FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY



You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

‘Cat in the Stacks: This Is Halloween

Cat Pumpkin Head

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


One of my favorite holiday movies ever, in a bizarre and subtly terrifying sort of way, is Disney’s The Nightmare Before Christmas. It’s a sort of cute moniker, too, for the weeks before finals. Finals—the nightmare before Christmas.

But let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves.

Instead, let’s talk about the ways in which this oddball stop-motion Tim Burton film mirrors the college experience in a few genuinely poignant and completely uncontrived ways!

The Seven Holiday Doors

Holiday Doors

Kind of like how you set endurance goals during a long run by mile markers, college is often about breaks and holidays and classes off. Halloween is usually the last hurrah before the bear of the stretch toward finals—Thanksgiving is like a feast at a pit stop—and Christmas Town is the finish line.

 

“And I, Jack – the Pumpkin King – have grown so tired of the same old thing.”

Jack snowflake

The Nightmare Before Christmas is all about a skeleton questioning his major. Or, rather, his career as the Pumpkin King. But he’s so good at what he does! It’s his calling, his purpose! But he needs to kidnap Santa and have a Christmas expedition to figure that out. Look, sometimes you get bored doing the at which things you’re best. Don’t let it discourage you. Ride it out and soon enough you’ll often recall what made you love what you’re doing in the first place.

 

“Everyone, please now, not so fast – there’s something here that you don’t quite grasp.”

Town Meeting

When Jack tries to explain what Christmas is to the residents of Halloween Town, they can only compare it to Halloween. They just don’t get it. It seems clear as day to Jack, but is a foreign language to the Halloween Town ghouls and monsters. Sounds a lot like the beginning stages of writing a thesis, doesn’t it? Keep at it.

 

Zero, with your nose so bright…

Zero nightmare

Jack had Zero, his ghost dog (essentially Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer), to light his way for his sleigh.  You have Google, librarians, and professors. Onward!

 

The Mayor of Halloween Town

Mayor Halloween

I have nothing enlightening to say about this one—only that if you feel like this is you, every day or every hour of the semester, you’re in good company.

Have fun on Halloween! Be safe.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
1 People Like This Post

The Highlighter: Explore Falvey’s Many Blogs

 

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

In addition to the Library News blog, Falvey publishes several subject-specific blogs on its site. This video shows how to access the library’s subject-specific blogs.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.

Like

Dig Deeper: Dirty Diamonds

Dirty DiamondsOn Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00 p.m., in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, co-editors of the all-girl comic anthology Dirty Diamonds, will discuss their comic careers, the life cycle of publishing small press comics, and the genesis of their joint publishing endeavors. They will walk through the development of the fifth issue of Dirty Diamonds, and detail the challenges and successes of their first foray into crowd-funding through Kickstarter.

Folkman maintains her studio at Mercer St. Studios in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, where she works on her nationally-exhibited mail art, video performance, auto-bio comic and romance collage projects. Phillips is a cartoonist based out of West Philly. She is currently detailing the story of her teenage years as the moderately successful webmaster of a “Weird Al” Yankovic fan site in the comic series “Weird Me.” She likes to get angry, get food, and get to sleep. Their goal for Dirty Diamonds is to give the women of comics a dedicated outlet for telling their stories.

This event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, the English Department, and the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship, is free and open to the public.

For more information on Dirty Diamonds, Folkman, and Phillips, check out the links below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison librarian for English and theater.


Dig Deeper

Dirty Diamonds on Tumblr

Dirty Diamonds Store

All Geek To Me Interview

ABI/Inform Complete: Melamed, S. (2014, Mar 27). Daughters of riot grrrl. McClatchy – Tribune Business News Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1510333199?accountid=1485


Bonus:

Check out this picture of a few of our awesome librarians (Rob LeBlanc, Sarah Wingo, and Robin Bowles) hanging out at New York Comic Con 2014! I hope they were careful; Smaug looks like he’s planning something…

LIBS AT COMIC CON2


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

Like

‘Cat in the Stacks: Homecoming

CAT-STAX

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Get hyped: this weekend is Homecoming! To be honest, until a few days ago and some Wikipedia reading, I always thought Homecoming meant the first football game at home after a string of away games. As it turns out, while football is of course a super exciting part of homecoming, the people “coming home” are the alumni.

Warning: there are some feelings incoming. Prepare yourself.

 

Feelings

Obligatory Mean Girls gif.

To Wildcats from years gone by, Villanova is home and always will be. College is a second home to its students for hundreds of reasons, most obviously because a majority of students physically move into campus residences halls and apartments. College is their first home away home. But even for commuters and part-timers, colleges become emotionally significant dwellings. They become so much more than sterile buildings with desk-filled classrooms.

I am only two months into the Villanova experience as a grad student, so I feel like I have a connection with the first-year experience of campus, but I do vividly remember the first few months of my undergrad experience: the excitement, the fun, the new friends and new responsibilities. But I also remember anxiety, fear, and homesickness. I remember challenges and I remember mistakes.

The reason college becomes home for thousands upon thousands of people is not just because college is an exciting and fun place to live for a few semesters—it is home because it is a community of human beings learning how to think and learning how to live. It is home because it is, for so many students, the mostly-forgiving net where they take the first daring (or tentative) leaps into adulthood.

From the outside, college can look idyllic: beautifully manicured campuses filled with young thinkers thinking their ways to academic success. But from the inside, it is home: raw, feeling, and sometimes fraught, but a loving light. It’ll push you forward, but it will always welcome you back.

Now go check out the Homecoming event schedule!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
1 People Like This Post

Dig Deeper: Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania

We Are HereThis year’s annual Conscience of the Holocaust lecture, which will be held in room 204 of Falvey Memorial Library on Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 12:30 p.m., will feature Ellen Cassedy, speaker, journalist, author of non-fiction books, and Yiddish translator. Cassedy’s talk, “Remembering the Holocaust in Lithuania: Challenges, Controversies, and Hope for a More Tolerant Future” will explore how a nation scarred by genocide comes to terms with “the dark past.” Drawing on ten years of research into tolerance initiatives in Lithuania, award-winning author Ellen Cassedy will shine a spotlight on Holocaust remembrance in a land burdened with seemingly irreconcilable histories.

Ellen Cassedy’s We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust (University of Nebraska Press, 2012), begins with a personal journey into the old Jewish heartland (land of her Jewish forebears), and then expands into a larger exploration.  The book won four national awards and was short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Jewish Book World calls it “brilliantly balanced, totally engaging, and constantly penetrating.”

For more information on Ellen Cassedy, the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania, and other resources both online and here in Falvey, see the following links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.


Dig Deeper 

Ellen-head-shot-croppedSelected Internet resources

Ellen Cassedy site

Yad Vashem - The Beginning of the Final Solution, Murder of the Jews in the Baltic States

Holocaust Atlas of Lithuania

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

USC Shoah Foundation

Voices of the Holocaust

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

 

Selected Falvey Databases

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

ATLA Religion Database (EBSCO)

Historical Abstracts (EBSCO)

Opposing Viewpoints Resources in Context (Gale)

Oxford Bibliographies – Political Science, International Relations

Philosophy Documentation Center Collection (POIESIS)

Political Handbook of the World (Sage/CQ Press)

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (ProQuest)

 

Selected Guides

The Oxford handbook of genocide studies

Holocaust related encyclopedias

Course guide – Genocide and mass killing

 


Stein

Dig Deeper links selected by Merrill Stein, liaison librarian for geography and political science.

Like

The Highlighter: Browse a Magazine or Journal in “Lexis Nexis Academic”

HIGHLIGHTER-PRO

Sometimes I do not need to find a specific article, but I want to browse the magazine or journal that publishes articles on my topic. This video shows how to peruse a publication in the Lexis Nexis Academic database.  (Enable Closed Captioning for silent viewing):

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage. Or you can find them on YouTube.

Like

A Golden Anniversary for Wonka’s Golden Tickets, and a Previously Unpublished Chapter to Read

A first edition of signed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently available from the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America for $25,000.

A first edition of signed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently available from the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America for $25,000.

As Charlie and the Chocolate Factory celebrates its golden anniversary this fall, news of an unpublished chapter from an early draft of Roald Dahl’s masterpiece emerges: “Roald Dahl draft spills Charlie and the Chocolate Factory secrets.”

It’s fun to imagine what could have been, but I doubt that the book would have been better even with the “vanilla fudge mountain” or additional golden tickets and ticket winners. What do you think?

Read the previously unpublished chapter in its entirety here.


Gerald info deskArticle by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater.

Like

All about VUFind Infographic

VUFIND TIMELINE4


Infographic designed by Joanne Quinn with copy and invaluable assistance provided by Demian Katz and Darren Poley.

Like

‘Cat in the Stacks: Break

CAT-STAX

I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Break week is finally here! You’ve survived midterms, made it to mid-October! What hasn’t killed you has made you stronger. You’ve earned a break, so take it by the—oh. Wait. What’s that over there? It’s a huge “To Do” list of reading, writing, and studying looming for break week.

All This Work

For most of us, break week is not quite a vacation. But after a few collegiate semesters in my pocket, I’ve come to embrace it as a pretty special time—a stretch of days that can save or destroy my sanity for the second half of the semester. Really, getting a head start on final projects and research without having to worry about classes for a few days is pretty fantastic. And it’s not as if you have to spend every waking hour doing work (unless you’re in a really bad spot, in which case, grind away and Godspeed).

This year, my personal goal for break is to have a nice division of labor and chilling by following some personal guidelines.

How to Catch a Break During Break Week

Getting Up At Seven In The MorningAvoid sleeping in. I know you want to play video games until 3AM and sleep until mid-morning and then stare at your stack of articles with the intention of reading them but figure, hey, well I already wasted half the day, so why not just waste more? (Sorry, I’m projecting.) Getting up and getting work done early will free more of your afternoons and evenings for fun, and bonus: when break week is over, you won’t have to readjust to your class sleep schedule.

Work comfortably. You have to do classwork, sure, but there is one major difference… you get to do it in pajamas. Improve the atmosphere with a strong cup of hot coffee and a cat on your lap.

Create a schedule. I don’t know about you, but a huge portion of my homework time is usually spent trying to figure out exactly what I have to do—which pages to read, how long a paper has to be, when things are due. Lately, I’ve been marking everything well ahead of time, so that when it comes time to work, I can just get to work. Mark pages with Post-its or bookmarks. Lay out everything you need to work the night before you plan to do it (this also works for morning workouts!).

993dff014f860eReward yourself. I academically function on a positive reinforcement system. If I accomplish a set number of tasks on my to-do list during the day, I’ll indulge video games or Netflix at night. If you’re more extroverted than me (what do you expect? I’m a cat), plan some social outings.

When everything is said and done, and break week has ended, just remember… it’s only eight weeks until the end of the semester!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
1 People Like This Post

‘Cat in the Stacks: Meowdterms

CAT-STAXI’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


So here we are – it’s midterm.

Sheldon Bag

We’re all like, where did the time go? And we’re all like, why is there so much studying and writing to do? Can I please just procrastinate and consume hundreds of kitten gifs?

If that’s what you want, that’s what you’ll get. I’ve never been known to turn down a request for kitten gifs.

Crush Cat

Observe: the kitten gif in its natural habitat. This kitten, like you, is being crushed by deadlines and projects. But notice how he slips free, and is shocked—nay, flabbergasted—when the mat rolls on by and he’s left unharmed. Like the rolling mat of doom, this week will pass. And if you work hard, so will you.

How, you ask? How can I survive this?

Make Plans cat gif

Strategy, of course. Plan your days, plan your hours. Hey, plan your half-hours. And if you can, squeeze in a mental health hour—even if you don’t get the full sixty minutes of relaxation, it’ll at least give you some wiggle room between studying, writing, eating, and hopefully…

Cat Sleep

Sleeping. Avoid the all-nighters with all your might. Twenty minutes of Reddit or Facebook here and there might seem like a fun distraction, but if the trade-off is a messed up sleep schedule, try to reconsider.

Take Care of Yourself gif

Because you have to take care of yourself. Remember mens sana in corpore sano? It’s more important now than ever. Groggy brains make groggy work. Frustration makes everything harder to accomplish. But if you get frustrated (and you probably will), don’t be frustrated that you’re frustrated. Be gentle with yourself, pause, and be hypnotized by Lil Bub.

Lil bub face

 


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

Like
2 People Like This Post

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: October 9, 2014