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Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


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Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Dig Deeper: Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania

We Are HereThis year’s annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture, which will be held in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 12:30 p.m., will feature Ellen Cassedy, speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with “the dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, award-winning author Ellen Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Ellen Cassedy’s We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust (University of Nebraska Press, 2012), begins with a personal journey into the old Jewish heartland (land of her Jewish forebears), and then expands into a larger exploration.  The book won four national awards and was short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Jewish Book World calls it “brilliantly balanced, totally engaging, and constantly penetrating.”

For more information on Ellen Cassedy, the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania, and other resources both online and here in Falvey, see the following links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


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Ellen-head-shot-croppedSelected Internet resources

Ellen Cassedy site

Yad Vashem - The Beginning of the Final Solution, Murder of the Jews in the Baltic States

Holocaust Atlas of Lithuania

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

USC Shoah Foundation

Voices of the Holocaust

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

 

Selected Falvey Databases

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

ATLA Religion Database (EBSCO)

Historical Abstracts (EBSCO)

Opposing Viewpoints Resources in Context (Gale)

Oxford Bibliographies – Political Science, International Relations

Philosophy Documentation Center Collection (POIESIS)

Political Handbook of the World (Sage/CQ Press)

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (ProQuest)

 

Selected Guides

The Oxford handbook of genocide studies

Holocaust related encyclopedias

Course guide – Genocide and mass killing

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

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Dig Deeper: Journalism and the Great War

NYTimes-WWI headline 1918

When the Great War changed the course of the 20th century, it also greatly impacted the world of communication. Until this time, muckraking was the dominant journalistic movement, which was an incarnation of investigative writing that sought to unveil corruption and scandal (to “rake” up “muck”), especially regarding politics and social issues.

Some of the most influential journalists in the Progressive Era included Lincoln Steffens, Ida Tarbell, and Ray Stannard Baker, all three of whom wrote for McClure’s Magazine, which played a significant role in establishing the muckraking movement. While Steffens (1866-1936) focused on exposing government and political corruption, Tarbell (1857-1944) is perhaps best known for her work exposing John D. Rockefeller and the ills of his oil monopoly. Stannard (1870-1946) was an advocate of Woodrow Wilson during his presidential candidacy and was later asked by him to investigate the war in Europe. The muckraking movement, however, was to meet its end during World War I, during which government in general became adversarial toward journalism.

George Creel journalist

George Creel

Seven days after the United States entered the global conflict, President Woodrow Wilson created the Committee on Public Information (CPI), which strove to publicize the war through print and visual media in only constructive ways. Although the CPI did not have the ability to censor, its head, George Creel, a muckraking journalist himself, did advocate for voluntary self-monitoring and even issued a Preliminary Statement to the Press in May 1917 that urged editors to prevent publication of any news that could compromise military operations. As Creel was also a member of the government Censorship Board, which monitored communication over telegraph, telephone and cable, he was able to scrutinize periodicals as well as magazines, which were required to present their articles for the board’s review before publication.

The Espionage Act of 1917 and a 1918 sedition amendment frustrated attempts to publish an objective view of the war even further. The former barred any materials that ostensibly advocated disloyalty, insubordination, treason or obstruction of military recruitment, while the latter deemed criminal any published content disloyal to the government or military. In the hands of a manipulating Wilson administration, the freedom of domestic reporting was severely restricted.

Although operating under difficult conditions, there were numerous journalists who were able to distinguish themselves for their courage, intelligence and integrity.

Nellie_Bly_2

Nellie Bly

During what she thought only to be a vacation in Europe, Nellie Bly (1864-1922) witnessed the outbreak of the Great War. Previously, Bly had written for the New York World about government corruption, poor working conditions, and the Pullman labor strike, and even had the opportunity to interview American social reformer Susan B. Anthony. After taking a hiatus from investigative journalism, she was asked by a former World editor to write for the New York Evening Journal about her experiences in war-torn Europe. She ultimately accepted and is now known as America’s first female war correspondent reporting from the front lines.

John Reed (1887-1920) was another war correspondent who sailed to Europe soon after Germany declared war on France. He viewed the war largely as a product of commercialism and was frequently thwarted by censorship in the press. Reed is famously known to have shouted, “This is not my war, and I will not support it. This is not my war, and I will have nothing to do with it” (Homberger, John Reed, 1990, p.122). After President Wilson announced the involvement of the United States, Reed went on to publish vitriolic anti-war articles in the Socialist magazine The Masses, whose editors were eventually charged with conspiring to obstruct conscription.

After the war, author and journalist Georges Seldes (1890-1995) conducted an exclusive interview with the supreme commander of the German army, Paul von Hindenburg, who actually broke down in tears during the interview and discussed how pivotal America was strategically in winning the war.

With the efforts of these journalists and many others, it seems only appropriate that the Pulitzer Prizes, established by one of the most famous journalists and publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World, Joseph Pulitzer, were first awarded for achievement in journalism in 1917.


Dig Deeper: Resources about Journalism through the Great War

For a topic overview, check out the entry “Journalism, World War I” from our online reference Americans at War: Society, Culture and the Homefront. This entry concludes with a bibliography with sources that further investigate the history of journalism.

For primary sources, try browsing through a list of periodicals published during WWI.

Resources on Muckrakers past and present

A list of books about Ida Tarbell

Read more about Lincoln Steffens.

Discover the World War I diary of Ray Stannard Baker and more.

How well do you know Nellie Bly, the woman who travelled around the world in 72 days?

Find out more about the radical politics of John Reed.

Learn about the extraordinary career of Georges Seldes.

Resources about Joseph Pulitzer, the history of the prizes, and the works of individual prize-winning authors are all right here.

For more information about journalism throughout World War I, please email me, Alexander Williams, or call 610-519-8845.


Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments.

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Dig Deeper: The Village That Cried

HedtkeAs part of the Alumni Author series, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will be giving a talk titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk is based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944. The talk will focus on the crash of an American B-24 bomber into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944. The crash and ensuing firestorm killed 61 people, including 38 children in the village elementary school. This tragic event destroyed an entire generation of children in the village of 900 people. In addition, Hedtke’s talk will also touch upon the communal funeral and the village’s almost 70-year attempt to recover from this horrendous incident.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public, and will be held on Monday, Sept. 29 at 2:30 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

To learn more about the Freckleton, English Air Disaster, explore the resources provided below, chosen and organized by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

 


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Freckleton: The Village That Cried

Freckelton

Freckleton, known as “the village that cried,” is located on Britain’s beautiful Fylde Coast, situated in the historic Ribble Valley. It is approximately 230 miles northwest of London in Lancashire county.

BBC- Remembering the Freckleton air disaster of 1944  - with recording of eyewitness testimony

The Times Digital Archive 1785-1985 (Gale)Aircraft Crash on School

Historical New York Times: 1851-2009 (ProQuest)MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED: Soldiers Built Playground Where U.S. Plane Crashed in Britain

Washington Post Historical: 1877-1996 (ProQuest)Bomber Crash Kills All But 6 Of British Town’s 41 Children

Cabrini College news

Lancashire Aircraft Investigation Team (LAIT)

Ribble Valley

 

Books:

Freckleton HedtkeBlackpoolAtWar

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for Geography and Political Science.

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Dig Deeper: Noel Coward and Villanova Theatre’s New Comedy “Fallen Angels”

Fallen AngelsNoël Coward was a teenager 100 years ago when he began writing plays. Among the more than 50 plays he published, several continue to be performed and to draw audiences, including Hay Fever, Private Lives, Design for Living, Present Laughter and Blithe Spirit. When a skilled and capable director prepares a Noël Coward play, audience members enjoy an entertaining and memorable experience.

The Villanova University Department of Theatre’s production Noël Coward’ Fallen Angels promises to give audience members such a hilarious and memorable experience. The Rev. David Cregan, OSA, PhD ably directs a cast of talented, charismatic performers in this lively comedy.

Order your tickets soon before performances become sold out.

Noël Coward, in addition to creating enduring plays, wrote numerous songs, musical theatre works, poetry and short stories. Sarah Wingo—liaison librarian for English, literature and theatre—has assembled the following resources about this prolific playwright:


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Noel Coward

Official website: http://www.noelcoward.com/

Noël Coward Society: http://www.noelcoward.net/

Resources at Falvey: https://library.villanova.edu/Find/MyResearch/MyList/2588

IMDb page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0002021/

Artists Rifle
In light of the 100th anniversary of World War I, it is interesting to note that in 1918, Coward was conscripted into the Artists Rifles but was assessed as unfit for active service because of a tubercular tendency, and he was discharged on health grounds after nine months.

 


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Dig Deeper: Jeffrey Johnson, PhD on “The Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe”

Jeffrey_JohnsonIn honor of the 100th anniversary of World War I, Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, professor of history, will be giving a lecture titled “From the Pistol of June to the Guns of August 1914: Beginning the Self-Destruction of Imperial Europe.” The talk will take place Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 4:00 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

During the lecture, Dr. Johnson will discuss the background to the European diplomatic crisis of July 1914 that followed the assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and the various factors that led to war rather than a peaceful resolution of the crisis. He will then outline the initial phase of the fighting, as shaped by the Schlieffen-Moltke Plan that called for an all-out German attack on France through neutral Belgium while maintaining a defensive stance in the East. This plan and its subsequent failure transformed what might have been another localized Balkan war (like two previous ones in 1912 and 1913) into a long global war costing millions of lives and billions in property and resources. Finally, Dr. Johnson will briefly reflect on the broader historical significance of the First World War as the self-destruction of the ancient ideal of European empire, ultimately to be replaced by the modern ideal of international democracy.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public.

Below, Falvey’s team leader for academic integration, Jutta Seibert, has compiled a collection of resources should you wish to further study the topic of Dr. Johnson’s lecture.


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Books by Dr. Jeffrey Johnson

Johnson, Jeffrey A. The Kaiser’s Chemists: Science and Modernization in Imperial Germany (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990).

Johnson, Jeffrey A. and Roy M. MacLeod, eds., Frontline and Factory: Comparative Perspectives On the Chemical Industry At War, 1914-1924 (Dordrecht: Springer, 2006).

New Books About World War I Available at Falvey

Selected Surveys of World War I History:
John Horne, A Companion to World War I (Chichester, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).

J.M. Winter, The Cambridge History of the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Selected Online Encyclopedias:
Tom Pendergast, Sara Pendergast and Christine Slovey, eds. World War I Reference Library (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002)

John M. Merriman, J. M. Winter, Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction (Detroit, Mich.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006).

Alexander DeConde, Richard D. Burns and Fredrik Logevall. Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy. 2nd ed. (Gale Virtual Reference Library, 2002).

Robert D. Johnston, ed., Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History. Vol. 4: From the Gilded Age through the Age of Reform, 1878 to 1920 (Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010).


JuttaSeibertDig Deeper links selected by Jutta Seibert, team leader for academic integration.

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Dig Deeper: Outstanding Faculty Research Award Recipient: Sally Scholz, PhD

Sally ScholzA Scholarship@Villanova/Outstanding Faculty Research Award lecture featuring Sally J. Scholz, PhD, professor of philosophy, will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 24 at 2:30 p.m., in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Scholz will be talking about the extensive research that led her to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award in 2014.

Dr. Scholz’s talk, titled “Seeking Solidarity,” will articulate her thoughts not only on how invocations of solidarity conventionally call forth community’s spirit, inclusiveness and cooperation, but also on how nothing, unfortunately, keeps solidarities from sometimes being dangerous or harmful. Dr. Scholz’s presentation will explore these pernicious types of solidarities, revealing the moral failings of solidaristic relations.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office for Research and Graduate Programs, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dr. Scholz’s research, dig into the resources provided by Nikolaus Fogle, subject librarian for Philosophy.


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Books and Scholarship by Sally Scholz, PhD


Feminism GuideScholz, Sally J. Feminism: A Beginner’s Guide. Oxford ; New York: Oneworld, 2010.
Dr. Scholz’s most recent book, Feminism: A Beginnger’s Guide, is her authoritative introduction to feminism.

 

 

Political SolidarityScholz, Sally J. Political Solidarity. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008.

Political Solidarity is a major contribution to social and political philosophy, in which she advances her framework for understanding political solidarity.

 

 

Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance.” Journal of Social Philosophy 38, no. 1 (March 1, 2007): 38–52. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9833.2007.00365.x.
“Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance” is one of her most-cited articles, in which she develops her conception of political solidarity as a variety of solidarity which “unites individuals based on their shared commitment to a political cause,” but which “is incompatible with physically violent forms of activism and resistance.”

Scholz, Sally J. “Transnational Feminist Solidarity and Lessons from the 2011 Protests in Tahrir Square.” Global Discourse 4, no. 2–3 (May 9, 2014): 205–19. doi:10.1080/23269995.2014.914369.
In this very recent article, Dr. Scholz develops a conception of transnational feminist solidarity.

Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and the More-Than-Human World.” Ethics & the Environment18, no. 2 (2013): 81–99.
“Political Solidarity and the More-Than-Human World” is one of her more recent contributions, which brings her theory of political solidarity into dialogue with environmental philosophy.

 

Hypatia

 

Dr. Scholz is the editor of what is certainly the premier feminist philosophy journal, Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy.

 

Watch Dr. Scholz’s acceptance speech for the Outstanding Faculty Research Award, given at the Faculty Scholars Dinner.

 


Nik FogleDig Deeper links selected by Nikolaus Fogle, Subject Librarian for Philosophy.

 

 

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Dig Deeper: Kevin Spacey at Villanova

Kevin-Spacey-as-Clarence-Da-528x7061

Parents Weekend offers an opportunity for the parents of students, new and seasoned, to visit Villanova’s campus. Parents Weekend 2014 will be held from Sept. 19-21. This year’s guest speaker for the Saturday evening program is the inimitable Kevin Spacey. Spacey, an Academy Award-winning actor, currently executively produces and stars in the hit Netflix original series House of Cards. He is perhaps most known for his breakout role in The Usual Suspects and his memorable characters in American Beauty and L.A. Confidential.

But Spacey’s involvement in the arts does not end at producing and acting—he also funds emerging artists through the Kevin Spacey Foundation; has his own production company, Trigger Street Productions; and since 2004, he has worked with The Old Vic Theatre Company in London as Artistic Director.

If you’d like to learn more about Spacey, or delve into his filmography here at Falvey Memorial Library, check out the resources compiled by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English literature and theatre.

 


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Fun fact: Spacey’s Wiki page notes that his “first professional stage appearance was as a spear carrier in a New York Shakespeare Festival performance of Henry VI, part 1 in 1981.”

Falvey Memorial Library has two articles and two documentaries.

Here is the full list of films on VHS & DVD at Falvey.

And see how even Kevin Spacey pixelated can steal the show in an upcoming video game.

 


Sarah

Dig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

 

 

 

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Dig Deeper: Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month fetes “Platero y Yo”

Domesticated donkey, ass, asinus vulgaris or Equus africanus asi

Mercedes_Julia

On Thursday, September 18 at 3:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, Mercedes Juliá, PhD, professor of modern and contemporary literature and cultural studies in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures will be presenting a lecture in honor of Hispanic Cultural Heritage Month. Her talk is titled “The Inner Exile of Juan Ramón Jiménez.” Following Dr. Juliá’s talk, a bilingual presentation of Juan Ramón Jiménez’s Platero y Yo will be given. This event is part of the celebration of the Año Platero, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the publication of Platero y Yo.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Sigma Delta Pi and the Hispanic Honor Society, is free and open to the public.

Juan Ramón Jiménez

Juan Ramón Jiménez

In preparation for the presentation of Juan Ramón Jiménez’s Platero y Yo and to help commemorate its 100th publication anniversary, check out the following resources provided by Susan Ottignon, the liaison librarian for Romance Languages and Literatures.

 


Dig Deeper:

Falvey Memorial Library offers resources to assist you in researching and appreciating Juan Ramón Jiménez’s Platero y Yo.

Looking for criticism? Try searching one of these databases to find critical analysis in journal articles about the work. You can search “platero y yo” to pull up results

MLA International Bibliography (ProQuest)
This database consists of bibliographic records pertaining to literature, language, linguistics and folklore. It includes citations to articles from over 4,400 journals and series published internationally, as well as monographs, collections and various types of reference works.

Literature Criticism Online (Gale)
LCO is an extensive compilation of literary commentary reaching back 30 years and covering centuries of critiques on authors and their works that span all time periods, types of literature and regions. The cross-searchable collection brings together the most acclaimed literary series Drama Criticism, Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, Poetry Criticism and Short Story Criticism providing criticism on the major authors, dramatists and poets.

JSTOR
A searchable and browsable archive of full-text core journals in the humanities, social sciences and mathematics.

Sometimes, a summary or overview may provide insight into the author’s writing. By searching one of these resources, you can pull up a concise article.

MagillOnLiterature Plus (EBSCO)
Provides access to editorially reviewed critical analyses, brief plot summaries, and extended character profiles covering works by more than 8,500 long and short fiction writers, poets, dramatists, essayists and philosophers. Coverage includes sources Cyclopedia of Literary Places, Masterplots and European Fiction Series.

Literature Resource Center (Gale)
Full-text articles from scholarly journals and literary magazines are combined with critical essays, work and topic overviews, full-text works, biographies and more to provide a wealth of information on authors, their works and literary movements.

“Hear straight from the horse’s mouth!”

The Library has a documentary on Juan Ramón Jiménez in which he talks about his book “Platero y Yo”? Just ask for the VHS, “Platero y yo Radio Televisión Española”—PQ6619.I4 P62 2000 (VHS)—at the circulation desk.

Don’t know Spanish? No problem!

Falvey has an English translation, Platero and I, available in the main collection on the 4th Floor with call number PQ6619.I4 P633.

 


RS4540_FML164_SusanOttignon_018_EDIT---ed

Dig Deeper links selected by Susan Ottignon, Research Support Librarian for Languages and Literatures. Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

 

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Dig Deeper: Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, researches a major US women’s prison

Breaking Women

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library, Jill A. McCorkel, PhD, associate professor, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, will deliver a Scholarship@Villanova lecture about her recently published book, Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment. Dr. McCorkel will discuss how her four years of research in a major U.S. women’s prison helped her to uncover the reasons tougher drug policies have so greatly affected those incarcerated there, and how the very nature of punishment in women’s detention centers has been deeply altered as a result. Lauded as “prison ethnography at its best” (Lorna Rhodes, author of Total Confinement: Madness and Reason in the Maximum Security Prison), her book is published by New York University Press and was a finalist for the 2013 C. Wright Mills Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

This event—co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Sociology & Criminology, the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, and the Center for Peace and Justice Education—is free and open to the public.


Dig Deeper:

jill_mccorkelvillanova_edu

Resources by and about Dr. Jill McCorkel

Attending the lecture? Now read Dr. McCorkel’s new book: Breaking Women: Gender, Race and the New Politics of Imprisonment.

Find out more about the professor’s work and research interests by visiting her Villanova webpage

Keep up to date with the professor by following her on Twitter!

Check out Dr. McCorkel’s collaborative photo essay with prisoners from SCI Graterford @ Strongbox Magazine – Vol. 1 2009.

Becker, S. & McCorkel, J. (2011). The gender of criminal opportunity: The impact of male co-offenders on women’s crime.
Building on ethnographic research and feminist labor market analyses, this study explores how gender affects access to criminal opportunities. Using National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, the authors examine the effect a male co-offender has on women’s offending. They find that the presence of a male co-offender broadens women’s criminal involvement in distinctive ways.

McCorkel, J. (2003). Embodied surveillance and the gendering of punishment.
This ethnography explores the enactment of “get tough” politics in a state prison for women and considers whether the implementation of seemingly gender-neutral programs and policies implies that women’s prisons are no longer operating as “gendered organizations.”

McCorkel, J. (2004). Criminally dependent? Gender, punishment, and the rhetoric of welfare reform.
This study relies on ethnographic data collected from a state prison for women to examine whether and to what extent welfare and criminal justice policies were coordinated during the drug and poverty wars of the past decade. Findings reveal that drug war policies did indeed transform punishment practices on the feminine side of the penal system, but such transformations were ultimately premised on changes to institutional interpretive structures that altered the ways state actors conceptualized gender, crime and women’s needs.

More Resources on Women and Imprisonment

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU): Women in Prison
The ACLU “fights to ensure that the criminal justice system treats women and girls fairly, that it protects the health and safety of women in its custody, and that it facilitates their successful reentry into their communities.” Check out this web resource for general information, statistics, videos and its personal testimony series called “Words from Prison.”

Women’s Prisons in the United States
A list of United States federal and state prisons which either currently or once did contain female prisoners.

Female offenders: critical perspectives and effective interventions
This classic text explores a variety of topics on female offenders from the nature of female offending, its patterns and explanations, power-belief theory and relational theory to institutional assessment, classification and programs.

Interrupted life: experiences of incarcerated women in the United States
This is a “gripping collection of writings by and about imprisoned women in the United States, a country that jails a larger percentage of its population than any other nation in the world. This eye-opening work brings together scores of voices from both inside and outside the prison system including incarcerated and previously incarcerated women, their advocates and allies, abolitionists, academics and other analysts” (see the full description at the University of California Press).

Women’s mental health issues across the criminal justice system
An accessible guide to women’s mental health in criminal justice systems, this text touches on meeting the needs of juvenile and adult offenders, measuring traumatic events in the lives of incarcerated girls, crisis intervention teams training, policy implications, and the ethics of justice and mental health systems.

A list of all books with the subject “Female offenders Rehabilitation United States.”

A list of all books with the subject “Women prisoners Services for United States.”

Explore more about corrections in the United States with this comprehensive list of print and online titles.


Alex Williams

Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments. For questions or more information, feel free to contact him by email (alexander.williams@villanova.edu) or phone (ext.8845).

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Last Modified: September 15, 2014