: the Writing Center, the math tutoring center, the VSB tutoring [on the Library’s second floor]. Those are all really helpful, and visiting your professors’ office hours for any additional help. … Drink a lot of coffee to stay up. … Those are really the difference makers.”



SpandanaSpandana Vanukuri—“Just go through the writing [class] notes, which I have written … when the professor says something, the important points. … And then go through the [PowerPoint] slides. That’s it. … That more than will do it for me.”





RS8780_DSC_3063-scrMichael Anderson—“I usually hold up in a room and don’t come out. … I usually get a room in Tolentine and spend long hours there until I’m ready. It’s not fun. … with whoever has the exams with me, we just  get a room and start a study group, basically, ten hours a day during finals week.”





Edward Chang—“With only three weeks left, students should be going over the textbooks—whatever texts they had before—having all that set before actually starting to study so they don’t have to cram. Basically, don’t procrastinate.”






Jordan Pieper—“Try to get everything done the week before finals or done early. I’m an engineer so I write a lot of note sheets; that way I have all of my equations and all the information I need right on hand with me. That way I don’t need to worry about trying to search through it. Other than that there’s really not a lot I can do to prepare for engineering problems and so on. I also try to do a lot of practice problems.”


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Last Modified: April 8, 2015