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Dig Deeper: Money Smart Week @ Falvey Memorial Library

money smart week

Falvey Memorial Library is proud to announce its participation in this year’s Money Smart Week! Money Smart Week (April 5-12), created by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, is a public awareness campaign to promote financial literacy. In collaboration with the American Library Association, Money Smart Week @ your library brings financial programming to library communities. Read on for Money Smart Week @ Falvey Memorial Library event details and to find some great resources to help you be money smart!


KRISTYNA MSW

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Moving to the City

A VU Seniors Alumni 101 Event

Monday, April 7, 6:30 p.m.

Bartley 1011

Learn what it takes to move to, live and survive in cities like Manhattan, Washington and Philadelphia after graduation. After a brief presentation about the ins and outs of real estate, Alumni Chapter volunteers from these cities will share their personal advice and answer questions about life in the city.

Additional Resources:

Apartment Hunting Tips from the NYC Affordable Housing Resource Center

Eating Well on a Budget

Co-sponsored by Villanova Dining Services and VU Seniors

Tuesday, April 8, 1:00 p.m.

Falvey Memorial Library 205

Villanova Dining Services’ Alicia Farrow and Gail Mitchell will offer tips on food budgeting, shopping, preparation and eating well on campus. They will focus on getting the greatest nutrition for your dollar by suggesting healthy, palate-satisfying choices as alternatives to cheap, packaged food. A light lunch will be served on a first-come basis.

Additional Resources:
Villanova Dining Services Nutritional Information

Find nutrition resources, recipes, vegetarian options and other thought-provoking information.

Healthy Eating on a Budget

Useful tips from ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Managing/Repaying Student Loans

Tuesday, April 8, 4:00 p.m.

Falvey Memorial Library Room 205

In this session, Melissa Hannum and Heather Rosenstein, representatives from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA), will review various resources available to assist borrowers as they enter loan repayment.

Additional Resources:
YouCanDealWithIt.com

YouCanDealWithIt.com provides practical and easy-to-understand advice on how to deal with common financial situations facing today’s college students and recent graduates.

Money Matters When Looking for an Apartment and Signing a Lease Wednesday, April 9th, 4:30 p.m.
Falvey Memorial Library Room 204
Kathy Byrnes, Office of Student Life, will unpack the issues that come with off-campus living. She will discuss start-up expenses, financial elements of renting, household budgeting and protecting your security deposit.

Additional Resources:
Renting a Home or Apartment: Leases and Security Deposits from the Pennsylvania attorney general

Renting a Home or Apartment from USA.gov

Career Center Senior Hours: Market Yourself in the Career Center A VU Seniors Alumni 101 Week Event
Wednesday, April 9, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Career Center, Garey Hall
Visit the Career Center for the special senior hours to market yourself into that first job after graduation. Learn how to connect with key alumni, put the finishing touches on your resume and cover letter, and learn helpful tips on how to succeed in your upcoming job interviews. Don’t miss this opportunity to visit the Career Center for professional advice and some free refreshments and snacks provided by the VU Seniors Committee.

Additional Resources:

GoNova Jobs
Portal to job postings and on campus recruiting.

More resources for making money smart decisions:

Take your Wildcard and ask for a student discount at many cultural institutions.

Falvey Memorial Library’s books on personal finance.

MyMoney.gov
A product of the Congressionally chartered Federal Financial Literacy and Education Commission, which is working to strengthen financial capability and increase access to financial services for all Americans.

See the Money Smart Week Resources page for even more great resources!


kristyna-carroll_edArticle and resources by Kristyna Carroll, research support librarian for Business and Social Sciences. Photo by Alice Bampton.

 

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Literary Character March Madness Enters the Round of 16: Analyst Predictions

What a week it’s been for the library’s Literary Character March Madness! With votes rolling in both online and on our physical bracket by the circulation desk, we’ve finally entered the round of sweet 16. While each of these 8 battles will prove interesting in their own right, this week we’d like to offer four predictions in the signature match-ups of the round.

Curious George vs. Winnie the Pooh

imageI’m not sure anyone could have predicted that these two pants-less anthropomorphic goofballs would take down such heavy hitters as Anna Karenina and Alice in the round of 64, but here we are. In any case, despite the recent doping allegations and that very public falling out with the man in the Yellow Hat, the smart money is on Mr. George in this one. I mean, just look at his wittle face!

Hamlet v. Harry Potter

imageIn last year’s tournament Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling made it all the way to the championship match-up, taking down major contenders such as Herman Melville along the way. For that reason it seems like The Boy Who Lived … has the odds in this one. Sorry, Hamlet my man, but it looks like this one’s “not to be.”

James Bond vs. Tom Sawyer

imageIt’s high-tech gadgetry versus home-spun foolery in this Midwest match-up, but Mr. Bond-James-Bond won’t seem so suave after Tommy-Boy tricks him into whitewashing a fence, now will he? Then again I heard Bond’s been moving in on Becky Thatcher, so he may already be in Sawyer’s head. Seems like a coin-toss, but I’m going to take Sawyer in this one.

Gandalf vs. Dante

imageWow. These storylines just write themselves: the 5-3 battle in the East is between two Catholic wizards. Wait, I’m being told Gandalf isn’t Catholic. And Dante wasn’t a wizard?! What’s with the hat and spell book, then? Somebody else should really be writing this.

 

That’s all for now, book fans! Be sure to vote for your favorite characters here, and stick to the Library News blog for more analysis next week. Remember, you can follow Falvey Memorial Library (FalveyLibrary) on twitter (#novabookbracket) and Facebook for more action.

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Dig Deeper: John Paul II’s Theology of the Body

On Thursday, April 3 at 2:30 p.m. D.C. Schindler, PhD, associate professor of Metaphysics and Anthropology at The John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at The Catholic University of America and former Villanova professor will present a talk titled “The Labor of Love: John Paul II and the Sanctity of Work” as part of the Library’s annual Pope John Paul II Legacy Lecture series. This lecture will explore the meaning of human work as a form of self-gift by reflecting on John Paul II’s insights about work in the light of the theological anthropology of his Theology of the Body.

The event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and the Department of Humanities, will take place in Room 204 in the Learning Commons and is free and open to the public.As this Legacy Lecture will explore the meaning of human work in the light of the theological anthropology of Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body, you may be curious to learn more about this seminal text. It is actually a compilation of over 120 lectures John Paul delivered to audiences in St. Peter’s Square and Paul VI Audience Hall between 1979 and 1984, shortly after he succeeded Pope John Paul I.

In these lectures, the Pope addresses a wide range of topics such as the Christian ideal of marriage, adultery, the resurrection of the body, celibacy and virginity, the sacrament of marriage, contraception and more. Generally, the lectures urge us not to perceive the body as an object, but as a gift worthy of dignity and reverence. The compiled text shows much depth and quality of thought because the Pope had studied philosophy and theology before his papacy, but there are several aids available to the adventurous reader (see below).


95f45/huch/2278/14

 


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For more information on Pope John Paul II and his Theology of the Body, please explore the following resources that Falvey Memorial Library currently offers.

Print Books

The Theology of the Body

Theology of the Body Explained: A Commentary on John Paul II’s “Gospel of the Body”
An excellent commentary that is written in an accessible style and is divided into “cycles” that treat the main themes of the Theology of the Body.

Men and Women are from Eden: A Study Guide to John Paul II’s Theology of the Body
A highly-readable study guide that provides nine accessible “lessons” that introduces the reader to the Pope’s message. Also recommended for study groups and marriage preparation courses.

John Paul > II, > Pope, > 1920-2005. > Theology of the body.
A listing of all items treating the Pope’ Theology of the Body. Be sure to check out researcher Christopher West’s series of DVDs on this subject.

John Paul > II, > Pope, > 1920-2005.
A listing of all items treating all aspects of the life and work of the Pope.

Websites

Theology of the Body Institute
A non-profit, educational organization promoting the Theology of the Body to both Christians and non-Christians alike. Offers a certification program, various courses, articles, videos, and much more.

Theology of the Body.net 
An online resource for John Paul II’s Theology of the Body that offers articles, documents, links and other resources to assist in promoting and disseminating the Pope’s message.


RS6126_Alex-Williams-work-stationAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams. He is currently pursuing an MS in Library and Information Science at Drexel University’s iSchool.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Save Your Search

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you save a whole search-results list? This video shows how to save a whole search-results list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

 

 

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Symposium: Careers in International Development Day

international development logoA recently installed library display highlights the March 26 Careers in International Development Day. This is not your usual job fair but a symposium designed for career exploration. Catholic Relief Services organized and hosted the event in partnership with Villanova University, the College of Nursing Center for Global and Public Health, the Villanova School of Business, the VSB Center for Global Leadership, the Career Center, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, the Office of Mission and Ministry and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Consortium for Higher Education.

The blue and green display consists of wayposts to the plenary talk by Lindsay Coates, executive director of InterAction, titled, “The Scope and Changes in the Field of Humanitarian Relief” and the breakout roundtables on advocacy impacting policy, global health, government foreign service, humanitarian engineering, non-governmental organizations, social entrepreneurship, social impact investing, think tanks and the United Nations. Recent additions to the library collection touching on international development topics are also included as are works authored by Villanovans.


Dig Deeper

The library’s collection includes many books, article databases and statistical sources about international development. For the policy wonk, Columbia International Affairs Online includes full-text  case studies, policy briefs, scholarly articles and books. Public Affairs International  Service (PAIS) is an article database covering similar territory. Because international development is truly interdisciplinary, academic research on international development can be found in many specialized databases, such as  PubMed for health, EconLit for economics, and  Compendex or Inspec for engineering.

Since 1990 the United Nations has published the Human Development Report, which identifies trends in development, and the Index, which is a tool used to assess country level development in terms of life expectancy, education and income. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development publishes numerous books and statistical series on development in many dimensions all available in the OECDiLibrary. AidData.org takes a data driven approach to improving outcomes by publishing datasets, visualizations and reports.

Villanovans across the disciplines are engaged in research on various aspects of development aid. Suzanne Toton, EdD, writes about Catholic relief, world hunger and social justice. The writing of Kishor Thanawala, PhD, explores economic development and justice. Latin American Development is the area of expertise of Satya Pattnayak, PhD. Jonathan Doh, PhD, is a prolific researcher on nongovernmental organizations and global corporate responsibility. Christopher Kilby, PhD, is a thought leader on the economics of foreign aid. Ruth McDermott-Levy, PhD, is a practicing nurse, educator and researcher on international community health.

Careers in International Development Day speakers represent a variety of organizations, all with interesting web sites well worth exploring with links below:

Acumen http://acumen.org/

Bread for the World:  Have Faith, End Hunger http://www.bread.org/

Catholic Relief Services http://crs.org/

Center for Global and Public Health https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/nursing/centers/globalhealth.html

Global Policy Solutions http://globalpolicysolutions.com

InterAction:  A United Voice for Global Change  http://www.interaction.org/

United Nations Refugee Agency  http://www.unhcr.org

U.S. Agency for International Development  http://www.usaid.gov/


imagesArticle by Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, (pictured) business librarian and team coordinator for the Business Research team.

 

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops!

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Great Literary Characters Throw Down in Library March Madness

BRACKETOLOGY-LOGOHarry Potter cramming on Gandalf the Grey. James Bond posting up Lady Macbeth. It’s March already, and that means Falvey Memorial Library’s bracketed literary smack-down is underway.

Following 2013’s highly competitive tournament in which #1 seed William Shakespeare obliterated a fierce field of authors, past and present, we at the Library have decided to shake things up and make this year’s battle about the creations rather than the creators. That’s right: 2014 is all about character. With that in mind we’ve compiled a list of 64 of the greatest literary characters and pitted them against each other in our seeded bracket with the goal of finding Villanova’s favorite. Not since the confusing and angst-ridden world of fan fiction have literary universes collided with such force, with such enthusiasm, and with so few spelling errors. What a time to be alive.

Will Wilbur get ahead of Oedipus?

Will Wilbur get ahead of Oedipus?

Like last year, the winners of each matchup will be chosen purely by the fans. That means if you want to see Wilbur the Pig take down Oedipus, then you’ll have to vote. There are two ways to vote this year: on our giant print bracket at the library’s front desk or online via our submission form. As an added bonus, each submitter is eligible to win a prize at the end of the tournament, so vote early and often. Check this site for future analysis and predictions, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook (#novabookbracket) for up to the minute updates and results. Best of luck to your favorite, and may the best character win.

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Dig Deeper: 50 years with the Beatles

Beatles photo by United Press International, photographer unknown [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Beatles photo by United Press International, photographer unknown [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

It was 50 years ago this winter that the Beatles brought their synergistic mix of rock and roll, whitewash respectability and cynical working-class edge to America and touched off a revolution in music and youth culture that continues to reverberate to this day.

Now is the perfect time to dig deeper into the history of the Fab Four, and Falvey Memorial Library provides access to a wide range of entry points of various types into research of their incredible music and cultural impact, including chronological biographies, musicological and critical works and publication and song indexes.

If your interest is piqued by commemoration of their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, or images of Shea Stadium, the Cavern, the rooftop or Abbey Road, consider checking out some of the following resources.


Dig Deeper

BIOGRAPHY

Can’t Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain, And America, by Jonathan Gould

This recent chronological biography centers on musicology and historical context. Other biographies that focus more on the lives and careers of the Beatles are available through EZ-Borrow:

The Beatles, by Hunter Davies (1968)

Shout! : The Beatles in Their Generation, by Philip Norman (1981)

MUSICOLOGY/CRITICISM

We own several works that offer academic treatment of the Beatles, musicological, sociological, historical:

The Cambridge Companion To The Beatles

Features lots of musicological reverie and ample discussion of the Beatles in their cultural context.

Artificial Paradise: The Dark Side Of The Beatles’ Utopian Dream, by Kevin Fourier

Seeks to demonstrate that the Beatles’ history parallels the rise and fall of 1960’s “utopian dreams.”

Tomorrow Never Knows : Rock And Psychedelics In The 1960s, by Nicholas Knowles Bromell

Uses the Beatles as a springboard into a sociological study of ‘60’s drug culture.

The Beatles: Untold Tales, by Howard A. DeWitt

Reads like a conference proceeding, covers obscure topics such as the place of the pub in the development of Lennon’s craft and the role of Brian Epstein’s brother, Clive.

SONG INDEXES/REFERENCE WORKS

Revolution In The Head: The Beatles’ Records And The Sixties, by Ian McDonald

Tell Me Why : A Beatles Commentary, by Tim Riley

These two works contain song-by-song analyses of the entire Beatles catalog, with much historical context and musicological interpretation–and much author opinion to boot.

Here, There & Everywhere : The First International Beatles Bibliography, 1962-1982, by Carol D. Terry.

A sprawling bibliography of press coverage, reviews, books and other Beatles resources through the years.

Additionally, for an exhaustive annotated chronology of the Beatles in the studio, check E-ZBorrow for The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions: The Official Story of the Abbey Road Years 1962-1970, by Mark Lewisohn.

The extent of writings on the Beatles is practically limitless, and one source tends to lead into another: for instance, my desire for more context to enrich the dryness of the Lewisohn book pointed me in the direction of recording engineer Geoff Emerick’s fascinating memoir (Here, There and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles).

stephen-spatz-aeb-thumbnailIf this golden anniversary year finds you seeking to study up on the Beatles, Falvey can start you on the path. Let me know if I can be of assistance: stephen.spatz@villanova.edu


Our Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops!

 

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Discover Drama in Special Collections

Special Collections at Falvey Memorial Library offers a wide array of fascinating collections from the early printed works of Saint Augustine to Dime Novels, and many of these collections can be discovered on the Special Collections website and through the Digital Library.

However, many library users may not be fully aware of everything Special Collections has to offer or that they are free to make appointments to use the collections in person. As the library liaison for the departments of English and theatre, I would like to introduce you, the library user, to two related collections, housed in Special Collections, that may be of particular interest to theatre faculty and dramaturgy students.

norma shearer romeo julietThe DiOrio Theater Ephemera Collection, donated by Villanova alumni Eugene L. DiOrio, spans almost 60 years of theatrical history from 1946 to 2012. The collection consists of music and theatre programs for plays, musical theatre productions, musical performances and opera productions in the Philadelphia and New York metropolitan areas. Playbills form the bulk of this collection, but it also includes many subscription advertising brochures and other musical and theatrical ephemera. Film ephemera is also featured; on the left you will see the playbill and production stills from the Astor Theatre’s showing of the 1936 film Romeo and Juliet directed by George Cukor and starring Norma Shearer, Leslie Howard and John Barrymore.

longwood gardensIn addition to the materials donated by Mr. DiOrio, other materials have been added to the collection from James Kerr, spanning 1931-2012, that focus mostly on New York City productions. Like DiOrio’s original contribution to the collection, these materials are primarily playbills but also include news clippings about performances and obituaries for actors. On the right are two playbills from The Savoy Company. The first theatre company in the U.S. to fully produce the works of Gilbert and Sullivan without altering them to avoid copyright issues, The Savoy now claims to be the oldest amateur theater company in the world dedicated solely to the production of the works of Gilbert and Sullivan.

le theatre combinedThe Le Theatre collection may also be of interest to Villanova’s theatre department. This collection consists of issues of the late 19th-/early 20th-century French periodical Le Theatre. While the periodical itself is mostly in French, the issues contain stunning images of costumes and set design from turn of the century French theatre. This sample, on the left, illustrates the kinds of images to be found in this collection.

If you’re interested in viewing such items, please visit the Special Collection’s website, check for hours of availability, and make an appointment. Special Collections librarians encourage visitors to make appointments even if they intend to come during normal opening hours. Advance notice will ensure that the items are available and ready for use at the time of your visit.

Special thanks to Laura Bang, digital and special collections curatorial assistant, for informing me of these collections and providing me with background information about them.


SarahArticle by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

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Avoid the Post-Oscar Blues

oscarAre you feeling those post-Oscars blues? Wondering how to get over that crushing feeling of your favorite movie, “Gravity,” losing to “12 Years a Slave” in the best picture category? Well, have no fear: Falvey Memorial Library has an excellent selection of past Academy Award winning films to keep those Oscar’s parties alive for many weeks to come. DVDs are located on the first floor of Falvey West and are available for checkout for 7 days. Below is a brief list of movies in Falvey’s collection that have won Academy Awards:

Best Picture

Argo

The King’s Speech

The Hurt Locker

The Departed

Best Actor

Daniel Day Lewis (“Lincoln”)

Al Pacino (“Scent of a Woman”)

Anthony Hopkins (“Silence of the Lambs”)

Forest Whitaker (“The Last King of Scotland”)

Best Actress

Jennifer Lawrence (“Silver Linings Playbook”)

Natalie Portman (“Black Swan”)

Hilary Swank (“Million Dollar Baby”)

Louise Fletcher (“One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”)

Best Supporting Actor

Christopher Plummer (“Beginners”)

Christian Bale (“The Fighter”)

Javier Bardem (“No Country for Old Men”)

Tim Robbins (“Mystic River”)

Best Supporting Actress

Jennifer Connelly (“A Beautiful Mind”)

Dianne Wiest (“Hannah and Her Sisters”)

Catherine Zeta-Jones (“Chicago”)

Penelope Cruz (“Vicky Cristina Barcelona”)

Article by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

 

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Extra! Extra! Newspapers in Special Collections

Extra“Extra! Extra! Newspapers in Special Collections” features various newspapers housed in Falvey’s Special Collections. The exhibit was curated by Laura Bang, digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant; Laura Hutelmyer, electronic resources and special acquisitions coordinator; and Jean Lutes, PhD, associate professor, Department of English, and director of academics, gender and women’s studies. Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer, created the graphics for the exhibit.

“Extra! Extra! …” begins in the vertical case which houses a placard with information about newspapers, concluding with “This exhibit provides a glimpse of some of the varied types of newspapers that can be found in Falvey’s Special Collections.” Also on display in this case are 12 mastheads reproduced from newspapers; “The Lepracaun,” “Public Ledger,” “Chicago Ledger,” “The New World” and “New York Ledger” are among those shown. On the bottom shelf are a large scrapbook from c.1880s containing clippings related to the Catholic Church and a bound volume of the “Boston Cultivator” from March 1848 from which articles have been cut, probably for inclusion in someone’s scrapbook. The curator’s placard says, “Scrapbooks provided a format for readers to collect and organize a rapidly growing selection of reading materials.”

Five additional cases feature newspapers grouped by categories: “Early Papers,” “Illustrations,” “Social Justice,” “Family Papers” and “Publications for Young Readers,” all accompanied by informative placards.

“Early Papers” features works published in Philadelphia: “The Saturday Evening Post,” May 30, 1829 (here aDolls newspaper, but later a magazine); “Public Ledger,” March 25, 1836; “Saturday Night,” Nov. 16, 1889; and a bound volume of “Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine” opened to the July 1856 issue. The curator’s placard tells us that between 1836 and 1880 Philadelphia had 12 daily papers, many more than we have today.

“Illustrations” exhibits a “Public Ledger Color Supplement” cover from June 8, 1919; a “Dear Little French Orphan …” paper doll with several outfits; an image of “Picturesque Philadelphia: Old South Street Market;” an open volume of a New York “Illustrated News” from 1853 and placards explaining how illustrations were created in a time before it was possible to insert photographs in newspapers and magazines.

The “Social Justice” case offers four issues of this newspaper published from 1936 until 1942 by Father Charles Edward Coughlin, a member of the Basilian Fathers. Father Coughlin used “Social Justice” to promote his ideology and as a supplement to his radio broadcasts. Articles such as “Ladies and Gentlemen Meet Satan,” “The Roosevelt Cleaner,” “The Smut Vendor” and “Who Is Next on Relief?” give the reader a sense of Father Coughlin’s interests.

RS7611_Harper's“Harper’s Bazar: A Repository of Fashion, Pleasure, and Instruction,” “People’s Home Journal,” “Collier’s Weekly: An Illustrated Journal of Art, Literature and Current Events” and “Comfort” are displayed as “Family Papers.” These newspapers reflect the interests of American families in the years 1870 through 1919 (the years on display). Look carefully at them; the illustrations provide information about fashion and farm life, one shows a mounted policeman coming to the aid of a woman on a runaway horse, and, particularly appropriate for our winter weather, another displays couple riding a toboggan.

The final group of newspapers on display is “Publications for Young Readers:” “Golden Days for Boys and Girls,” Feb. 4, 1882, and “Happy Days: A Paper for Young and Old,” Feb. 2, 1907, and Nov. 6, 1915, issues. The front pages of these papers show large illustrations related to the stories included.

The exhibit will remain on display through May.

Article by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.

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Last Modified: March 5, 2014