FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

President Lincoln Assassinated 150 Years Ago

John_Wilkes_Booth_wanted_poster_colour
On April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, the first American president to suffer this fate. Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, had met with General Ulysses S. Grant and the Cabinet that morning and planned to attend with his wife and others a comedy, “Our American Cousin,” at Ford’s Theater that evening. In the afternoon he and his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, took a carriage ride followed by dinner. Mrs. Lincoln complained that she had a headache and wished to stay home; President Lincoln said he was tired, but needed entertainment and planned to go to the theater with or without his wife. After a brief visit to the War Department, the president returned to the White House for Mrs. Lincoln. Accompanied by Major Henry R. Rathbone and Clara Harris, Rathbone’s fiancée, the group arrived at the theater after the play had started.

150401162524-john-wilkes-booth-exlarge-169

150401161637-lincoln-ford-theatre-presidents-box-exlarge-169
President and Mrs. Lincoln and their guests were seated in a decorated box at Ford’s Theater and John Parker, a guard, was stationed outside the box. Unfortunately Parker left his post and, during the third act of the play shortly after 10 pm, John Wilkes Booth, a famous American actor, entered the box and shot the president in the back of his head. The gunshot rang out; Booth climbed over the balustrade of the president’s box and jumped onto the stage where he brandished a dagger and shouted, “Sic semper tyrannis! (Thus always to tyrants!)” Although he had caught a spur in the draperies decorating the box and landed so awkwardly that he broke a leg, Booth was able to escape from the theater, setting off a massive manhunt that lasted until April 26. On that date John Wilkes Booth and an accomplice, David Herold, were captured in a tobacco barn near Bowling Green, Virginia. Herold surrendered; Booth was killed.

A young doctor in the theater audience, Dr. Charles Leale, examined the president shortly after Booth shot him, and it was decided that Lincoln be carried across the street to William H. Petersen’s boarding house rather than be transported the greater distance to the White House. Over six feet tall, Lincoln was laid diagonally across the bed in the small first floor bedroom of a government employee. Lincoln’s personal physician, Dr. Robert King Stone, was summoned although three doctors had accompanied Lincoln to the Petersen House. In the hours before Abraham Lincoln died over 90 people visited the Petersen House. Lincoln’s son, Robert, was brought to the house and remained there until his father died. Mrs. Lincoln was there, periodically visiting her husband, then retreating to a nearby room.

Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln

At 7:22 a.m. on April 15, President Lincoln died, having never regained consciousness. When informed of his death, Mrs. Lincoln said, “Oh, my God, and have I given my husband to die?” Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton said, “Now he belongs to the ages.” Lincoln’s body was placed in a temporary casket and transferred to the White House. Andrew Johnson was sworn in as president. On April 18 Lincoln’s body lay in state in the East Room of the White House. After a funeral the following day, he was laid in state in the Capitol Rotunda. On April 21 his body was taken to the railroad station in Washington to begin the long journey – 1,654 miles – to Springfield, Ill. At various locations along the route to Springfield, the train’s scheduled stops were published in the local newspapers. At those stops, the coffin was placed on a hearse and taken to an appropriate public building for viewing by the public. Finally, on May 4 he was buried in Springfield.

The final military engagement of the Civil War occurred on May 12, a skirmish at Palmito Ranch, Texas, although Robert E. Lee had surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865, effectively ending the war.

On June 30, 1865, eight assassination conspirators were convicted and on July 7 they were executed. John Wilkes Booth, who had actually fired the bullet which killed Lincoln, had been dead since April 26.


Dig Deeper:

“A Doctor’s View of the Lincoln Assassination.” Interview with Blaine Houmes, M.D.

Timeline by Clark Evans, Library of Congress historian.

Eyewitness from the National Archives

Lincoln’s Assassination (2014). Edward Steers, Jr.

The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory (2010). Harold Holzer, Craig L. Symonds and Frank J. Williams.

The Lincoln Assassination: The Evidence (2009). William C. Edwards and Edward Steers.

When the Bells Tolled for Lincoln: Southern Reaction to the Assassination (1997). Carolyn L. Jarrell.

The Assassination and Death of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, at Washington, on the 14th of April, 1865 (1865). Abott A. Abott.

The Conspirators:
American Brutus: John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies (2004). Michael W. Kauffman.

The Assassin’s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln (2008). Kate Clifford Larson.

The Riddle of Dr. Mudd (1974). Samuel Carter.



imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


Like

Dig Deeper: Dr. Lisa Sewell and Impossible Object

SewellOn Tuesday, April 14 at 4:30 p.m., a Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Lisa Sewell, PhD, associate professor of English and co-director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will be held in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Sewell will read from and discuss her newly published collection of poetry, Impossible Object, which won the first annual Tenth Gate prize. The Tenth Gate, named in honor of Jane Hirshfield, recognizes the wisdom and dedication of mid- and late-career poets. A book sale and signing will follow the lecture.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English, is free and open to the public.

To learn more about Dr. Sewell’s poetry, dig deeper into the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Sewell’s work in Falvey’s Catalog: https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Author/Home?author=Sewell%2C+Lisa%2C+1960-

Audio via Poets.org:  http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/lisa-sewell

Liberal Arts and Sciences’ Faculty Spotlight highlights Dr. Sewell for winning the 2014 Tenth Gate prize for her poetry manuscript, Impossible Object:  http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/gws.html


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


Like

Dig Deeper: Helene Moriarty, PhD

MoriartyOn Tuesday, March 24 at 2:30 p.m. in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Helene Moriarty, PhD, RN, Professor at the College of Nursing will present a Scholarship@Villanova/Endowed Chair lecture. Dr. Moriarty is a nurse advocate for military veterans and their families who has targeted her scholarly work on the health needs of those who have served in the military. Her lecture will focus on her research with interprofessional teams at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She will present findings from an intervention study, funded by NIH, that evaluates the impact of an innovative in-home intervention for veterans with traumatic brain injury and their families.

Dr. Moriarty is the inaugural appointee to the College of Nursing’s first endowed faculty chair, the Diane L. and Robert F. Moritz, Jr. Endowed Chair in Nursing Research. This award was established in 2013 by Robert F. Moritz, Jr. DDS ’51 VSB and his wife Diane to advance research and scholarship within the College and its academic programs.

This event, co-sponsored by the College of Nursing, Falvey Memorial Library and the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC), is free and open to the public.

For more information related to Dr. Moriarty’s area of expertise, check out today’s Dig Deeper, organized by Barbara Quintiliano, nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian.


Dig Deeper 

Challenges Faced by Veterans Suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been called the “signature wound of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.” It is caused by trauma to the head, most often from an explosive device, vehicle accident or fall. Since 2001, the number of active U.S. service personnel suffering from TBI has been rising, and almost 25,000 new cases emerged in 2014 alone. In 2013, the directors of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a joint report to Congress in which they stated that TBI had become “a public health problem, the magnitude and impact of which are underestimated by current civilian and military surveillance systems.”

Even mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly termed a “concussion,” can have detrimental consequences for returning veterans, their spouses and others who love and care for them. However, unlike more severe cases, mTBI often goes undiagnosed, and resulting cognitive and emotional problems may not appear until long after the vet returns home. Some of the challenges associated with mTBI include short- and long-term memory loss, attention deficits, impaired executive function and strained interpersonal relations.

Dr. Moriarty and her colleagues have been conducting innovative research sponsored by the Philadelphia VA Medical Center and funded by the NIH. In this controlled study they are investigating the efficacy of a veterans’ in-home program (VIP). Dyads composed of a veteran who has sustained mild to moderate TBI and his/her spouse or partner are recruited for participation. Through in-home intervention the researchers hope to facilitate increased understanding and deeper communication between veteran and partner so that both will enjoy an improved quality of life.

Learn more about TBI and its effects on vets and their families:

DoD Worldwide Numbers for TBI
http://dvbic.dcoe.mil/dod-worldwide-numbers-tbi

Family Caregiver’s Guide to TBI
http://www.caregiver.va.gov/pdfs/FamilyCaregiversGuideToTBI.pdf

‘Hidden’ Brain Damage Seen in Vets With Blast Injuries
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_150550.html

Hyatt, K.S. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (American Journal of Nursing)
http://tinyurl.com/mtbivets (VU LDAP ID and password required)
Loved Ones Caring for Brain-Injured Veterans May Face Health Risks
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_150855.html
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (video)
http://afterdeployment.dcoe.mil/topics-traumatic-brain-injury
Report to Congress on Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Understanding the Public Health Problem Among Current and Former Military Personnel
http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/pdf/Report_to_Congress_on_Traumatic_Brain_Injury_2013-a.pdf


Dig Deeper introduction written and resources selected by Barbara Quintiliano, nursing and life sciences liaison and an instructional services librarian.


Like

Dig Deeper: Irish Novelist Claire Kilroy Appears Tonight

Claire_KilroyIrish novelist Claire Kilroy, Charles A. Heimbold, Jr. Chair of Irish Studies, will be giving a reading on Tuesday, March 17 at 6:00 p.m. following a reception in the President’s Lounge of the Connelly Center. Each academic year, a distinguished Irish writer is chosen to serve for the spring semester as the Charles A. Heimbold, Jr. Chair of Irish Studies. Inaugurated in 2000, it has become one of the most prestigious Irish studies positions in the United States.

The reading, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Irish Studies Program, the Irish Dance Team and the Irish Cultural Society, is free and open to the public. It is part of a weeklong series of events celebrating St. Patrick’s Day, presented by the Irish Studies Program in conjunction with Falvey Memorial Library. Other events include Nova Feis: Lecture featuring Eoin Mc Evoy, visiting Fulbright Scholar on Thursday, March 19, 5:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner, Falvey Memorial Library.

From the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: “Claire Kilroy was born in Dublin, Ireland. She attended Trinity College, Dublin, where she studied English as an undergraduate and where, after a brief time working in television, she also earned her M.Phil in Creative Writing in 2001. Kilroy is the author of four novels—All SummerTenderwireAll Names Have Been Changed, and The Devil I Know—and has been described by Barbara Kingsolver, author of Flight Behaviour, as a writer who “packs a stunning worldly wisdom into her beautiful prose”; and has also been called “a quirky and excitingly original writer” by Anne Fogarty of the Irish Times. Kilroy cites her literary influences as John Banville and Vladimir Nabokov, and Lolita as her favorite book. She currently resides in Dublin with her husband and infant son, to whom she devotes most of her time.” Read more here.

To learn more about Claire Kilroy and her bibliography, check out the resources below selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and Theater.


Dig Deeper

Falvey Holdings:
All Summer

Tenderwire

Devil I Know

All Names

Read a Guardian review of Kilroy’s most recent book.

Check out and follow Kilroy’s Goodreads profile.

Read a 2010 interview.


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


Like

Nor’easter vs. Clipper: What’s the Difference Between These Dreaded Winter Storms?

NORESTER

We hear these terms on weather reports, but do we really know what they mean? (I certainly didn’t although I remember friends arguing about which way nor’easters move.) Both are storms and both can impact our area. What are they and how do they differ?

A nor’easter (sometimes called a northeaster) forms at sea, within 100 miles of the Atlantic coast. It is named for the direction of the powerful winds that bring these storms ashore. Nor’easters are most common from September through April although they also occur at other times.

Nor’easters, with winds often reaching hurricane-force, make landfall from New England through the mid-Atlantic regions. Unlike hurricanes, nor’easters are not named. These storms bring frigid temperatures, powerful winds, coastal flooding and blizzards. Notable nor’easters include the Great Blizzard of 1888 and the “Perfect Storm” of 1991.

A clipper (more accurately an Alberta Clipper), however, forms inland as a low-pressure system in Alberta, Canada. These winter storms move southeast into the Canadian plains and the Great Lakes before eventually moving off shore into the Atlantic Ocean—sometimes as far south as the Baltimore/Washington area. Clippers bring quick bursts of snow (one to three inches, with more in the mountains), colder temperatures and gusty winds (35-45 mph). Clippers occur most often from December through February.

There we have it: both are primarily winter storms created by low-pressure systems, both occur most often in fall through spring, both bring wind and snow although in different degrees. However, their points of origin are quite different: the clipper develops inland and moves offshore; the nor’easter begins offshore and moves inland. Let’s hope we’ve seen the last of both of these this winter.

Dig Deeper

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Cambridge Guide to the Weather (2000). Ross Reynolds.
Weather: How It Works and Why It Matters (2000). Arthur R. Upgren.
The Weather Sourcebook: Your One-Stop Resource for Everything You Need to Feed Your Weather Habit (1994). Ronald L. Wagner.


imagesArticle and photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


Like

Dig Deeper: Literary Festival Features Bruce Smith

Bruce SmithOn Thursday, Feb. 19 at 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, Bruce Smith will be giving a poetry reading and talk. Smith is one of the Literary Festival’s featured speakers. Originally from Philadelphia, Bruce Smith is the author of several books of poems, including The Other Lover (2000), a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He will be reading selections from his collection entitled Devotions. Publisher’s Weekly called his poems “alternately sharp, slippery, and tender,” and in them he “finds a way to take in almost everything—’Shooter Protocol,’ Charlie Parker, high school shop class—moving seamlessly between critique and embrace.” A book sale and signing will follow the reading.

This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English. It is free and open to the public.

For more information on Bruce Smith and to check out some of his poetry, visit the resources below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison library for English and Theater.


Dig Deeper

Bruce Smith’s bio and some of his poetry can found on The Poetry Foundation. You can find some poems here.

Check out Smith’s National Book Award Foundation page for a video of a reading.

Bruce Smith’s Devotions andThe Other Lover are forthcoming to Falvey’s catalog.


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


Like

Dig Deeper: Megan Quigley, PhD on Modernist Fiction

Megan QuigleyA Scholarship@Villanova lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library will feature Megan Quigley, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of English. Dr. Quigley will speak about her book, entitled Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form, and Language, newly released from Cambridge University Press, which explores the intertwined history of 20th-century British fiction and philosophy. Specifically, it argues that much modernist literary experimentation connects to the linguistic turn in philosophy.

The event is  co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English and is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dr. Quigley and her work in Modernism, check out the resources below, provided by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and Theater.


Quigley BookDig Deeper

Visit Dr. Quigley’s professional website at http://meganquigley.com/. To view a list of her publications, click here.

Selected Scholarship:
Modern Novels and Vagueness.” Modernism/Modernity, 15.1 (2008) 101-129. Print.
To read the full text, click here.

 


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


Like

Dig Deeper: William Y. Arms, PhD

Arms

On Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, William Y. Arms, PhD, will be delivering a lecture entitled Academic Libraries in the Digital Age. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Department of Computing Sciences, is free and open to the public. j_luciaEvent organizers also expect Joseph P. Lucia, former director of Falvey Memorial Library and now dean of libraries at Temple University, to appear and offer his perspective on Arms’ work and the changing face of digital libraries.

For further information relevant to Dr. Arms and his publications, check out the resources listed below.


Dig Deeper

Digital LibrariesAuthor of Digital Libraries. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2000.

See what William Y. Arms has published by using Falvey’s Articles & More search function.

Use WorldCat.org to see what books Dr. Arms published.Professor Emeritus, Computing & Information Science

Professor Emeritus, Computing & Information Science, Cornell University

Career highlights

Publications


Resources selected by research support librarian Susan A. Ottignon.


Like

Dig Deeper: A Thomas Merton Centennial

2015-01-30 11.24.21

Thomas Merton, a Trappist monk from 1941 until he died December 10, 1968, was born on Jan. 31, 1915, in Prades, France. Best known for his autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain, published in 1948, he also wrote about social problems, the contemplative life, prayer and other topics. The Seven Storey Mountain was a best seller and is now considered a classic work, a modern day Confessions of St. Augustine. Still in print, The Seven Storey Mountain has been translated into more than 20 languages.

Merton was educated in France, England and the United States. He graduated from Columbia University in New York City with a master’s degree. He converted to Catholicism in 1938 while completing his graduate work. He taught briefly at Columbia and originally planned to join the Franciscans (Order of Friars Minor). However, the Order did not admit him, and Merton then applied to the Trappists at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky. He joined the Trappists (Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance) on Dec. 10, 1941, and remained in the order until his death 27 years later while attending a meeting of religious leaders in Bangkok, Thailand.

In the monastery Abbot Frederick Dunne urged Frater Louis (Merton’s religious name) to write his autobiography, to write biographies of Cistercians and to translate Cistercian works. Merton was a prolific author. Among his numerous works are five volumes of his letters and seven volumes of his personal journals and over 60 other titles.

Brother Patrick Hart, OCSO, says, “Many esteem Thomas Merton as a spiritual master, a brilliant writer, and a man who embodied the quest for human solidarity.”

merton-books

Dig Deeper (These are just a sample of Falvey’s holdings.)

About the Trappists and Cistercians
Trappist: Living in the Land of Desire (1997) by Michael Downey
Voices of Silence: Lives of the Trappists Today (1991) by Frank Bianco
The Abbey of Gethsemani: Place of Peace and Paradox – 150 Years in the Life of America’s Oldest Trappist Monastery (1998) by Dianne Aprile
The Rule of Saint Benedict (2001) by Saint Benedict, Abbot of Monte Cassino

Works by Merton
Thomas Merton: A Bibliography (1974)
Thomas Merton: Selected Essays (2013)
Thomas Merton: Essential Writings (c.2000)
Journals of Thomas Merton (c.1995-c1997)

About Merton
The Thomas Merton Encyclopedia (2002) by William Henry Shannon
Merton: A Biography (1980) by Monica Furlong
Thomas Merton, Social Critic: A Study (1971) by James Thomas Baker
Thomas Merton: Prophet of Renewal (2005) by John Eudes Bamberger

 

 


imagesArticle and photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


Like

Dig Deeper: The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture

Composite3The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture will take place in Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Nov. 5 at 7:00 p.m. The annual event focuses on scholarship about Italian-American history, culture, and the immigrant experience. This year’s lecture will feature Joseph L. Tropea, PhD, retired professor and former chair, Department of Sociology, George Washington University.

Dr. Tropea’s previous research projects in institutional history have been published in Social Science History, Criminal Justice History, Journal of Education Quarterly, Journal of Management HistoryInternational Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, as well as in edited works in the U.S. and Europe. His recent research (his presentation’s focus) shifts to social history of the greatest mine disaster in U.S. History, which killed 361 persons, including 170 Italian migrants. His work, so far, includes findings which change the facts and interpretations of that 1907 disaster, especially for Italians (West Virginia History, 2013); a biography of a once-chastised northern Italian mother of five, widowed by the disaster (Women’s Studies, 2013); and a beguiling effort to document intimacies and intricacies of four Calabrian migrants to West Virginia’s Fairmont Coal Field, including a miner who died in the explosion (under review).

The presentation will reveal many bizarre but illustrative errors and myths that constitute too much Italian-American history and identity. Dr. Tropea’s grandparents migrated from four regions in Italy (Abruzzo, Lazio, Basilicata and Calabria) to settle in West Virginia, two of whom were present in Monongah at the time of the 1907 disaster. In addition, he was honored in Rome for his research and also as “Italian Man of the Year” in Clarksburg, West Virginia.

For more information on Monongah and Italian-American history, visit the resources below, selected by Alexander Williams, liaison librarian to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments.


Dig Deeper

The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella
Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture Blog Resources

 Resources by Joseph L. Tropea

Tropea, J. L. (2013). Monongah revisited: Sources, body parts, and ethnography. West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, 7(2), pp. 63-91. doi:10.1353/wvh.2013.0017

Tropea, J. L. (2013). Catterina DeCarlo Davia – A West Virginia donkey. Women’s Studies, 42(4), pp. 369-389. doi:10.1080/00497878.2013.773196

Tropea, J. L. (2008). Revisiting Monongah. [Review of the book Monongah: The tragic story of the worst industrial accident in US history by J.D. McAteer]. Appalachian Journal, 35(4), pp. 358-364.

Tropea, J. L., Miller, J. E., & Beattie-Repetti, C. (Eds.). (1986). Proceedings from AIHA ’86: Support and struggle: Italians and Italian Americans in a comparative perspective : proceedings of the seventeenth annual conference of the American Italian Historical Association. Staten Island, N.Y.: The Association.

 

More Resources

Argentine, P. (Producer & Director). (2007). Monongah remembered [Motion picture]. United States: Argentine productions.

Bartlett, M., & Grubb, W. The Monongah mine disaster and its social setting: A collage of newspaper accounts. Fairmont, WV: s.n.

How many at Monongah? (1995). Professional Safety, 40(3), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.v illanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/200413992?accountid=14853

McAteer, J. D. (2014). Monongah: The tragic story of the worst industrial accident in US history. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Monongah Mines Relief Committee. History of the Monongah mines relief fund: In aid of sufferers from the Monongah mine explosion, Monongah, West Virginia, December 6, 1907. [Whitefish, Mont.?]: Kessinger Pub..

Pitz, M. (2007, December 5). Italians arrive to honor immigrants killed in 1907 Monongah mine blast. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.post-gazette.com/life/lifestyle/2007/12/05/Italians-arrive-to-honor-immigrants-killed-in-1907-Monongah-mine-blast/stories/200712050217

Pitz, M. (2007, November 28). Bell from Italy to toll in Monongah. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.post-gazette.com/frontpage/2007/11/28/Bell-from-Italy-to-toll-in-Monongah/stories/200711280322

Rittenhouse, R. (2014). Monongah coal mine disaster 1907-2007: Pictorial history of a monumental tragedy. Westover, W.Va.: R. Rittenhouse.

Skog, J. (2014). The Monongah mining disaster. Minneapolis, Minn.: Compass Point Books.

Soladay, M. (2009). Remembering Monongah. Ambassador, 21, 11. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/204841924?accountid=14853

U.S. Department of Labor: Mine Safety and Health Administration. (1998, May 20). Mining disasters – An exhibition: 1907 Fairmont Coal Company mining disaster Monongah, West Virginia. Retrieved from http://www.msha.gov/DISASTER/MONONGAH/ MONON1.asp

 


Alex WilliamsDig Deeper links selected by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and liaison to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments. 


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: November 4, 2014