FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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Fall ’09 Library Research Workshops

falvey_doorwayIt’s that time of the year again:  The fall semester is right around the corner and everybody is scrambling to finish his or her syllabus.  Please contact me as early as possible if you plan to bring your class to the Library for a research workshop, even if it will be much later in the semester.  The Library’s classroom tends to get booked quickly.  I find that research workshops are most beneficial when they are scheduled after students have picked their paper topics.

There may be no room in your syllabus for a library workshop, but you feel that your students could definitely use some extra help.  A research course guide is a practical alternative.  Please take a look at some of the online course guides from previous semesters:  art history, criminal justice, history, and sociology. In the past I have often done both, research workshops and online course guides in lieu of handouts.

Last but not least, remember to order books and videos early, so that they will be available in the Library when you or your students need them.

Here is my contact information:
E-mail: jutta.seibert@villanova.edu
Phone: 610-519-7876
Office: 1st floor, Falvey Library

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Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures

encyclVillanova faculty and students now have online access to the Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures (Leiden: Brill, 2007). The Encyclopedia focuses on women and the civilizations and societies in which Islam has played an historic role. It is “an essential reference work for students and researchers in the fields of gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as scholars of religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.” Over 1000 scholars from around the world contributed to the encyclopedia, among them Prof. Hibba Abugideiri who teaches in Villanova’s history department.

The Encyclopedia is organized thematically as follows:

Vol. 1: Methodologies, Paradigms and Sources
Vol. 2: Family, Law and Politics
Vol. 3: Family, Body, Sexuality, and Health
Vol. 4: Economics, Education, Mobility and Space
Vol. 5: Practices, Interpretations and Representations
Vol. 6: Index

The treatment of concepts such as orientalism, harem, and jihad is thorough but still comprehensible to undergraduate students. Each entry includes a bibliography which traces the scholarly literature on any given topic. Cross references are hyper-linked and easy to follow. Entries can be viewed in html or pdf formats, e-mailed and/or printed. Most entries are subdivided by geographic area, but not all geographic areas are systematically covered. A search of the full text of all entries can only be done through the Advanced Search feature. The Quick Search link, which can be limited to Search this publication only, searches only the titles of entries.

Some of the letters used to transliterate Arabic names and terms are not available on standard U.S. keyboards. Two examples are the letters kāf (ﻙ) and ḥā (ﺡ), which are occasionally rendered as ß and £ respectively. Scholars with an Arabic keyboard or those who are familiar with keyboard shortcuts can enter symbols such as £ or ß or can copy and paste them from other sources into the search box. Undergraduate students who are generally not familiar with transliteration issues may not grasp the limitations of certain search terms. Transliteration is also not consistent throughout the Encyclopedia and it is advisable to try different versions in order to catch all instances of a given term, e.g., Ibn Hanbal is also transliterated as Ibn £anbal

Links to the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures can be found in the Library’s catalog, on the Gender and Women’s Studies subject guide as well as under E-Reference Resources (History, Multicultural Studies, Sociology).

Comments? Please let us know what you think.

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Victorian Life through the Lens of 19th Century Magazines

uk_perFalvey is delighted with its acquisition of 19th Century UK Periodicals.

Series 1 of this collection, entitled New Readerships, consists of  women’s and children’s periodicals, as well as humor and leisure/sport magazines and chronicles the rise of modern magazine culture. Featured are women’s magazines, such as Hearth and Home and the Women’s Penny Paper, satirical titles such as Punch and Fun, magazines aimed at the young, such as Boy’s Own Paper, as well as a number of sports and leisure magazines.

Series 2 of 19th Century UK Periodicals, entitled Empire, includes the complete run of over 90 magazines. Topics range from the abolition of the slave trade within the British Empire in 1807 to the first Opium Wars (1839-42) and the “scramble for Africa” in the 1880s and 1890s.

Records to all magazines in the collection will be added to the Library’s online catalog. Each record will have a link to individual titles. Links to the digital collection itself appear on the Databases A-Z list (under N), as well as on the primary sources tab of the history subject guide.

Comments? Please let us know what you think.

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New campus-wide access to the Chronicle of Higher Education through Falvey

news.gifFalvey now offers the university community online access to the Chronicle of Higher Education, “the No. 1 source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty members and administrators.” Widely valued for the timeliness and credibility of its news coverage, the Chronicle has won numerous awards for its coverage of political issues with impact on higher education. Popular features include the careers section with its job listings, annual salary surveys, and the scholarly productivity index, ranking 375 Ph.D. granting institutions. In addition, the online Chronicle offers exclusive daily news articles, podcasts and access to its digital archive dating back to 1995.

Because the site license includes off-campus access through LDAP (Villanova email ID and password) authentication, readers who already have a personal or departmental subscription may consider canceling it now. Those who still enjoy holding the print version of the Chronicle in their hands will find it on the periodical shelves on the first floor of the Library.  For quick, convenient access to the online Chronicle, bookmark the link found in the Library’s catalog.

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The Gerritsen Collection of Aletta H. Jacobs (1543-1945)

Villanova faculty and students now have permanent access to close to 5,000 new primary sources on women’s history from around the world. The Library recently acquired a digitized version of the Gerritsen Collection. The original collection is housed in the Spencer Library at the University of Kansas and consists of more than 4,700 books, pamphlets and periodicals. The materials span four centuries, from 1543 to 1945 and 15 languages. English (British and American) documents are most heavily represented (over 2,000 titles), but German (929) and French (734) titles are strongly represented as well.

In the late 1800’s, Dutch physician Aletta Jacobs and her husband C.V. Gerritsen began collecting books, pamphlets and periodicals reflecting the evolution of a feminist consciousness and the movement for women’s rights. The Gerritsen Collection has since become the greatest single source for the study of women’s history in the world. For a more detailed description, see “The Gerritsen Collection.” by Janet Sharistanian et al. in Feminist Studies, vol. 3, no. 3/4 (spring-summer 1976), pp. 200-206.

Links to the Gerritsen Collection can be found under Databases A-Z as well as on the primary source tabs of the History and Gender & Women’s Studies subject guides of the Library’s web site. Individual catalog records for all individual titles in the collection with direct links to the digital documents will be added to the Library’s catalog in the near future.

Questions or comments? Please feel free to leave a comment or send an e-mail directly to jutta.seibert@villanova.edu.

Gerritsen Collection

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Picturing Women’s History

Did you know that ARTstor includes the Schlesinger History of Women in America Collection? This digital collection includes over 36,000 images  from Harvard University’s Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library, the leading national repository for women’s history. “These images represent the work of both professional and amateur artistic and documentary photographers, including the work of many women photographers as well as men.”

Click here to see a selection of images from the Schlesinger Collection, including pictures of Amelia Earhart, Clara Barton, and Susan B. Anthony. Browse through the images with the help of the arrows at the bottom of the screen. Click on the i-button for detailed information about the images.

To search the complete collection, please go to the Library’s homepage, click on Databases A-Z, select ARTstor and add the keywords schlesinger, harvard to your search terms. Alternatively go to Find and select Browse ARTstor by collection.

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The Gerritsen Collection of Aletta H. Jacobs (trial until 3/5/2009)

Gerritsen journal title page The Library is currently running a trial of The Gerritsen Collection of Aletta H Jacobs. The trial will last until March 5, 2009. Log-in with your Villanova user id and password and enter welcome on the Proquest log-in screen. Please take a look and let us know what you think.

The Gerritsen Collection is currently housed in the Spencer Library at the University of Kansas and was until recently only in microfilm available to the wider public. The collection consists of more than 4,700 books, pamphlets and periodicals. The materials span four centuries, from 1543 to 1945 and 15 languages.

In the late 1800’s, Dutch physician Aletta Jacobs and her husband C.V. Gerritsen began collecting books, pamphlets and periodicals reflecting the evolution of a feminist consciousness and the movement for women’s rights. The Gerritsen Collection has since become the greatest single source for the study of women’s history in the world. For a more detailed description, see “The Gerritsen Collection.” by Janet Sharistanian et al. in Feminist Studies, vol. 3, no. 3/4 (spring-summer 1976), pp. 200-206.
                   

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Last Modified: February 13, 2009