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DH in the Classroom: Aurelius Digital Humanities Launches Second Project

During the spring semester, the Aurelius Digital Humanities Initiative launched its second project, a digital edition of El Peru en sus tradiciones en su historia, en su arte. The project was commandeered by Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish Chad Leahy, PhD, who worked with his special-topics Spanish class to digitize and transcribe the text. Guidance was also provided by Laura Bang, digital and Special Collections curatorial assistant, and David Uspal, senior web specialist for library services and scholarly applications. Dr. Leahy explains that the materiality of text as object, the smell and feel of the item itself, has a story to tell us and digital humanities as a new technology has a way of opening this aspect of the text to the world.

chad-repl

  El Peru en sus tradiciones en su historia, en su arte is a 133 page multimedia scrapbook that contains postcards, newspaper clippings, drawings—more than 160 distinct visual objects in all. In many cases, these entries are copied without original sources, raising difficult questions regarding authorship, provenance and purpose. There is no way to prove authorship, but Dr. Leahy speculates that the text may have originated through the Augustinian missions in Peru and was probably a gift. The latest internal date, 1924, suggests that the scrapbook was produced in the latter half of the 1920s. In addition to studying the Peruvian text, Dr. Leahy’s class had the opportunity to develop hands-on digitizing skills while scanning the text Los dramas de la Guerra, a serialized account of the First World War published in Barcelona during the war years.

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Participants loved the way the website reformatted for easy reading on hand held devices.

David Uspal wrapped up the event by explaining the development behind the website. Uspal said, “in addition to the transcription work by the undergraduate students, technical support for the project was provided by Falvey [Memorial] Library’s Technology Development Team, with a large contribution by technology graduate assistant Pragya Singhvi.  Pragya’s work on importing transcription documents and automatically producing TEI and HTML versions of these documents will both help reduce the work necessary on future translation projects (and thus, more likely to get more and varies projects approved) and allow these projects to adopt open standards which will allow for greater use in the academic community.”


Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Publications Team and special acquisitions coordinator in Resource Management

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Tag Items in the Library’s Catalog

Do you ever think an item should have a search term or category associated with it, but it doesn’t? This video shows how to make items easy to find by adding a tag. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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‘Twas the Week Before Finals: Essential Ethics & Philosophy Resource

IEE logo

Recently, Falvey Memorial Library obtained access to the International Encyclopedia of Ethics, an essential reference work in the field of ethics and philosophy.  The encyclopedia is a comprehensive resource comprised of over 700 entries, ranging from 1,000 to 10,000 words in length, written by an international cast of subject experts. It provides clear definitions and explanations of all areas of ethics including the topics, movements, arguments, and key figures in normative ethics, metaethics, and practical ethics.

Hosted on Elsevier’s Science Direct platform, the IEE interface is simple enough for new researchers while providing the flexibility required by advanced scholars. From the IEE main page, users can browse broad subject categories ranging from traditional subjects such as the Ethics of politics to modern issue such as computer and information management ethics.

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The main search box allows for broad searching in all subject classifications and the results page displays comprehensive search limiters that allow users to limit results to particular resource types (books, articles, etc.), dates, and other useful parameters as well as the ability to check off and email multiple articles to themselves.

Rob thumbFor more information or assistance, contact Rob LeBlanc, First Year Experience & Humanities Librarian.

 

 

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Easter Sunday: Dig Deeper

Easter Good Wishes Card

Easter Bunny Postcard, 1900.
Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

For a long time, Easter Sunday meant no more to me than the day my brothers and I reluctantly got out of bed and put on over-starched shirts so we could arrive at our local church for 7:30 a.m. Mass. Trapped in what we thought was a seemingly endless cycle of sitting, standing, kneeling (repeat), all we wanted to do was run home, for we knew that, if we were lucky, the Easter Bunny had come and left plastic eggs in the backyard for us to find and discover their mysterious contents. In other words, The Mystery was a complete mystery to me.

Now, when the spring rains come and the wind carries the smell of fecund earth, I don’t think about having to wake up early and putting on a suit. I think of the Greek myth of Persephone who, returning from her stay with Hades in the Underworld, signals the end of winter and the beginning of new life on earth. I think of the rabbit, that fertile animal who symbolizes the coming of spring. I think of the egg, that really simple yet powerful symbol of fertility, purity and rebirth, and of new life breaking through the eggshell much as Christ came forth from the tomb. I think about how these eggs were originally stained red, as in the postcard above, in memory of the blood Christ shed during the Crucifixion for us.

The most important of Christian feasts, Easter, “the great day,” celebrates the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has given us new life by dying for our sins. I wish this time of the year reminds you, too, what a gift of hope the light of spring is after so much winter darkness.

Easter – Dig Deeper:

Here are just a few of the resources on Easter available at Falvey:

Passover and Easter: Origin and History to Modern Times 

An excellent and exhaustive study treating the histories and comparisons of Passover and Easter. Recommended for undergraduates and graduate students alike.

Journey to Easter: Spiritual Reflections for the Lenten Season

Written by Pope Benedict XVI, this title discusses the meaning of the Easter season, the birth, death, passion and resurrection of Christ, and more, in a very meditative style.

Easter Vigil and Other Poems 

A collection of Poems written by Pope John Paul II before he became Pope.

The Challenge of Easter

A very short and highly accessible introduction to what Easter means and why we celebrate it.

Easter in the Early Church: An Anthology of Jewish and Early Christian Texts 

A very thorough collection of texts with commentary on Easter in the early church from Jewish, Greek, Latin and New Testament writers.

Revisiting the Empty Tomb: The Early History of Easter 

Explores how the Gospels vary on what happened at the empty tomb of Christ and provides careful discussions of the origins of Easter.

Urbi et Orbi Message of Pope Francis – Easter 2013

This papal address and blessing Urbi et Orbi (“to the City [of Rome] and the World) was given by Pope Francis on Easter in 2013 and explains how Easter is the exodus, the passage of human beings from slavery to sin and evil to the freedom of love and goodness.

Warmest wishes on Easter from everyone at Falvey Memorial Library.


Alex Williams theology liaisonAlexander Williams, ’11 MA, is the temporary librarian liaison to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and a research librarian on the Academic Integration and the Information and Research Assistance teams. He is currently pursuing an MS in Library and Information Science at Drexel University’s iSchool.

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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And the Best Literary Character Is…

BRACKETOLOGY-LOGOThe time has finally come: today we crown Falvey Memorial Library’s top literary character. After three weeks of fierce voting and competition, the tournament draws to a close with two titans in the Championship matchup: Atticus Finch, lawyer extraordinaire, and Gandalf, White or Gray depending on your preference. But before we name a victor let’s take a look at a few of the match-ups these two characters had to get here.

2014-04-16 19.45.14Gandalf v. Ebenezer Scrooge:

Gandalf’s opening match-up was an intense showing of geriatric prowess. You’d think that Gandalf would take this one in a landslide, as Scrooge is famously crotchety and smells like Metamucil and IcyHot, but the final count was closer than anyone expected. In the end Gandalf proved too much for old man Ebenezer, and we all learned a valuable lesson about generosity and the ancient Istari order. So that was nice.

Gandalf v. Winnie the Pooh

No one, and I mean no one, could have predicted the tournament that Winnie the Pooh ended up having. You’d think a character whose single motivation is a desire for condensed milk and “hunny” wouldn’t stand a chance against the psychological complexity of Elizabeth Bennett. But then again this is March, and anything can happen I guess. Luckily, Gandalf escaped the bear with minimal lumps, probably because he’s an all-powerful white wizard and not a hopelessly naïve, snack-grubbing cartoon bear JEEZ. I’m sorry guys. I just—I flew off the handle.  Let me be the first to apologize to the Disney Corporation and all the Pooh lovers out there, wherever you are. This one’s for you.

Atticus Finch v. Tom Sawyer

Well, we were expecting a very cordial match-up between these two Southern gentlemen. We were expecting a sporting competition between two good-ol-boys, one in a white suit and the other in overalls, just sippin’ ice tea at the general store. What we got was an absolute beatdown, and it wasn’t pretty. Atticus Finch trounced Tom Sawyer in the Elite Eight, with Tom Sawyer receiving just two measly votes on the big board. Two. I feel kinda bad for the guy. He can barely look Becky Thatcher in the eye after that.

2014-04-16 19.26.12But our final match was the most contentious yet, garnering over 80 votes! When the dust settled, we were looking at a 52-30 victory by none other than…Gandalf! Congratulations my man, we knew you could do it.

Thanks to everyone who voted this year. Stay tuned to find out who won the drawing and will receive a free copy of a book featuring one of these fine characters. And as always, happy reading.

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Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online

Brill's New Pauly OnlineFalvey Memorial Library is pleased to announce that it now offers Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online, which serves as a complement to Brill’s New Pauly Online: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World. The supplements consist of six distinct reference titles that provide in-depth information on ancient authors and texts, historical atlases, the history of classical scholarship, the reception of myth and classical literature, and more. This resource is highly recommended for humanists and scientists alike.

With Brill’s New Pauly Supplements Online, you now have access to the following titles:

1)      Chronologies of the Ancient World - This is an exhaustive list of names, dates and facts about the rulers and dynasties that have played significant roles in the course of history.

2)      Dictionary of Greek and Latin Authors and Texts - Provides an overview and history of ancient authors and their works up to the present and contains lists of manuscripts; scholia; early, modern and bilingual editions; translations; and commentaries.

3)      Historical Atlas of the Ancient World - Covering the ancient Near East, the Mediterranean world, the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic world and the Holy Roman Empire from 3000 B.C. to the 15th century A.D., this new atlas illuminates the political, economic, social and cultural developments of key areas in history.

4)      The Reception of Myth and Mythology - Explores how and where the myths of Greece and Rome have spread into literature, music and art over the centuries.

5)      The Reception of Classical Literature - This supplement provides an overview of the reception and influence of ancient literary works on the literary, visual and musical arts from Antiquity to the present.

6)      History of Classical Scholarship – A Biographical Dictionary - Offers an overview of the history of classical studies and contains biographies of over 700 scholars from the 14th century to the present in social, political and cultural contexts.

After completing a quick and simple registration online, you will find a series of “personal user tools” that can catapult your research experience into another world. Some of these added features include the ability to label and “star” entries, to email entries to yourself or classmates, and to share links on social media (Facebook and Twitter). You can save your searches and easily return to those lists of results, manage them from “My Account,” and even subscribe to Brill’s RSS Feed to learn when new or revised content is added.

As an additional bonus, try out the “Cite this Page” feature found at the end of each entry. If you are using this resource for an assignment, copy and paste citations to create your reference list in just seconds. You can also use the “export citation” feature to send the bibliographic information to EndNote or RefWorks, or you can even save it as a document in either MLA or Chicago Style.

Be sure to browse the bibliography at the end of each entry so you can easily find other sources that explore your topic of interest.

Alex Williams theology liaisonIf you have any questions pertaining to this resource, please contact Alexander Williams via email or telephone (ext. 8845).

 

 

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Ramp Up Your Research: How to Add Comments to an Item

Did you know you can add a comment to an item’s catalog record? This video shows how to add comments to an item right from within the catalog.

(Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Gerald info deskVideo tutorial produced by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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Lisa Sewell, PhD, Expands Poster Event to Include Student Prose

SEWELL DREW

Lisa Sewell and Alan Drew

Since 2006, Lisa Sewell, PhD, associate professor in the Department of English; director of programming, Gender and Women’s Studies; and faculty editor-in-chief of CONCEPT, an Interdisciplinary Journal of Graduate Studies, has collaborated with Falvey Memorial Library to hold an open-mic poetry reading. A well-published poet with several books of her poetry in Falvey’s collection, Dr. Sewell volunteers her time to engage students in and to promote this annual event.

Dr. Sewell has also worked with the Library to display posters featuring senior students’ poems throughout its first floor during April, National Poetry Month. This year, Dr. Sewell teamed up with Alan Drew, MFA, assistant professor of English/creative writing, to include both senior student’s poems and excepts from their prose on the posters. Why only seniors? These students are contestants for the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards.

Several contestants for the Class of 2014 Creative Writing Awards have given the Library permission to display their prose excerpts and poems not only on posters in the Library but also on the library’s blog. Please check here regularly to see their contest entries.


Article by Gerald Dierkes, information services specialist for the Information and Research Assistance team, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

 

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Dig Deeper: Money Smart Week @ Falvey Memorial Library

money smart week

Falvey Memorial Library is proud to announce its participation in this year’s Money Smart Week! Money Smart Week (April 5-12), created by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, is a public awareness campaign to promote financial literacy. In collaboration with the American Library Association, Money Smart Week @ your library brings financial programming to library communities. Read on for Money Smart Week @ Falvey Memorial Library event details and to find some great resources to help you be money smart!


KRISTYNA MSW

Dig Deeper

Moving to the City

A VU Seniors Alumni 101 Event

Monday, April 7, 6:30 p.m.

Bartley 1011

Learn what it takes to move to, live and survive in cities like Manhattan, Washington and Philadelphia after graduation. After a brief presentation about the ins and outs of real estate, Alumni Chapter volunteers from these cities will share their personal advice and answer questions about life in the city.

Additional Resources:

Apartment Hunting Tips from the NYC Affordable Housing Resource Center

Eating Well on a Budget

Co-sponsored by Villanova Dining Services and VU Seniors

Tuesday, April 8, 1:00 p.m.

Falvey Memorial Library 205

Villanova Dining Services’ Alicia Farrow and Gail Mitchell will offer tips on food budgeting, shopping, preparation and eating well on campus. They will focus on getting the greatest nutrition for your dollar by suggesting healthy, palate-satisfying choices as alternatives to cheap, packaged food. A light lunch will be served on a first-come basis.

Additional Resources:
Villanova Dining Services Nutritional Information

Find nutrition resources, recipes, vegetarian options and other thought-provoking information.

Healthy Eating on a Budget

Useful tips from ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Managing/Repaying Student Loans

Tuesday, April 8, 4:00 p.m.

Falvey Memorial Library Room 205

In this session, Melissa Hannum and Heather Rosenstein, representatives from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA), will review various resources available to assist borrowers as they enter loan repayment.

Additional Resources:
YouCanDealWithIt.com

YouCanDealWithIt.com provides practical and easy-to-understand advice on how to deal with common financial situations facing today’s college students and recent graduates.

Money Matters When Looking for an Apartment and Signing a Lease Wednesday, April 9th, 4:30 p.m.
Falvey Memorial Library Room 204
Kathy Byrnes, Office of Student Life, will unpack the issues that come with off-campus living. She will discuss start-up expenses, financial elements of renting, household budgeting and protecting your security deposit.

Additional Resources:
Renting a Home or Apartment: Leases and Security Deposits from the Pennsylvania attorney general

Renting a Home or Apartment from USA.gov

Career Center Senior Hours: Market Yourself in the Career Center A VU Seniors Alumni 101 Week Event
Wednesday, April 9, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Career Center, Garey Hall
Visit the Career Center for the special senior hours to market yourself into that first job after graduation. Learn how to connect with key alumni, put the finishing touches on your resume and cover letter, and learn helpful tips on how to succeed in your upcoming job interviews. Don’t miss this opportunity to visit the Career Center for professional advice and some free refreshments and snacks provided by the VU Seniors Committee.

Additional Resources:

GoNova Jobs
Portal to job postings and on campus recruiting.

More resources for making money smart decisions:

Take your Wildcard and ask for a student discount at many cultural institutions.

Falvey Memorial Library’s books on personal finance.

MyMoney.gov
A product of the Congressionally chartered Federal Financial Literacy and Education Commission, which is working to strengthen financial capability and increase access to financial services for all Americans.

See the Money Smart Week Resources page for even more great resources!


kristyna-carroll_edArticle and resources by Kristyna Carroll, research support librarian for Business and Social Sciences. Photo by Alice Bampton.

 

Our Dig Deeper series features links to Falvey Memorial Library resources curated and provided by a librarian specializing in the subject, to allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

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Literary Character March Madness Enters the Round of 16: Analyst Predictions

What a week it’s been for the library’s Literary Character March Madness! With votes rolling in both online and on our physical bracket by the circulation desk, we’ve finally entered the round of sweet 16. While each of these 8 battles will prove interesting in their own right, this week we’d like to offer four predictions in the signature match-ups of the round.

Curious George vs. Winnie the Pooh

imageI’m not sure anyone could have predicted that these two pants-less anthropomorphic goofballs would take down such heavy hitters as Anna Karenina and Alice in the round of 64, but here we are. In any case, despite the recent doping allegations and that very public falling out with the man in the Yellow Hat, the smart money is on Mr. George in this one. I mean, just look at his wittle face!

Hamlet v. Harry Potter

imageIn last year’s tournament Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling made it all the way to the championship match-up, taking down major contenders such as Herman Melville along the way. For that reason it seems like The Boy Who Lived … has the odds in this one. Sorry, Hamlet my man, but it looks like this one’s “not to be.”

James Bond vs. Tom Sawyer

imageIt’s high-tech gadgetry versus home-spun foolery in this Midwest match-up, but Mr. Bond-James-Bond won’t seem so suave after Tommy-Boy tricks him into whitewashing a fence, now will he? Then again I heard Bond’s been moving in on Becky Thatcher, so he may already be in Sawyer’s head. Seems like a coin-toss, but I’m going to take Sawyer in this one.

Gandalf vs. Dante

imageWow. These storylines just write themselves: the 5-3 battle in the East is between two Catholic wizards. Wait, I’m being told Gandalf isn’t Catholic. And Dante wasn’t a wizard?! What’s with the hat and spell book, then? Somebody else should really be writing this.

 

That’s all for now, book fans! Be sure to vote for your favorite characters here, and stick to the Library News blog for more analysis next week. Remember, you can follow Falvey Memorial Library (FalveyLibrary) on twitter (#novabookbracket) and Facebook for more action.

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Last Modified: April 3, 2014