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Reaxys, Organic Chemistry Resource, Replaces Beilstein

By Alfred Fry, Science Librarian

Beilstein, an organic chemistry database, has been replaced by Reaxys.  Reaxys also contains content from Patent Chemistry and Gmelin, an inorganic and organometallic chemistry database. Reaxys can be found on the Databases A-Z page and on the Chemistry Subject Guide.

Search for substances or reactions in Reaxys.  If you have a compound or group of compounds that you regularly use, you can create your own templates and save them as icons in the structure editor toolbar.

Filter your results in many ways.  When searching for substances, you can filter by sub-structure, molecular weight, number of fragments, various physical and spectroscopic data, bioactivity and other limits.  When searching for reactions, you can limit by sub-structure, yield, reagent/catalyst, solvent, reaction type, number of steps and other filters.

The results list contains a variety of information.  When you search for substances, the results list has links to the preparations, all reactions, physical data, spectra, bioactivity, use/application and other data.  When you search for reactions, the results contain the yield and experimental conditions, such as temperature, time, solvents or special conditions.  For preparation reactions, click on “Show Experimental Procedure” to see the procedure from the original article or patent.

The Synthesis Planner enables you to easily combine reactions into one overall plan.  You can easily see whether or not compounds are commercially available.  If not, simply click on “Synthesize” to see preparations.  Synthesis Plans can be saved as PDFs or Word documents.

I will be happy to demonstrate Reaxys to you and your students.  You can contact me at 484-685-6758 or alfred.fry@villanova.edu.

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Last Modified: January 20, 2011