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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (10/7)


Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!


Cultural Studies Food Week–The Taste of Justice: Rhetoric and Reality. Monday-Friday, Oct. 26-30. In our annual speaker series, students will learn about the politics of food production and consumption as they relate to nutrition and other issues. Each evening’s event will include Q and A for students as well as tasty culinary treats.

Did you know—

Need a Quiet Place to Study? This short video provides a lighthearted look at a resource the Library takes seriously:
quiet study spaces.


how to do chemical tricksHey, gang! Since you’ll have all kinds of time on your hands next week, why not try out some nifty chemistry projects? The Blue Electrode blog has just what you need! A book that Falvey recently contributed to Project Gutenberg, How To Do Chemical Tricks, is now available for your reading pleasure. It contains “some highly amusing and instructive tricks!” As noted in the review by resident blogger Demian Katz, “some of the experiments might still be fun to perform today (if you can figure out how to modernize the archaic terminology).”



Ginger reading book

You’ve heard of eating local – how about reading local?  A handful of libraries are establishing programs of one kind or another to promote local authors to their local patrons. This is, of course, a really great help to burgeoning authors–but it also highlights the ways a public library can be part of a “literary ecosystem” for a particular community.

If you’re interested in the works and writings of people in our Villanova community, check out the Community Bibliography.



It is Hispanic Heritage Month – a celebration that recognizes the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States. Technically a month that straddles two, HHM is celebrated each year between September 15 and October 15,and includes the anniversaries of the independence of five Latin American countries.

The term Hispanic or Latino refers to Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish cultures or origins regardless of race. According to the 2010 Census, 50.5 million Americans identify themselves as Latino or Hispanic, representing a 3% increase since 2000.

Each day this month we will reproduce one of twenty countries represented on a joint poster project sponsored by the library and the Office of Mission and Ministry. Each poster features QR codes linking to premier resources that the library has for researching Hispanic history, culture or language and more importantly, the names of the specialized subject librarians devoted to aspects of these studies. Contact Susan Ottignon (Romance Languages and Literature,) Jutta Seibert (History and Art History) or Merrill Stein (Geography and Political Science) for further research needs or assistance. Posters designed by library Communication team leader, Joanne Quinn, with the assistance of Ottignon and Stein. The library wishes to thank Christopher Janosik, PhD and the Office of Mission & Ministry for their support of this project.

BOOKTOBER – Meet the millennial Forsythe Pendleton Jones III!

1460728658481483042First of all, who’s willing to admit that they knew that was Jughead Jones’ real name? And sure, Archie may be listed first on the comic book marquee, but we all know Juggie is the real star of the show. Perennially cool under pressure – until something comes between him and a stack of cheeseburgers – Jug is always the aloof onlooker, the chill bystander as Arch makes a fool of himself fawning over Betty and/or Veronica. Well, now it’s official – Jughead’s causing a big wave in the comic book world by getting a modern makeover by Chip Zdarsky (Howard the Duck) and artist Erica Henderson (The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl). It comes out today, Riverdale!

On this day in 2003, Arnold Schwarzenegger was elected governor of California. As most know, Schwarzenegger is a body builder gone action movie star, most well-known for his roles in The Terminator, Predator, and Conan the Barbarian. As most people may not know, Schwarzenegger lurks Reddit fitness threads and has a very cool habit of being a fitspiration for unsuspecting Redditors. Cool dude.

arnold s

“The mind is the limit. As long as the mind can envision the fact that you can do something, you can do it, as long as you really believe 100 percent.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger


If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


‘Caturday: “Library Corner” of the 40’s and 50’s

There was a time when Wildcat book lovers and library patrons could read about new book titles and library events in the “Library Corner” section of the Villanovan. The excerpts below are from 1949 and 1950 when library news shared a page with articles about the school radio station and the Physics club. We know that ‘Cats still read books and articles, our circulation statistics tell us that, but these days they read about new resources, books, and events on the Library’s news blog online.

(If you’re interested in book reviews, check out the “Book-tober” feature in The Eight Thirty daily blog this month. Our first review was posted on Oct. 2.)

Library Corner Oct 11 1949


Library Corner Oct 10 1950
















Images courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.

LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnail‘Caturday blog post by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of the Access Services team.


Foto Friday: Avoid the crowds; meet with Pope Francis and the World Meeting of Families through the printed page

pope books

Selected books by or about Pope Francis:

  • A big heart open to God : a conversation with Pope Francis / Call Number: BX1378.7 .F712 2013
  • Fioretti : the little flowers of Pope Francis : heartwarming stories of the Gospel in action / Call Number: BX1378.7 .T66513 2014
  • Francis : man of prayer / Call Number: BX1378.7 .E8313 2013
  • I ask you to pray for me : opening a horizon of hope / Call Number: BX1378.7 .A25 2013b
  • The church of mercy : a vision for the church / Call Number: BX1378.7 .A25 2014

 Selected books about marriage and family:

  • A Christian theology of marriage and family / Call Number: BX2250 .R825 2003
  • Marriage : the rock on which the family is built / Call Number: BX2250 .M39 2009
  • Marriage and family : experiencing the Church’s teaching in married life / Call Number: BX2250.M37 1989
  • The splendor of love : John Paul II’s vision for marriage and family / Call Number: BX2250 .S355 2003
  • Vocation to virtue : Christian marriage as a consecrated life / Call Number: BX2250 .L357 2014 Located: Falvey West – 1st Floor

Selected books about conjugal love:

  • Fruitful and responsible love / Call Number: BV4639 .J55 1979
  • On human life : Humanae vitae / Call Number: HQ766.3 .C33 2014
  • Sexuality, marriage, and family : readings in the Catholic tradition / Call Number: BX1795.S48 S53 2001
  • The Catholic Church on marital intercourse : from St. Paul to Pope John Paul II / Call Number: BX1795.S48 O23 2009
  • The nuptial mystery / Call Number: BT701.3 .S3613 2005

Selected books about Theology of the Body:

  • Called to love : approaching John Paul II’s theology of the body / Call Number: BX1795.B63 A53 2009
  • Gift & communion : John Paul II’s Theology of the body / Call Number: BX1795.B63 K8713 2014
  • Men and women are from Eden : a study guide to John Paul II’s Theology of the body / Call Number: BX1795.B63 J6434 2005
  • Theology of the body explained : a commentary on John Paul II’s “gospel of the body” / Call Number: BT741.2.J643 W47 2003

Questions? Email: darren.poley@villanova.edu

Article by Darren Poley, the theology subject specialist, scholarly outreach librarian and curator for the Augustinian Historical Institute. Book collage by Joanne Quinn.Darren




The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (9/15)


Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!


Arthur Cola: The Silent Chime of the Bell, Immigrants, Riots and Old St. Augustine. 4:00 p.m. in room 204. Author, Arthur Cola will discuss his new book, Pure and Tarnished Hearts. Copies of Cola’s book will be available for purchase and signing after the talk. Light refreshments will be served. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu

Pope Francis Family

In celebration of World Meeting of Families 2015 and Pope Francis’ visit to Philadelphia Falvey Memorial Library invites you to celebrate your family by sharing a family photo. There are two ways to participate. 1.) Bring in a copy of your favorite family photo and hang it on the library display window. 2.) Post your family photo on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram with the hashtag #falveyfamily and we’ll hang it for you. Please note, submission of a photo implies your permission to use images on library social media accounts, displays, and publications. Provide copies and not originals as photos displayed will not be returned.




If you would like the opportunity to take home the large sign of our Pope Francis display as a commemorative souvenir of the 2015 World Meeting of Families, please fill out a ticket with your name and contact email (available near the display). For a second entry, enter a family photo to be included in our display. (For remote participants, hashtag your photo #falveyfamily.) The random drawing will be held in November, when the display is dismantled.


Religious Diversity Day Lecture featuring Daniel Mark, PhD. Tomorrow. Wednesday, September 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Daniel Mark, PhD, assistant professor of political science, presents a lecture titled “Faith, Forgiveness and Family Life: An Orthodox Jew in Conversation with the Catholic Church.” Questions? Contact: julia.sheetz@villanova.edu  Dr. Daniel Mark

Did you know—

The Library houses a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment that allows participants to become virtually immersed in a setting in which they can move about as though they were in the actual setting.


bicyclethief460Isn’t this great weather for riding bikes? Cool, dry, breezy and not a cloud in the sky. If you’re not a bicyclist, then consider watching the critically acclaimed film, The Bicycle Thieves (or Ladri di biciclette). Adapted from the novel by Luigi Bartolini, the film is a classic example of Italian neorealism and has been touted as the greatest film of all time by a Sight & Sound magazine poll. The Guardian review of the film summarizes it best:

“Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani) is a poor man who is thrilled when he is at last offered a job: delivering and putting up movie posters. But he needs a bicycle, and must supply his own, so his wife Maria (Lianella Carelli) pawns the family’s entire stock of bed linen to redeem the bicycle he had already hocked. On his first day at work, the unlocked machine is stolen and Antonio drops everything to go on a desperate odyssey through the streets of Rome with his little boy Bruno (Enzo Staiola) to get his bike back, pleading and accusing and uncovering scenes of poverty similar to theirs wherever they go.”


On this day in 2004, Gary Bettman announced the infamous NHL lockout that led to the cancellation of an entire hockey season. Good thing we don’t have to worry about that this year! The Philadelphia Flyers start off their season in a few short weeks against the Tampa Bay Lightning. Will you be watching? Hockey is a great backdrop for midterm studying!


“The highest compliment that you can pay me is to say that I work hard every day, that I never dog it.” – Wayne Gretzky


If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


‘Caturday: Podcasting Wildcats

novanation logoHey, NovaNation! Want to know who else is podcasting on campus?

Take a look at the podcast posts on our blog this week, then jump over to some of the links below.

The Villanova University channel on College Sports Live is getting ready for a year of on demand podcasts of Villanova games!

There are some excellent podcasts on Sports Law from The Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova School of Law.

And don’t miss the Villanova University lecture and event podcasts on iTunes U.

vu itunes








If you’re thinking of creating your own podcasts, check out the resources offered by UNIT on the University website. They also have some helpful podcasting FAQs.

podcasting bookWant more help? The Library has current print and online resources about “do it yourself” podcasting.


‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of Access Services.


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Philadelphia Researching Tips

Even though Philadelphia is only 13 miles away, navigating the city may seem like another world in some sense. With world class institutions, museums, and parks, coupled with a rich history running throughout the city, it is no wonder people can feel overwhelmed when visiting Philadelphia. Luckily Falvey has access to many resources to help navigate and research any topic on Philadelphia. Whether the resource is in print or online, the Library can help resolve any confusion when it comes to researching the City of Brotherly Love.


Falvey has a vast collection of books on Philadelphia; where that collection is located in the Library depends on your subject of research. Start with “Philadelphia” in the subject line to narrow your results.



Use the facets on the right to filter the results down to your area of interest:



In this example, the results are filtered down into books about Philadelphia politics. The picture below displays that books on this subject can be found in the F 158 call number section of the library.



Online Resources

Jutta Seibert, History Librarian and Academic Integration Team Leader, suggests the following free resources readily available online:

Historical Images of Philadelphia – 20,000 historical images of the city dating back to 1841 courtesy of the Free Library.

Library Company of Philadelphia – The Library Company was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin and remains to this day an independent cultural institution. Its rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art are worth a visit to its Locust Street location. The Library Company currently hosts “Fashioning Philadelphia – the Style of the City, 1720-1940.” Selected exhibits such as the “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic” are available online.

Digital Maps of Philadelphia – Digital access to city maps ranging from 1834 to 1962 courtesy of the Free Library.


This is a short, starting point for researching tips on Philadelphia. Remember to always contact your subject librarian for a more in depth search.

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Life as the Sister of the Liberty Bell

This post was originally posted on December 10, 2009.

A recently digitized title from the Villanova Digital Collection, The Liberty Bell’s Sister by the Rev. Louis A. Rongione, OSA, provides a history and overview of the companion to the Liberty Bell that once rested in Falvey Memorial Library and now resides in the Augustinian Heritage Room of the Saint Thomas of Villanova Monastery.


The history of the bell started on October 16, 1751 when the Pennsylvania Assembly voted that a bell weighing 2000 pounds costing between 100 and 150 pounds (sources disagree on the specific cost – ed.) should be purchased from Whitechapel Bell Foundry in  London and then be provided for use in the new State House that was later called Independence Hall.

That historic bell cracked upon its first testing. It was felt by that same governing body that because of the need to recast twice after cracking, and the bells poor tone quality, a replacement should be purchased.

A bell of the same weight and cost was then ordered.

In the summer of 1754 the Liberty Bell’s sister arrived in Philadelphia.

On August 13, 1754, however, the Pennsylvania Assembly voted not to replace but to keep both bells as the populace who once found the Liberty Bells’ tone annoying had grown accustomed to it.

The original bell was hung in Independence Hall and the Sister Bell was hung on a special cupola in front of her, attached to the State House Clock, to toll the hours. She performed this task from 1754 to 1830, except for a brief period of time during the Revolutionary War.

Both bells rang for special occasions. One such occasion was the reading of the Declaration of Independence, July 8, 1776.

The Sister Bell is no stranger to political intrigue. On September 14, 1777 British forces were threatening invasion and then occupied Philadelphia. The bells were smuggled to secret location in Allentown to prevent the enemy from melting them down and using them for ammunition.

The British left Philadelphia June 27, 1778 and the sisters were returned to their home.

In 1830 the City of Philadelphia kept the original bell and sold the Sister Bell and Stretch Clock to Reverend Michael Hurley, O.S.A., Pastor of Saint Augustine’s Church, 4th and Vine Streets, Philadelphia.

On May 8th 1844 St. Augustine’s Church was burned to the ground by members of the Native American Party. The clock, library, paintings were totally destroyed and the bell cracked into pieces in the fire. Her fragments were gathered and given to Joseph Bernhard of Philadelphia for recasting.

In 1847 the Sister Bell was recast but she was greatly reduced in size. She was sent to Villanova College founded in 1842 by the same Augustinian Fathers who served St. Augustine’s Church.

From 1847- 1917 the Sister Bell hung in a locust tree and was used to call the students to class, chapel and their meals. In 1917 she was sent to Jamaica Long Island and was used in the steeple of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Augustinian Church, but on September 20, 1942 she returned home to Villanova for the inauguration of the Centennial year 1942-1943.

Currently the Sister Bell has found a home in the Augustinian Heritage Room. She may be seen by appointment by calling the Rev. Martin L. Smith, OSA: 610-864-1590.


See more at: http://blog.library.villanova.edu/digitallibrary/2009/12/10/life-as-the-sister-of-the-liberty-bell/#sthash.veyLsTWz.dpuf


‘Caturday: Impatient Pets

We’ve crossed over the midsummer mark, and most school-aged children have been off from school for a few weeks. What are your little Wildcats doing this summer? YMCA camp? Traveling with the family? Having fun with friends at the community pool? Do they have chores to do?

I hope they aren’t tempted to follow this young lady’s example.

Girl feeding cat and dog salami

“Don’t be impatient, children!”

Trade card featuring a girl feeding salami to a dog and cat, given with Frank Leslie’s “Chimney Corner”, from the Villanova Digital Library Dime Novel and Popular Literature collection.


Alice’s Adventures and Mock Turtle Soup

Alice's Adventures in WonderlandSince this is a library food blog, I like to find recipes that will connect to a book or to reading in general. So this month, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, I decided to read this childhood favorite again in the hopes of finding culinary inspiration.

The story begins with Alice half-dozing outside on a hot summer day as her older sister reads a book with “no pictures or conversations in it.” As her mind wanders, she enters another world where animals talk, playing card soldiers double as croquet arches, and a Queen randomly orders executions for trivial infractions. But it’s the Mock Turtle who gets my attention. He goes to school, sings, dances and plays games. We learn of the sad Mock Turtle’s schooling in chapter 9 and he performs the Lobster Quadrille in chapter 10. Both chapters are filled with songs, puns and word play.

I’m not sure if it was the Queen’s mention of Mock Turtle Soup or if it was the Turtle Soup song that inspired me to make soup. And there was no doubt in my mind that it would be the mock version of turtle soup. The ingredients would be easier to find and cheaper than using real turtle. That, combined with the happy childhood memories of finding cute little turtles near Fern Hill Lake, prevented me from considering turtle meat.

mock turtleIn the earliest publication of Alice’s Adventures, the Mock Turtle was beautifully illustrated by Sir John Tenniel, who showed the character with a calf’s head and hoofs instead of flippers on his hind legs. He may have been inspired to draw the Mock Turtle this way because of the transition to “dull reality” as Alice’s sister thought of how “the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle’s heavy sobs.”

Instead of making the traditional Victorian mock turtle soup, which calls for calf’s head and heels, I adapted a Louisianan recipe from the In a While, Crocodile cook book that had a little more kick to it. In addition to ground beef, I added ground veal, as a nod to the traditional calf ingredient.

¾ lb. ground sirloin

¾ lb. ground veal

6 stalks celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup chopped onion

3/4 cup butter

15 oz. tomato puree

30 oz. chicken broth

30 oz. beef broth

1/2 cup flour mixed with 1 cup water

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce

1 cup ketchup

1 teaspoon hot sauce (more if you like it hotter)

2 bay leaves

1-1/2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup lemon juice

1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

6 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

6 slices lemon, for garnish

1 cup sherry (or to taste)

Mock turtle saute stepSaute the meat, celery, garlic, and onion in butter until meat is brown and veggies are translucent. Add to the slow cooker (6 quart or larger).

Add tomato puree, chicken broth, beef broth, flour mixture, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, hot sauce, bay leaves, thyme, salt, and pepper to the slow cooker. Stir.

Cook on low heat for 3 ½ hours.

Add lemon juice, parsley, and eggs. Stir well and cook for another 30 minutes. If desired, skim and discard fat from top of soup.

IMG_8535Immediately before serving, remove bay leaves, add sherry to taste, and garnish individual bowls with lemon slices. Enjoy with buttered bread.




If you’re looking for a historically accurate mock turtle soup recipe, try the one copied below, from Martha Lloyd’s Household Book. (Martha was a close friend of Jane Austen.)

Mrs. Fowle’s Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf’s head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop’t very small. A ¼ of a pint of oysters chop’t very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop’t. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.

“The Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and began, in a voice sometimes choked with sobs, to sing this:—

‘Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,

Waiting in a hot tureen!

Who for such dainties would not stoop?

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beautiful Soup!


‘Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,

Game, or any other dish?

Who would not give all else for two

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beauti—FUL SOUP!’”

Food blog by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services team.

Mock Turtle Soup recipe adapted from In a While, Crocodile: New Orleans Slow Cooker Recipes by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, © 2014 by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.


“The audience is half of the poem”: the First Latino Poet Laureate

Library of Congress appoints the 1st Latino Poet Laureate

Connecting to people through performance is crucial for Herrera. “I used to stand on the corner in San Diego with poems sticking out of my hip pocket, asking people if there was a place where I could read poems,” he recalls. “The audience is half of the poem.”

(Retrieved from LA Times, 6/22/15)
Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Photo: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/juan-felipe-herrera

Congratulations to Juan Felipe Herrera, who was appointed the 21st poet laureate on June 10 by the Library of Congress. Herrera will be the first Hispanic-American person to be chosen as poet laureate in the United States in the 79 years since the program’s inception. His tenure will begin in September—national Hispanic heritage month.

Herrera, the son of migrant farmers, spent much of his youth travelling and living in tents in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Though terribly underprivileged, he was presented with the remarkable opportunity to attend UCLA as a young adult. From there, he went on to attend Stanford University and the University of Iowa’s Writing Workshop, where he earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

Through his education and experiences as a young Hispanic-American, Herrera developed a deep passion for writing and performing in both English and Spanish. He penned several pieces, including collections of poetry and children’s books in honor of his heritage and worldview. In addition to his writing and performing, Herrera has been an avid teacher and has also served as the poet laureate of California from 2012-2014.

Villanova University was lucky enough to welcome Juan Felipe Herrera as one of the featured speakers during the 14th annual Villanova Literary Festival, organized by Alan Drew, Assistant Professor of English & Creative Writing. The talk took place on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner. A jam-packed audience had the opportunity to listen to Herrera as he read and performed selected poems in both Spanish and English. With great enthusiasm and detail, Herrera shared his past experiences and showed poignant images to illustrate his work.

It’s been reported that Herrera’s main focus during his tenure as poet laureate will likely be to connect people of all different cultural backgrounds through poetry and to help highlight the stories of those people who are typically overlooked.

Interested in learning more about Juan Felipe Herrera? Check out Falvey Memorial Library’s holdings by this author.

Also, visit the following sites for additional information on Herrera and the position of Poet Laureate, provided by librarian Susan Ottignon.

Juan Felipe Herrera, Current Poet Laureate

List of works by Juan Felipe Herrera

Past Poets Laureate: 2011-present

About the Position of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry

Dig Deeper links provided by Sue Ottignon, subject librarian for romance languages and literatures.


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Last Modified: June 29, 2015