FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

Dig Deeper: The Revolutionary War and American Independence

DECLARATION
 
“… these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.

 Not just a list of grievances, the Declaration of Independence is also a checklist for good government. Its approval and adoption by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776 in Philadelphia (woot woot!) marks the beginning of a new nation, the United States of America.

Bell_Tower_of_Independence_HallIt’s easy to take the ideological stories of the birth of our nation and its heroes for granted as they have been taught to us since elementary school and romanticized in movies and television. But have you, as an adult, visited the Liberty Bell or Independence Hall (where the Declaration and its forebear, the Articles of Confederation,) were debated? Or walked the streets near Declaration House at 7th and Market where Thomas Jefferson wrote the document? Have you ever read or researched with a critical eye, materials that dig deeper into the symbolic, mythical and political realities of the document’s history?

The following links, curated by history liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert, are great scholarly resources for getting beyond the myths and into the historical context of the American Revolution. Why not take some time this July 4th weekend to explore some of Falvey’s many resources written about that time? She’s also included authentic primary materials from the Digital Library, to truly complete your step back into history.


 New Books

Books about the Declaration of Independence

Books about the American Revolution

Books about the history of the U.S. Constitution


 Primary Sources in Digital Collections

Falvey Memorial Library has a strong collection of primary sources about this monumental period in American history. Here are some suggestions from the library’s digital collections. Additional primary sources, available in print or microform only, can be discovered with the help of the library’s online catalog.

American Founding Era
This collection brings together scholarly digital editions of the papers of major figures of the early republic: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Dolley Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Harriott Pinckney Horry.

America’s Historical Newspapers, 1690-1922
Follow the War of Independence and the birth of a new nation in contemporary newspapers.

Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1800
Follow the events of the American Revolution from a local perspective.

American Periodicals Series
Read the first magazines published in the American colonies and in the early republic.

Early American Imprints, Series I: Evans, 1639-1800
Digital copies of over 37,000 books and pamphlets published and sold in the American colonies and the early republic.

Early American Imprints, Series II: Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801-1819
Digital copies of over 36,000 books and pamphlets published and sold in the early republic.

Sabin Americana, 1500-1926
Digital copies of works about the Americas published throughout the world from 1500 to the early 1900’s.

American State Papers, 1789-1838
Legislative and executive documents of the first 14 U.S. Congresses.

Interested in the other side of the story? Discover British opinions on events in the American colonies through contemporary newspapers and magazines:

Online References

Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History

Encyclopedia of the American Constitution

Dictionary of American History

American National Biography Online

Encyclopedia of the American Revolution

A Companion to the American Revolution

Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


imgres

Jutta Seibert

Links and resources prepared by Jutta Seibert, team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for History. Introduction by Joanne Quinn.


Like

The Curious ‘Cat: What would you change? What would you keep?

Curious Cat
This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could change one thing about the Library, what would it be? What about the Library do you hope never changes?

RS9223_Christian LolkChristian Lolk—“I have a background in the humanities, so as many books and sections devoted to the humanities as possible … I’m a new student, but I checked around the Library this past semester, and I noticed there’s not much past the late ‘80s purchased or put on the shelves … I would prefer some newer books and more in the humanities.”

Editor’s Note—Browsing the collection often leads to discoveries of new books, connections among various subjects, or in-depth knowledge of a specific topic. Another strategy for finding new books, though, is to use Falvey’s powerful catalog either to sort your search results by date—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data descending 

 

 

 

 

—or to use the “Year of Publication” filter to set a date range—

2015 - 07 Jul - catalog results - data range

RS9226_John Costello

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Costello—“[change—] more electrical outlets … not change—the calming environment”

RS9228_Mary Jane Mahan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Jane Mahan—“I don’t know what I want to change about the printers, but something. I’m always so relieved when a printing problem is solved … I’m just grateful … I wish there was more lounge lighting for those late-night studies. And something I hope that never changes is the warmth of the café addition. I’m a returning student from 20 years ago, and my jaw dropped when I saw food in the Library. I thought there had been some kind of coup. But it’s made it so nice … it just makes me feel good. It makes me feel relaxed at times when things can be quite stressful.”

RS9231_Simhachalam PanduriSimhachalam Panduri—“I would like to increase the number of study rooms because every time I think of getting a study room it’s always busy. I can’t get any; I need to wait for one or two hours to get a study room.”

RS9235_Blessing Mbamalu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blessing Mbamalu—“I’m a fourth-floor kind of person, and I realize it’s not going to be that quiet, so I wish it was a little bit more [quiet]. I don’t know how you would be able to enforce it to make it stricter.”

RS9239_Anusha Mathur

 

 

 

 

 


Anusha Mathur
—“One thing I would like to change about the Library is more seating space. In the fall or spring [semesters] whenever I enter at 4:00 p.m. and the Library is extremely busy, I don’t find space to sit. Maybe that is one thing which can be done.”


Like

Stonewall Book Awards honor works of GLBT merit

stonewall_logoThe 2015 Stonewall Book Awards given by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT) of the American Library Association were presented this weekend in San Francisco at the organization’s annual conference.

The awards are given annually to English-language works of merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience. Several major categories are awarded: the Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award, the Barbara Gittings Literature award and the Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award. The awards are given to works published the prior year.

This year’s winners include—

 Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award

51lOr0fYHkLPresented to This Day in June, written by Gayle E. Pitman and published by Magination Press, an imprint of the American Psychological Association.

Other Children’s and Young Adult Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender teens speak out, written and photographed by Susan Kuklin, published by Candlewick Press.
  • I’ll Give You the Sun, written by Jandy Nelson, published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.
  • Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress, written by Christine Baldacchino, with pictures by Isabelle Malenfant, published by Groundwood Books

Barbara Gittings Literature Award

Prelude-to-Bruise-683x1024Presented to  Prelude To Bruise, written by Saeed Jones, published by Coffee House Press.

Other Barbara Gittings Literature Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Bitter Eden, written by Tatamkhulu Afrika, published by Picador USA.
  • Frog Music, written by Emma Donoghue, published by Little, Brown and Company.
  • The Two Hotel Francforts, written by David Leavitt, published by Bloomsbury.
  • My Real Children, written by Jo Walton, published by Tor Books.

Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award

51NViGPmlUL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Presented  to Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims, written by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, published by New York University Press.

Other Israel Fishman Non-Fiction Award Honor Books nominated were—

  • Gay Berlin, written by Robert Beachy, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
  • Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More, written by Janet Mock, published by Atria Books.
  • Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, and the Battlefield of AIDS, written by Martin Duberman, published by The New Press.
  • Charity & Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America, written by Rachel Hope Cleves, published by Oxford University Press.

Dig Deeper: The Stonewall Riots

stonewallii

Resistance to a police raid inside a small, Greenwich Village jukebox bar (one of the few in New York City where  the LGBT community were welcomed) marked the start of the gay rights movement. As hundreds upon hundreds of protesters poured out onto the streets over six days of rioting, the gay community, previously forced into secrecy, finally saw the strength of its own numbers. The event proved to be a turning point. The following year saw the start of annual gay pride parades and other outward demands for recognition, respect and equal rights—events often held on the Stonewall anniversary and eventually in hundreds of cities. The Stonewall Book Awards is just one of the many ways the event is commemorated.

Last week was a landmark week for the gay rights movement for two reasons: first, the Supreme Court decision affirming the right to same sex marriage in all fifty states, and, though less publicized, the naming of the Stonewall Inn as an official New York City landmark. Learn more about this incredible chapter in human rights history through the following library resources (or hundreds more – just ask!) curated by History liaison librarian, Jutta Seibert.

Dig Deeper: Stonewall Riots

1. Books about the Stonewall Riots in the Falvey collection

2. Gale Virtual Reference Library (Databases A-Z): Introductions to the subject matter from a selection of the Library’s subject encyclopedias.
Tina Gianoulis. “Gay Liberation Movement.” In St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, edited by Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast, 211-15. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000.

3. Sage Knowledge platform (Databases A-Z): More introductions and overviews from social sciences encyclopedias.
Lucian Truscott and Priscilla Glanville. “Stonewall Rebellion.” In Encyclopedia of Leadership, edited by George R. Goethals, Georgia J. Sorenson and James MacGregor Burns, 1492-98. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2004. doi:10.4135/9781412952392.n340.

4. CQ Global Researcher: An excellent overview over the evolution of gay rights in the U.S.
Reed Karaim. “Gay Rights.” CQ Global Researcher 5, no. 5 (March 1, 2011): 107-32.

5. New York Times: Read the original news coverage of the 1969 riots.
“4 Policemen Hurt in ‘Village Raid.’” New York Times, June 29, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118526412?accountid=14853.
“Police Again Rout ‘Village’ Youths.” New York Times, June 30, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/118687806?accountid=14853.

6. Washington Post: Read about the movement as it was described in the year the riots occurred.
Nancy L. Ross “Homosexual Revolution.” The Washington Post, October 25, 1969. http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/143552646?accountid=14853.

7. OpinionArchives: Browse the archives of the country’s leading opinion magazines and follow the changing public opinion. OpinionArchives includes the complete archives of The Nation, The New Republic, The National Review, The New Yorker, and Commonweal among other titles.


Dig Deeper links provided by Jutta Seibert, team leader – Academic Integration. Article by Joanne Quinn, team leader for Communication and Service Promotion.


Like

Foto Friday: How to Pierce the Clouds

SKIESOVER-CHAP

Stormy skies over the Church on Tuesday night.

Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending.
You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds?
Lay first the foundation of humility.
–  Saint Augustine


Like

Spotlight on Falvey Forums: Engaging the Villanova Community

falvey-spaces-logo

Final

the Reading Room

Due to the growth in the number of event venues at Falvey and the capacity to have multiple programs going on simultaneously, the number of events in the Library has skyrocketed into hundreds each academic year.

We are often still asked, “Why does the Library have events at all?” The answer is quite simple: If a library has value, it is more than a learning resource center or a conduit for data. The university library retains much of its value as a place where things happen, especially the organized and the unexpected acquisition of knowledge outside the classroom.

It is not just a place where study and research occurs, but also a place where ideas become connected and many discoveries are made by scholars who are living, learning and thriving in the community the library serves. It is an anchor institution for a university education. It is also a place where the many members of the university are enriched by experiences that can help them interpret the world they are trying to explain by means of the academic enterprise.

Final 2

Why so many events?

Because the number of connections and discoveries to be made are innumerable, the ways in which our world can be interpreted and explained are unbounded. And although there are limits to what a library can do, Falvey wants to flourish as a place encouraging  inspiration, consciousness raising and community engagement. 

Final 3
If you are interested in booking an event, or just more information about the intellectual, cultural, and social programming in Falvey, please contact a member of the Scholarly Outreach team, which manages the events for the Library.



Like

The Curious ‘Cat: Would you rather … ?

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “If you could choose between having the current library and current earning potential when you graduate OR having a library without online electronic databases, an online catalog, or online research help but also having double the earning potential when you graduate, which would you prefer?

 

1. Danielle FarerDanielle Farer—“The first one … It’s really hard to find what you need in a library without the assistance of people to help you and without the computers to help you and having to do all that work by yourself … I remember when I was younger and you actually had to flip through the card catalog; that’s really time-consuming … I’d much rather make less and have the process be a lot easier.”

2. Sushmita Arjyal

 

 

Sushmita Arjyal—“I would definitely go with the second choice: electronic suppliances have helped in past and also will help in future … If we can have more, then it would be nice … it has helped the online catalog and the online sources that we can find books online; we can find the [building] map and find where the books are.”

3. Craig Gilbert

 

 

 

Craig Gilbert—“I’d prefer the first. … The more information you have, the better off you’re going to be. The money comes by itself later; the money doesn’t have to be connected to the information. We’re not in school to make money; we’re in here to learn.”

4. Susheel Bajaj

 

 

 

 

Susheel Bajaj—“I would prefer the “all” one. It has all the online stuff—online books, online materials—because you don’t need to carry a hardcopy of the book. That would be very easy, and you can read the stuff anywhere you want … on the go, on the mobile device, on the tablet, anywhere on the go. So that would be good if we had more of the online materials instead of hardcopy of the books.”

5. Matthew Zarenkiewicz

 

 

Matthew Zarenkiewicz—“[I prefer] the current library. My earning potential … I’m worried about, obviously, but not so much that I would sacrifice the amount of time that I save using the online database and things like that to do research, especially this summer when I’m doing research. So I’m very happy for all of that.”

6. Indu Priya Eedara

 

 

 

Indu Priya Eedara—“The first one: It’s always better to have online catalogs or online stuff, which would be easier to access.”


Like

Spotlight on Falvey Forums: Learning Commons Lounge

falvey-spaces-logo

Today’s focus: the Learning Commons Lounge

Learning Commons Lounge

Learning Commons Lounge, Falvey Memorial Library

 

A secluded forum in the Library is the lounge located on the second floor in the Learning Commons in Falvey, near Learning Support Services, across from Room 202. When this public area opened in 2012, it was described as “the new lounge space with funky furniture and cafe lighting.”

Given its out-of-the-way location on Falvey’s second floor, even though it is a public event space as a part of the Learning Commons, it is “a neat little comfortable back corner where thoughts can brew and be blended.” It is occasionally used as a venue for casual events hosted by the Library.
This past year’s events include the “Coffee Break” series sponsored by the English department and a series of book discussions by the Tolle Lege Literary Society. Some of the Learning Commons Lounge’s best features are its mellow ambiance and morphable layout. Although moderately small, it is also a quieter public event space than Speakers’ Corner on the first floor.

Learning Commons Lounge 2

Photo by John Welsh.

If you are interested in booking an event, or just more information about the Learning Commons Lounge, please contact a member of Falvey’s Scholarly Outreach team, which manages this event space for the Library.

Check here each day this week for information on each of Falvey’s other event venues: including the Speakers’ Corner and Rooms 204 and 205.



Like
1 People Like This Post

The Curious ‘Cat: What Do Villanova Students Really Think about the Library?

Curious Cat

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What do you wish the Library knew about your needs as a student?

CC 2015-06-17 - #1 Black Shirt - Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku-scr

Pradeep Kumar Reddy Musku—“In computer science every semester they would introduce some new courses … and some [new] textbooks … But when we go to the Library website, we never find those books. It would be helpful if you would coordinate with the other departments and … get the information, like what the new courses they are offering, and get in contact with the faculty who are offering those courses and order the books, not to issue them to the students but at least two or three different copies in the Library. That would be great because one of the courses we have … I did not get … even a PDF version, anything like that in the Library. So it would be great if you would coordinate with the different departments and get at least the online versions rather than the printed versions of the books.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #2 Purple Shirt - Thomas Modayil Jacob 1-scr

Thomas Modayil Jacob—“And the need [for computer science textbooks] is urgent in the computer science and the computer engineering departments ‘cause there a lot of fields we have courses on, like semantic web and big data, which don’t have textbooks as yet. So I think that the Library needs to coordinate with the professor to at least have those relevant papers or, if there is a textbook, then the textbook, at least in the PDF form.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #3 Army Shirt - G. Ramesh Krishna-scr

Ramesh Krishna—“Since we don’t have the books, we need to take a loan from other libraries … we need to get the books that are not available here we need to get the loan from others libraries. So that would be helpful if … instead of loaning from other libraries it would be better if have those books in our Library.”

Editor’s note—The Library does not purchase textbooks for current courses unless the titles are specifically ordered by faculty.
One reason – Expense: New editions are often published in a year or so, rendering the textbook we would have purchased obsolete.
Another reason – Competition: The Library doesn’t want to be in competition with the University Shop.
Library staff, however, have begun to explore ways that Falvey can better meet our students’ need for textbooks. Keep checking this blog for updates.

CC 2015-06-17 - #4 Rebecca Snow-scr

 

Rebecca Snow—“I think it’s important to have quiet places. We have one upstairs, but maybe another room would be good. [Otherwise,] I like the way it’s set up; I think it’s good.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #5 - Shaina Smolowe-scr

 

 

 

 

 

Shaina Smolowe—“More printing for free would be incredibly helpful.”

CC 2015-06-17 - #6 - Stephanie Mader-scr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephanie Mader—“I like the quiet study room upstairs. I like the access to the computers. I like the coffee room; it might be nice if that were open during the summer.”


Like

The Highlighter: Navigate EBSCO-Provided Databases Like a Pro

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Falvey subscribes to over 250 databases, and many of these are supplied through EBSCO, a database provider. This video shows how to navigate EBSCO-provided databases.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


Like

Philosophy Librarian Nik Fogle Wins Above and Beyond Award

NIK-&-FR-PETER

Nikolaus (Nik) Fogle, PhD, received the Above and Beyond Award, one of three awards given by the Villanova University Staff Council each year to members of the University staff. He received the award at the University Staff Council Awards Luncheon on May 1.

The criteria for the award are that the recipient “will have performed a significant action or service that: surpasses the requirements of their job description, is voluntary, is unexpectant of compensation in time off or payment, [and] is either within or outside of their scheduled work hours.”

Dr. Fogle joined Falvey in 2012 as the philosophy librarian and Philosophy, Theology and Humanities team coordinator. He works with several humanities departments and programs on campus, providing research assistance, information literacy instruction, and support for a range of collaborative projects.

For the last two years he has held a fellowship in the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowships provide recent PhDs with “a unique opportunity to develop expertise in the new forms of scholarly research and the information resources that support them.”

Asked about receiving the award, Dr. Fogle said, “I’m really grateful and honored. I’m so lucky to get to work with so many brilliant, encouraging and thoughtful people.”


imagesArticle by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: June 11, 2015