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Dig Deeper: Frosty Russian Novels

Siberia

Siberia

With the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games in full swing, now is the perfect time to burrow into a frosty Russian novel. Whether writing in the frozen tundra of Siberia or amid the bustling streets of St. Petersburg, Russian novelists are always eager to plumb the inky depths of the soul and explore the limits of the human psyche. To help guide us on a tour through this unique branch of world literature, Team Leader- Humanities II, Subject Librarian for English Literature and Theatre Sarah Wingo has compiled a list of resources on classic Russian literature. You can find those links below.

Всего хорошего and as always, happy reading.


Dig Deeper:

anna karenina book coverNo list of Russian literature (especially snowy Russian literature) would be complete without Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. You can find the book, along with criticism, in the library collection, or you can download the entire public domain text for free to your device or e-reader.

For the uninitiated, this list provides the quick and chilly of all the “must reads” in Russian literature.

If you’re interested in contemporary Russian lit, here’s a great resource from the University of Virginia.

This blog chronicles an art project inspired by another novel by Tolstoy, his sprawling epic War and Peace.

The plays of Anton Chekhov are dark comedies, equal parts devastating and beautiful. Of his many great works, The Cherry Orchard and The Seagull manage to stand out. Because his works are also in the public domain, you can find a complete alphabetical list of full texts here.

Finally, some Cambridge Companions on the subject:

Cambridge Companion to Chekhov

The Cambridge Companion to Dostoevsky

The Cambridge Companion to twentieth-century Russian literature

The Cambridge Companion to the Classic Russian Novel

The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy

“Art is a human activity having for its purpose the transmission to others of the highest and best feelings to which men have risen.”

- Leo Tolstoy


2014-01-29 14.53.13Article by Corey Waite Arnold, writer and intern on the Communication and Service Promotion team. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

SarahLinks prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.

Our new Dig Deeper series features curated links to Falvey Memorial Library resources that allow you to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of seasonal occasions and events held here at the Library. Don’t hesitate to ‘ask us!’ if you’d like to take the excavation even further. And visit our Events listings for more exciting upcoming speakers, lectures and workshops! 

 

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Last Modified: February 20, 2014