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Dig Deeper: Literary Festival Features Bruce Smith

Bruce SmithOn Thursday, Feb. 19 at 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, Bruce Smith will be giving a poetry reading and talk. Smith is one of the Literary Festival’s featured speakers. Originally from Philadelphia, Bruce Smith is the author of several books of poems, including The Other Lover (2000), a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He will be reading selections from his collection entitled Devotions. Publisher’s Weekly called his poems “alternately sharp, slippery, and tender,” and in them he “finds a way to take in almost everything—’Shooter Protocol,’ Charlie Parker, high school shop class—moving seamlessly between critique and embrace.” A book sale and signing will follow the reading.

This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English. It is free and open to the public.

For more information on Bruce Smith and to check out some of his poetry, visit the resources below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison library for English and Theater.


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Bruce Smith’s bio and some of his poetry can found on The Poetry Foundation. You can find some poems here.

Check out Smith’s National Book Award Foundation page for a video of a reading.

Bruce Smith’s Devotions andThe Other Lover are forthcoming to Falvey’s catalog.


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


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Dig Deeper: Megan Quigley, PhD on Modernist Fiction

Megan QuigleyA Scholarship@Villanova lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 2:30 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library will feature Megan Quigley, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of English. Dr. Quigley will speak about her book, entitled Modernist Fiction and Vagueness: Philosophy, Form, and Language, newly released from Cambridge University Press, which explores the intertwined history of 20th-century British fiction and philosophy. Specifically, it argues that much modernist literary experimentation connects to the linguistic turn in philosophy.

The event is  co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English and is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dr. Quigley and her work in Modernism, check out the resources below, provided by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and Theater.


Quigley BookDig Deeper

Visit Dr. Quigley’s professional website at http://meganquigley.com/. To view a list of her publications, click here.

Selected Scholarship:
Modern Novels and Vagueness.” Modernism/Modernity, 15.1 (2008) 101-129. Print.
To read the full text, click here.

 


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


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Dig Deeper: William Y. Arms, PhD

Arms

On Friday, Feb. 13 at 11:00 a.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, William Y. Arms, PhD, will be delivering a lecture entitled Academic Libraries in the Digital Age. William Arms is professor emeritus of computing and information science at Cornell University. Throughout his career he has been a leader in implementing innovative computing in higher education, including education computing, computer networks and digital libraries. He has been influential in shaping the National Science Foundation’s digital library programs, including the Digital Libraries Initiative and the National Science Digital Library.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Department of Computing Sciences, is free and open to the public. j_luciaEvent organizers also expect Joseph P. Lucia, former director of Falvey Memorial Library and now dean of libraries at Temple University, to appear and offer his perspective on Arms’ work and the changing face of digital libraries.

For further information relevant to Dr. Arms and his publications, check out the resources listed below.


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Digital LibrariesAuthor of Digital Libraries. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2000.

See what William Y. Arms has published by using Falvey’s Articles & More search function.

Use WorldCat.org to see what books Dr. Arms published.Professor Emeritus, Computing & Information Science

Professor Emeritus, Computing & Information Science, Cornell University

Career highlights

Publications


Resources selected by research support librarian Susan A. Ottignon.


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Dig Deeper: A Thomas Merton Centennial

2015-01-30 11.24.21

Thomas Merton, a Trappist monk from 1941 until he died December 10, 1968, was born on Jan. 31, 1915, in Prades, France. Best known for his autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain, published in 1948, he also wrote about social problems, the contemplative life, prayer and other topics. The Seven Storey Mountain was a best seller and is now considered a classic work, a modern day Confessions of St. Augustine. Still in print, The Seven Storey Mountain has been translated into more than 20 languages.

Merton was educated in France, England and the United States. He graduated from Columbia University in New York City with a master’s degree. He converted to Catholicism in 1938 while completing his graduate work. He taught briefly at Columbia and originally planned to join the Franciscans (Order of Friars Minor). However, the Order did not admit him, and Merton then applied to the Trappists at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky. He joined the Trappists (Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance) on Dec. 10, 1941, and remained in the order until his death 27 years later while attending a meeting of religious leaders in Bangkok, Thailand.

In the monastery Abbot Frederick Dunne urged Frater Louis (Merton’s religious name) to write his autobiography, to write biographies of Cistercians and to translate Cistercian works. Merton was a prolific author. Among his numerous works are five volumes of his letters and seven volumes of his personal journals and over 60 other titles.

Brother Patrick Hart, OCSO, says, “Many esteem Thomas Merton as a spiritual master, a brilliant writer, and a man who embodied the quest for human solidarity.”

merton-books

Dig Deeper (These are just a sample of Falvey’s holdings.)

About the Trappists and Cistercians
Trappist: Living in the Land of Desire (1997) by Michael Downey
Voices of Silence: Lives of the Trappists Today (1991) by Frank Bianco
The Abbey of Gethsemani: Place of Peace and Paradox – 150 Years in the Life of America’s Oldest Trappist Monastery (1998) by Dianne Aprile
The Rule of Saint Benedict (2001) by Saint Benedict, Abbot of Monte Cassino

Works by Merton
Thomas Merton: A Bibliography (1974)
Thomas Merton: Selected Essays (2013)
Thomas Merton: Essential Writings (c.2000)
Journals of Thomas Merton (c.1995-c1997)

About Merton
The Thomas Merton Encyclopedia (2002) by William Henry Shannon
Merton: A Biography (1980) by Monica Furlong
Thomas Merton, Social Critic: A Study (1971) by James Thomas Baker
Thomas Merton: Prophet of Renewal (2005) by John Eudes Bamberger

 

 


imagesArticle and photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


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Dig Deeper: The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture

Composite3The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture will take place in Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Nov. 5 at 7:00 p.m. The annual event focuses on scholarship about Italian-American history, culture, and the immigrant experience. This year’s lecture will feature Joseph L. Tropea, PhD, retired professor and former chair, Department of Sociology, George Washington University.

Dr. Tropea’s previous research projects in institutional history have been published in Social Science History, Criminal Justice History, Journal of Education Quarterly, Journal of Management HistoryInternational Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, as well as in edited works in the U.S. and Europe. His recent research (his presentation’s focus) shifts to social history of the greatest mine disaster in U.S. History, which killed 361 persons, including 170 Italian migrants. His work, so far, includes findings which change the facts and interpretations of that 1907 disaster, especially for Italians (West Virginia History, 2013); a biography of a once-chastised northern Italian mother of five, widowed by the disaster (Women’s Studies, 2013); and a beguiling effort to document intimacies and intricacies of four Calabrian migrants to West Virginia’s Fairmont Coal Field, including a miner who died in the explosion (under review).

The presentation will reveal many bizarre but illustrative errors and myths that constitute too much Italian-American history and identity. Dr. Tropea’s grandparents migrated from four regions in Italy (Abruzzo, Lazio, Basilicata and Calabria) to settle in West Virginia, two of whom were present in Monongah at the time of the 1907 disaster. In addition, he was honored in Rome for his research and also as “Italian Man of the Year” in Clarksburg, West Virginia.

For more information on Monongah and Italian-American history, visit the resources below, selected by Alexander Williams, liaison librarian to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments.


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The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella
Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture Blog Resources

 Resources by Joseph L. Tropea

Tropea, J. L. (2013). Monongah revisited: Sources, body parts, and ethnography. West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, 7(2), pp. 63-91. doi:10.1353/wvh.2013.0017

Tropea, J. L. (2013). Catterina DeCarlo Davia – A West Virginia donkey. Women’s Studies, 42(4), pp. 369-389. doi:10.1080/00497878.2013.773196

Tropea, J. L. (2008). Revisiting Monongah. [Review of the book Monongah: The tragic story of the worst industrial accident in US history by J.D. McAteer]. Appalachian Journal, 35(4), pp. 358-364.

Tropea, J. L., Miller, J. E., & Beattie-Repetti, C. (Eds.). (1986). Proceedings from AIHA ’86: Support and struggle: Italians and Italian Americans in a comparative perspective : proceedings of the seventeenth annual conference of the American Italian Historical Association. Staten Island, N.Y.: The Association.

 

More Resources

Argentine, P. (Producer & Director). (2007). Monongah remembered [Motion picture]. United States: Argentine productions.

Bartlett, M., & Grubb, W. The Monongah mine disaster and its social setting: A collage of newspaper accounts. Fairmont, WV: s.n.

How many at Monongah? (1995). Professional Safety, 40(3), 20. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.v illanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/200413992?accountid=14853

McAteer, J. D. (2014). Monongah: The tragic story of the worst industrial accident in US history. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press.

Monongah Mines Relief Committee. History of the Monongah mines relief fund: In aid of sufferers from the Monongah mine explosion, Monongah, West Virginia, December 6, 1907. [Whitefish, Mont.?]: Kessinger Pub..

Pitz, M. (2007, December 5). Italians arrive to honor immigrants killed in 1907 Monongah mine blast. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.post-gazette.com/life/lifestyle/2007/12/05/Italians-arrive-to-honor-immigrants-killed-in-1907-Monongah-mine-blast/stories/200712050217

Pitz, M. (2007, November 28). Bell from Italy to toll in Monongah. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved from http://www.post-gazette.com/frontpage/2007/11/28/Bell-from-Italy-to-toll-in-Monongah/stories/200711280322

Rittenhouse, R. (2014). Monongah coal mine disaster 1907-2007: Pictorial history of a monumental tragedy. Westover, W.Va.: R. Rittenhouse.

Skog, J. (2014). The Monongah mining disaster. Minneapolis, Minn.: Compass Point Books.

Soladay, M. (2009). Remembering Monongah. Ambassador, 21, 11. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/204841924?accountid=14853

U.S. Department of Labor: Mine Safety and Health Administration. (1998, May 20). Mining disasters – An exhibition: 1907 Fairmont Coal Company mining disaster Monongah, West Virginia. Retrieved from http://www.msha.gov/DISASTER/MONONGAH/ MONON1.asp

 


Alex WilliamsDig Deeper links selected by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and liaison to the communications, sociology, and criminal justice departments. 


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Dig Deeper: W. Ian Lipkin, MD, Mendel Medal Recipient

LipkinVillanova University has named world-renowned epidemiologist and “microbe hunter” W. Ian Lipkin, MD, as the recipient of its 2014 Mendel Medal, in recognition of his groundbreaking work in the development of genetic methods for microbial surveillance and discovery, as well as his research into infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and West Nile Virus.

Named “the world’s most celebrated virus hunter” by Discover Magazine, Professor Lipkin’s scientific contributions include the first use of genetic methods to identify an infectious agent, discovery of the implication of West Nile virus as the cause of encephalitis in North America in 1999, invention of MassTag PCR and the first panmicrobial microarray, first use of deep sequencing in pathogen discovery, and molecular characterization of more than 500 viruses. In 2003, at the height of the SARS outbreak, Professor Lipkin traveled to China at the invitation of the World Health Organization, the Chinese Minister of Science and Technology and the Vice President of the Chinese Academy of Science to co-direct research efforts and train Chinese microbiologists how to test for the virus. More recently, he was the sole external investigator invited by the Ministry of Health in Saudi Arabia to assist in identifying reservoirs and vectors for transmission of the MERS coronavirus.

First awarded in 1929, Villanova’s Mendel Medal is given to outstanding contemporary scientists in recognition of their scientific accomplishments. The medal honors 19th century Augustinian friar and scientist Gregor Johann Mendel, Abbot of the Augustinian Monastery, Brünn, Austria, (now Brno, the Czech Republic), best known as “the father of modern genetics,” for his discovery of the celebrated laws of heredity that bear his name. Previous medalists have been Nobel Laureates, Lasker and MacArthur awardees, and recipients of the National Medal of Science.

(Copy Source: http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2014/0324.html)

Professor Lipkin will deliver the 2014 Mendel Medal Lecture “Of Microbes and Man: A Delicate Balance” at 2:00 p.m. on October 31 in the Villanova Room of the Connelly Center. The event is free and open to the public.

To learn more about epidemiology, consult the sources below, selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.


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Major databases:

PubMed

Web of Science

Scopus

 

Our epidemiology journals:

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Search/Results?lookfor=Epidemiology&type=AllFields&sort=year&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Epidemiology%22&filter%5B%5D=format%3A%22Journal%22
A selection of the best introductory epidemiology books from our collection:

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/MyResearch/MyList/2665


RS4532_FML164_RobinBowles_019_EDITDig Deeper links selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.


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Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


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Dig Deeper: Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania

We Are HereThis year’s annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture, which will be held in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 12:30 p.m., will feature Ellen Cassedy, speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with “the dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, award-winning author Ellen Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Ellen Cassedy’s We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust (University of Nebraska Press, 2012), begins with a personal journey into the old Jewish heartland (land of her Jewish forebears), and then expands into a larger exploration.  The book won four national awards and was short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Jewish Book World calls it “brilliantly balanced, totally engaging, and constantly penetrating.”

For more information on Ellen Cassedy, the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania, and other resources both online and here in Falvey, see the following links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


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Ellen-head-shot-croppedSelected Internet resources

Ellen Cassedy site

Yad Vashem – The Beginning of the Final Solution, Murder of the Jews in the Baltic States

Holocaust Atlas of Lithuania

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

USC Shoah Foundation

Voices of the Holocaust

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

 

Selected Falvey Databases

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

ATLA Religion Database (EBSCO)

Historical Abstracts (EBSCO)

Opposing Viewpoints Resources in Context (Gale)

Oxford Bibliographies – Political Science, International Relations

Philosophy Documentation Center Collection (POIESIS)

Political Handbook of the World (Sage/CQ Press)

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (ProQuest)

 

Selected Guides

The Oxford handbook of genocide studies

Holocaust related encyclopedias

Course guide – Genocide and mass killing

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


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Dig Deeper: Journalism and the Great War

NYTimes-WWI headline 1918

When the Great War changed the course of the 20th century, it also greatly impacted the world of communication. Until this time, muckraking was the dominant journalistic movement, which was an incarnation of investigative writing that sought to unveil corruption and scandal (to “rake” up “muck”), especially regarding politics and social issues.

Some of the most influential journalists in the Progressive Era included Lincoln Steffens, Ida Tarbell, and Ray Stannard Baker, all three of whom wrote for McClure’s Magazine, which played a significant role in establishing the muckraking movement. While Steffens (1866-1936) focused on exposing government and political corruption, Tarbell (1857-1944) is perhaps best known for her work exposing John D. Rockefeller and the ills of his oil monopoly. Stannard (1870-1946) was an advocate of Woodrow Wilson during his presidential candidacy and was later asked by him to investigate the war in Europe. The muckraking movement, however, was to meet its end during World War I, during which government in general became adversarial toward journalism.

George Creel journalist

George Creel

Seven days after the United States entered the global conflict, President Woodrow Wilson created the Committee on Public Information (CPI), which strove to publicize the war through print and visual media in only constructive ways. Although the CPI did not have the ability to censor, its head, George Creel, a muckraking journalist himself, did advocate for voluntary self-monitoring and even issued a Preliminary Statement to the Press in May 1917 that urged editors to prevent publication of any news that could compromise military operations. As Creel was also a member of the government Censorship Board, which monitored communication over telegraph, telephone and cable, he was able to scrutinize periodicals as well as magazines, which were required to present their articles for the board’s review before publication.

The Espionage Act of 1917 and a 1918 sedition amendment frustrated attempts to publish an objective view of the war even further. The former barred any materials that ostensibly advocated disloyalty, insubordination, treason or obstruction of military recruitment, while the latter deemed criminal any published content disloyal to the government or military. In the hands of a manipulating Wilson administration, the freedom of domestic reporting was severely restricted.

Although operating under difficult conditions, there were numerous journalists who were able to distinguish themselves for their courage, intelligence and integrity.

Nellie_Bly_2

Nellie Bly

During what she thought only to be a vacation in Europe, Nellie Bly (1864-1922) witnessed the outbreak of the Great War. Previously, Bly had written for the New York World about government corruption, poor working conditions, and the Pullman labor strike, and even had the opportunity to interview American social reformer Susan B. Anthony. After taking a hiatus from investigative journalism, she was asked by a former World editor to write for the New York Evening Journal about her experiences in war-torn Europe. She ultimately accepted and is now known as America’s first female war correspondent reporting from the front lines.

John Reed (1887-1920) was another war correspondent who sailed to Europe soon after Germany declared war on France. He viewed the war largely as a product of commercialism and was frequently thwarted by censorship in the press. Reed is famously known to have shouted, “This is not my war, and I will not support it. This is not my war, and I will have nothing to do with it” (Homberger, John Reed, 1990, p.122). After President Wilson announced the involvement of the United States, Reed went on to publish vitriolic anti-war articles in the Socialist magazine The Masses, whose editors were eventually charged with conspiring to obstruct conscription.

After the war, author and journalist Georges Seldes (1890-1995) conducted an exclusive interview with the supreme commander of the German army, Paul von Hindenburg, who actually broke down in tears during the interview and discussed how pivotal America was strategically in winning the war.

With the efforts of these journalists and many others, it seems only appropriate that the Pulitzer Prizes, established by one of the most famous journalists and publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World, Joseph Pulitzer, were first awarded for achievement in journalism in 1917.


Dig Deeper: Resources about Journalism through the Great War

For a topic overview, check out the entry “Journalism, World War I” from our online reference Americans at War: Society, Culture and the Homefront. This entry concludes with a bibliography with sources that further investigate the history of journalism.

For primary sources, try browsing through a list of periodicals published during WWI.

Resources on Muckrakers past and present

A list of books about Ida Tarbell

Read more about Lincoln Steffens.

Discover the World War I diary of Ray Stannard Baker and more.

How well do you know Nellie Bly, the woman who travelled around the world in 72 days?

Find out more about the radical politics of John Reed.

Learn about the extraordinary career of Georges Seldes.

Resources about Joseph Pulitzer, the history of the prizes, and the works of individual prize-winning authors are all right here.

For more information about journalism throughout World War I, please email me, Alexander Williams, or call 610-519-8845.


Article written and links provided by Alexander Williams, research support librarian for the social sciences and the liaison to the communication, criminology and sociology departments.


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Dig Deeper: The Village That Cried

HedtkeAs part of the Alumni Author series, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will be giving a talk titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk is based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944. The talk will focus on the crash of an American B-24 bomber into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944. The crash and ensuing firestorm killed 61 people, including 38 children in the village elementary school. This tragic event destroyed an entire generation of children in the village of 900 people. In addition, Hedtke’s talk will also touch upon the communal funeral and the village’s almost 70-year attempt to recover from this horrendous incident.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of History, is free and open to the public, and will be held on Monday, Sept. 29 at 2:30 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library.

To learn more about the Freckleton, English Air Disaster, explore the resources provided below, chosen and organized by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

 


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Freckleton: The Village That Cried

Freckelton

Freckleton, known as “the village that cried,” is located on Britain’s beautiful Fylde Coast, situated in the historic Ribble Valley. It is approximately 230 miles northwest of London in Lancashire county.

BBC- Remembering the Freckleton air disaster of 1944  – with recording of eyewitness testimony

The Times Digital Archive 1785-1985 (Gale)Aircraft Crash on School

Historical New York Times: 1851-2009 (ProQuest)MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED: Soldiers Built Playground Where U.S. Plane Crashed in Britain

Washington Post Historical: 1877-1996 (ProQuest)Bomber Crash Kills All But 6 Of British Town’s 41 Children

Cabrini College news

Lancashire Aircraft Investigation Team (LAIT)

Ribble Valley

 

Books:

Freckleton HedtkeBlackpoolAtWar

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for Geography and Political Science.


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Last Modified: September 26, 2014