FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Library News

Art of Spring Break: Mood Board with Dr. Amanda Norbutus

ARTOFSB
Keeping in theme with the Art of Spring week, this week’s mood board features Amanda Norbutus, PhD, Mendel Science Post-Doctoral Fellow and a faculty member here at Villanova. Dr. Norbutus is involved with the conservation treatment of Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David,”a large-scale oil on canvas that currently resides in “Old Falvey,” Falvey Memorial Library’s original wing.


AJN - MaastrichtAmanda Norbutus’ background has focused mainly on the surface analysis of art. She analyzed the materials and methods used in a Dutch genre painting as part of her master’s thesis research in analytical chemistry (M.S., Villanova University, 2008).  At the University of Delaware, Norbutus investigated the best practices of outdoor public mural production, protection, and preservation as part of her doctoral research; specifically, the assessment of commercially-available paints and protective coatings.  Her current research as a Mendel Science Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry involves protective coatings for modern art.  She is a lecturer in the science of art materials, art conservation, as well as criminalistics and forensics at Villanova University and an instructor for the NSF Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops & Communities of Scholars “Advanced Chemistry and Art” workshops.

(via Conserving a Giant: Resurrecting Pietro da Cortona’s “Triumph of David”)


Condi_Rice

via Wikimedia Commons

I am inspired by the natural beauty of the world and trying to understand how it all works.

If I could be any person for a day, I’d be Condoleezza Rice. She is a powerful woman, and I would love to help shape the world like she has been able to with her career. Plus, the travel!

If springtime were an art piece, it would be an Impressionist painting, perhaps a Renoir.

The most useful tool I used today is my cell phone. Although I really should give credit to the old fashioned ink pen for writing down data.

Today I’m feeling the color green. I’m anticipating spring.

I’m listening to I heart Radio, the Florida Georgia Line station.

One Summer Adventure I’m daydreaming about is boating on the Cheasapeake or the James River.

flordia georgia lineHappiness is good friends, loving family, an intriguing book, and having adventures.

Everyone should know how to sew and cook. I took a Buzzfeed quiz on how long I’d survive the zombie apocalypse. Let’s just say, I think those two reasons are why I “lasted” at least 6 months.

I am amazed by my students. They tackle challenges outside of their comfort zones, either with science material or mastering a new artistic technique, and they impress me every time.

Thank you, Dr. Norbutus!


Like

Nor’easter vs. Clipper: What’s the Difference Between These Dreaded Winter Storms?

NORESTER

We hear these terms on weather reports, but do we really know what they mean? (I certainly didn’t although I remember friends arguing about which way nor’easters move.) Both are storms and both can impact our area. What are they and how do they differ?

A nor’easter (sometimes called a northeaster) forms at sea, within 100 miles of the Atlantic coast. It is named for the direction of the powerful winds that bring these storms ashore. Nor’easters are most common from September through April although they also occur at other times.

Nor’easters, with winds often reaching hurricane-force, make landfall from New England through the mid-Atlantic regions. Unlike hurricanes, nor’easters are not named. These storms bring frigid temperatures, powerful winds, coastal flooding and blizzards. Notable nor’easters include the Great Blizzard of 1888 and the “Perfect Storm” of 1991.

A clipper (more accurately an Alberta Clipper), however, forms inland as a low-pressure system in Alberta, Canada. These winter storms move southeast into the Canadian plains and the Great Lakes before eventually moving off shore into the Atlantic Ocean—sometimes as far south as the Baltimore/Washington area. Clippers bring quick bursts of snow (one to three inches, with more in the mountains), colder temperatures and gusty winds (35-45 mph). Clippers occur most often from December through February.

There we have it: both are primarily winter storms created by low-pressure systems, both occur most often in fall through spring, both bring wind and snow although in different degrees. However, their points of origin are quite different: the clipper develops inland and moves offshore; the nor’easter begins offshore and moves inland. Let’s hope we’ve seen the last of both of these this winter.

Dig Deeper

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Cambridge Guide to the Weather (2000). Ross Reynolds.
Weather: How It Works and Why It Matters (2000). Arthur R. Upgren.
The Weather Sourcebook: Your One-Stop Resource for Everything You Need to Feed Your Weather Habit (1994). Ronald L. Wagner.


imagesArticle and photos by Alice Bampton, digital image specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team. 


Like

The 8:30 | Things to know before you go (2/27)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

SAVE THE DATE!

Scholarship@Villanova/Endowed Chair Lecture featuring Helene Moriarity, PhD, RN. Professor at the College of Nursing.  Dr. Moriarty is a nurse advocate for military veterans and their families who has targeted her scholarly work on the health needs of those who have served in the military.  Her lecture will focus on her research with interprofessional teams at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Tuesday, March 24 at 2:30 p.m. in room 204.


THE ISSUE OF NET NEUTRALITY
Thursday saw an important decision made in favor of net neutrality. Interested and concerned about net neutrality but not exactly sure you understand it? Check out this article from USA Today. A handy infographic is also provided.
Prioritization and Neutrality

 


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺

One more day of February’s face and then it’s Spring Break!

much ado

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Look at that sea, girls–all silver and shadow and vision of things not seen. We couldn’t enjoy its loveliness any more if we had millions of dollars and ropes of diamonds.” – Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery


HAVE A GREAT DAY, AND A SUPER FANTASTIC SPRING BREAK!

The 8:30 is also taking Spring Break off and will return on Monday, March 9. If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

‘Cat in the Stacks: Oh my, Midterm Memes!

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


During midterms and the subsequent ramp up to finals, you might find yourself in a zombified and slightly pathetic state of bargaining with your alarm and finding ridiculous ways of adding more time into the day.

They won’t work, I’ve tried.
One does Not Simply midterms
But it is true: no matter how much effort you put into sleeping well and getting work done during designated times, life happens. Deadlines and due dates are fixed and looming. Then there’s that one chapter of material you just didn’t quite get around to, or didn’t quite get, and you promised yourself you’d look at it before exams—aaaaand it’s exams.

Oops.

I’m all about preaching time management and scheduling and making good choices, but let’s be honest: sometimes you have to make the hard choices. Sleep, and hope the extra energy makes you more efficient while studying. Don’t sleep, and hope the extra time spent studying puts you in a better place.

The important thing is, once you’ve made your choice and made your bed and you’re trying to stay above water, don’t beat yourself up for it.

Hunger Games midterms

Hey Girl Midterms

This Too Shall Pass


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


Like

The 8:30 | Things to know before you go (2/26)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Graduate Student Resume Workshop. 4:00 p.m. -5:45 p.m. in room 205. Questions? Contact Jayme Nordin: jnordin@villanova.edu

VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


 ARE YOU AN ANDROID AUDIOPHILE?
Or a Google Play Music user? If so, good news! Google Play Music has increased its song capacity from 20,000 to 50,000 songs — more than double the original limit! Pysched doesn’t even begin to cover it (even if most of us wouldn’t even hit 10K). How would you fill your library?


I DON’T KNOW IF YOU KNEW THIS, BUT WE TWEET!

Twitter-iconFollow us on Twitter to easily keep track of library announcements, blog updates, interesting retweets, and totally charming banter.

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Nurture your mind with great thoughts. To believe in the heroic makes heroes.” – Coningsby by Benjamin Disraeli 


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

The 8:30 | Things to know before you go (2/25)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

EXTENDED HOURS FOR MIDTERMS!
The library will be open until 3:00AM. Study party!


VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


Don’t miss the Villanova Digital Library content round-up!

content roundup dig lib small

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


GETTING READY FOR BRACKETOLOGY!
Bracket Kallie Smaller
Outreach intern Kallie is a profesh taper. You’ll never see cleaner blank spaces (sorry, T. Swift)! Hint: these March Madness Matchups might make your stomach growl. Look for the voting board by Falvey’s entrance right after Spring Break. Nom!


FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK
facebook logo
If you give our page a like on Facebook, you’ll be so in the know. Not only do we share links to all the goings-on of our blog, but we also post announcements and share very cool content from all around the internet!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Every page of every book was a peep-hole into the realm of knowledge. His hunger fed upon what he read, and increased.” – Martin Eden by Jack London


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.

 


Like

The 8:30 | Things to know before you go (2/24)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

VSB Peer Tutor Office Hours. 6:00-7:30 p.m. in room 205. Open to all VSB students. Walk-in study sessions. (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the semester.) Questions? Contact: patricia.burdo@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE!

Scholarship@Villanova/Endowed Chair Lecture featuring Helene Moriarity, PhD, RN. Professor at the College of Nursing.  Dr. Moriarty is a nurse advocate for military veterans and their families who has targeted her scholarly work on the health needs of those who have served in the military.  Her lecture will focus on her research with interprofessional teams at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Tuesday, March 24 at 2:30 p.m. in room 204.


REMEMBERING STEVE JOBS

imgresToday Steve Jobs would have celebrated his 60th birthday. Whether you’re a Mac or more of a PC, it’s hard to deny the influence of Apple’s forthright and visionary leader. An interesting read at any time, Jobs’ Stanford commencement speech from 2005 is especially poignant today. We especially love the tale of how the elective calligraphy class he took before at Reed College impacted the design of the original Macintosh. (BTW – did you know that original fonts on the Mac were named after Philadelphia Main Line towns? Or is that urban folklore? Hmm…sounds like a job for a librarian!) Click here for the full text of the address.


Follow Us

Follow us to find out what’s happening at Falvey!

social media icons

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY

“You have plenty of courage, I am sure,” answered Oz. “All you need is confidence in yourself. There is no living thing that is not afraid when it faces danger. The true courage is in facing danger when you are afraid, and that kind of courage you have in plenty.” – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/20)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…


Office for Undergraduate Students Event: Law Workshop on Personal Statements. Personal Statement and Addendum Workshop featuring Cecilia Caldeira, J.D., Associate Director of Admissions, Pace University School of Law. Open to all. 12:00 p.m.- 1:15 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: michael.j.pennington@villanova.edu

CBA Valecon Student Workshop. 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. in room 205. Questions? Contact: sharon.ballard@villanova.edu

Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) Regular Group Meeting. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather once a week on (most) Fridays to play video games in a safe and fun environment. 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge (Holy Grounds). Always accepting new members. Questions? Contact: laura.matthews@villanova.edu

Irish Studies: Galway Summer Study Abroad Information Session. 3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: joseph.lennon@villanova.edu


BEST MOVIE EVER SET IN A LIBRARY?

1208358_343224559213020_902474558_nYou know it’s The Breakfast Club, which turned (gulp!) thirty this month! Five total strangers, with nothing in common, meeting for the first time. A brain, a beauty, a jock, a rebel and a recluse. …before the day was over, they broke the rules.

But we all know the best part of the movie was just how cool their school library was! Who didn’t covet that library with its multi-tiered Danish modern vibe and that banging sound system!!

Can you think of any other movies set in libraries? Let us know in the comment section!


SHAMELESS SOCIAL MEDIA PLUG ☺
pinterest-icon-vectorAre you a pinner? We are, too! Check out our Pinterest.

 

 

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Cuddle up. Rain always stops. It always stops. It always does.”
Ellen Gilchrist, The Courts of Love: Stories  Gilchrist is an American novelist, short story writer, and poet. She won a National Book Award for her 1984 collection of short stories, Victory Over Japan and is celebrating her 80th birthday today.


SEVENTEEN DEGREES? NO PROBLEM!

Stay inside and send us ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News!  You’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


Like

‘Cat in the Stacks: Error 404, Syllabus Not Found

CAT-STAX

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a first-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Welcome to the driest blog post you’ve ever stumbled upon! Just kidding. I’m trying to do something useful, here, play along! No one really talks about this in college, this growing academic epidemic, but it’s a pervasive challenge sweeping the galaxy.

Keeping a schedule.

This seems like a September topic, but nay, ‘tis not—the not-quite-midterm period probably sees the most syllabus ignorance. Giant papers and finals aren’t due yet. The routine of this semester’s classes is by now ingrained. It’s a recipe for syllabus disaster.

Using A Personal Organizer To Organize The Events For The Next WeekEven a super-good A+ student sometimes forgets to look at syllabi. Horrifying, I know. And why? Because for whatever reason, syllabi can feel overwhelming  like Egyptian hieroglyphs. Depending on your discipline, some professors swear by the letter of their perfectly formatted and standardized documents—others might treat them more fluidly. Some clarify page numbers and Blackboard uploads, some don’t. Some lay out all major assignments in one section; others bury their due dates in the weekly assignments.

But at the end of the day, it is your job to decipher the mysteries, and your job to do things on time.

If scouring syllabi and transferring important information to your personal life-keeping charts and grids of choice is not a habitual New Semester Tactic for you, you’re probably accustomed to the weekly To Do List panic. If you don’t have or need personal life-keeping charts and grids of choice, you are a mystical beast of myth and your powers of retention and grit far surpass that of us mere mortals and there is absolutely no need for you to read this blog.

If you are a mere mortal like me, here’s my recipe of avoiding syllabus disasters (a recipe which intensifies every semester):

  1. Ahem, behold my strict teacher voice: the syllabus is actually an assignment for the first class. Treat it like any other reading assignment.
  2. If you know you can use the physical syllabus itself as your schedule and touchstone, highlight/circle/underline important dates. Every time you pull out your work outside of class, look at the syllabus.
  3. If you know you can’t use the physical syllabus itself as your schedule, highlight/circle/underline important dates and transfer them to your calendar.
  4. I find it best to use a grid style calendar to visualize your priorities. If you have a set time during your week to accomplish research, homework, writing, and studying, let major projects visually span multiple days—don’t just write the project on the due date. Assign yourself the work on the day you’ll do the work.
  5. If you use a written calendar, remember to look at it. If you won’t remember to look at it, consider Google Calendar for your smartphone or internet-enabled device.
  6. And, if you really want to know how excessive I can be, I do all of the above and then use Google reminders to block out recurring reminders of upcoming assignments over the weekend.

Now go check your syllabi!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


Like

Dig Deeper: Literary Festival Features Bruce Smith

Bruce SmithOn Thursday, Feb. 19 at 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library, Bruce Smith will be giving a poetry reading and talk. Smith is one of the Literary Festival’s featured speakers. Originally from Philadelphia, Bruce Smith is the author of several books of poems, including The Other Lover (2000), a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He will be reading selections from his collection entitled Devotions. Publisher’s Weekly called his poems “alternately sharp, slippery, and tender,” and in them he “finds a way to take in almost everything—’Shooter Protocol,’ Charlie Parker, high school shop class—moving seamlessly between critique and embrace.” A book sale and signing will follow the reading.

This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English. It is free and open to the public.

For more information on Bruce Smith and to check out some of his poetry, visit the resources below, selected by Sarah Wingo, liaison library for English and Theater.


Dig Deeper

Bruce Smith’s bio and some of his poetry can found on The Poetry Foundation. You can find some poems here.

Check out Smith’s National Book Award Foundation page for a video of a reading.

Bruce Smith’s Devotions andThe Other Lover are forthcoming to Falvey’s catalog.


Sarah WingoDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: February 19, 2015