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Great Study Spaces on Campus

Looking for a place to study away from the dorm rooms and dining halls? The Library has a wide variety of study spaces for quiet individual study, group study and overnight study. The Villanova campus also provides great study areas you might not know about.

Group study room largeIn addition to its open seating areas on the first, second, third and fourth floors, Falvey Memorial Library has six group-study rooms on the upper floors. Groups of two or more students can check out group study rooms at the front desk.

The Griffin Room on the first floor and the two large meeting rooms, 204 and 205, on the second floor can also be used for studying when they aren’t booked for events. The lab and meeting rooms require a Wildcard for access.

24/7 study space is available in the first floor Holy Grounds @ Falvey lounge and in the Falvey Hall lobby and reading room. A swipe of your Wildcard will gain you entrance to these late night study areas.

Driscoll Hall has a student study area with tables, chairs, soft seating, and private carrels on its second floor—the room is predominantly for nursing students, but is also open to non-nursing students.

The Center for Engineering Excellence and Research (CEER) has a graduate study lounge on the first floor for the use of graduate engineering students. CEER also has tables and chairs in several corridors, available to all Villanova students.

grad student lounge

Liberal Arts & Sciences graduate student lounge

A study lounge for the exclusive use of graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is on Falvey Hall’s third floor.

Bartley Hall has two quiet study rooms on the 2nd floor; one with a large table and one with a few private carrels.

The Villanova School of Law has quiet study areas available to any Villanova student. Its private study rooms are for Law students only.

Can you add any great study spaces to this list? (Then again, maybe you don’t want everyone to descend on your top secret study space.)

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Blog round-up: ten quick hits from across campus

TEN QUICK HITS2

The first article in this series concentrated on content update from Falvey’s reference blogs. From here on out, this blog content roundup will feature ten quick hits from across campus, including highlights from blogs of the library.

1. Find out if that “perfect idea” of yours has some merit.

2. This student played tic-tac-toe against a Supreme Court Justice over the summer break.

3. Wonder if there were any werewolf sightings?

4. Alert to all political science, French major, and study abroad aficionados.

5. The one interview question (directive?) you should be prepared to answer.

6. Pretty cool to be a part of this.

7. At least one new student is enjoying their time here.

8 The Department of Public Administration has two new professors, one who loves to cook beef wellington and the other can weld!

9. The English Department hosted a happy hour at the Library!

10. Speaking of happy hours, Villanova Theatre shows us how to make cocktails as classy as the cast from Fallen Angels.

 


Blog roundup by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

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Falvey Welcomes its New Interim Director

BOB DEVOS

Robert DeVos, PhD, associate vice president for instructional analysis, professor, mathematics and statistics, became Falvey Memorial Library’s new interim director this summer. He has accepted this new role in addition to his existing responsibilities with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Dr. DeVos agreed to an interview to discuss his new position.

GD (Gerald Dierkes)—Why did you take on the role of interim library director? 

RD—I have worked closely with [Rev. Kail C. Ellis, PhD, OSA, vice president for academic affairs, Department of Political Science] since 1997 as associate dean when he was the dean and again for the last 3 years as associate vice president and he as the VPAA. He asked me to take on the additional responsibility and I accepted it.

GDWhat do you consider the library director’s role/purpose at Falvey Memorial Library?

RD—I can only give you my perspective. Anyone in an administrative position has the responsibility of dealing with resources. These resources can be people, money, equipment, etcetera. The library director’s position is to administer the resources given to the Library. These involve trying to make good decisions:

  • On hiring (There are several vacancies, and I felt strongly that we should hire permanent staff in the non-librarian positions. A new director might change how the Library functions with regard to librarians, but the non-librarian staff will be needed independent of a new direction for the Library);
  • On the use of current staff;
  • On space allocations (possible change in some office space); and
  • On the use of the budget.

GDWhat do you find most exciting about this job? Why?

RD—I have had many roles at VU and enjoy the challenge of learning something new. In all of my previous roles, I have found that when I leave a position, I leave with having made some new friends. I look forward to that happening here.

GDWhat about the Library surprised you when you started working here?

RD—The many different roles of the librarians—I did not know much about the large educational role that they carry. I also was surprised as to the many events run by the Library.

GDWhat do you consider the Library’s role/purpose at VU? What do you think are the major issues facing the Library today? 

RD—I will mention a few major issues that I see.
1. Given the changes in administration, the morale is low. This is
…..difficult to change, but I hope by being open and available we
…..can move forward.
2. Structure of the staff: When the new director is appointed, that
…..person will probably reorganize. I am trying to make things work
…..and will avoid a reorganization since we can’t keep changing.
3. Resources: With budgets being cut or not rising at the same level
…..as costs, journals, etc. need to be cut. Space is always a problem.
4. OLE [Open Library Environment]: Many staff want to implement
…..[OLE] next summer, but there are also a large number who are
…..saying let’s wait. I am having difficulty in knowing the best path.

GDWhat is an area of improvement you would like to make in the Library?

RD—Ask me this in a few months.

GDWhat role does/will the Library have in Villanova University’s Strategic plan, for example, to become a national research university?

RD—One cannot have quality programs without journals, data bases and books. These costs need to be built into the budget as programs are added. Whenever any new degree is proposed, the library director does get to comment. That person should make sure these costs are added.

Father Ellis obviously places a great deal of confidence in Dr. DeVos, and the library staff is grateful for his leadership and support.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

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In Honor of the Birthday of Our Lady, Sept. 8

attachment

Truly you are worthy to be blessed,
Mother of our God, the Theotokos,
You the ever blessed one, and all blameless one,
And the Mother of our God.

You are honored more than the Cherubim,
And you have more glory, when compared, to the Seraphim;
You, without corruption, Did bear God, the Logos;
You are the Theotokos; You do we magnify.

Higher than the heavens above are you,
And you are much purer than the radiance of the sun;
You who have redeemed us from the curse which is upon us;
The Lady of all people, in hymns, do we honor you.

From the great multitude of my sins, ill am I in body, ill am I also in my soul;
I am fleeing to you, the one who is all-blessed,
The hope of all the hopeless,
Please come bring help to me.

Lady and the Mother of Him who saves,
Receive the supplications of the lowly who pray to you;
Mediate between us and the One you brought forth;
O Lady of all people, intercede for us.

More than a beautiful piece of ancient poetry translated into English, the above is a hymn of magnification (a megalynarion) to the Blessed Virgin Mary, which incorporates a prayer of earnest and humble request to her as the Mother of God. This liturgical ode to Our Lady is slightly modified in the Office of Consolation in the Byzantine Catholic tradition, a tradition which is an Eastern rite of the Catholic Church.

Although broken into stanzas above, the Megalynarion is sung as a whole in the service of Paraklesis in Eastern Orthodox churches. A beautiful recording of this prayer of supplication to the Theotokos is performed by Eikona on “PARAKLESIS – The Mother of Light.”

The first two stanzas are the  Ἄξιον ἐστίν = Axion estin (in Greek) or Достóйно éсть = Dostóino yesť (in Slavonic), a classic theotokion; a hymn-prayer to the Theotokos, Mary, Mother of God. For more on this title for Mary, read “Mary the Theotokos (‘Birth-Giver of God’),” Dr. Mary B. Cunningham’s chapter in the collection of essays entitled The Orthodox Christian World, p. 189 ff.

The first part of the Axion estin (the first stanza above) is a troparion revealed AD 980 by the Archangel Gabriel to a monk on Mount Athos. (“Mt. Athos is the monastic republic on the Chalkidiki Peninsula in Greece. It is in many respects the spiritual heart of the Orthodox world.” Clark Carlton, The Truth: What every Roman Catholic Should Know About the Orthodox Church, p. 15.) An older sticheron (the second stanza above and the second half of the Axion estin) was originally composed ca. AD 750 in honor of the Theotokos by Saint Cosmas of Jerusalem, the 8th cen. hymnographer, and Bishop of Maiuma the ancient port city of Gaza.

The remaining three stanzas are from the “Canon of Supplication to the Most Holy Theotokos” (aka, the Little Paraklesis), which originated with Theophanes of Nicaea who died AD 818 (and who is also remembered as Theophanes the Confessor). He is quoted as having written, “It cannot happen that anyone, of angels or of men, can come otherwise, in any way whatsoever, to participation in the divine gifts flowing from what has been divinely assumed, from the Son of God, save through his Mother” (Michael O’Carroll, Theotokos; a theological encyclopedia of the Blessed Virgin Mary, p. 241).

The understanding of the Virgin Mary as Mother and Mediatress is further developed in the West by authors such as St. Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort (in the 17th century). In fact her role in salvation history, the maternal love of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and her spiritual maternity to the all the faithful was fully recognized by the fathers of the Second Vatican Council (cf., Chapter 8 of Lumen Gentium), and in the writings of many popes before and after Vatican II.

Pope Paul VI in the 20th century wrote, “The Blessed Virgin’s role as Mother leads the People of God to turn with filial confidence to her who is ever ready to listen with a mother’s affection and efficacious assistance” (Marialis Cultus §57) in an apostolic exhortation “For the Right Ordering and Development of Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary,” which is included in the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops publication Mary in the church[remove extra spave]: a selection of teaching documents.

St. Pope John Paul II, in the late 20th century, spoke often of the Mother of God (see Mary, God’s yes to man : Pope John Paul II Encyclical letter, Mother of the redeemer, and  Theotókos : woman, mother, disciple). Pope Benedict XVI, in the early 21st century, wrote in his first encyclical letter God is Love, “Mary has truly become the Mother of all believers. Men and women of every time and place have recourse to her motherly kindness and her virginal purity and grace, in all their needs and aspirations, their joys and sorrows, their moments of loneliness and their common endeavours. They constantly experience the gift of her goodness and the unfailing love which she pours out from the depths of her heart. The testimonials of gratitude, offered to her from every continent and culture, are a recognition of that pure love which is not self- seeking but simply benevolent” (Deus Caritas Est §42).

For a good introduction to the Byzantine Catholic tradition overall, see the DVD, “An Introduction to the Eastern Catholic Church.” Some useful books in the reference collection (on the Learning Commons in Falvey) that are good for exploring the Eastern Christian tradition are The Blackwell dictionary of Eastern Christianity, The encyclopedia of Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and Creeds & confessions of faith in the Christian tradition.

Photo from the National Catholic Register http://www.ncregister.com/site/article/byzantine-beauty


darren_edArticle by Darren G. Poley, Scholarly Outreach team leader and theology librarian. 

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Catalog Week: How to Add Comments to an Item

CATALOG2

Did you know you can add a comment to an item’s catalog record? This video shows how to add comments to an item right from within the catalog (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: How to Tag Items in the Library’s Catalog

CATALOG2

Do you ever think an item should have a search term or category associated with it, but it doesn’t? This video shows how to make items easy to find by adding a tag. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Embracing a Fresh Beginning: Upcoming Events in Falvey this Fall

FALLEVENT-HEAD

The sun is setting on the summer season, and you know what that means—a new semester is upon us! With hesitation we traded in our strappy sandals and beach tags in exchange for new text books and 3-ring binders. And, while we could start to wallow in self-pity, we should remind ourselves that the new semester brings with it a chance for a fresh start and a new opportunity to be productive. For, as T.S. Eliot once said, “Every moment is a fresh beginning.” At Falvey Memorial Library, we are preparing to embrace the challenges that the fall semester will present us with a newfound energy and focus.

In fact, the Scholarly Outreach team has been working behind the scenes this summer to strategically plan a semester full of interesting, engaging events to keep Villanova students, staff, faculty and community members busy. There is a lot to look forward to! Falvey will offer a great range of events this semester, all of which will appeal to varied interests.

James Hedtke, PhD

James Hedtke, PhD

As always, we will continue to offer informative, insightful events. For instance, James Hedtke, PhD, ’73 MA, professor of history and political science at Cabrini College will present an Alumni Author series talk on Sept. 29  titled “They Never Grew Old: The Freckleton, England Air Disaster of 1944.” The talk will be based on his recently published book The Freckleton, England, Air Disaster: The B-24 Crash That Killed 38 Preschoolers and 23 Adults, August 23, 1944 and will focus on the crash of an American military aircraft into the village of Freckleton on August 23, 1944.

Ellen Cassedy

Ellen Cassedy

Falvey is also fortunate to host Ellen Cassedy—speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator—at our annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture on Oct. 22. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with its “dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Joseph L. Tropea, PhD

Joseph L. Tropea, PhD

Falvey will also be welcoming Joseph L. Tropea, PhD, retired Professor and former chair, Department of Sociology, George Washington University on Nov. 5 for our annual event that focuses on scholarship about Italian-American history, culture and the immigrant experience: The Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture. Dr. Tropea will discuss his recent work, which draws focus to social history, particularly on the 1907 Monongah, West Virginia mine disaster, which killed 361 persons, including 170 Italian migrants.

Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips

Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips

On the lighter side, Falvey is planning a graphic-novels event featuring Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of Dirty Diamonds (an all-female comic anthology) on Thursday, Oct. 30. Claire and Kelly will discuss their experiences in editing, in being involved in a Kickstarter project and in working with all female contributors.

Additionally, this fall we will continue to co-sponsor an wide array of regularly scheduled events like the VSB peer-tutor office hours and Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts club for those looking to get a bit of extra study help or those simply looking for a break from all of the studying!

And, as always, we will continue to serve as the host site for faculty, staff, and official student organizations to plan their campus events and meetings and need space. We are happy to be able to offer several event/meeting locations for all types of events, such as open houses, panel discussions, lectures, round table meetings, and so on. Requests should be submitted at least 10 days in advance via Falvey’s “Request a Venue” form.

Make sure to mark your calendars now and keep checking Falvey’s Events and Displays page for details about upcoming events!

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Catalog Week: How to Save Your Search

CATALOG2

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you save a whole search-results list? This video shows how to save a whole search-results list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: How to Create a Personal “Favorites” List

CATALOG2

Did you know Falvey’s catalog can help you create a personal “Favorites” list of library items? This video shows how to save an item to your personal-favorites list right from within the catalog. (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing.)

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Catalog Week: Quickly Find the Article(s) You Need

CATALOG2

Find articles quickly with the following library-catalog features (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

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Last Modified: September 2, 2014