FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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Library Construction Alert: Falvey World History Collection to move to new onsite location!

This summer Falvey Memorial Library will start a building renovation project with the goal of transforming the Library into a more inviting and welcoming space. During the first phase of this project, the second floor will be completely gutted, except for the Special Collections room. In preparation for this phase, all current second-floor books will be relocated to the former bound-periodicals stacks, located in the Old Falvey section of the building. While this move in no way affects the American history collection, most D call numbers, with the exception of African and Australian history, will be moved into Old Falvey.
Clean-up work in Old Falvey has already started. Facilities Management staff will rehab and repaint the Old Falvey stacks to make them more inviting and conducive to shelf browsing. While the Library will do its utmost to keep its collection accessible while it is in transit, there may be some short periods of interrupted access. Be prepared for noise or messiness when you visit the Library over the summer. All heavy-duty construction should be completed before the fall semester begins.
Please feel free to contact me with any concerns that you may have.

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Hidden treasures in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set

  • Posted by: Laura Bang
  • Posted Date: April 16, 2011
  • Filed Under: History

When most people think of government documents, they think of boring, hard-to-read reports that go on for pages and pages. So you might think the American State Papers, 1789-1838 and the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817-1994 are nothing to get excited about. In actuality, however, these sets both contain a wealth of information and images that are both interesting and informative.

U.S. Congressional Serial Set

The American State Papers, 1789-1838 contain legislative and executive documents from the first fourteen U.S. Congresses. Reports, documents, and journals of the 15th through 103rd Congresses are available in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817-1994. These materials cover more than just American government history – they also include fascinating glimpses of American and world history on a variety of subjects, such as botany, ethnography, travel, natural history, and lots more.

Pictures and maps are scanned from original prints; documents are now scanned from original prints as well (previously they were scanned from microfilm). In addition to the usual search parameters, the search interface allows for searching by bill or resolution number and congress number. You can also browse by subject, type of publication, personal name, act name, geographic name, and standing committee name. Researchers can export information to RefWorks and create their own personal collections on the database.

 

Search screen of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

Search screen of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set. (Click to see a larger version.)

Below are just a few examples of research topics using materials from these sets.

Around the World in 80 Documents: 19th-Century Publications on Europe, Africa and Asia in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set by Steve Daniel, Senior Editorial Consultant, ReadexIllustration of silkworms from the U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

Resolving a Stolen Past: The General Allotment Act, Individual Indian Money Accounts, and the U.S. Congressional Serial Set by Charles D. Bernholz, Professor and Government Documents Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Promoting Silkworms: Using Electronic Texts and Digital Images for a Historical Exhibition by Dana Dauterman Ricciardi, Curator, Framingham Historical Society and Museum

Transcontinental Railroad Construction and Chinese Laborers in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set by Suping Lu, Professor and Liaison Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Take a look and see what interesting things you can discover!

When most people think of government documents, they think of boring, hard-to-read reports that go on for pages and pages. So you might think the American State Papers, 1789-1838 and the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817-1994 are nothing to get excited about. In actuality, however, these sets both contain a wealth of information and images that are interesting,

 

The American State Papers, 1789-1838 contain legislative and executive documents from the first fourteen U.S. Congresses. Reports, documents, and journals of the 15th through 103rd Congresses are available in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817-1994. These materials cover more than just American government history – they also include fascinating glimpses of American and world history on a variety of subjects, such as botany, ethnography, travel, natural history, and lots more.

 

Pictures and maps are scanned from original prints and documents are now scanned from original prints as well (previously they were scanned from microfilm). In addition to the usual search parameters, the search interface allows for searching by bill or resolution number and congress number. You can also browse by subject, type of publication, personal name, act name, geographic name, and standing committee name. Researchers can export information to RefWorks and create their own personal collections on the database.

 

Below are just a few examples of research topics using materials from these sets.

 

Around the World in 80 Documents: 19th-Century Publications on Europe, Africa and Asia in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set

By Steve Daniel, Senior Editorial Consultant, Readex

 

Resolving a Stolen Past: The General Allotment Act, Individual Indian Money Accounts, and the U.S. Congressional Serial Set

By Charles D. Bernholz, Professor and Government Documents Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Promoting Silkworms: Using Electronic Texts and Digital Images for a Historical Exhibition

By Dana Dauterman Ricciardi, Curator, Framingham Historical Society and Museum

 

Transcontinental Railroad Construction and Chinese Laborers in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set

By Suping Lu, Professor and Liaison Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Take a look and see what interesting things you can discover!

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Eyewitness to the Civil War and Reconstruction: Historic Newspaper Added Through Alumnus James Mason’s Bequest

  • Posted by: Jutta Seibert
  • Posted Date: April 11, 2011
  • Filed Under: History


By Alice Bampton.
Falvey recently received a bequest from the estate of James L. Mason, a 1964 Villanova graduate (B.S. in Education) who died in 2009. His cousin, Gail Ciociola, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the English department, said, “[I]t comes as no surprise to me that Jim left a bequest to Villanova and, in particular, to the library. He loved the university and with his passion for reading knew there was no better way to serve it in his passing than to honor the library where he likely spent so much of his time.”

Mason’s gift was used to purchase the Christian Recorder, which began regular publication in Philadelphia in 1861.

Find the complete story on Library News.

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Falvey Favorites, Tags, and Lists

Have you ever wondered what those cute little hearts in the library’s catalog could do for you?  Did you notice that some catalog records are tagged? Favorites and tags can be used in different ways to organize books into lists for personal use or to share them with students and colleagues.  Here is a short overview of the functionality of these catalog features.

Tags are public, which means that everybody can see them in the online catalog. The creator of a tag does not control its use in the catalog. Others may add the same tag to other records. Take a look at the his8204 tag. Anybody can add the his8204 tag to a similar or a totally unrelated title. Records with the same tag can be retrieved with a tag search, one of the search options in the catalog. Simply type h into the search box. The new search prediction feature of the online catalog will list all existing tags with an initial h, among them his8204. Tags are a social bookmarking feature and are generally used for classification purposes. Each tag represents a piece of metadata contributed by the community. I used the his8204 tag to create a list of selected ancient sources in translation. Tags are great for students collaborating on a project. Just remember that you have no editorial control over the use of a tag. This also means that the community can contribute to your list and expand it.

Use the Favorites feature if you would like to retain editorial control over your lists. You can still share your lists with students and colleagues. Just remember that only public lists can be shared. Simply copy the URL of a list and post it online or distribute it via email. Ready to create a list? Click on Add to Favorites in the record of your first title. You will be prompted to log into your catalog account. You can choose to add titles to a new or to an already existing list. Lists can be edited and records can be enriched with personal notes and tags. Here are some examples:
Academic Writing
American Political History
Contemporary Popular Music

It is easy to create new lists and add tags in the online catalog. Give it a try. To access existing lists in your personal catalog account, simply click on My Account in the top right hand corner of the library’s Web site and log into Catalog Favorites, Tags & Lists.

Feel free to contact us with any questions or comments that you may have.

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The Online Edition of the Library’s New Books Shelf

  • Posted by: Jutta Seibert
  • Posted Date: November 1, 2010
  • Filed Under: Art History, History

futureDid you know that the library’s catalog includes a New Items search feature, that makes it easy and convenient to browse the new books and films acquired for your department?  You can use it to browse the new titles ordered in your field.  Many of the titles ordered in the last thirty days are unavailable and have titles in all capital letters.  These items are currently on order and have not yet arrived on the book shelf.  Please note that these order records are short records and do not include call numbers or subject headings.  Available catalog facets will only work for complete records with the exception of the format facet.

Click here to browse new history titles ordered in the last thirty days
Click here to browse new art history titles ordered in the last thirty days

Visit the New Items link on a regular basis and keep up to date with new purchases in your subject area.  Feel free to contact me with any feedback and comments that you may have.

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American Founding Era Digital Collections

  • Posted by: Laura Bang
  • Posted Date: October 25, 2010
  • Filed Under: History

AdamsLast year, Falvey acquired the digital edition of the Papers of Thomas Jefferson from the University of Virginia Press. These papers are part of the American Founding Era Collection, which contains the papers of other noteworthy figures of the early republic. Falvey has recently acquired access to three more of these collections: the Adams Papers, the Papers of George Washington, and the Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution.

The Adams Papers Digital Edition brings together all volumes printed in the series to date, including John Adams’s complete diaries, selected legal papers, family correspondence, and state papers.

WashingtonThe Papers of George Washington Digital Edition consists of electronic editions of all 59 volumes that have appeared in print thus far. This collection includes the complete diaries as well as five series representing various stages of Washington’s life.

The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution traces the evolution of the Constitution through each of the thirteen states’ conventions. The collection contains “copies of over 60,000 documents from well over 1,000 libraries” encompassing “convention and legislative records, private papers, and all newspapers, broadsides, and pamphlets … when relevant.”

ConstitutionAll editions are annotated and allow users to switch between the hierarchical print volume arrangements and a chronological arrangement. In addition, all collections are cross-searchable. The search page allows users to refine their search in many useful ways. You can search the text within the content or the notes (or both, of course), search for names, set date range limits, and specify which collection or collections to search within. Please note, however, that while you can search all collections in the American Founding Era Collection, the library only has access to Jefferson, Adams, Washington, and the Ratification collections. For more details and tips about searching these collections, see the help page.

The library also owns print editions of these works. Check the catalog for the Adams Papers, the Papers of George Washington (Colonial Series, Revolutionary War Series, Confederation Series, Presidential Series, Retirement Series), and the Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution.

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to get in touch with us.

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Goodbye and Hello

lauradavid

The history/sociology liaison team lost one of its original members – David Burke, who will devote more time to resource management and the creation and organization of metadata in Falvey’s growing digital library.

Laura Bang, a recent graduate of the University of Maryland’s library science school, replaces David on the liaison team. Laura joined Falvey this past spring as a curatorial assistant in Special and Digital Collections. Originally from Santa Barbara (Ca.),  Laura received her bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Bryn Mawr College. Last summer, while in graduate school, Laura worked at the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany. Laura noted that the IYL is located in a fifteenth-century castle and that her work there was her “favorite experience in library school.”

Jutta Seibert, coordinator of Academic Integration, continues as team coordinator and Alice Bampton, Visual Resources librarian, remains on the team.

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200 years of U.S. History and Politics in Congressional Documents

serialset1Are you interested in U.S. history and politics? Have you worked with the Serial Set before or did you always shy away from using it because of the time and effort involved in tracking down documents included in this series?

Villanova faculty and students will have access to the full text of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set and the American States Papers on a trial basis until October 11. The Library is evaluating the purchase of this valuable resource and we would like to include your opinions into the evaluation process.

The Serial Set goes back to the 15th Congress (1817). The online version currently on trial includes the years 1817 to 1994. It contains House and Senate documents as well as House and Senate reports. The documents cover a wide variety of topics and include reports of independent organizations, reports of special investigations made for Congress, and annual reports of non-governmental organizations.
The American State Papers, 1789-1838 are part of the trial access.
Take a look, evaluate its value for faculty and student research projects and email your feedback to Jutta Seibert.

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Getting Started With RefWorks

  • Posted by: Jutta Seibert
  • Posted Date: September 7, 2010
  • Filed Under: History

blog2RefWorks Library Workshop
Date: Sunday, September 12
Time: 12:30-2:00 p.m.
Location: Griffin Room, 1st floor, Falvey

Please set up a RefWorks account by clicking on the “Sign up for an Individual Account” link before you come to the workshop and download Write-N-Cite if you bring your personal laptop.

You will learn how to

  • – export references from catalogs, indexes, and digital collections,
  • – edit references,
  • – create folders for different projects,
  • – create references from scratch in RefWorks,
  • – cite in Microsoft Word with Write-N-Cite (Chicago style).

Please e-mail me at jutta.seibert@villanova.edu if you would like to attend, but have not yet signed up.

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Library Resources About Epidemics and Public Health

  • Posted by: Jutta Seibert
  • Posted Date: August 31, 2010
  • Filed Under: History

choleraMedical research has come a long way since the 1918 influenza epidemic, but last year’s H1-N1 scare demonstrated how vulnerable we still are when faced with a new and highly contagious virus. Today’s population density and global travel habits increase the speed with which epidemics can turn into pandemics.

Are you interested in learning more about the history of the “French disease” or the yellow fever outbreak in Philadelphia in the 18th century? Would you like to learn more about the field of public health as it emerged in response to epidemic diseases.
Falvey’s large collection comprises encyclopedic essays, books, primary sources in digital collections and peer-reviewed journal articles about the history of epidemics, public health, and hygiene.

The Epidemics in History Research Guide identifies numerous library resources and lists relevant Library of Congress subject headings that will improve search results in the online catalog. It includes links to sample essays, articles and primary sources in Falvey’s digital collections.
The online research guide can be found on the Course & Topic Guides page under the Guides tab on the library home page. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments that you may have.

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Last Modified: August 31, 2010